Gardening

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  • Seeking Growing Space

    You Grow Girl
    Gayla Trail
    23 Feb 2015 | 2:18 pm
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  • Vegetable Garden at Church

    Shawna Coronado
    Shawna Coronado
    23 Feb 2015 | 4:20 am
    Churches, synagogues, mosques, temples, and houses of worship of every various sort; these are the places you will find miles and miles of grass. Grass is by far the largest cash crop in the United States, yet grass-that-you-mow-regularly is an unfriendly plant for the environment. It’s not the grass that’s the larger issue, it’s the mowing and the gasoline used for mowing and the fumes related to mowing. For example, there was 11,000 gallons of gas-product spilled by the Exxon Valdez in the ocean. Remember that? Yet American citizens spill approximately 17,000 gallons of…
  • Hear me on Heritage Network Radio

    Cold Climate Gardening
    Kathy Purdy
    1 Mar 2015 | 7:18 am
    This Monday, March 2, 2015, at 3pm, I’ll be speaking with Carmen DeVito and Alice Marcus Krieg on the latest segment of their We Dig Plants! podcast. It will stream live at 3 pm or you can listen to it later at your convenience. Hope you’ll lend me your ear and tell your friends, too!
  • weekend reading: feeding crows, willie’s guitar, gmo grist

    A Way To Garden
    margaret
    28 Feb 2015 | 7:34 am
    RENDERED A SHUT-IN or thereabouts by winter, I confess to conspicuous consumption: I eat a lot, and gobble up media, [read more…] The post weekend reading: feeding crows, willie’s guitar, gmo grist appeared first on A Way To Garden.
  • Green Flowers

    The Occasional Gardener
    28 Feb 2015 | 9:37 am
    I don't often see green flowered orchids at the farmers market but I did today and two spectacular ones at that. Dendrobium Callophyllum on the right is a native of Java, Lesser Sunda Islands and the Moluccas. Hallelujah it likes  sun and I have just the spot for it. I will be moving it out of its pot (growing on charcoal) to attach to a branch to hang on the Dark Verandah. Most of the epiphytes I have, similarly set up are clustered around the shady bits so its great to have this filling one of the sunnier gaps. And fill nicely it will as it has 5 or 6 fairly lanky arched leaf…
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    You Grow Girl

  • Seeking Growing Space

    Gayla Trail
    23 Feb 2015 | 2:18 pm
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  • Winter Cookbook Roundup

    Gayla Trail
    23 Feb 2015 | 10:42 am
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  • Near Perfect Seed Storage

    Gayla Trail
    20 Feb 2015 | 8:52 am
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  • Seeds > Winter + Giveaway

    Gayla Trail
    19 Feb 2015 | 8:41 am
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  • The You Grow Girl Library + Giveaway

    Gayla Trail
    9 Feb 2015 | 1:52 pm
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    Shawna Coronado

  • Vegetable Garden at Church

    Shawna Coronado
    23 Feb 2015 | 4:20 am
    Churches, synagogues, mosques, temples, and houses of worship of every various sort; these are the places you will find miles and miles of grass. Grass is by far the largest cash crop in the United States, yet grass-that-you-mow-regularly is an unfriendly plant for the environment. It’s not the grass that’s the larger issue, it’s the mowing and the gasoline used for mowing and the fumes related to mowing. For example, there was 11,000 gallons of gas-product spilled by the Exxon Valdez in the ocean. Remember that? Yet American citizens spill approximately 17,000 gallons of…
  • How to Plant a Garden Post Vertical Garden

    Shawna Coronado
    20 Feb 2015 | 4:30 am
    Last season my 14 year old daughter came to me and said, “I want to plant some seeds this year.” Awesome. I suggested she plant a few seeds in one of my front lawn beds and was answered emphatically, “NO! I want to grow my own garden!” She gave me a long list of ideas on where she would like to plant her garden and I happily agreed and settled for a vertical garden space on the balcony. MyGardenPost.com sent out a great vertical garden for the family to try, so we determined that would be my girl’s planting station for her very own garden. First step –…
  • How to Grow Baby Blue Eyes Flowers (Nemophila menziesii)

    Shawna Coronado
    16 Feb 2015 | 4:30 am
    I will never forget the first time I saw Baby Blue Eyes flowers (Nemophila menziesii) – my breath caught a little as I walked around a corner at the Chicago Botanic Garden and there they were – a wave of sky blue. They do this amazing “wave-in-the-wind” thing I love and attract pollinators. Below is a page from my latest book, the Illinois Getting Started Garden Guide, that will give you a fantastic idea on how to get started growing this adorable blue eyed beauty. Baby Blue Eyes Botanical Name – Nemophila menziesii Bloom Period and Seasonal Colors – Blue…
  • How To Build A Rainbow Garden

    Shawna Coronado
    9 Feb 2015 | 10:31 am
    Every year I try to plant a new vegetable garden design in my front lawn no-till vegetable garden. I adore bold colors and have always wanted to create a Rainbow Garden, so decided to plant up a bright and beautiful design for my friends and neighbors. This rainbow garden design turned out marvelous and was very easy to layout and plant. Because my front lawn vegetable garden is a no-till bed, I try to add different amendments on top of the soil before I plant every season. This year I added Organic Mechanics potting soil. Next season I will add fresh soil or rotted manure. First step is to…
  • Cenote Jardin de Eden; A Garden of Eden in the Jungles of Mexico

    Shawna
    9 Feb 2015 | 4:03 am
    Totally loved a swimming in nature experience in Mexico we had a few years ago and with winter being winter and all, you know – cold, dank, dark, horrible (and such) – I thought you could use a little break. I originally posted this story back in 2011, but it never gets old to swim in the gorgeous Cenote Jardín de Edén (translation – the “Garden of Eden Cenote”). This cenote is in the Yucatan Peninsula and was an unimaginably beautiful eco adventure and the perfect break for our cold weather. Above you see a photo that shows the semi-tropical jungle as it connects with an…
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    Cold Climate Gardening

  • Hear me on Heritage Network Radio

    Kathy Purdy
    1 Mar 2015 | 7:18 am
    This Monday, March 2, 2015, at 3pm, I’ll be speaking with Carmen DeVito and Alice Marcus Krieg on the latest segment of their We Dig Plants! podcast. It will stream live at 3 pm or you can listen to it later at your convenience. Hope you’ll lend me your ear and tell your friends, too!
  • Drowning in Snow?

    Kathy Purdy
    23 Feb 2015 | 2:58 pm
    It seems the snow will never stop. We haven’t had the huge accumulations that parts of New England have seen, just another couple of inches one day, another couple of inches a few days after that. After a while it does amount to a whole bunch. The sun has been shining more (when it’s not […]
  • Cold Climate and Short Season Gardening Book Round-up

    Kathy Purdy
    19 Feb 2015 | 7:47 pm
    What do cold climate gardeners do in the winter, after they have wrung every drop of enjoyment out of their now-bedraggled seed catalogs? Why, they read gardening books, of course. To help my readers in this endeavor, I have assembled all the books that I have either read or are in my possession that relate […]
  • Only Icicles Growing Here: Garden Bloggers Bloom Day February 2015

    Kathy Purdy
    15 Feb 2015 | 2:09 am
    We’ve had plenty of cold (subzero Fahrenheit temps at night) and plenty of snow (pushing 18 inches at this point), and the only thing growing here is icicles. They grow when the sun shines, especially if we manage to hover around the freezing point, our new definition of a heat wave. And the sun hasn’t […]
  • Book Giveaway! The Right-Size Flower Garden: Design Solutions for (almost) Auto-Pilot Gardens

    kmendez
    11 Feb 2015 | 5:29 pm
    We’re busy, we’re aging, but we love gardening! Are you swamped with a job and family; or an over-50 gardener that doesn’t move at the same pace; or a city dweller with a passion for plants but little space to work with? I bet you fall into one of the above scenarios.  I fit two […]
 
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    A Way To Garden

  • weekend reading: feeding crows, willie’s guitar, gmo grist

    margaret
    28 Feb 2015 | 7:34 am
    RENDERED A SHUT-IN or thereabouts by winter, I confess to conspicuous consumption: I eat a lot, and gobble up media, [read more…] The post weekend reading: feeding crows, willie’s guitar, gmo grist appeared first on A Way To Garden.
  • march garden chores

    margaret
    26 Feb 2015 | 8:36 am
    MY BEST MARCH GARDEN ADVICE: Make like a daffodil. Poke your head up and have a look around—but be prepared [read more…] The post march garden chores appeared first on A Way To Garden.
  • birdnote q&a: woodpecker drumming

    margaret
    23 Feb 2015 | 8:19 am
    ‘I AM HERE. THIS IS MY TREE.’ That’s the message delivered in fast, percussive style from the woodsy garden perimeter [read more…] The post birdnote q&a: woodpecker drumming appeared first on A Way To Garden.
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    The Occasional Gardener

  • Green Flowers

    28 Feb 2015 | 9:37 am
    I don't often see green flowered orchids at the farmers market but I did today and two spectacular ones at that. Dendrobium Callophyllum on the right is a native of Java, Lesser Sunda Islands and the Moluccas. Hallelujah it likes  sun and I have just the spot for it. I will be moving it out of its pot (growing on charcoal) to attach to a branch to hang on the Dark Verandah. Most of the epiphytes I have, similarly set up are clustered around the shady bits so its great to have this filling one of the sunnier gaps. And fill nicely it will as it has 5 or 6 fairly lanky arched leaf…
  • False Rue

    24 Feb 2015 | 4:39 am
    As I often complain, I'm in ownership of a quite a few plants that remain unidentified as that's how plants are sold here- without any kind of label. Occasionally the seller might be knowledgeable enough to identify the plant- sometimes it even helps just to know the local name. Otherwise its a google search that might take a while to track down. Let me just say though, it is astonishing what google can do with a few keywords. I now also have about three textbooks written by local authors and make it a morning habit to flip through them, cup of coffee in hand. This is the other method that…
  • Lightning Orchids

    30 Jan 2015 | 1:03 am
    My dad called these Lightning Orchids, which I've discovered is not correct, the plant is Dendrobium Crumanatum and the common name for them is Pigeon Orchids. He said that they flowered after a lightning storm and he's not completely wrong about that. This orchid forms buds after there is a temperature drop, usually due to a thunderstorm. Nine days later long necklaces of white flowers with a yellow throat bloom gregariously with members of this species in its vicinity. The blooms are fragrant, particularly in the morning and last only a day.This ephemeral quality perfectly suits where these…
  • The Color Orange

    4 Jan 2015 | 9:12 pm
    The decision to go for a color palette with warm sunset accents in the Gravel Garden developed along a few lines. One was how well those colors look with the many succulents I have here. Another is how it pairs with all the concrete and gravel mulch and terracota that dominates the hardscape. It also makes sense that it is in the same spectrum as the berries of the Ficus Deltoides and also the ripe Citrus when it fruits. Finally, this garden's best moment is at the end of the day when the sun is just about to set providing a lovely glow to the space which reminded me of how the cottage…
  • Painterly Whites

    25 Nov 2014 | 5:59 am
    The ribs on the Caladium Lindenii pictured left, look like they're painted on. In the background of the picture on the right, what looks like green paint spattered on white paper is Diffenbachia Star Bright I think, hard to tell with so many variations that look quite similar. The papery leaves in the foreground with the broad watercolor stripes belong to variegated Arrowroot, Maranta Arundinacea, possibly my favorite of this trio.I inherited these guys from my parents garden, which along with a collection of fragrant white flowered plants, I started organizing into a 'white corner'. To…
 
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    May Dreams Gardens

  • March 1st - Spring Flowers and Dr. Hortfreud

    Carol
    1 Mar 2015 | 9:37 am
    Ah yes, the blooms of early spring. It's time for them to appear, now that it's March 1st. In this first picture, the snowdrops are making their appearance, but it is under the cover of snow. They are like little nodding bells, ringing in the spring, though currently, with the March 1st snowfall, their nodding bells have been nearly silenced, perhaps even crushed. Only the most well-trained
  • Garden fairies discuss the end of winter

    Carol
    28 Feb 2015 | 7:35 am
    Garden fairies here. We are garden fairies and we have decided to post on this blog to talk about the weather and in particular the end of winter. Is winter ever going to end?  We ask ourselves this over and over. Just a few weeks ago it seemed like the question was if winter was ever going to get started because it really wasn't all that bad and it hadn't snowed that much. Then all of a
  • I am the conflicted gardener

    Carol
    22 Feb 2015 | 7:53 pm
    Just a picture of a wooded garden scene I am the conflicted gardener. On the one hand, I feel as though I should be buying plants for my garden that will reduce the amount of time, effort, and strength needed to maintain it. To that end, I ordered two pawpaw trees to plant  where the big viburnums grew until two weeks ago when I had a crew cut them out. The pawpaw tree is a native tree
  • In one month...

    Carol
    19 Feb 2015 | 7:13 pm
    In one month, give or take a day or two, I'll be out in the garden planting peas. I know it doesn't seem possible that it will be warm enough to sow peas in a month, given today's high temp of around 7F and the snow that blankets the ground right now. But it is always this way. No one will believe me when I tell them in mid February I'll be out planting pea seeds in a month, right on St.
  • Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day - February 2015

    Carol
    14 Feb 2015 | 9:05 pm
    Welcome to Garden Bloggers's Bloom Day for February 2015. If you have been posting faithfully for bloom day since the beginning, you are now starting your ninth year of bloom day posts. Yes, that's right. If you've been playing along since the first post back in February 2007, you really do now have eight years of an online journal of blooms in your garden.  And you probably claimed you
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    Old Country Gardens

  • SUNY Farmingdale

    Melanie Vassallo
    23 Feb 2015 | 5:57 pm
    What could be better on a cold winter night than to go through photos of lush gardens? It's a fridgid 14 degrees outside but this topic is doing it's best to warm me up.One of my favorite places to visit on Long Island are the trial gardens at the State University at Farmingdale. There are 9 or 10 distinct different garden rooms/themes there to see, one more spectacular than the rest. It's a hidden jewel, few people know where to find it. As you drive past the parking lot there's not much more than these gates to see.If you are lucky enough to to stop and park your car, all you need to do is…
  • Photo's through the years

    Melanie Vassallo
    4 Jan 2015 | 1:26 pm
    Being January, there's not much I can do about gardening right now. One of my new years resolutions is to rejoin the gardening world, plant a new garden and hopefully see some gardening friends again. Over the last four years I've continued to grow some things, visit gardens and take photos. My mind though is rusty, plant names that used to trip across my tongue are hard to remember. I've been reading my old posts and going through thousands of photos to loosen things up in my brain. Thousands of photos? Absolutely! Today I added up a few photos and found that in 2008 I took 1,656 garden…
  • In a nutshell - 2014

    Melanie Vassallo
    28 Dec 2014 | 4:41 pm
    With the year coming to a close I find myself looking through the photos I've taken this past year. Although I haven't been posting, it doesn't mean I haven't been gardening. Those of you who know me will recognize that the location of my garden has changed again. This time I think I'm really home.The gardens here are quite different than anything I've worked with before. It's by far the smallest property I've worked with which actually turns out to be quite difficult. In the past I had a large empty piece of property to develop. The yards here were overgrown and quite shady. Luckily…
  • A New Blog For Me

    Melanie Vassallo
    30 Nov 2014 | 7:29 pm
    Hi there!It's been an awful long time since I've posted to this blog. As some of you know, there have been many changes to my life in the past four years. The good news is I'm in a wonderful place now and finally back on track for some writing and photography. While my gardens now are a small cottage garden and not yet ready for photos, I get to visit lots and lots of other gardens like the one photographed above, The Peconic River Herb Farm.My partner Andy and I travel quite a bit, even if sometimes its just to one of the stunning locations right here on Long Island. I've started a new…
  • Love at Sagamore Hill

    Melanie Vassallo
    14 May 2013 | 8:28 am
    In March Andy bought a brand new Harley Davidson Road Glide. It was chilly out for riding but we bundled up and went for some rides here on Long Island. Last Saturday he suggested we visit some places on the north shore, near us. The first was the Vanderbilt estate in Centerport, then we decided to visit Teddy Roosevelt's home, Sagamore Hill. The flowering trees were in all their glory and as we drove into the parking lot we drove right past a female turkey.It's courting season and soon we saw the male turkey, trying his best to gain the female's interest. I took a photo even though the…
 
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    Digging

  • Screech owl in the owl box

    Pam/Digging
    28 Feb 2015 | 4:39 am
    I can’t tell if it’s the same one I spotted in a tree last week, but yesterday evening my daughter looked out the kitchen window and spotted a screech owl in the owl box. She came running to find me, and I went running for my camera. My hope is that this is a nesting female, and the owl I saw last week is her partner. Time will tell, but whether it’s a male taking refuge from the drizzly cold or a female checking things out, I’m glad we have an owl box to welcome them. All material © 2006-2015 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.
  • Yellow fever on a cold day

    Pam/Digging
    27 Feb 2015 | 8:21 am
    February is our squirreliest month, springlike one minute, cold and gray the next. We Texas gardeners are longing for spring but feeling a sense of urgency to get the garden prepped before summer’s heat returns. Despite a long stretch of dreary cold, which has put on hold several painting and hardscaping projects I need to get done, I really can’t complain when my streetside garden is blazing yellow and gold. Yup, the gophers are blooming! As winter turns to spring, gopher plant (Euphorbia rigida), paired with green-and-gold ‘Color Guard’ yucca, warms even the coldest…
  • Plant This: Chinese fringeflower

    Pam/Digging
    25 Feb 2015 | 8:24 am
    As winter and spring duke it out in late February, Chinese fringeflower (Loropetalum chinense) starts strutting its stuff, flashing hot-pink, strappy-petaled flowers amid its dusky-purple, evergreen leaves. Dark foliage is kind of rare in central Texas — our native and adapted plants tend to have gray-green and silver-blue leaves, an adaptation for surviving heat and drought — so the wine-colored leaves of this Asian shrub are a welcome addition to our gardens. Pictured here, in the lower garden along my back fence, is Loropetalum ‘Sizzling Pink’, which has grown…
  • Plant romance at Redenta’s Garden and other Dallas shops

    Pam/Digging
    23 Feb 2015 | 5:22 am
    I made a Dallas dash — a day trip from Austin to Dallas (3 hours each way) — last Saturday to visit my son at college. My mom and daughter joined me, and we hit a few unique Big D shops just before and after lunch, knowing that College Boy wouldn’t emerge from his man cave until later. I love road trips. Do you? We started at Big Mango Trading Company, an Indonesian import shop specializing in garden sculpture and furniture. I’d heard about it from the owners of the fabulous Blue Lotus Garden (pictured here), and it was fun to explore and imagine creating a tropical…
  • Digging is up for Better Homes and Gardens Blogger Award!

    Pam/Digging
    20 Feb 2015 | 6:20 am
    Better Homes and Gardens magazine has named Digging a top 10 finalist in the Gardening category of its 2015 Blogger Awards, and wow, I’m honored! Thank you to those who nominated my blog, and to BHG’s editors for the recognition! I love how Better Homes and Gardens supports bloggers by featuring one in each issue of its magazine. It enlarges on that tradition with its 2nd annual Blogger Awards, which recognizes 6 categories of blogs, including one just for garden blogs. Not home and garden. Not lifestyle, fashion, and gardening. Just gardening. We plantaholics, hortheads, and…
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    Blithewold Blogs

  • Moving ahead

    Kristin Green
    27 Feb 2015 | 9:14 am
    Even though it feels like winter has stalled over New England and we might never see the ground again, we are moving ahead towards spring. Our engines are revving and we’ll be ready to hit the ground running at the first sign of thaw. We’re sowing seeds, taking cuttings, and keeping up with the insect activity in the greenhouse […]
  • Hope springs

    Kristin Green
    20 Feb 2015 | 8:50 am
    It’s awfully hard to feel optimistic about spring when the snow is knee-deep and deeper and the temperatures are in the single digits. It feels for all the world like winter will go on forever. This is what our world looks like right now… Beautiful, yes… But I think most of us are ready to move on. […]
  • Deep winter

    Kristin Green
    6 Feb 2015 | 8:28 am
    Last week’s blizzard seem to open the gate to a real winter complete with snow storm after snow storm, and hard-core cold. We’re being tested on our ability to stay upright on icy patches, and on keeping our cool when we can’t get where we’re going on time. But we’re also being reminded about what we love about […]
  • After the blizzard

    Kristin Green
    30 Jan 2015 | 7:10 am
    As storms go, this one (we’re calling it Juno?) was pretty great — at least for those of us without travel plans or emergencies. For me, it struck just the right balance between excitement from the big buildup in the media and bluster-full winds, and a kind of compulsory coziness. There was nothing to do for a whole night and […]
  • February at Blithewold “I Remember”

    Margaret Whitehead
    29 Jan 2015 | 10:02 am
    The Christmas decorations are put away for another year, and Blithewold enters a hibernation of sorts — taking a well-earned rest before the activity and commotion of preparing for another season.  An icy wind is howling around the Mansion, rattling the windows on the third floor.  My mind turns to springtime and my favorite time […]
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    Flatbush Gardener

  • Invasive Plant Profile: Chelidonium majus, Celandine, Greater Celandine

    Anonymous
    23 Feb 2015 | 7:58 pm
    Revised 2015-02-23: This was one of my earliest blog posts, first published in June 2006. I've overhauled it to 1) meet my current technical standards, and 2) improve the content based on the latest available information. Chelidonium majus,... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • An Elegy for Biophilia

    Anonymous
    23 Feb 2015 | 5:35 am
    I was moved to write this by a short missive from Reverend Billy: When I go to pray, which is sometimes difficult being so without any god, I think of that time in my life, because the natural world was overwhelming the god that my family insisted... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Pollinator Gardens, for Schools and Others

    Anonymous
    20 Feb 2015 | 8:29 pm
    I got a query from a reader: I’m working on a school garden project and we’d like to develop a pollinator garden in several raised beds. Can you recommend some native plants that we should have in our garden? Ideally we’d like to have some... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • World Wetlands Day

    Anonymous
    2 Feb 2015 | 6:52 pm
    Not only is it Imbolc, aka Groundhog Day (Flatbush Fluffy did NOT see his shadow today. You're welcome.), it's also World Wetlands Day. After seeing some of the photos shared by others on Twitter, I thought I would share my Flickr photo albums of... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • FAQ: Where do you get your plants?

    Anonymous
    3 Jan 2015 | 5:15 pm
    [First in what I hope will be a series of Frequently Asked Questions, FAQs. If you have any questions for me, I invite you to leave a comment, or ping me on Twitter.] Question: Where do you get your plants? Answer (short)I specialize in gardening... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
 
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    heirloom gardener

  • Forcing Forsythia

    Julia Erickson
    5 Feb 2015 | 12:22 pm
    Forcing forsythia is super easy! Now is the time to grab some clippers and cut several forsythia branches.  I like the long, straight ones because they make more dramatic arrangements.  However, the branching ones are beautiful too as seen here.  Once you have cut the branches put them in water and wait anywhere from one to three weeks for the buds and flowers to appear depending on how late in the winter you cut them.  There is no need to change the water while your waiting for the branches to bloom.  I do find it helpful, however, to make a 1/2 inch vertical cut at…
  • Winter Floral Arrangements

    Julia Erickson
    6 Jan 2015 | 3:50 pm
    Bringing flowers in from the garden is one of my great joys as a gardener.  Winter presents a challenge in that there is less to choose from, but the desire for greenery grows stronger.  One of my goals this winter is to create an arrangement each week from the garden.  It will not only beautify my living space, but will satisfy my desire to be in the garden at a time of year I ordinarily would not.  I share with you week 1.This small vase contains clipping of cedar clippings and yellow twig dogwood gathered from the garden with an accent of purple from Japanese…
  • NYBG: Much to Savor, and Worry About, Amid Mild Winter’s Early Blooms

    Julia Erickson
    31 Mar 2012 | 7:00 pm
    By LISA W. FODERAROPublished: February 26, 2012 At the New York Botanical Garden in the Bronx, an experimental plot was in full flower on a recent February afternoon, as the thermometer edged toward 60.“This is the earliest I’ve seen all of these things in flower,” said Todd Forrest, the garden’s vice president for horticulture and living collections. “The ground isn’t even frozen. That’s shocking.”
  • Latest buzz on bee decline: Studies blame pesticides

    Julia Erickson
    30 Mar 2012 | 6:49 pm
    Updated: Friday, March 30, 2012 1:49 PMSETH BORENSTEINAssociated PressWASHINGTON (AP) -- A common class of pesticide is causing problems for honeybees and bumblebees, important species already in trouble, two studies suggest. But the findings don't explain all the reasons behind a long-running bee decline, and other experts found one of the studies less than convincing. The new research suggests the chemicals used in the pesticide -- designed to attack the central nervous system of insects -- reduces the weight and number ofqueens in bumblebee hives. These pesticides also cause honeybees to…
  • NJ.com: Chatham Township lets farming debate go fallow for summer

    Julia Erickson
    28 Jul 2011 | 8:17 pm
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    Ledge and Gardens

  • Where The Rosemary Grows

    Layanee DeMerchant
    20 Feb 2015 | 12:41 am
    I am feeling a little guilty. Well a lot guilty actually. New England is experiencing record snowfall this winter. It is the winter of the endless storms. Some people pick up and go to Florida to escape the harsh New England winters. My Mom actually loves Florida and she is there right now but I love a place with a cooler climate. A climate in winter where temperatures are usually between 40F and 70F. A climate where, if you owned a plot of land, you could actually garden all year long. Since the EM can telecommute and my skills are limited to the New England gardening cycle, we decided to…
  • Juno-Great Expectations

    Layanee DeMerchant
    26 Jan 2015 | 12:56 pm
    The garden has become a playground for white tailed deer. They sneak in after dark and scamper around nibbling the Rhododendrons. There is not just one hoof print. There are many. They must know that the hunters have left after sitting or stalking their elusive daytime presence. They obviously know that there are no longer dogs here. They are taking advantage. You can see the tips of the frayed Rhodies. They rarely touch the boxwoods or the hellebores. They love arborvitae. I am left today worrying about them just a bit as the big storm bears down on New England. Where will they spend the…
  • Merry Christmas - 2014

    Layanee DeMerchant
    24 Dec 2014 | 11:53 am
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    A Leafy Indulgence

  • The Quincunx And The Olitory

    Swimray
    10 Feb 2015 | 7:53 pm
    I added quincunx and olitory to my lexicon. Read on and you will too.2015 gardening began this weekend. I packed up and labeled my contributions for the Washington Gardener Magazine annual Seed Exchange. This one held in Virginia is scheduled on the first weekend in February. The day's program began at the registration table to pick up my goody bag of seeds and promotions. Then on to peruse the table full of garden catalogs, old magazines, and more promotions. Then down the ramp to the main attraction: the seeds.I brought some packets of my famous bombast rose poppy seeds [posted 2013.06.02],…
  • In Between

    Swimray
    24 Jan 2015 | 5:05 pm
    Here am I between two storms. A rain-sleet-snow-freezing rain "event" happened overnight and snow is predicted for tomorrow night. We are also between the seasons; at a midpoint with the light at the end of the winter tunnel. Next stop on the bus: spring.The signs are there. Some things in the garden are beginning to stir. And next Saturday is the annual Washington Gardener Magazine Seed Exchange in Virginia. Coming home afterwards with a bucket full of new seeds to try out gets the gardening juices going again. A trip around the yard found some heads poking out. No sign of the crocus…
  • Last Year's Resolutions Scorecard

    Swimray
    30 Dec 2014 | 7:26 pm
    This year 2014 saw the least number of posts to this blog because there were fewer new additions to the garden. How did last year's resolutions go? Let's see how your resolutions ended up, too.Post thoughts and gardening results on the blog more than once a month, even if no one reads them.Do the math: 24 posts = at least two per month. (But only one post in November, and one in December.)Start working on getting the poinsettia to bloom earlier in the fall, to be sure it blooms in time for Christmas, instead of later at New Year's.Cross this one off. The poinsettia up and died on me this…
  • Tending To The Tender Snacks

    Swimray
    30 Nov 2014 | 12:15 pm
    Root crops and I just don't mix well. Carrots are one of the first creatures (they are supposed to be easy) that I tried growing, year after year, without much success. They ended up dry, splitting, deformed runts. After a few years of adding sand to my garden soil more appropriate for clay pottery than gardening, the results were no better.Then, I discovered compost and organic material, and thought to try that to improve the soil density. Building upon last year's carrot success, I gave it another shot this year with the Tendersnax hybrid purchased a year or two ago. The results are truly…
  • Last Gasp Before Winter

    Swimray
    3 Nov 2014 | 3:42 am
    Most of the garden has fallen asleep before winter arrives, but some defiant plants refuse to give up. Acidanthera, members of the glad, family look as lush and healthy as a summer day. They continue to flower, albeit with fewer blooms than in summer.The pineapple sage (Salvia elegans) is in its glory at this time. It waits until just before frost to throw out its red threads against its chartreuse foliage. This year the plant really took off after a severe winter that I thought would have killed it off like its neighbor the rosemary. Now, every day brings new branches tipped with new flower…
 
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    A Leafy Indulgence

  • The Quincunx And The Olitory

    Swimray
    10 Feb 2015 | 7:53 pm
    I added quincunx and olitory to my lexicon. Read on and you will too.2015 gardening began this weekend. I packed up and labeled my contributions for the Washington Gardener Magazine annual Seed Exchange. This one held in Virginia is scheduled on the first weekend in February. The day's program began at the registration table to pick up my goody bag of seeds and promotions. Then on to peruse the table full of garden catalogs, old magazines, and more promotions. Then down the ramp to the main attraction: the seeds.I brought some packets of my famous bombast rose poppy seeds [posted 2013.06.02],…
  • In Between

    Swimray
    24 Jan 2015 | 5:05 pm
    Here am I between two storms. A rain-sleet-snow-freezing rain "event" happened overnight and snow is predicted for tomorrow night. We are also between the seasons; at a midpoint with the light at the end of the winter tunnel. Next stop on the bus: spring.The signs are there. Some things in the garden are beginning to stir. And next Saturday is the annual Washington Gardener Magazine Seed Exchange in Virginia. Coming home afterwards with a bucket full of new seeds to try out gets the gardening juices going again. A trip around the yard found some heads poking out. No sign of the crocus…
  • Last Year's Resolutions Scorecard

    Swimray
    30 Dec 2014 | 7:26 pm
    This year 2014 saw the least number of posts to this blog because there were fewer new additions to the garden. How did last year's resolutions go? Let's see how your resolutions ended up, too.Post thoughts and gardening results on the blog more than once a month, even if no one reads them.Do the math: 24 posts = at least two per month. (But only one post in November, and one in December.)Start working on getting the poinsettia to bloom earlier in the fall, to be sure it blooms in time for Christmas, instead of later at New Year's.Cross this one off. The poinsettia up and died on me this…
  • Tending To The Tender Snacks

    Swimray
    30 Nov 2014 | 12:15 pm
    Root crops and I just don't mix well. Carrots are one of the first creatures (they are supposed to be easy) that I tried growing, year after year, without much success. They ended up dry, splitting, deformed runts. After a few years of adding sand to my garden soil more appropriate for clay pottery than gardening, the results were no better.Then, I discovered compost and organic material, and thought to try that to improve the soil density. Building upon last year's carrot success, I gave it another shot this year with the Tendersnax hybrid purchased a year or two ago. The results are truly…
  • Last Gasp Before Winter

    Swimray
    3 Nov 2014 | 3:42 am
    Most of the garden has fallen asleep before winter arrives, but some defiant plants refuse to give up. Acidanthera, members of the glad, family look as lush and healthy as a summer day. They continue to flower, albeit with fewer blooms than in summer.The pineapple sage (Salvia elegans) is in its glory at this time. It waits until just before frost to throw out its red threads against its chartreuse foliage. This year the plant really took off after a severe winter that I thought would have killed it off like its neighbor the rosemary. Now, every day brings new branches tipped with new flower…
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    Bumblebee Blog

  • Lessons from Miss P

    Robin Ripley
    1 Mar 2015 | 1:39 pm
    Thank you for subscribing and visiting http://bumblebeeblog.com We lost our 18-year-old cat Miss P a couple of months ago. It was a very sad time around here. But I still think I see her shadow out of the corner of my eye from time to time. Two months later I’m pretty sure some of the pet hair I see on my coat […] The post Lessons from Miss P appeared first on Bumblebee Blog.
  • The Story of Little Man or Don’t Push Robin Too Far

    Robin Ripley
    12 Jan 2015 | 9:47 am
    Thank you for subscribing and visiting http://bumblebeeblog.com The story I’m about to tell may make you think differently about me. I feel differently about myself. It started this past spring. To fill out my coop I ordered six female chicks from My Pet Chicken—two Appenzeller Spitzhaubens and four Polish chicks. If you’ve never ordered chicks before, you may be surprised to learn […] The post The Story of Little Man or Don’t Push Robin Too Far appeared first on Bumblebee Blog.
  • The Totally Real Dangers of Rural Living

    Robin Ripley
    30 Nov 2014 | 11:15 am
    Thank you for subscribing and visiting http://bumblebeeblog.com Living here in a fairly rural part of Maryland, I see things that the average suburbanite wouldn’t encounter in a year living in a sanitized and manicured neighborhood. I can sit in my favorite chair and watch red foxes play fight in the back field. In spring, the tulip trees look like Christmas trees with […] The post The Totally Real Dangers of Rural Living appeared first on Bumblebee Blog.
  • Announcing My Big New Plan to Make a Whole Lot of Money

    Robin Ripley
    15 Oct 2014 | 10:58 am
    Thank you for subscribing and visiting http://bumblebeeblog.com Now that I have put the pack back on, so to speak, and am blogging again after my year-long blog vacation, I decided I better check in on those clever blog gurus. You know who they are. They’re the professional bloggers who tell us amateur-hour bloggers all the things we need to do to become […] The post Announcing My Big New Plan to Make a Whole Lot of Money appeared first on Bumblebee Blog.
  • What I Did on My Vacation from Blogging

    Robin Ripley
    25 Sep 2014 | 8:08 am
    Thank you for subscribing and visiting http://bumblebeeblog.com Well, hello there! Did you notice I was gone? Did you miss me? I missed you. Truly, I didn’t set out to take nearly a full year off from blogging here at Bumblebee. Sometimes, life just gets in the way. Sometimes you have to make a choice between living life or writing about it. Not […] The post What I Did on My Vacation from Blogging appeared first on Bumblebee Blog.
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    Garden Rant

  • Let us now praise evergreens by Susan Harris

    Susan Harris
    27 Feb 2015 | 5:38 am
    The more I garden, the more I want plants that look like something all year – namely evergreens.  Compared to the much flashier flowering plants, they’re pretty underwhelming at the garden centers but boy, do I appreciate them right about now. Take, for example, this scene just outside my living room window, the window I look out when I’m doing my stretches every morning. The bright green and yellow evergreen against the house is a ‘Picturata’ Acuba in its second year in my garden.  It’ll slowly grow to an eventual 4-6′ tall, when it’ll be an…
  • The Road To Hell Is Paved With Chunky Gravel And Indifferently Chosen Plants by Ivette Soler

    Ivette Soler
    24 Feb 2015 | 8:00 pm
    **Trigger Warning*** This is a rant, and the images that follow may be unpleasant to some. They certainly are to ME. A bit of background to set the stage: Los Angeles is in a severe drought. Considering the fact that Los Angeles is a city built in a desert and reliant almost 100% on water imported from outside its boundaries, you’d think water conservation would have always been a top priority, but no. We cycle in and out of water concern with every severe drought. During a water shortage, there is a panic. The Dept of Water and Power becomes draconian, establishing tiers for water usage…
  • Me generation, 2.0 by Elizabeth Licata

    Elizabeth Licata
    24 Feb 2015 | 5:52 am
    This is a Shutterstock mansion image, not the one referenced in the post. Why can’t people do whatever they want with their own property? This is America, after all. Yes. But individual volition, as essential as that is, depends on a delicate relationship between the desires of the one and the comfort of all. It’s an ongoing debate, and I hear snippets of it all the time, because I’ve been involved for some years in historic preservation in Buffalo. We have nineteenth century structures that are owned by absentee landlords who don’t understand why they need to patch a roof or why they…
  • How to Barter Gardening Expertise for Home Repairs and Soup by Susan Harris

    Susan Harris
    20 Feb 2015 | 6:48 am
    Timebanks are being created all across the U.S. so that people can help members of their community in whatever way they can, and get help in return, though probably not from the person they helped. Hours spent helping are banked, and all skills are treated the same. Timebanks are a bit subversive that way, treating driving neighbors to doctor appointments the same as preparing their taxes or fixing their plumbing. Most subversive of all is that no payment is involved. All that, and you get to know your neighbors, too. It’s bartering, with the help of the Internet. I joined the timebank…
  • Poor Man’s Fertilizer by Thomas Christopher

    Thomas Christopher
    19 Feb 2015 | 12:39 pm
    As I contemplate the task of plowing the driveway, I find it hard to see anything appealing in last night’s snowfall.  It seemed to me that we already had plenty of the white stuff, with a blanket some 14 inches deep.  However, I’m trying to console myself with the thought of all the benefits this stuff has for the garden. “Poor man’s fertilizer” is what the old Yankees called snow and there is considerable truth to that expression. Snowflakes as they form and fall absorb nitrates from the atmosphere and then release these nutrients into the soil as the snow melts.  Much is lost…
 
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    Life In Sugar Hollow

  • The Winter, The Winter

    Tracey
    10 Feb 2015 | 10:26 am
    Lately, I feel as if my own voice has been reduced to a squeak. My multiple life roles can be a challenge to balance and as an introvert, I can only recharge through down-time that requires no verbal feedback from me (or additional stimuli). Writing needs time and thought and after responding to everyone else all day, I got nothing. I am okay with this, as long as I can pass out face first into the pillow at the end of the day, without anyone's feelings getting hurt. But my writing does suffer, or simply . . . . doesn't exist at all.Eeeeeeeeeeeeeep!The vast, quiet of winter landscapes is good…
  • Getting Back to Autumn

    Tracey
    13 Nov 2014 | 9:06 am
    A lot of cleanup happening in the garden these days. It is amazing, when I think that two years ago I was very pregnant with a big baby. (Sam was almost nine pounds when he was born - and me being 5' 1", you can imagine how I looked. I made everyone around me nervous, starting at about seven months.) And last autumn, I was whooped from work, adjusting to having a kindergartner and nursing that big baby.But this year, the mobility is back and it feels incredible! I have been raking and mulching leaves - to return to the beds for overwintering and a good feeding. I planted a fragrant winter…
  • My Article on Bulbs for RHome Magazine's Garden Column

    Tracey
    3 Nov 2014 | 8:10 am
    For the beginner gardener, spring-blooming bulbs are a satisfying, easy start. For the seasoned gardener with a failing memory (me), spring-blooming bulbs are a delight because every forgotten fall-planted bulb is a spring-time surprise. For any gardener, the sweetness of early life in the waning, winter garden and the welcomed injection of color within a previously bleak landscape – is the best kind of jumpstart to the approaching spring season. The first step is actually just remembering to plant bulbs at a time when gardening tends to be off of the radar – mid- to late-autumn. (I have…
  • Letting August Bring Us On Home

    Tracey
    21 Aug 2014 | 7:37 am
    All photos from our gardens, except the top photo and the last. {The last is from Hollywood Cemetery in Richmond - a landscaping feat in and of itself, overlooking the James River.} Sam and I also visited the Edgar Allan Poe Museum during that same day - and finally got to see its Enchanted Garden.The top photo is Willow Spring - in Sugar Hollow. We have hit that time of year when we are celebrating tomato and melon harvests, zinnias, cleomes, black-eyed susans and daisies. I have to say, this is the first time in a long time that I am sad to see summer go. A beach vacation to Chincoteague;…
  • The Pace of June

    Tracey
    26 Jun 2014 | 7:43 am
    Things to be grateful for: St. Germain + strawberry nectar + seltzer + apple mint cocktails.Trailing roses (pre-Japanese beetle infestation - grrrrrrr.)A toddler who plucks raspberries right off of the canes and shoves them directly into his mouth. Also, dimpled elbows.Fragrant dayliles that smell like lily-of-the-valley. (Word.)Black raspberries and wildflowers from our woods.Sweet ice-box pickles.
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    Transatlantic Gardener

  • Viburnum dripping with berries

    Graham Rice
    1 Mar 2015 | 1:00 am
    It’s amazing what you find on a short walk round a good garden. Just ten minutes after finding the two witch hazels at the Royal Horticultural Society garden at Wisley, and before spotting the Winter weirdness in the banana border I came across this stunning viburnum. It’s an old favorite but still rarely seen – Viburnum betulifolium (left, click to enlarge). I remember seeing this at the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew decades ago and it made a lasting impression. As you can see, it’s the shining red fruits that are so eye-catching. The picture was taken about three weeks ago, in early…
  • Witch hazel mystery solved?

    Graham Rice
    21 Feb 2015 | 1:00 am
    A combination of an enjoyable winter walk at the Royal Horticultural Society garden at Wisley in Surrey and a quick check in the relevant monograph looks to have solved the mystery of the Asian witch hazel in our Pennsylvania garden. The problem is that the plant of Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Pallida’ we bought from White Flower Farm in Connecticut back in 2007 retains most of its old dry brown leaves through the winter and into flowering time – which ruins the display. And 'Pallida' is not supposed to do that. But at Wisley, on one side of the path near the lake, was H. x intermedia…
  • Developments in sweet peas

    Graham Rice
    17 Feb 2015 | 1:00 am
    A couple of interesting sweet pea developments to tell you about. First of all, the hybrid made by Keith Hammett between the familiar sweet pea, Lathyrus odoratus, and L. belinensis (click to enlarge), discovered in Turkey in 1987, has been formally named by RHS botanist Dawn Edwards – Lathyrus x hammettii. Keith worked for many years using L. belinensis with its yellow and orange flowers, to create a yellow flowered sweet pea – he started by crossing it with ‘Mrs Collier’ - and that work continues. But along the way it has, rather surprisingly, led to the development of some…
  • Winter weirdness in the banana border

    Graham Rice
    13 Feb 2015 | 1:00 am
    On a quick gallop around the Royal Horticultural Society’s garden at Wisley, in Surrey south of London, last week I came across what from a distance looked like a rather old-fashioned artistic installation. But no, it’s the bananas in their winter livery (click the images to enlarge). Growing bananas outside in Britain (zone 8) is a dicey business – so often the winters are just too cold. So the banana plants in the subtropical borders, across the lawn from the restaurant, are wrapped in fleece and hessian (burlap to Americans) to protect them. You can tell from the way that the…
  • European premiere of our movie on Friday!

    Graham Rice
    20 Jan 2015 | 7:47 am
    I've occasionally mentioned family activities other than horticultural ones - and the next exciting event is the European premiere of our movie in Northamptonshire on Friday! Lies I Told My Little Sister is a family drama-comedy, written by my wife judy, which won many awards at North American festivals last year including Three Best Film honours, Best Actress, Best Actor, Best Supporting Actor and Best Screenplay. After the death of her oldest sister, a globe-trotting photographer is spurred by guilt onto a family trip to Cape Cod, Massachusetts, with the younger sister she used to torment.
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    WashingtonGardener

  • Video Wednesday: Bringing Publicity to Public Gardens

    WashingtonGardener
    25 Feb 2015 | 2:51 pm
    Last night I participated in the live Garden Chatter via Google Hangout with terrific hosts Brenda of #GardenChat fame and Adam Cortell of Digging the Garden. My fellow guest was Susan Harris of GardenRant.com fame. We discussed the DC Gardens project, which officially launmches this MOnday, March 2. Stay tuned for more details soon.
  • Washington Gardener Magazine February 2015 issue features 17 Award-Winning Garden Photos, Viburnum Leaf Beetle, Native Pachysandra, and much more...

    WashingtonGardener
    14 Feb 2015 | 3:49 pm
    Washington Gardener is the magazine for gardening enthusiasts in the Mid-Atlantic region.The February 2015 issue is being sent now as a PDF to all current subscribers.It is also now posted at: http://issuu.com/washingtongardener/docs/washingtongardenerfeb15 This issue includes:~ Top Heucheras for the Mid-Atlantic~ 17 Award-Winning Garden Photos~ February Garden Task List~ Meet Chef and Author Jonathan Bardzik~ Native Pachysandra~ New Pixie Grape Introduction~ Be Prepared for Viburnum Leaf Beetle~ Local Garden Events Listing~ Year of the Coleusand much more...Note that any submissions,…
  • Win Passes to the Capital Remodel & Garden Show

    WashingtonGardener
    13 Feb 2015 | 4:56 pm
    For our February 2015 Washington Gardener Reader Contest, Washington Gardener is giving away sets of two passes each to the upcoming Capital Remodel & Garden Show at the Dulles Expo Center in Chantilly, VA (prize value $20).   Find innovative products, new ideas, practical advice, and great deals in remodeling, home improvement, and gardening with hundreds of experts all under one roof. From windows and flooring to cabinets and landscaping and much more. Read more about the show here at www.capitalremodelandgarden.com. The event takes place Friday, February 27 - Sunday, March 1.
  • Native Spotlight: Spring Dreaming

    WashingtonGardener
    10 Feb 2015 | 7:58 am
    Guest Blog by Rachel Shaw  SpiderwortFebruary is the time for making plans for the coming gardening year. There are limited and not very enticing tasks that can be done in the yard now, weather permitting: picking up downed branches and pulling winter-hardy weeds come to mind. Pruning can be pleasant on a nice day. Otherwise, not much else to do besides dream of spring and make plans. So instead of focusing on a particular native that I have taken pleasure in growing, I’m going to write about a few plants that I’d like to grow or that I’ve grown in the past and would like to grow…
  • Winning Garden Photos Wow Crowd

    WashingtonGardener
    9 Feb 2015 | 1:21 pm
    Here are the winners of the 9th AnnualWashington Gardener Magazine Garden Photo Contest that were recently announced at the Washington Gardener Seed Exchange at Green Spring Gardens in Fairfax County, VA. There were many 'oohs' and 'aahs' as we showed the 17 winning entries, which our judges had narrowed down from the 284 images entered. Eight of the 11 winning photographers were present at the ceremony (see photo at right), so that made it doubly exciting to hear them comment on how and where they took their images.The winning photos will also be published in the next issue of Washington…
 
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    A Tidewater Gardener

  • Summer Color II

    Les
    25 Feb 2015 | 4:30 pm
         We had another snow last night, but apparently it was just a light appetizer. Tonight we are predicted to get the worst snowfall of the season with up to 8" of the heavy and wet variety. The schools were closed today and will not open tomorrow either. The city has already decided it will be closed too, with only emergency services in operation. I realize that we don't have it as bad as
  • Summer Color I

    Les
    21 Feb 2015 | 10:48 am
         Given all the white and all the cold of my last post, and given the fact that many of you might have been experiencing much the same thing just outside your own doors, I thought I would share some more colorful photos from a warmer time. These are all shots of the annual display beds taken last summer at the Norfolk Botanical Garden where I work. My team is responsible for their design,
  • Winter Walk-Off 2015

    Les
    18 Feb 2015 | 11:19 pm
         Happy, happy, joy, joy! Winter will be over, at least officially, in just one month. Here at A Tidewater Gardener we celebrate the occasion with a Winter Walk-Off meme, and this year will mark five years. For those of you who aren't familiar with my little challenge, this is a way to encourage all bloggers to rise from the couch, cast off that musty Afghan, grab a camera, and get out of the
  • Bloom Day - Ante Freeze

    Les
    14 Feb 2015 | 11:15 pm
         It's Bloom Day, but it is not supposed to get above freezing today, and I don't want to go outside, so you will have to make do with photos I took yesterday. Some of what you will see was pretty yesterday, but looks a little stressed today, and will certainly look different after tonight. The weather people are predicting the coldest temperatures of the year and are calling for 12ºF (that's 
  • Another Roadside Attraction

    Les
    3 Feb 2015 | 5:53 pm
         My wife, my brother, and I spent much of New Year's Day at Flamingo Gardens in Davie, Florida. The Wray family started Flamingo Gardens as a citrus farm back in the 1920's on a live oak hammock surrounded by land reclaimed from the Everglades. At one time there were over 2000 acres planted in various types of citrus, including a 20 acre citrus laboratory. Intrigued by other tropical plants,
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    clay and limestone

  • Wildflower Wednesday: Fifth Anniversary!

    Gail
    24 Feb 2015 | 11:00 pm
     I can hardly believe that 5 years have passed since the first Wildflower Wednesday meme post. I want to thank each of you for joining me on my continuing journey to create the best wildlife garden possible.Verbesina virginica At first I wasn't sure what I wanted to do to celebrate this anniversary and then it occurred to me that I could share that first official Wildflower Wednesday post with some updated text and photos. So that's what I've done. If you like you can link back to earlier Wildflower Wednesday posts by clicking on the plant name. Panicum virgatumHere it is~a trip…
  • They called the winter storm Octavia

    Gail
    19 Feb 2015 | 7:00 am
     She's blew into town and left a frozen world in her wake. ice not snowI hoped the snow that was forecast would arrive and protect the garden from subzero temperatures that threatened. We got ice instead. It looked like snow, but, it was ice. A dangerous ice that brought the city to a halt, closed schools and downed power lines.It sparkled and beckoned me to explore, so I bundled up, grabbed my camera and ventured out.Ice coated everything. Trees, shrubs, grasses and power lines.Itea virginicaPanicum virgatumIt was stunningly beautiful. I was shocked to find perfect Hamamelis…
  • Oh, how I love you, little Nuthatch!

    Gail
    14 Feb 2015 | 6:30 am
     I love all the little birds that visit and live in my garden. Those of you who are long time readers know that the Tufted Titmouse is my favorite, and that the Chickadee was one of the first birds I could identify, but, you might not know that the agile little White-breasted Nuthatch is another favorite. They're quite cute with their clean black, gray, and white markings. I love watching them move about the garden. I see them clinging to the house bricks while waiting their turn at the feeder; climbing upside down a tree trunk searching for insects; grabbing a seed to hide in the bark…
  • Winged Elm

    Gail
    8 Feb 2015 | 5:51 am
    The morning light was still gray when I climbed the ladder to try to get a photo of the twig with its corky ridges. Ulmus alata is the botanical name and those corky, ridged wings on young stems are a hallmark of this native of tree. Winged Elm is a fast growing deciduous tree endemic to the woodlands of the southeastern and south-central United States. Elms are host plants to over 200 butterfly and moth species (think important bird food) and squirrels and chipmunks eat the nutlets of the samaras.  It has delightful early spring blooms that pop against a blue sky, but, today…
  • Wildflower Wednesday

    Gail
    27 Jan 2015 | 11:00 pm
    Hamamelis vernalisWitch hazels are blooming right now and filling the air with their sweet vanilla fragrance whenever the sun warms up the garden. It's no accident that most winter blooming plants have some fragrance...Nature had to insure that insect pollinators could easily find their way to a plant that blooms when most of the garden is fast asleep. Those lucky enough to catch a pollinator visiting in the deep of winter describe seeing small flies and gnats...perhaps even hoverflies. Just last week when the temperature reached 60° there were honeybees nectaring on the flowers.But, our…
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    Dirt Therapy

  • Snow today, gone tomorrow

    Phillip Oliver
    27 Feb 2015 | 5:11 pm
    It was here one day and gone the next! That is okay - it was beautiful while it lasted. A reader was telling me that she had not seen her ground for two weeks because of snow. I know that it can get old. It was strange though seeing everything covered in white yesterday morning and all gone by the afternoon.I said in the previous post that I did not want to get out in it. I changed my mind and did venture out briefly to take more photos. It was a very sunny morning and so beautiful but very cold. The snow was melting fast and falling from the trees in heavy thuds. From inside the house, it…
  • Snow Day

    Phillip Oliver
    26 Feb 2015 | 7:44 am
    After weeks of near hits and misses, we finally got our snow day. And it was a significant one. We got about 3 inches but areas to the south of us got up to 10 inches. It arrived late in the day and continued through the early evening. It is beautiful. However, I guess I am just getting old but I had no desire to get out in it. In fact, all of these photos were taken from the windows inside the house! The sun is out this morning and it is falling off the trees. I suspect it will be gone by this afternoon. I still do not want to get out in it. These photos will have to suffice!Text and…
  • Icy Jewels

    Phillip Oliver
    16 Feb 2015 | 6:05 pm
    We missed the snow this week - earlier forecasters were saying that we could get as much as 2-5 inches. However, as it often happens, the snow line went much farther north so we missed out. We are getting cold rain and sleet and everything is wet. It is going to get very cold tonight and black ice will be a problem in the morning. There is also concern about the ice on trees. I would much have preferred the snow!I did get a change to get a few shots of the beautiful ice in the garden today.Text and photos by Phillip Oliver, Dirt Therapy
  • Black and White Pound Cake

    Phillip Oliver
    4 Feb 2015 | 12:00 pm
    I always find myself hesitant to make pound cakes - not only can they be expensive but they are not very kind to the waistline. When I contemplate using 10 eggs, 4 sticks of butter, 3 cups of sugar and 4 cups of flour in a cake, I wonder - is it going to be worth it? Well, the answer to that is usually yes! I have tried several Maida Heatter pound cake recipes and all of them have been exceptional. This one sounded different and unique and it turned out to be as delicious as any of her others.The unique part is the 3/4 cup of chocolate syrup that goes into the second batter. I have never used…
  • Pineapple Upside-Down Cake

    Phillip Oliver
    21 Jan 2015 | 3:19 pm
    This is an old-fashioned cake that I remember my mother making. I am not sure if her recipe was the same as this one (this recipe is from Maida Heatter's Cakes, Cader Books, 1997) but it tastes just like I remember it. This cake is made in a cast-iron skillet (or you can use any frying pan or 12-inch pie plate). It is fairly easy to make and fun to put together. The hardest part is turning the heavy skillet upside down but the cake comes out easily. I would recommend placing a plate or cardboard cake circle directly over the skillet and hold it carefully when flipping it over. A helping hand…
 
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    Natural Gardening

  • Creating a natural garden

    Lisa
    26 Feb 2015 | 5:12 pm
    As my gardening companion and I prepare to leave a garden (really a low-maintenance native plant-dominated landscape) that we've created over the last 22 years, it's interesting to reflect on the changes that we've made -- all to the good, certainly, from the perspective of being good stewards of our space in the world.We've converted 1.44 acres of what was largely lawn, punctuated by a few large hardwood trees (oaks and hickories), to a native-plant rich diverse landscape,devoted to woodland in frontwith the side yard screened by a diversity of shrubs and trees, not all native, so including…
  • Hmm, snow....

    Lisa
    24 Feb 2015 | 4:41 pm
     Waking up to a lovely snowy scene is not what I usually expect to see in late February, but that's what I saw out the windows this morning.  Cool-season greens and window boxes will still have to wait for warmer weather.
  • A warmer day (and vegetable musings)

    Lisa
    22 Feb 2015 | 4:41 pm
    Finally, the last bit of accumulated ice has melted and it was a "normal" temperature day, with highs ~ 58°F.I'm itching to plant cool-season greens - I've missed having homegrown greens (kale, collards, mustard, etc.) over the last two winters, even though I've felt we've eaten nothing but homegrown greens in years past.So, we're enjoying broccoli, collards, red cabbage, and kale from the grocery store -- cooked with garlic, red onions, and a bit of balsamic vinegar -- they're quite nice.But a restaurant meal out at a local Mexican place yesterday evening was telling -- the "vegetables"…
  • Brown thrashers and cardinals

    Lisa
    21 Feb 2015 | 5:25 pm
    Even if the weather doesn't seem like spring, and is unusual for late February, plants and animals mark and take notice of lengthening days.The male cardinals are singing now, the robins are flocking, and a brown thrasher is pronouncing loudly (very early in the morning) that his territory consists of the hollies outside the kitchen door.  (We've had thrashers nesting there for years).We've had snowdrops in flower, and daffodils trying to open.  And there are native trout lily and iris leaves emerging, too.It's been too cold to poke around out in the front woodland border, but I…
  • Global weirding

    Lisa
    18 Feb 2015 | 5:49 pm
    I wrote a piece ~ seven years ago about what North American gardeners (and botanists) thought about climate change for The Public Garden (at that time, the journal of the American Association of Public Gardens and Arboreta --AABGA, now APGA). It didn't end up being published, probably because it was too telling. American botanical gardens are in denial about what they need to do around conservation and promoting sustainable gardening practices to the public, etc.  This is true of American horticulture associations, too, I'm sorry to say, from Garden Writers Association to our…
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    Outside Clyde

  • Turned On

    Christopher C. NC
    28 Feb 2015 | 7:22 pm
    The shoveling of the driveway next door went well. It was cleared and melted, ready for use. Not this one. I plan to park at the top until the melt is complete down to the permafrost. Shoveling one gravel driveway is enough. The snow shovel has seen its last though. Why is the scoop made out of brittle plastic? The answer of course is so it won't last and I'll have to go buy a new one.
  • Just To Get To The Front Door

    Christopher C. NC
    27 Feb 2015 | 5:32 pm
    The front porch isn't covered and the roof drips two feet from the door. There used to be gutters, but a big snow ripped them off the house. Since no one is supposed to be here in the winter, it usually isn't a problem. Who cares how deep the snow gets? Tomorrow afternoon it will be a problem. People are arriving with all their stuff and they have to get to the front door.
  • Now Melt

    Christopher C. NC
    26 Feb 2015 | 1:40 pm
    The heavy snow stayed south. Thank you. Another three inches was added to the pile here. All that snow does make my future tree and shrub border more visible while it is still small. During the Lush of summer it is next to invisible. Soft fluffy mounds cover the cold stone truth beneath. The Fothergilla twigs have grown. The
  • Run Toto Run

    Christopher C. NC
    25 Feb 2015 | 4:07 pm
    Right in this group of trees, up at the top of the driveway, flying through the air is where it will be. It's just best I wait til the snow melts. Previous experience with high shiny balls and ladders in snow proved a bit dangerous. I have left over cable and eye hooks from the mini loft library railing project. I went to the store today and bought the last packet of 1/8"
  • More Than Expected

    Christopher C. NC
    24 Feb 2015 | 12:18 pm
    This much snow was not part of my plan. The suggested amount was an inch at most. I planned for a dusting. It looks more like four inches. Now there is a suggestion that another two to four inches could be coming on Wednesday night. That was not in my plan either. My plan included
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    Growing The Home Garden

  • Nashville Lawn & Garden Show 2015: Wine Festival

    18 Feb 2015 | 12:14 pm
    26th Annual Nashville Lawn & Garden Show 2015Nashville Lawn & Garden Show Announces Wine FestivalWine Festival occurs on Saturday, March 7 during the 4-day Show Nashville, TN – The Nashville Lawn and Garden Show will partner with the Tennessee Farm Winegrowers Alliance to present a one-day-only Wine Festival during its traditional four-day Show at the Tennessee State Fairgrounds.  The Show will incorporate locally produced wine from more than a dozen of the state’s most celebrated wineries on Saturday, March 7.  Wine Festival wrist bands will be available inside the…
  • Layering a Viburnum, The Results!

    7 Feb 2015 | 6:34 pm
    It's not a secret that I'm a fan of plant propagation. Who wouldn't be? You get free plants! One of the easiest ways to propagate a plant is through a technique called layering. With layering you essentially pin down a branch of a shrub or tree to the soil and encourage it to form roots. The roots usually appear at a node (the spot on the branch where leaves form). Recently I transplanted a rooted viburnum that I was able to turn into 5 additional plants just by pinning down a couple low hanging branches with rocks.Often you will see people recommend making a small wound on the branch below…
  • An Update from Dave

    5 Feb 2015 | 6:43 am
    Good morning gardeners! I wanted to write a post to update you on a few events going on in my life. I don't write much personal information on this blog. I always like to keep my writing very close to gardening, but I felt it was time to share an update with you. For the last 8 years I have been a stay at home dad. For 7 of those years I've been writing about gardening here in Growing The Home Garden. It's been a lot of fun to be able to be at home with my 4 children and explore gardening through their eyes. I love talking about vegetable gardening, plant propagation, and all the projects…
  • The New Southern Living Garden Book - Review!

    30 Jan 2015 | 6:49 am
    Great garden books are an awesome resource for any gardener. They become a reference that gardeners can go back to over and a over again to fill in the blanks or come up with new ideas. The New Southern Living Garden Book is just that, a great resource book for southern gardeners. I was sent a copy for review recently and was very impressed with it.Aff. Link to Amazon The New Southern Living Garden Book touts 2,000 full color photos, 500 garden ideas, and 8,000 flowers, vegetables, trees, and other plants. That is a lot of gardening to fit inside one manual!The photographs are beautiful.
  • Building a Garden Gate

    19 Jan 2015 | 6:58 am
    There are few structures in the garden more prominent than a gate. A good garden gate can invite a person into the garden, protect the garden from intruders, and becomes a feature to draw the eye. This weekend I put together a gate for my vegetable garden fence (which is still under construction). I managed to complete the majority of work on the gate over the weekend but I still have some odds and ends before I would call it a finished project.All materials for this project were supplied by Lowe's and the Creative Ideas Network of Bloggers!The material list:Deck Screws: 1 1/4" and 2"4 - PT…
 
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    Sharing Nature's Garden

  • Ice in the garden...

    Diana
    28 Feb 2015 | 5:15 am
    Baby, it's cold outside...Central Texas gardens are being slammed with ice and even snow in some parts.  I feel for our northern friends who have it so much worse than we do.  We're feeling very deprived of our "normal" warmer early spring temperatures.Iris, wisteria, and Texas Mountain laurel buds are being sabotaged. Delicate new shoots on perennials have bitten the dust. And, our evergreens will once again be slow to start their growth. Here are a few signs that it's really cold in my garden.  This Japanese aralia will recover, but isn't this one of the most pitiful…
  • Adding dimension and bones to the winter garden...

    Diana
    23 Feb 2015 | 3:48 pm
    Now is a great time to plan for NEXT winter's garden.   When the blooms and the perennials have come and gone, what's left in your garden?  With many of the plants dormant, you can truly see the bones of your landscape and assess your needs.Is there a wall of green -- several sets of medium-leafed glossy green shrubs that all blend into one another?  Does your garden lack definition?Now is the perfect time to think about what you can add to the garden this spring that will give you depth and texture and form when you look out of  your window next winter.  Below,…
  • Adding interest and dimension to the bones of the winter garden...

    Diana
    23 Feb 2015 | 3:09 pm
  • New dry creek project done and ready for rain!

    Diana
    22 Feb 2015 | 6:52 am
    The dry creek remodel is done and I can't wait for it to rain so I can see how well it works.I know that the very front of the dry creek already works because I washed all the dried dirt from the driveway puddle area into the creek bed and it just dropped down between the rocks like it's supposed to, instead to swirling in the dirt and lapping back at me.The moss rocks are gorgeous. (I know my crew thought I was crazy when I oohed and aahed over the great colors on them!)  They're set for the most part, but I will adjust them some more so that they look random.  (I don't really do…
  • Winter is perfect for spiffy new hardscaping to satisfy gardening urges

    Diana
    21 Feb 2015 | 8:21 am
    It's almost planting season here in Central Texas, but to keep me from jumping the gun, I'm starting my winter hardscaping project.  Winter is the perfect time to work on the bones of the garden -- getting everything ready for the fun to come. This was the path/dry creek when it was at its best with native stone that we collected from our property.  But over the years, the rock has been kicked around, gotten buried with soil and mulch and the side rocks  have moved out of place and gotten scraggly looking. So, yesterday my crew came here to start on this year's main…
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    The Transplantable Rose

  • Garden Bloggers Bloom Day, February 2015

    Annie in Austin
    16 Feb 2015 | 9:24 pm
    When May Dreams Carol proposed her idea of bloggers everywhere posting photos of what was in bloom each month, I was up for it, and made a post for the first Garden Bloggers Bloom Day on February 15th, 2007. That was a long time ago by internet-standards... Carol's idea has staying power! Sometimes I post for GBBD, sometimes not - but I wanted to be part of the 8th anniversary. This winter has been relatively normal, bringing some rain and multiple freezes, with the lowest temperature in my garden about 20F. That was cold enough  to knock off many tender plants. Then some recent warm…
  • My Blog Does NOT Belong to Texas Outdoorsmen!

    Annie in Austin
    5 Dec 2014 | 10:48 am
    Are you seeing this blog post on blogspot? Or are you seeing it at TexasOutdoorsmen dot com?  if you're seeing my posts and photos on the TexasOutdoorsmen dot com site, it is absolutely without my permission. This website has been copying my garden blog and garden blogs belonging to many of my garden friends, and we want it to stop. I may not post that often, but putting my copyrighted words and photos on my blog does not mean that other websites can proceed to repost my work - and it's especially annoying when my work is used to pump up those websites to attract revenue-producing ads.
  • Passalongs and Reseeders Say Happy Autumn

    Annie in Austin
    30 Sep 2014 | 8:34 pm
    DECEMBER 5, 2014: Are you seeing this blog post on blogspot? Or are you seeing it at TexasOutdoorsmen dot com?  if you're seeing my posts and photos on the TexasOutdoorsmen dot com site, it is absolutely without my permission. This website has been copying my garden blog and garden blogs belonging to many of my garden friends, and we want it to stop.This post, Passalongs and Reseeders Say Happy Autumn, was written by Annie in Austin for her Transplantable Rose blog. After August 2014 tied the tile for Second Driest August on Record in Austin, many of us gardeners were not looking forward…
  • Clerodendrum incisa - the Musical Notes Plant

    Annie in Austin
    24 Sep 2014 | 11:44 pm
    DECEMBER 5, 2014: Are you seeing this blog post on blogspot? Or are you seeing it at TexasOutdoorsmen dot com?  if you're seeing my posts and photos on the TexasOutdoorsmen dot com site, it is absolutely without my permission. This website has been copying my garden blog and garden blogs belonging to many of my garden friends, and we want it to stop. If you live in Central Texas you probably know one of the most interesting nurseries in Austin- Barton Springs Nursery on Bee Caves Road It's a fine place to buy full-size plants, shrubs, trees, native plants and roses. For experimentally…
  • Still Posting After All These Years

    Annie in Austin
    18 Jun 2014 | 4:13 pm
    This post, Still Posting After All These Years, was written by Annie in Austin for her Transplantable Rose blogThe Transplantable Rose turned eight years old last week. Eight years is long enough for two presidential terms. Eight years covers all the grades in an old-fashioned grammar school, and is also long enough to change a 13-year-old child into a fully-fledged, 21-year-old adult. Did my blog change in eight years? The format changed as Blogger evolved but that’s about all.  But blogging did change something in this blogger’s mind and habits.Before the Transplantable Rose ever…
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    Kiss my Aster!

  • Hey Valentine!

    Kiss My Aster!
    13 Feb 2015 | 8:55 am
    I have a soft spot for Valentine's day, even though I'm far from romantic. So I made these for you. Cut, sign and distribute as needed.
  • The Beauty of The Armpit Garden

    Kiss My Aster!
    23 Jan 2015 | 11:56 am
    This house came only with a very small back garden. It’s oddly situated, tucked around the back of the house, where none of my neighbors can see it but I get great views from inside the house. Because the whole garden is tucked in a nook a) it’s my “armpit garden” b) it’s also got great protection and serves as a pretty bitchin’ microclimate. But the best part is that this garden is for no one but me. It’s mostly dark and moody- the dream garden of my inner 19 year old. Dark dahlias and way too much bronze fennel, Redbor kale is bolting all over town, towering like Godzilla,…
  • Kiss My Christmas!

    Kiss My Aster!
    22 Dec 2014 | 1:42 pm
     It's like I've been in active avoidance of the date, which is December 22nd. I set up an advent tree for Hazel so that we could both keep track of how many days were left until Christmas but I still couldn't grasp it, even with the visual. Between me and you, I even set up the tree 3 days late.I made a few wreaths, including a 24" one made from clippings from a Yew that grows outside my front door. It was easy to work with and looks fine... it just doesn't smell like an evergreen. In fact, it smells a bit like a aloe plant that's beginning to rot out.I chose a different route in…
  • A Little Bit Potting, A Little Bit Party: Reuse THIS!

    Kiss My Aster!
    3 Dec 2014 | 1:42 pm
    I've tried a lot of potting benches and I've also tried to be the kind of person that doesn't need a potting bench. I mean, what a luxury piece of furniture! Are potting benches in the same league as bidets? I really do like them. Potting benches, not bidets.So I really needed one and after looking around I realized there wasn't anything I wanted, specifically.And then Dan found this:It's a really old concrete laundry sink he found on Craigslist for nothing. I think he hurt himself in many ways getting it to me. I have a slice of old crappy melamine that covers the top, this is my work…
  • Dug up my Dahlias Today

    Kiss My Aster!
    10 Nov 2014 | 12:25 pm
    I don't know about this batch of dahlias. I don't have a good place to store them (my garage is too cold, Ryan, but thanks for the offer!) and they are so cheap to just BUY new ones every spring. PLUS I get to choose new ones instead of the same ol' Dahlias I've known since, like, forever.Hrrrmmph. They are dug and drying and... we'll see. Maybe I can find a good spot for them.Also, this happened and I'm too lazy to type it again.
 
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    Our Little Acre

  • Longwood Gardens: Shades of Gray

    Kylee Baumle
    16 Feb 2015 | 6:05 pm
    It would just be too tacky to make a play on "that movie" that premiered over the weekend, so I won't do that. But I have to show how much better Mother Nature does it anyway.In my last blog post, I shared some photos of last spring's visit to Longwood Gardens.The conservatory there is a world all in itself, with each partof it worthy of an essay highlighting its features. It was the lovely shades of gray in its Silver Garden that especially caught my eye this visit.Take a look:So many of these plants exhibiting gorgeous shades of gray/silver/blue look as if they would be feathery soft to…
  • A Springtime Visit to Longwood Gardens

    Kylee Baumle
    12 Feb 2015 | 8:30 pm
    Longwood Gardens, the treasure created by the Pierre du Pont family near Kennett Square, Pennsylvania, is an enjoyable experience at pretty much any time of the year, but my visit last April made more of an impression on me than my first visit way back in September of 2006. The reason for this may have been a combination of two things.When I made that first visit, I was a new gardener and while absolutely awestruck by its loveliness and grandeur, my familiarity with plants had not yet reached a level much beyond their aesthetics. That alone is more than enough to appreciate this garden or any…
  • l've Never Met a Better Lavender - It's 'Phenomenal'!

    Kylee Baumle
    5 Feb 2015 | 3:25 am
    We know that fragrance has the power to take us back in time to an experience and it can transform our mood. It's also one of the joys of gardening - growing plants that not only look pretty, but smell that way too.Lavender is one of the most well-known fragrant plants there is and while I love growing it, it can be persnickety about our Zone 5b climate and our native heavy clay soil. Even with soil amendments, there are years that can be pretty tough on even well-established lavender plants. If only there was a lavender that existed that was just a little more forgiving...Oh, wait. There…
  • Wordless Wednesday: Winter Birds of Color

    Kylee Baumle
    4 Feb 2015 | 1:00 pm
    Today, I'm living in a snow globe, with 2-4 more inches of snow to fall in addition to the 8-10 inches we got over the weekend. The blue jays are foragers, waiting patiently until the outside cats have had their fill of kibble, and then they swoop in and grab a snack for themselves.Blue Jay(Cyanocitta cristata)
  • Wordless Wednesday: How Long Can a Dead Lemon Cypress Look Alive?

    Kylee Baumle
    20 Jan 2015 | 9:01 pm
    Yes, really.
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    The Gardens of Petersonville

  • The Monarchs Have Arrived

    Sheila
    19 Feb 2015 | 6:15 pm
     For the past six years I have been planting native milkweed to attract Monarch butterflies. We are in the migration path for their annual trek from Mexico to California and because of the over population of our area their natural food source, the milkweed plant, is disappearing at alarming rates, having a negative impact on these lovely and amazing creatures. For many years I never saw any sign of them and so I moved the milkweed around the yard and even planted them in different spots. It did take a few years to see any signs of butterflies at all after the yard had pretty much…
  • New Fruit Trees

    Sheila
    15 Feb 2015 | 9:27 am
    We're adding a new fruit tree (actually two) to the SJC gardens this year. When we moved into the Laguna beach house there was a pomegranate tree, or more like a pomegranate bush, growing way down in the back forty. Planted by birds I'm guessing. Anyway, I found it rather charming and a lovely addition to have on hand, both for the tasty fruit that is so good for us, as well as the decorative component. There are few things as lovely and sensual as a large bowl of pomegranates during the holidays. Especially when you cut a few open to show the beautiful seeds and gorgeous colors inside.
  • Happy Valentines Day

    Sheila
    14 Feb 2015 | 12:00 pm
    It's been a number of years since I've indulged in planting bleeding hearts (Lamprocapnos spectabilis) in the shade garden. I guess once again the rain has been encouraging me to take a chance on something that I know is just a short-lived charmer. Even though they are supposed to be perennials, I have never seen them come back to bloom the second year around here, but they are just so sweet, I am willing to go to the trouble and expense just to have them in the garden for a few months in the late winter and early spring. Besides, is there a more perfect flower for Valentines Day? Anyone can…
  • Taking a Chance With The Iris

    Sheila
    9 Feb 2015 | 10:28 am
    I don't know if I'm early or late, but I do know that this isn't the ideal time of year to be digging and dividing bearded iris, but our mild climate is very forgiving and I didn't get any flowers last year, so I figure the worse that can happen is I don't get any blooms until next year anyway. But chances are I will get a few flowers if I am lucky, so I have been taking advantage of this lovely weather and out digging the rhizomes up and separating the mothers from the babies. It has been five or six years that most of these plants have been in the ground, way too long to go without…
  • A Beacon of Light

    Sheila
    8 Feb 2015 | 11:23 am
    If I remember correctly we were traveling last year this time and I missed seeing my pretty little pyrus calleryana or Ornamental Pear tree bloom  One of the first plants to show color, it is looking especially robust this year as are all of the shrubs and plants in the Moonlight Garden, I suspect due to the rainfall we have had this winter. It is a beacon of sunshine in the middle of winter as the California natives are starting to bloom and some of the early spring flowers are waking up. The weather is lovely this week and just perfect for getting out in the garden and taking care of…
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    oclandscape.com

  • Work in Progress- Cotati Concrete

    Michael O'Connell
    17 Feb 2015 | 4:28 pm
    For this ranch house in Cotati we are working on new concrete patios and walkways in the front and back yards. These new walkways create a new sense of entry to the front of the house and modernize the landscape. Related posts: Work in Progress- Greenbrae Project We are getting ready to pour a concrete slab for... Current Project- Commerical Concrete and Wall Installation We are working on a project in San Rafael for... Common Mistakes: Don’t Paint that Concrete! A continuing entry in our Common Landscape Mistakes series: It...
  • Turned Earth Turns 500!

    Michael O'Connell
    28 Jan 2015 | 10:50 pm
    When I started this blog in 2005 little did I think I would still be writing it 10 years later. But here we are. The rate of posts may have slowed down since the beginning, but we just logged our 500th post to the blog. I find blogging is a great way to share our work in a more informal forum with more frequent updates than our main website. That and you can read my occasionally coherent thoughts and musings. If you want to read every post since 2005 you can visit the live archive listing page. Enjoy and thanks for reading. -Michael O’Connell Related posts: Turned Earth Turns 100! I…
  • Reviewing Our Reviews

    Michael O'Connell
    27 Jan 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Our Reviews Online Positive Reviews- 15/17 unique reviews We have reviews spread across several different sites, with good experiences that reflect our way of doing business. Below you’ll find a survey of those reviews, with links to the appropriate sites. Our composite score would translate to 4.5+ stars out of 5. In fact, of our 17 unique reviews as of this writing, we have only two negative reviews. I have included unique reviews, as some customers have left reviews on multiple sites. You can read past customer testimonials of our work on our blog. This is also helpful as it gives…
  • Petaluma Interior Pool House Design

    Michael O'Connell
    26 Jan 2015 | 4:37 pm
    We are working on an interesting project with Bradanini Associates, developing an interior pool house planting scheme. The planting seeks to make the area a tropical oasis, as half the interior is devoted to the pool and the other half to a patio with palms and other tropical plantings. The plant selection provides an added chanllenge of selecting plantings that will give the desired look while doing well in a lower light environment.   Petaluma Pool House   Related posts: From the Drawing Board- Petaluma Planting Plan This project in Petaluma situated on a large corner lot...
  • Two Small Stone Projects

    Michael O'Connell
    20 Jan 2015 | 4:19 pm
    Winter’s slower pace provides more schedule flexibility to fit in smaller projects. These two projects, one in Mill Valley and the other in Corte Madera had two things in common- small spaces and new Indian Sandstone. In Corte Madera we installed a new Navajo Brown Indian Sandstone patio. This created a more elegant and usable space, with screening achieved with Bamboo in concrete pots. In Mill Valley, we installed new Navajo Dusk Indian Sandstone over an existing concrete path, making an attractive new entry. “Our project was a rather small one involving our front entry,…
 
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    Skippy's Vegetable Garden

  • my first seedling!!!

    kathy
    1 Mar 2015 | 8:12 am
    It's a little onion sprout. Variety: Red Wing. Actually there are two of them. I feel like a new parent.
  • fig tree is leafing out

    kathy
    28 Feb 2015 | 9:25 pm
    Last year I bought a little fig tree to replace my previous tree that died last winter. Last year, I left the tree outside - very stupid of me. This year, I planted the tree in a large planter inside. Back in October or November it dropped all of its leaves. I was worried it was dead, but it is leafing out now. I'll take that as a sign of spring, even though that is a giant pile of snow outside the window.
  • goodbye to coldest and snowiest February

    kathy
    27 Feb 2015 | 9:57 pm
    Its the last day of a remarkable month. February 2015 has ended up breaking records in Boston as the coldest and the snowiest February ever (64.8 inches - 5.4 feet). At least its a short month. I hope March is better. March is not starting out great: a snowstorm is forecast soon that is supposed to break our snowfall record making 2015 the snowiest winter on record in Boston. (We're at 102 inches now - the record is here is 107.) I suppose some people love the snow, but at this point, it's really in the way. Parking and driving are difficult, roofs are collapsing and it takes so long to clear…
  • sowing

    kathy
    27 Feb 2015 | 8:57 pm
    Tonight I planted broccoli, cabbage, eggplant and radicchio. Varieties are here. I'm experimenting with different seed cell sizes. I put the eggplants in larger cells (I sowed 2 seeds per cell and will thin to 1 per cell) as they need to grow 'til the soil warms and will be pretty large before planting out. The cabbage goes out sooner (the middle of April, but only if I can get at the garden through the snow!), so I put them in smaller cells. In the past, I've planted 4 or more broccoli seedlings in single larger cells, but want to see if they do better if I don't rip the roots apart to…
  • new garden calendar app - beta testers needed

    kathy
    23 Feb 2015 | 3:29 pm
    Note added 2-25-2015: Thanks so much to all who emailed me for Beta testing! I will not be taking any more testers. I hope the app will be available for sale by early next week. It will be either $0.99 or 1.99 USD at the Apple store. I'll post a link here too.I've been working on an I-phone version of my planting calendar. It will be posted at the Apple Store soon and I'm looking for some beta testers. If you are a vegetable gardener who grows you own plants from seed and are interested in a free copy of the app and agree to provide me feedback, please email me at: kathy@skippysgarden.com…
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    Ilona's Garden Journal

  • Everyone Talks About The Weather

    Ilona Erwin
    25 Feb 2015 | 6:39 pm
    I ventured out between the pine and the spireaWherever I go (the few times I can venture out), everyone is talking about the weather, how cold it is, how tired they are of it, etc, etc. Depending on just how cold it is I either find lots to do on my computer, or I have an excuse to sit and watch a favorite show with a hot cup of something.Watched plenty of the British detective shows I like so well - I've watched most all of them. All of "Vikings", caught up with "Grimm", "Walking Dead" ...  I won't bore you with the long list of why my seat is spreading into the legend of…
  • Late Winter Is Time To Prune

    Ilona Erwin
    17 Feb 2015 | 10:58 am
    Visualizing how to cut tree branchesIf we get a break in the weather (which we will, eventually), it will be ideal time to get the pruning tools out and clean up winter damage, trim out fruit trees, and cut back many clematis vines.Those that bloom on new wood are prime candidates for pruning, although those which are scrubby looking, like quince bushes or other shrubs benefit from some pruning. I know we are supposed to wait until after bloom on many of our shrubs, but I have had some problems with some of them, and when a tree or shrub is dormant is one of the best times to prune, no matter…
  • Update, Philosophical Distractions, Life

    Ilona Erwin
    14 Feb 2015 | 9:52 am
    My instagram pic from last weekWe have only a coating of snow.Yes, I know. I should post more often.It is one of those winters that see-saw between normal temperatures and deep cold. I hate the deep cold.All our snow has melted away during the January thaws and now February has some very unusual near zero temperatures. Boston took all our snow! I'm sure they would share with us if only they could. But nature isn't like that, is it? The one place we get a regular "come-uppance" on just how much poer and control we humans actually wield.Making VideoI've been tinkering around with new projects.
  • The Requirements of Age: Updating

    Ilona Erwin
    17 Jan 2015 | 8:40 am
    The photo I add when I have nothing else to add (placeholder photo?)This is an old blog, as blogs go.I find it has been in dire need of updating, as I try to replace missing photos for the related links feature. Many of the older links had no pictures, an early complaint of some of my readers, and this has proven to be a great liability in modern blogging practice.So updating has been my main blog occupation lately.It is no surprise to many that have been online for awhile, that many blogs have simply gone missing, too. Promising writers and photographers simply closed up shop, which left me…
  • New Year, New Look, New Plans

    Ilona Erwin
    6 Jan 2015 | 6:03 am
    What's Ahead Christmas Roses More Video in 2015 The blog has a new look. In keeping with the changes of the internet,i.e. more mobile users, I attempt to create a more functional design. You may notice the emphasis on including a video gallery. That is the direction I hope to go this year- always choosing the most challenging option possible, I guess.The important thing for me is to not worry about how amateur I look in the process of the learning curve, but producing something useful and helpful to other gardeners.Why would I want to make more videos? Probably because I like to…
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    Homely Capers

  • Make Your Own Insect Repellent

    Ben
    7 Feb 2015 | 3:22 pm
    With summer in full swing and outdoor activities such as camping and barbecues being high on the todo list the ongoing annoyance of bugs and insects can often ruin an enjoyable day. Earlier we spoke about how to reduce the mosquito population at your house, today we will look at a DIY Insect Repellent that contains houshold items that make it cheap to make and safer than most commercial sprays. Commercial Repellents: When used as directed, commercial insect repellents can stop mosquitoes and other biting insects. When you use too much repellents can be harmful to your health. Here are some…
  • Reduce Mosquitoes around your home

    Ben
    31 Jan 2015 | 9:48 pm
    Mosquitoes in the back yard are not only annoying during a barbeque but mosquito transmitted diseases, such as malaria, dengue fever, and ross river fever, can be a danger to your families health. There are a number of ways to deal with the outbreak, but a two pronged approach of prevention and cure will give the best results. Life Cycle of a Mosquito: As the mosquito develops it goes through four distinct stages: Egg, Larva, Pupa, and Adult. These stages can be easily recognised by sight. Egg: The mosquito lays its eggs one at a time, they can be individual or joined together to form…
  • 3 ways to stop smelly drains

    Ben
    27 Nov 2013 | 6:02 pm
    You all know that smell? The one which nearly makes you throw up your breakfast when you get in the shower or brush your teeth. Because of the problem I had last week, we’re talking about smelly drains. Before we get to the fixes it is best to understand what causes drains to smell in the first place. The main causes are: Build up of hair and soap High school biology taught us that all kinds of yeast and bacteria love growing in warm wet climates… Just like your drainage system! Combine that with some hair and soap scum to grow on and you have the finest environment for a new life…
  • Grow these vegetables from Scraps you would normally throw out

    Ben
    22 Sep 2013 | 2:34 am
      Rather than composting all of your vegetable scraps, another option for some vegetables is to re-grow them! Why not grow some more spring onions from the bottoms or a pineapple plant. Not only is it reducing what you would normally throw out, it will save some money on the way. Here are some links to demonstrate how to re-grow your vegetable scraps: Celery / Ginger / Garlic / Sweet Potato / Spring Onion Onions Basil Bok Choy Pineapple Carrot Tops Tomatoes
  • What to put in the compost – info graphic

    Ben
    22 Sep 2013 | 1:12 am
    As a follow up to the Compost Tumbler and the Compost Tumbler Update, here is an infographic to explain what to put in your compost bins!
 
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    Bananas.org

  • Winter in San Diego

    sunfish
    1 Mar 2015 | 11:06 am
    :waving:
  • Greetings and Salutations

    Baphijmm
    28 Feb 2015 | 7:07 pm
    Hello! I live in the US, southern New Mexico, just outside of a little town called Mayhill. It's high up in the mountains, where the difference between USDA Zones 6 and 7 depends entirely on what the weather decides to do in a given year. As such, naturally, my banana experiments have been container-bound, but still. I don't remember when I started trying to grow bananas from seed, but I do know my first experiment was with Musa sikkimensis; naturally, this got me pretty discouraged pretty quickly. This year however, in addition to trying new varieties (Ensete glaucum, Ensete ventricosum,…
  • Dried crushed egg shells

    Narnia
    28 Feb 2015 | 1:29 pm
    What is the benifit,if any, of spreading dried crushed egg shells through rows of banana plants? now and then its good to apply a light layer of lime right?- Will the egg shells be a lime sustitute? What is the benifits ,if any of spreading egg shells around rose bushes? thanks.
  • Canistel: Tropo vs. Oro

    dekkard
    27 Feb 2015 | 6:49 pm
    We are considering two types of canistel but can only plant one. Does anyone have any personal experiences with both "oro" and "tropo"? We want good, sweet flavor with moist flesh (as opposed to the dry varieties). We plan to prune it back to 10 or 12 feet in Z10a. Any input is appreciated.
  • Enano Gigante a bare root storing candidate?

    siege2050
    27 Feb 2015 | 4:38 pm
    Been trying to find a cavendish type that I can store under the house bareroot. I have seen some people have tried and failed at it. I have heard that cavendish does not go dormant and will die if not watered, etc. I have a Enano Gigante I bought last year at lowes thats in my house in a pot. At first I forgot to water, then after I saw how well it was doing without water compared to my other cavendish types, I started not watering it all all. It appears to have gone dormant, no die back and no growth for several months now in a state similar to what my orinoco's go into. After I get a few…
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    North Coast Gardening

  • DIY Bird Seed Blends for Feeding Wild Birds (and a Guide to the Best Seeds)

    Linda
    19 Feb 2015 | 9:10 pm
    Feeding wild birds is a rewarding pastime and a wonderful way to identify different birds in your area, which is good information to have if you are planning to use native plants in your garden to attract specific species. It’s also a great way to share a love of wildlife with children who may be too young use binoculars or to properly enjoy birds in nature. However, if you’ve ever purchased seeds at the supermarket or hardware store, you’re probably aware that the blends they sell contain a lot of filler seeds which birds turn their beaks up at. This junky birdseed ends up all over the…
  • Landscape Designer’s Tools of the Trade: Best Measuring Tools

    Genevieve
    9 Feb 2015 | 2:01 pm
    We’re coming up on that time of the year when most of us are doing more armchair gardening and garden planning than actual outside, in-the-dirt gardening, and one of the biggest challenges people encounter when they start measuring or plotting out their garden to create an overall plan is that their tools are woefully inadequate and make the job feel much more intimidating than it has to be. When your rusty measuring tape only goes to 25 feet, but your yard extends out quite a ways, it can be tough to even know where to begin. Today, I want to share a few of the professional tools of the…
  • Buying Bee-Friendly Plants: Neonicotinoid-Free Nurseries, Growers, and Seed Sources

    Genevieve
    3 Feb 2015 | 3:59 pm
    Recently I’ve heard from a number of wildlife gardeners who say they are no longer buying plants from regular retail nurseries because there is no way of telling whether or not the pollinator-attracting plants they are purchasing have been treated with neonicotinoid pesticides. Neonicotinoids (imidacloprid, etc) are a class of pesticide which many studies indicate contribute strongly to colony collapse disorder in honeybees, and can also kill other bees. However, the pesticide isn’t all bad. Neonicotinoids are often used because the application process is so safe in comparison to…
  • What Birds Need in Winter: Creating a Year-Round Habitat Garden

    Genevieve
    21 Jan 2015 | 4:15 pm
    When attracting birds to the garden, we often think of setting out some bird feeders and maybe a bird bath. But like us, wild birds need a variety of things to thrive, and especially in inclement weather. As we lose many of our natural lands to development, supporting local and migrating birds through all of the seasons becomes ever more important. Today, we talk with Kim Eierman about how gardeners can attract and help out wild birds in winter. Eierman is an incredibly knowledgeable writer (catch her over at her blog, EcoBeneficial and speaker who teaches at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden, The…
  • Pruning Ornamental Grasses: The Ultimate Guide

    Genevieve
    12 Jan 2015 | 7:04 pm
    Though most gardeners feel some level of confidence when it comes to pruning perennials and even woody shrubs and trees, when it comes to pruning ornamental grasses, even the serious gardener can feel some confusion. Each type of grass has different requirements, which makes it hard because there’s not one rule of thumb which fits all. While some varieties look shaggy and sad if not whacked to the ground each January, for other types of grass this treatment sounds the death knell. Not to worry. I’ve got you covered with a list of the ornamental grass varieties that are grown most…
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    High Altitude Gardening

  • Wordless Wednesday: The Gorgeous Boys

    13 Feb 2015 | 8:54 am
    Every February, these big dudes pay us a visit. And, they're no dummies. They're hanging out inside the Park City city limits ~ where they can rest in my backyard ~ safe and sound...For more {slightly} Wordless Wednesday participants, click here!Follow @Kate_HAGardens
  • The Lazy Girl's Artisan Bread

    4 Feb 2015 | 11:31 am
    Prepare to be dazzled.While the East Coast digs out from yet another epic snowstorm, here I sit in my {grumble grumble} Western ski resort with the windows wide open, peering out on a muddy brown landscape. Ran errands without a jacket earlier this morning. It's all adding up to be a very non-wintery winter. Kind of disappointing because I love winter. And, the whole idea of hunkering down, indoors, with a good book, a great movie or marvelous aromas wafting from the kitchen. Just something about a cold, snowy day that inspires a yummy homemade bread.One of my East Coast, fortunate…
  • Wordless Wednesday: The Mouse Hunter

    21 Jan 2015 | 10:39 am
    For more Wordless Wednesday participants, click here!Follow @Kate_HAGardens
  • Pesky Pests

    14 Jan 2015 | 3:07 pm
    'Twas a winter wonderland out on my deck this morning! :))  Probably looks frigid but it was 30 degrees ~ warm enough for this snow lover to stand there with the door wide open, enjoying a cup o' my famous cowgirl coffee. (More accurately, that cowgirl coffee is infamous. I'm a devout lover of French Roast and the blend is too strong for most anyone but me.)I was delighted to see the snow. The epic cold, followed by unnaturally warm days, was really messing with my mood.It is January, after all. My snowshoes are begging for attention.And, so are my windowsill flowers. I gave everyone a…
  • Balmy.

    8 Jan 2015 | 12:35 pm
    This impressive fellow was keeping an eye on me while I visited the horses. One of the things I'll always miss about living in the country.'Tis a balmy 48 degrees! One week after it was 10 below zero. Windows are open, breeze blowing in. I hear the drip, drip of icicles melting away after 7 short days of real winter.Sable has the best view of local ski resorts, but she doesn't seem to care. Way more interested in a cookie.As the weather warmed, I scurried over to the stables to take the coats off the horses. They were super friendly and kind of sassy ~ kicking up their heels and running in…
 
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    Ewa in the Garden

  • Growing ginger lily in cold climate

    26 Feb 2015 | 7:53 am
    Let’s see how we grow and propagate ginger lily (Hedychium) here in Poland, Europe, where temperature can drop in the winter down to  -30C/-22F and in the summer can get up to 36C/97F. We can grow ginger lily outdoors, but for the winter it has to go indoor, no way it could stay outside for the winter.. This particular ginger lily is growing all year round in the winter garden/
  • Book Review: Tomatomania! A Fresh Approach to Celebrating Tomatoes in the Garden and in the Kitchen

    22 Feb 2015 | 10:11 am
    In this book words are as important as the juicy pictures. One warning before you read now anyfurther. If you didn’t grow tomato yet, there is high possibility that after going through this book you will join the club of tomatomaniacs worldwide! If you are not afraid, give me your hand and let me tell you about ‘Tomatomania! A Fresh Approach to Celebrating Tomatoes in the Garden and in the
  • 20 Best Post in 2014 You Don't Want to Miss... aha?

    10 Jan 2015 | 7:52 am
    While going already up and forward to 2015, but also looking backwards at what 2014 has brought, I just made a list of best posts of Ewa In The Garden in 2014. Just in case if you have missed any them, you can now go through the list and choose which one to check.  They got most hits this year and when I mean the number of hits it counts in tens of thousands for each post.  Catch up now
  • Merry Christmas from Portugal

    23 Dec 2014 | 10:30 am
  • Plants that bloom in winter: ALOE ARBORESCENS

    22 Dec 2014 | 1:51 pm
    What can I say to express it? Enormous, fascinating, breathtaking flowering you can experience?  And that would be not enough to say how magical moment you enter  while bumping suddenly on the sea of flowering aloe!   This very modestly looking plant, so popular as indoor plants in colder climates, can’t be suspected of producing so spectacular inflorescence (the entire stem with
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    Your Small Kitchen Garden

  • 2015 Seed Giveaway: Grand Prize Winner

    Daniel Gasteiger
    25 Feb 2015 | 9:24 pm
    My (nearly) annual seed giveaway closed on February 15. Seeds are almost in the mail! Here’s where things stand: I’ve laid out seeds to fill 50 envelopes for winners of this year’s seed giveaway. My wife and I selected the grand prize winner! I contacted people who nearly almost kind of entered the giveaway but might have missed a critical step (no mailing address received here). I designed, printed, and applied new seed envelope labels – more than 160 envelopes. I’ve packed 80 seed envelopes with 80 still awaiting attention. I wrote (am writing) this post to let…
  • Amazing Green Sausage Heirloom Tomatoes

    Daniel Gasteiger
    5 Feb 2015 | 12:01 am
    For at least four months after harvest, these tomatoes got moved around in our dining room until I noticed they’d started to wrinkle. These are Green Sausage tomatoes—an heirloom paste tomato that remains green when it ripens. It also, apparently, creates a hermetic barrier between its innards and the rest of the universe. In late January, I ate a fresh homegrown heirloom tomato harvested from my outdoor garden. This is remarkable because by early October of last year, those of my tomato plants that hadn’t been killed by blight had been frozen by an early frost. Green Sausage, the…
  • Don’t Freeze Ya Freesias

    Daniel Gasteiger
    31 Jan 2015 | 2:28 am
    The coldest days of winter and a typical central Pennsylvania snow reaffirm the area’s USDA hardiness zone rating. Freesias would not survive this winter outdoors. Freesias! I took a flier last spring and bought a package of freesia bulbs on closeout. I’ve never grown freesias. I couldn’t have identified them had someone led me to a freesia patch to harvest a few for a bouquet. Knowing so little about them, I planted twelve freesia bulbs according to instructions on the package: buried many inches deep in a 12-inch container. In a few weeks, exactly two plants emerged. Eventually…
  • Vegetable Seed and Corona Tools Giveaway 2015!

    Daniel Gasteiger
    25 Jan 2015 | 11:11 pm
    Please note this giveaway is closed. Follow this link to learn who won the prize. The Quickest Way to Enter The quickest way to enter the giveaway: Leave a comment on this blog post that shares an entertaining gardening experience. Send an email that includes a mailing address and the email address you used on the comment form. Click this link to send the email. Read the rest of the post for instructions on how to increase your chances of winning the tools and receiving free seeds. This giveaway ends on Friday, February 15 at midnight. This year’s seed giveaway once again features the…
  • Happy Birthday, Bren!

    Daniel Gasteiger
    3 Dec 2014 | 3:03 pm
    The part of our visit that most resembled a formal tour began with the flower bed in front of Bren’s house. It was instantly apparent Bren’s garden plan preserves habitat for felis catus, the domestic cat. If you spend any time online and you’re serious about gardening, you’re likely to have heard of Brenda Haas. The curator of #gardenchat, Bren is a garden photographer and a social media guru. I got to visit Brenda at her home earlier this year and I wrote about the experience in a post titled Visit in Brenda Haas’s Garden. There you’ll find information about #gardenchat and how…
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    Veggie Gardener: Organic Vegetable Gardening Tips

  • Drying and Storing Seeds from 5 Common Garden Vegetables

    Veggie Gardener
    28 Feb 2015 | 10:41 pm
    As each planting season arrives, you are faced with the choice of which veggies to grow. Once this decision is made, the next step is to acquire seeds for planting. This can be done by shopping at local farm and garden stores or online ordering, but it gets even better than that: you can instead […]
  • The Colorful Carrot: Purple Popularity

    Veggie Gardener
    22 Feb 2015 | 6:09 pm
    When most people think of a carrot, orange is the color that comes to mind. The color orange has been primarily associated with the carrot for quite some time as far as the masses are concerned. Though an orange carrot is a welcome sight in soups, salads, and on dinner plates, there was a time […]
  • Preventing Splits and Cracks in Tomatoes

    Veggie Gardener
    15 Feb 2015 | 10:29 am
    Watching as beautiful tomatoes come to fruition thanks to your gardening efforts is quite rewarding. As they appear, small and green, transitioning soon to become large, red, and delicious, we wait eagerly for the day they are ready to be plucked from the vine and moved inside to the dinner table. Sometimes during that process, […]
  • Can’t We All Just Get Along? The Importance of Plant Placement Gardens

    Veggie Gardener
    7 Feb 2015 | 2:13 am
    We’ve all had an experience in our lives where we were exposed to someone with whom we simply did not click. Whether it was a classmate or coworker, everyone knows someone who is the oil to their water. Despite your best efforts, there are some people in this world you are going repel or who […]
  • Epsom Salt: 5 Reasons to Try it in Your Garden

    Veggie Gardener
    31 Jan 2015 | 7:25 pm
    It is widely known that Epsom Salt has many benefits for the human body and improves our health in multiple ways. Whether it is flushing toxins, reducing inflammation, increasing nerve function, easing muscle pain, acting as a laxative, or remedying migraine headaches, Epsom salt is here to help us heal and feel better. It does […]
 
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    Miss Rumphius' Rules

  • Green Gardens

    Susan aka Miss. R
    27 Feb 2015 | 4:34 am
    Green is a thing. Right now it’s a missing thing. It’s what I miss most during winter and what makes me smile first in the spring–those small green shoots pushing up through frigid earth. I’ve been thinking about making flowerless gardens. Gardens that are mostly green. Gardens that rely  on scale and texture and subtlety of hue and maybe some skilled pruning. In New Jersey, where I practice landscape design, this may prove to be more difficult than it is in warmer climates where there are bolder choices and plants with immense architectural leaves. Many of the…
  • My Award Winning Garden Design

    Susan aka Miss. R
    16 Feb 2015 | 6:51 am
    Last fall, I entered a garden I designed in New Jersey in 2015 APLD International Landscape Design Awards in the Planting Design category. It was awarded the highest honor, a Gold Award. To be honest, I knew the value of the design, but since it is the antithesis of current planting trends, I was really pleased. Current trends in planting design seem to require ornamental grasses and meadow-like qualities. This garden has neither, but that doesn’t make it unsustainable or unfriendly to all  but deer. The garden’s underlying structure of boxwood hedging and pyramids gives it…
  • Design vs. A Sense of Place

    Susan aka Miss. R
    11 Feb 2015 | 3:29 am
    I’m not an architecture critic.  I am someone who loves great architecture both contemporary and historic. In my work as a landscape designer part of my focus is to create landscapes and gardens that surround the attendant architecture in such a way that the design partnership between them is timeless and seamless.  As a designer this may seem counter intuitive, but I believe that the best design has a sense of place and that my hand in that should be less, rather than more, visible. Last week I visited Frank Gehry’s new building for the Fondation Louis Vuitton in Paris.  It…
  • Garden Travel: Back and Forth

    Susan aka Miss. R
    17 Jan 2015 | 4:59 am
    Next week I’m travelling again. This time on a search for garden antiques and vintage in the markets in Paris and parts of Belgium. I am continuing on to Rome for a few days of play after that. For the first time in many, many years, I won’t be taking my laptop with me.  I’ve traded the bulk and weight for my camera stuff and a tablet, so please follow my Instagram account for what I see and off the cuff inspiration. I’ve also been waiting a while to post about a visit to Vizcaya when I was in Miami in November so here it is.  I was enchanted.  For a landscape…
  • A Year beyond Miss R…

    Susan aka Miss. R
    27 Dec 2014 | 3:53 am
    When I become this inconsistent, something is going on.  What has it been?  Life and work. Yes, Miss R has been part of that mix, but 2014 has been an odd year. It’s been an awakening of sorts. I love to write, but there are things that are more important to me than that.  I’ve rediscovered my three happiest places –at the drawing board, indulging my gypsy feet, and my newest obsession, photography. I made a yearlong commitment to be the President of APLD and I wrote some interesting (I hope) stories for Garden Design magazine. I organized a European Objects and Oranments…
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    Journal

  • Fran Sorin's Inspirational Garden Guide Has Been Reissued.

    Allan
    22 Feb 2015 | 10:05 pm
    Digging Deep: Unearthing Your Creative Roots Through Gardening,  Fran Sorin,   Braided Worlds Publishing.              There is one book in my library that I can never part with: Fran Sorin’s Digging Deep. When it was published ten years ago, it validated the personal creativity I discovered when I first began to garden. On its pages, I also found a lifetime mentor in the author’s warm, inspiring voice and I return to her words whenever I need to refresh my creativity. Recently, the book was republished in a revised tenth anniversary…
  • The Flower Garden Style of Piet Oudolf

    Allan
    1 Feb 2015 | 10:24 am
    Image copyrighted by Scott Weber. Used with permission Scott Weber, of Portland, Oregon, has been designing and planting flowerbeds around his property for several years. Above and below are two of the many stunning photos he shares with readers on his blog Rhone Street Gardens. The images of his mini meadow-like plantings always take my breath away no matter how frequently he posts. Scott once mentioned that Piet Oudolf inspires the spirit and design of his garden. Image copyrighted by Scott Weber. Used with permission. For over one hundred years, the English flower garden remained the…
  • A Purple Autumn Perennial That Pops: Vernonia Lettermannii

    Allan
    4 Jan 2015 | 11:44 am
    Photo credit:The University of Tennessee, Institute of Agriculture A client gave me a mandate to enhance her flowerbed whenever I find a reliable perennial that blooms in purple. To please her, I scour my suppliers’ catalogues every spring looking for purple blooming plants. Then I test grow them for a few seasons to determine how they perform. Most are disappointing.  A few become messy or invasive. Some are short-lived plants lasting one or two seasons while others are unable to survive climate conditions in my growing zone. Happily, this year I discovered that the recently…
  • I Didn't Charge for My Gardening Advice.

    Allan
    21 Sep 2013 | 12:42 pm
    My financial adviser Billy called me the other day and asked if I would offer garden design advice to one of his neighbors. The wife is undergoing chemotherapy and has determined that a revamp of her tired-looking garden would be an ideal project to put back some balance into her life. Their garden truly needs a major overhaul and I was pleased to offer suggestions; I even recommended the name of a handy man that can do it economically. The husband is on board with the project and eager to make it happen. When I first heard the family name of these neighbors, I smiled. Their two children had…
  • Beauty of Moscow Is a Bittersweet Lilac Delight

    Allan
    1 Jul 2013 | 1:40 pm
    image:- portersnurseries.comIt should be no surprise to other passionate plant collectors that when syringa “Beauty of Moscow” a.k.a. Krasavitsa Moskvy, was introduced, I was compelled to buy one for myself. In truth, I didn’t need another lilac shrub. There were already too many growing in my garden. However, the hype accompanying this new plant was strong and, like many other gardeners who can hardly wait for the next wowing plant to become available, I succumbed to the charms of the publicity, without waiting for other gardeners’ feedback. As is often the case in my…
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    Garden Therapy

  • Inspired ByNature – Moss Art

    Stephanie
    1 Mar 2015 | 6:49 am
    I was lucky enough to have a private tour last week of the ByNature studio in East Vancouver. Walking into the studio I was instantly transported into a tropical rainforest with a warm, humid climate and wall-to-wall tropical plants in a variety of unique planters and frames. ByNature has the exclusive rights to a number of innovative European designs, like moss frames, wall planters, and even upside down planters (see all the products here). Perhaps one of my favorite designs are all the Mossart Still Nature installations around the space. These are the height of low maintenance design…
  • Forcing Flowering Branches to Bloom Indoors

    Stephanie
    27 Feb 2015 | 11:31 am
    Forcing is the term used for bringing plants indoors to bloom. The term may be a tad too strong for cut branches, though. Forcing, in regards to bulbs, can mean months of chilling, then planting, then watering, then growing. Bulbs really need some strong urging to grow and bloom indoors. Flowering branches, however, require more of a gentle encouragement than a strong arm. Don’t get me wrong, I’m all for the art of forcing bulbs indoors. I do it myself. The work is therapeutic and the results are worthwhile. Seeing and smelling signs of spring far before they will be enjoyed in…
  • Ultra Healing Foot Balm

    Stephanie
    24 Feb 2015 | 8:43 pm
    Whether you spend your day in high heels, work boots, or flip flops, this foot balm is just the thing to perk up tired feet. As a gardener my feet take a beating. This peppermint foot balm is full of all-natural ingredients that heal, soften and soothe so I can spend my time digging rather than dealing with dry, cracked heels and achy feet. This foot balm is made to go together harmoniously with this Peppermint Foot Scrub recipe. After a good soak in warm water, a cooling peppermint foot scrub, this balm seals in moisture and helps to repair cracks and dryness. A true peppermint pampering for…
  • Seaside Garden Design

    Stephanie
    22 Feb 2015 | 6:07 am
    This beautiful seaside-inspired garden, called The Blue Greenhouse, was created by designers, Rose Blamey of Windrose Garden Design, and Kimberley Loewen of Flourish Garden Design. I shouldn’t have been surprised that this garden was my instant favourite at the BC Home + Garden Show, because I have been long-time fans of their impressive work. The centerpiece of the garden is a turquoise greenhouse from BC Greenhouses that would be any gardeners dream playroom. Filled with terracotta pots of spring bulbs, seedlings, and succulents, it’s no wonder I was drawn in so quickly. Rose…
  • Home Tweet Home Rustic Metalwork Birdhouse

    Stephanie
    17 Feb 2015 | 4:03 pm
    A birdhouse is meant to last / to weather / to improve as it provides a nest outdoors for some lucky feathered friends. I decorated this wood birdhouse with those thoughts in mind as I participated in the Home Tweet Home charity challenge for the BC Home & Garden Show. (PS: This isn’t my first year decorating a silent auction item for charity. Remember my Gnome from last year?) Visitors to the BC Home + Garden Show can participate in a silent auction of bespoke birdhouses, each handcrafted by a local influencer – and inspired by a drawing of a dream home as imagined by young…
 
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    Urban Organic Gardener

  • It’s here! 🍅 Join Urban Organic Gardener’s Monthly Seed Club

    UOG
    27 Feb 2015 | 8:24 pm
    The Urban Organic Gardener’s Monthly Seed Club is here and we’re ready to start shipping seeds. With Spring season right around the corner now is the best time to join.  We’ll automatically send you the best seeds to plant – at the right time of the year – specific to where you live. Sign up now for  $10 and receive a custom collection of NON-GMO Heirloom seeds every month.  Start by answering a few questions about your garden:  Click here to get started Easy as 1 – 2 – 3       Frequently Asked Questions Q: What is it? A: Members…
  • 66 Things You Can Grow In Containers

    UOG
    22 Feb 2015 | 7:40 pm
    Bet you didn’t know you could grow all these different plants in containers!  Give it a try.  You might just be surprised!  
  • How to Source Non-GMO Seeds

    UOG
    10 Feb 2015 | 9:49 pm
    Source: NaturallyLoriel.com Naturally Loriel recently published a blog post on a very important topic:  How to Source Non-GMO Seeds. She says, “You begin to learn which food companies deserve your support and try to find a local farmer’s market in your area. You realize it’s so important to meet and shake the hands of the farmer that produces your food. Unfortunately though, you’re not as lucky as Lauren is, and the farmer’s markets in your area royally suck. The only other logical solution is to grow your own food.” Click here to read the original blog post:…
  • Top 5 Featured Urban Organic Garden Photos on Instagram

    UOG
    29 Jan 2015 | 10:08 am
    Follow Urban Organic Gardener on Instagram:  www.instagram.com/urbanorganicgardener - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - - - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - - - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – -…
  • Gotham Greens Rooftop Farming | Built in Brooklyn

    UOG
    16 Jan 2015 | 9:30 am
    Gotham Greens is a startup in Gowanus focused on creating sustainable rooftop farming solutions by adding working greenhouses to office buildings throughout the 5 boroughs. Anthony talks to the Co-Founders and Chief Agricultural Officer about why they decided to found the company in Brooklyn.
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    Gardener's Journal

  • ‘Bunch-Type’ Sweet Potatoes Fit Compact Gardens

    gscadmin
    19 Feb 2015 | 8:09 am
    If you grow sweet potatoes in containers, consider the “bunch” varieties from Steele Plant Company: Vardaman and Porto Rico. And if you’ve never grown sweet potatoes before, try a few of these in your garden this year. I talked to Ken Sanders at Steele Plant, and he says the bunch types will do well in large containers, such as a washtub or a whisky barrel. I bet they’ll also thrive in the Jumbo Potato Grow Bag. Unlike traditional sweet potatoes, the bunch types don’t have long vines; plants remain compact. Porto Rico (also called Puerto Rico and Porto Rica)…
  • Planting Season in the Cubicle Farm

    gscadmin
    9 Feb 2015 | 5:29 am
    Just-sown corn seeds, which look just like popcorn. To sow, sprinkle them on the soil surface and push them down to ensure good seed-to-soil contact. My file drawer: I used biodegradable take-out trays as planters, Germinating Mix for the soil and set them atop the reservoirs of a couple GrowEase Seed Starters. I’m growing corn in my file cabinet. Actually, I’m growing something called “corn shoots.” In seven to 10 days, they’ll be ready for harvest, and I hear they’re delicious. Why the file cabinet? These shoots taste best when they grow in darkness, so…
  • 6 Compact Crops for Vegetable Gardeners

    gscadmin
    2 Feb 2015 | 5:31 am
    G-Star F1 Summer Squash is one of my favorite crops for small-space gardeners. All of the varieties featured in this post are available at High Mowing Seeds. Vates Kale Boothby Blonde cucumber Little Finger eggplant Glacier tomato Purple Beauty pepper If you’re gardening in compact spaces and plan to grow only a few vegetables this year, these are the ones to choose. With careful watering and regular fertilization, you can easily harvest fresh greens, cucumbers, eggplants, summer squash, peppers and tomatoes all season long. More ideas: Read Top Crops for Small Gardens. Vates Kale is…
  • Coleus: an Old Favorite in New Clothing

    gscadmin
    26 Jan 2015 | 5:24 am
    A variety called Redhead is bred to hold its color in the sun. Sedona Each year, the National Gardening Bureau selects one annual to receive special recognition, and 2015 has been designated Year of the Coleus. I’m pleased to see this plant some attention. It’s a sturdy performer that doesn’t demand much from the gardener. Coleus was popular among gardeners in the early 1900s, who created showy beds that spawned the term “carpet bedding.” Today, coleus comes in more colors, forms and textures, making them ideal for pots and planters. Look for compact, rounded…
  • The Orchid Challenge Begins with Hope and a Plan

    gscadmin
    19 Jan 2015 | 5:44 am
    Like pumpkins on Nov. 1, out-of-bloom orchids are often available at great prices. I’m not going to call it a resolution, even though it’s January. Let’s just say that I’ll give it my best shot. I was at the garden center, and I saw a table full of out-of-bloom orchids marked down 50 percent. I couldn’t resist, so I picked up three with the intent to get them to bloom again. Because moth orchids (phalaenopsis) are known for being good rebloomers, I picked two of those, including one that’s miniature (just 3″ tall), growing in a pot the size of a…
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    Annie's Gardening Corner

  • Summer Combos

    24 Feb 2015 | 7:50 am
    Rather than just count the 24 #daystillspring, let's take it one step further and look at a summer combo/plant flashback easy enough for even the novice to create. The only requirement - lots of sunshine, awesome soil and no procrastination. This red and yellow flash of Sunflowers and ‘Red Flash’ Caladium can be part of your summer garden. Just jot it down and get ready to plant. This red and yellow flash of Sunflowers and ‘Red Flash’ Caladium can be part of your summer garden. That's just in case you might be counting the #daystillsummer instead, which that number is...drum roll,…
  • The First Faint Scent...

    23 Feb 2015 | 7:53 am
    This weekend felt like there was the first faint scent of spring. And for those who are counting...the number is getting closer. Just 25 #daystillspring. 25 days and counting...But as John Geddes reminds us, "...I hear the sounds of melting snow outside my window every night and with the first faint scent of spring, I remember life exists..." Until then...Benny woofs it best.  Done with the snow...napping till spring!© All Images – Property of Bilowz Associates Inc.    If you like this blog, check in for your daily share's worth of garden inspiration, landscape…
  • Cycles & Markets

    20 Feb 2015 | 7:22 am
    Cycling Routes - one of the top 7 Landscape Architecture trends of the 21st CenturyWhile this may sound like a financial piece, today’s post touches upon trends and something written about earlier this week.  First, let's talk what's trending; one of the top 7 Landscape Architecture trends of the 21stcentury - cycling routes, which stands as # 4 on the list of 7. In this recent LA Newsfeed article, the European planners and landscape architects seem to be one pedal ahead of the game. Anyone in the design game realizes making cities more bicycle-friendly can prove challenging with the…
  • Nature’s Bouquet

    19 Feb 2015 | 7:39 am
    29 #daystillspringWhen all one can find in the landscape is nature’s bouquet, Earl Nightingale's words remind us, “Always keep that happy attitude. Pretend that you are holding a beautiful fragrant bouquet.” Soon our spring flowers will create the real thing... 29 #daystillspring and counting, until then it’s nature’s bouquet or a few captured memories from last year.     © All Images – Property of Bilowz Associates Inc.    If you like this blog, check in for your daily share's worth of garden inspiration, landscape architecture and design tips; always…
  • Wednesday Sound Bites

    18 Feb 2015 | 7:53 am
     The sun looked like it was coming in for a landing this morning. Hope it's here to stay. Melt the snow away!It’s a #WordlessWednesday image on this February morn. The sun, which was amazingly bright kicks off the post for today. If you’ve been paying attention to more than weather, the days are getting longer and this sun sure beats another foot of snow even it if was only 4º.  But rather than just share a #nature image, there’s a couple of sound bites worth sharing. It's time to get your thoughts in forward gear - start thinking garden, landscape, design plus 30…
 
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    Serenity in the Garden

  • Nature Words Deleted from the Dictionary..oh no!

    Jan Johnsen
    1 Mar 2015 | 7:48 am
     In 2009 Oxford Junior Dictionary (Oxford University Press) revealed a list of the entries it no longer felt to be relevant to a modern-day childhood. So they deleted these words from the Junior dictionary. These are the words deleted:acorn, adder, ash, beech, bluebell, buttercup, catkin, cowslipcygnet, dandelion, fern, hazel, heather, heron ivy, kingfisher lark, mistletoenectar, newt, otterpasture and willow. The words taking their places in the new edition…
  • Cut ornamental grasses...do not forget.

    Jan Johnsen
    27 Feb 2015 | 5:39 am
    Cutting ornamental grasses makes them healthier and better looking.Remove all dry, old growth so new growth will get sunlight and air. Use sharp-bladed tool to do this (large masses - electric chain saw).Do not trim it any lower than 5 inches from the ground.
  • Renew Your Garden Tools!

    Jan Johnsen
    26 Feb 2015 | 4:25 am
    Caked on dirt on these shovels.... Winter is the time to get your garden tools in shape... hand tools such as shovels, picks, trowels, loppers, etc. should be cleaned, sharpened and well oiled.Steel wool can clean off any rust or caked-on dirt.But the most important thing I have found is to make sure to oil the tools. It is a rust preventative and a wood saver. Moss in the CityA while back, in our shop (I own a landscape design/build firm and we have trucks, crews and lots of tools) we would have a large container filled with sand and motor oil and put our tools in it. ...the…
  • Fothergilla - a Favorite Shrub

    Jan Johnsen
    24 Feb 2015 | 9:42 am
    Fothergilla Leaf from quercus design blogI adore Fothergilla gardenii Mt Airy. (wonderful photo of fothergilla leaf from Quercus Design blog)Fothergilla is native to the Appalachians, is deer resistant  and sports fragrant, honey scented, early spring flowers before the leaves come out.The flowers are white, short bottlebrush spikes that light up a sunny to partial sun woodland corner. The flowers are followed by blue green, heavily textured foliage.Photo from Robs Plants Website - http://www.robsplants.com/plants/FotheGardephoto by Laura McKillop'Mt…
  • Ken Druse - Real Dirt - 'Heaven is a Garden' Interview 2-20-2015

    Jan Johnsen
    20 Feb 2015 | 11:44 am
    This week I was thrilled to be interviewed by the one and only Ken Druse...author of 19 books (with another one out soon!)   Ken's website is Real Dirt .His last, beautiful book was done in association with my friend, Ellen Hoverkamp. It is called 'Natural Companions' The interview is on a podcast and you can listen to it anytime. It is based on my book, Heaven is a Garden, and Ken, of course, is an excellent interviewer and the questions were wonderful. I am honored that he asked me for an interview.Click here to go to REAL DIRT website and the podcast.
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    MySecretGarden

  • Northwest Flower & Garden Show - 2015: West Seattle Nursery Display Garden

    22 Feb 2015 | 7:03 am
    The name of this display garden was 'Birds Do It... Bees Do It...' As a person who had an uncle-beekeeper and spent many happy childhood days among beehives, I was naturally partial to this garden. Back in those times, there was nothing more exciting for me than to find myself during a morning in a forest where dozens of beehives stood. It was a magic place with no industry within hundreds of
  • Northwest Flower & Garden Show - 2015: Elandan's Display Garden

    19 Feb 2015 | 5:25 am
    This was the first time that we attended the Northwest Flower & Garden Show on a Saturday.  I was expecting a big crowd of visitors to be with us and the flowers to be wilted. Surprise-surprise! It wasn't more crowded than some Wednesdays and Thursdays in previous years. And, the flowers weren't wilted! This post includes the pictures of one of the display gardens - The Root of True Romance.
  • 2014 Garden Memories and 'Picture This' Contest Update

    11 Feb 2015 | 5:00 am
    Following Saxon Holt's suggestion, I spent several hours going through  my 2014 photo archive and selecting my favorite garden pictures. I then chose one image that is special to me. The Gardening Gone Wild contest encouraged me to look again at my garden and recall some nice moments from the last year. It was a good year. I had several new plants blooming for me for the first time. 
  • Lawrence Johnston's Serre de la Madone Garden

    31 Jan 2015 | 6:57 am
    This garden on the Mediterranean coast of Southern France was created by Major Lawrence Johnston (1871 - 1958), designer and plantsman, born in London into an American family. I've never been to his  garden in England, Hidcote Manor, but visited Serre de la Madone twice: in May 2013 and in May 2014. Our first visit was wonderful and exciting, but most of the pictures were lost during my camera's
  • Hampton Court Gardens - 131 Pictures

    23 Jan 2015 | 6:38 am
       1  Hampton Court Gardens were the final gardening stop in our May trip to Europe last year. It's important to finish a trip on a very high positive note, isn't it?  Hampton Court with its clipped trees as perfect exclamation marks was a wonderful choice for this mission.  Located just 18 kilometers from downtown London, Hampton Court is easy to reach by train. Our short trip on
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    Veg Plotting

  • GBMD: Snowdrop

    VP
    1 Mar 2015 | 12:30 am
    Snowdrops at Welford Park, late February 2015. I discovered the above poem recently when I visited Hodsock Priory - John Armstrong wrote it especially for Chelsea Physic Garden. The poem's last 2 lines seemed fitting for today's Muse Day, seeing we've just entered the the first month of spring.Today's the day when many of the snowdrop gardens close their doors for the season and we'll have to make do with our photographs and memories until next year. But then there are crocuses and daffodils peeping out the soil in greeting, and so our gardening year moves on to other…
  • Unusual Front Gardens #21: Cotoneaster

    VP
    27 Feb 2015 | 12:30 am
    When your door opens directly onto Corsham High Street and you have very little space for planting, how on earth do you have a front garden?I'm not quite sure which species -C. franchetii perhaps?The solution in this instance is to go vertical and clothe your house with an evergreen plant. When I was writing my post on Pyracantha last year, I remembered this place and sallied forth to photograph it as an example of how the shrub could be used. It was only when I went to take a close-up photo of the plant that I found it was Cotoneaster, not Pyracantha. Durrrr.However, whatever plant it…
  • The Allure of Orchids... and Photography

    VP
    25 Feb 2015 | 12:30 am
    Many moons ago I organised some volunteer weekends at Kew's herbarium (which you can read about here). The first year coincided with their inaugural orchid festival and it was a real treat to be given a guided tour after we'd finished our fern work.Fast forward 20 or so years and it was great to see the festival's gone from strength to strength. Most of the exhibits (and the most spectacular ones) are in the Princess of Wales Conservatory, but keen-eyed orchid spotters will find them scattered throughout Kew's other buildings. For instance, I spotted some at the International Garden…
  • Spuds I Like

    VP
    23 Feb 2015 | 12:30 am
    I've decided to grow less spuds this year, but that's not stopped me from adding potatoes to my list of projects for 2015. I've decided to have a bit of a trial to see if there is anything which can shift my love for the scrummy, buttery Harlequin.The key to this trial was a trip to my local Potato Day courtesy of my local allotment society and Pennard Plants a couple of weeks ago. There were around 30 different varieties there, with some I'd never heard of and therefore of particular interest. One of the best things about potato days is visitors can buy as few or as many of each variety they…
  • Puzzle Corner: Jigsaws

    VP
    20 Feb 2015 | 12:30 am
    NAH and I often rent a cottage for our UK holidays. Most of them have a stock of books and games to help wile away any rainy days and that's how we've rekindled our love of jigsaw puzzles. It's great to have something companionable to do on a rainy day or in the evening before going out.It's got to the point where we're disappointed when there isn't one available, so we've started to buy them as presents to guarantee we'll get our puzzle fix. As you can see, NAH's latest choice for me was very appropriate. I've just bought this jigsaw via eBay which depicts 2010's Chelsea Flower Show. It's…
 
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    GrowBlog

  • How to Grow and Cook the Tastiest Fingerling Potatoes

    26 Feb 2015 | 11:04 am
    In the Andean Mountains of Peru and Ecuador where potatoes were born, it is not unusual for family farmers to plant a dozen different kinds of potato in one field. As shown in this beautiful photo essay from , many of the varieties valued by Peruvian farmers are what we would call fingerling potatoes – small elongated tubers with a bit of a curl. People have been growing fingerling potatoes for around 8,000 years, so they have stood the test of time, and I think I know why. Sturdy fingerling potatoes always make a crop, and they are wonderful to eat. And, because they are expensive to buy,…
  • Plan for the Hungry Gap With These 5 Easy Perennials

    19 Feb 2015 | 12:44 pm
    Traditionally late winter through to early summer was a time of famine, known as the 'hungry gap', when the last of the overwintering and stored vegetables have been consumed and the first of the new year are still eagerly awaited. In his book How to Grow Winter Vegetables, Charles Dowding refers to this period as 'winter's shadow', and it's an apt name for this dark time in the gardening year.
  • Growing Vegetables in Clay Soil

    12 Feb 2015 | 4:10 pm
    Gunky clay is no one's idea of wonderful garden soil. When wet it's heavy and slimy, and it dries into chunky slabs that crack into pieces. Like other extreme , tight clay can be radically improved with regular infusions of organic matter and thoughtful handling. I have been growing vegetables in clay soil all my life, and we have come to an understanding. I respect clay soil's needs and quirks, and it pays me back with a fun and fruitful garden.
  • Seed Sowing Using Recycled Containers

    5 Feb 2015 | 10:57 am
    Gardeners are a resourceful bunch, making the most of what's to hand and taking the time to get more from less. Perhaps it's because patience is such an integral part of what we do – after all, even the quickest vegetables still take weeks from sowing to harvest.
  • How to Clear Overgrown Land Without Using Chemicals

    29 Jan 2015 | 11:22 am
    If gardens could talk, oh, the stories they might tell. At my house, the tale would begin twenty years ago, when bulldozers came to clear an opening in the woods suitable for growing food. Seasons passed and the garden grew and prospered, but then personnel changes caused the plot to go through a fallow period. The space left to rest was quickly invaded by a legion of invasive plants, from privet to poison ivy, plus plenty of tree seedlings from the adjoining forest.
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    The Enduring Gardener

  • Winter Garden Visits

    The Enduring Gardener
    24 Feb 2015 | 10:40 am
    Why anyone would visit a garden in the winter is a bit of a mystery to the non-enthusiast, but for those in the know it provides the perfect opportunity to see the bones of the garden. Ok, you do need to wrap up in your warmest clothes and wear waterproof footwear, but it does allow you to see how the experts maintain, protect and prepare for the coming season. Which is why I went along to Great Dixter’s Winter Open Weekend. The snowdrops were at their peak carpeting the ground beneath the shrubs in the many borders. This confirms advice I read recently that you should plant snowdrops where…
  • It’s Buzzing Out There

    The Enduring Gardener
    19 Feb 2015 | 10:57 pm
    Warm sunshine, barely a breeze and the flowers are unfurling, birds singing and bees of every shape and size are buzzing round the garden accompanied by squadrons of hoverflies. Stop Press! I’ve just seen a tortoiseshell butterfly! It’s on days like this that the slog through winter dissolves and I find myself itching to get out there and do things – lots of things. But before the hard work begins, it’s time to celebrate the early arrivals in the garden whether floral or flying. Daphne Jacqueline Postil is as alluring to the bees as it is to us Crocuses are in beautiful and colourful…
  • Gearing up in the Greenhouse

    The Enduring Gardener
    17 Feb 2015 | 8:51 am
    Until recently the overwintering seedlings and early sown seeds have shown very little above soil activity, but as the days lengthen and (sometimes) the temperatures rise, there are definite signs of growth. It’s time to clean the grimy windows and get sowing in earnest. Now that I have some modest heat in the greenhouse everything is a lot less vulnerable to fluctuating temperatures. January sown sweet peas Autumn sown poppies   Autumn sown corncockle February sown spinach February sown dill
  • Starter Homes for Birds

    The Enduring Gardener
    30 Jan 2015 | 10:48 pm
    Our dilapidated old garage might have been pretty useless for housing our car, but its ivy-smothered exterior was popular with the birds who found many suitable nesting places. Our new weather boarded garage is very smart and is perfect for parking the car but it currently lacks foliage – so our birds need new homes. With this in mind – and with National Nest Box Week coming up from the 14th-21st February – I have bought a couple of new nestboxes. I’m still pondering where to put them – the north side of the garage would be ideal but the lack of cover may well put the birds off.
  • Three Gardens from the Chelsea Flower Show 2015 Preview

    The Enduring Gardener
    23 Jan 2015 | 10:37 pm
    In my earlier post about Sir Paul Smith, I wrote about the role of green as the anchor that holds everything in place in a garden – so it’s unsurprising that the greenness was what I noticed as I looked at some of the drawings of this year’s Chelsea gardens. No doubt, when we get to Chelsea our eyes will seek out the excitement, and the actual gardens will be further enlivened by shape, texture and the play of light, but it is useful to see the contribution that green makes to each of the gardens and bear it in mind for the planting in our own garden. Jo Thompson’s Sylvan Retreat will…
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    Urban Gardens

  • Bike-Powered Coffee Shops Serving the Mobile Generation and the Environment

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    27 Feb 2015 | 9:35 pm
    Step aside Starbucks. There’s a new caffeinated kid on the block and she’s on a roll. With 50 cafés sold to 12 countries in nine months, the world’s smallest but fastest growing coffee chain is coming to a corner, or a curb, near … Read More...The post Bike-Powered Coffee Shops Serving the Mobile Generation and the Environment appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Better Homes and Gardens Names Urban Gardens One of Top Ten Gardening Blogs

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    24 Feb 2015 | 10:51 pm
    We’re thrilled to announce that Urban Gardens is a top ten finalist in the Gardening category for the Better Homes and Gardens 2015 Blogger Awards. Editors received over 3,000 BHG reader nominations from which they selected ten finalists based on creativity, quality of … Read More...The post Better Homes and Gardens Names Urban Gardens One of Top Ten Gardening Blogs appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Design-Centric Indoor Plant Lights For Urban Living

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    12 Feb 2015 | 4:00 am
    I continue to be enamoured with Italian lighting design brand Bulbo, whose fashionably functional pieces I featured during my last BlogTour to Milan Design Week in April 2014. Bulbo will be exhibiting their design-centric LED-powered vegetable garden systems at LOFT, the future-oriented … Read More...The post Design-Centric Indoor Plant Lights For Urban Living appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Crazy In Love With These 10 Valentines Day Gifts

    Maggie Wells
    10 Feb 2015 | 8:49 pm
    Did the most romantic person on Earth swoop into a bathroom and create this swoon-worthy scene for the object of their adoration? Personally, I don’t care what the circumstances were. This is such a gorgeous idea, and it should get just … Read More...The post Crazy In Love With These 10 Valentines Day Gifts appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Elegant DIY Petal Vase From Plastic Spoons

    Tierney VanderVoort
    2 Feb 2015 | 2:43 pm
    Have a ton of left over plastic spoons from your last barbecue? Use them to make this chic petal vase! I was inspired by a ceramic  vase I saw at Zara and thought I’d give it a whirl using plastic … Read More...The post Elegant DIY Petal Vase From Plastic Spoons appeared first on Urban Gardens.
 
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    Busch Gardens in Virginia Blog

  • Happy New Year - Celebrating the Year of the Sheep at Busch Gardens

    Emily Bea
    23 Feb 2015 | 8:54 am
    Happy New Year to All! You may wonder why I am wishing you all a Happy New Year, well last Thursday marked the beginning of the Chinese New Year.  As we say good bye to the year of the horse, we usher in the year of the Sheep (goat or ram).  This spring festival dates back more than 2000 years.  It is said that all of the animals were asked to meet on New Year’s Day to celebrate and only 12 animals arrived for the celebration.  To reward all of the animals that did show up, a year was named after each animal.     Grazing is a favorite activity for the…
  • Tastes of the Big Easy, Far East Coming to Busch Gardens Food & Wine Festival

    Emily Bea
    16 Feb 2015 | 9:05 am
    A taste of New Orleans is coming to Busch Gardens’ third annual Food & Wine Festival. The French Quarter is one of two new themed kiosks debuting at this year’s festival. The menu is still being developed, but Busch Gardens Executive Chef Justin Watson said it will consist of Cajun- and Creole-inspired recipes—think Gumbo—that will bring the flavors of the Big Easy right here to Virginia. Watson is also introducing guests to Eastern Asia cuisine, the second all-new menu debuting at this year’s festival, which opens May 22 and runs Fridays, Saturdays and…
  • Happy Valentine's Day to Our Fans

    Emily Bea
    13 Feb 2015 | 1:45 pm
    On Valentine’s Day we celebrate love in all its glorious forms. It’s a day that we tell the people in our lives just how much they mean to us. So today, we’d like to profess our admiration, our devotion, our gratitude to you, our fans.  Busch Gardens would be nothing but a collection of pathways and tangled metal structures if weren’t for one thing: people.  It is people, the team members who work here and the guests who spend their days here, which fill this empty space and bring it to life. It’s the screams as Griffon tips, waits…..drops.
  • New Busch Gardens Show is a Barrel of Fun

    Emily Bea
    9 Feb 2015 | 8:43 am
    Busch Gardens Williamsburg is “rolling” out a new show this spring in honor of the park’s 40th anniversary.  Roll Out The Barrel follows a fictional German town as its residents celebrate their 40th annual town beer brewing festival. “In the same way that Celtic Fyre celebrates beloved Irish traditions, Roll Out The Barrel celebrates German traditions that have been part of the Busch Gardens experience for four decades,” said Scott Gasparich, Busch Gardens vice president of entertainment. Roll Out The Barrel incorporates the best elements of the park’s…
  • Best of the Busch Gardens Blog 2014 - Part Three

    Emily Bea
    6 Feb 2015 | 8:34 am
    We're one week closer to the park being open. To help the time pass until you can soar on coasters, feast at the Festhaus or explore all the World's Most Beautiful Theme Park has to offer, we bring you the final installment of our Best of the Blog series. We end with the scariest and the most heartwarming events at Busch Gardens. From new Terror-tories to elven mischief, here are our favorite posts from the end of 2014:   Best Of...Fall/Winter   9. Wendigo Woods: A Terror-tory Terror-story In fall, the blog became a spooky place each Terror-Story Tuesday. Most popular was…
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    A Charlotte Garden

  • You're thinking about Spring, aren't you?

    Daricia McKnight
    7 Feb 2015 | 8:36 am
    The New Southern Living Garden BookOxmoor House, 768 pages, $34.95Of course you are! It's so exciting when the days lengthen and we get a few warmish days in January and February. Gardening in the South definitely has its rewards, and an early Spring is one of them. While you're outside this weekend in the nearly 70 degree temperatures that are predicted (and we know the meteorologists are always right), think about where you might want to add some new plants to your garden.To help you with that plant list, I have a recommendation: The New Southern Living Garden Book. There are more than…
  • Summer Wrap-Up: Portland, Day 3, Part 1

    Daricia McKnight
    23 Sep 2014 | 10:22 am
    Portland Japanese GardenThe Japanese Garden in Portland is more than five acres of peace and tranquility. Pondering my lack of photos from there, I think I was just too absorbed in the experience to remember to get my camera out. The waterfall above might have been my favorite view (it's a cell shot). Trails meandered up the hill and through the woods. Water and the sounds it makes were a soothing backdrop…completely enchanting.Some of us were fortunate enough to tour the garden with the garden curator, Sadafumi Uchiyama, who kept us enthralled with Japanese garden and design philosophy.One…
  • Summer Wrap-Up: Portland, Day 2, Part 2

    Daricia McKnight
    16 Sep 2014 | 4:53 pm
    After lunch at Joy Creek Nursery (Day 2, Part 1), our group of Flinging garden bloggers headed to Old Germantown Gardens, the two acre property of Bruce Wakefield and Jerry Grossnickle. As soon as I took one look down this inviting slope, deja vu hit.But then as quickly, a flash of recall—I turned to Bruce and asked him if his garden had ever been on the HGTV program, "A Gardener's Diary."*His look of total disbelief reminded me just what a garden nerd I am! I had recorded and saved several of those shows and watched them over and over—and in fact, yes, theirs was one of them!Bruce and…
  • Happy Bloom Day!

    Daricia McKnight
    15 Sep 2014 | 5:13 pm
    Yellow Wood Sage (Salvia koyame)If you look into my garden from next door or across the street, you will see a lot of green but maybe nothing blooming. It's been an unusual year, starting with a very slow spring—cool and wet. Everything grew very tall and then flopped until I tied it up or cut it back. Then it got hot and dry and everything bloomed out early, or else the deer pruned all the flowers off.Even so, there is more than might appear, and if you take a stroll through, these are some of the blooms still hanging on.Yellow wood sage is blooming and spreading and I couldn't be more…
  • Windowsill Art

    Daricia McKnight
    15 Sep 2014 | 10:35 am
    At any given moment the windowsill over my kitchen sink will have a wildflower, an acorn, a piece of something or other rooting, maybe a sprig that smells nice—one or all of these. I like to keep natural things close by to enjoy them, but also to observe them for a while, maybe notice how they change over time, or sometimes just appreciate their daintiness up close. Whatever the reason, I know there are others of you who do this too (or your children do), and your windowsills and tabletops look a lot like mine.Windowsill Art—Creating one-of-a-kind natural arrangements to celebrate the…
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    Growing Veggies

  • Using Ethylene to Ripen Fruits and Vegetables

    Annette
    16 Feb 2015 | 6:59 am
    “Putting a ripe apple or two in with a bowl of tomatoes and covering lightly soon ripens the tomatoes. The cover is to first keep the gas in the bowl and second to keep fruit flies out.” We received this helpful tip from our customer Ernest Barkes of North Saanich, BC, Canada. His knowledge of ethylene, the gas released from apples that helps ripen other fruits and vegetables, comes from southern Ontario over 70 years ago when the gas was not available. What is Ethylene? Ethylene is a naturally occurring plant hormone that assists the growth, ripening and deterioration of fruits,…
  • You Probably Had No Clue How These Everyday Foods Grow

    Annette
    24 Jan 2015 | 6:48 am
    Peanuts, vanilla, black pepper – these foods are by no means exotic, and you probably use them regularly in the kitchen. But, can you envisage a peanut flower, a vanilla orchid or a peppercorn vine? Keep reading to learn the extraordinary beginnings of these ordinary foods. Peanuts Image credit: Jojonicdao There are several misconceptions about the peanut. Some are unaware that the peanut is a legume, and others believe peanuts grow in trees (like walnuts), or as a part of the plants root (like potatoes). The peanut is a unique plant as it flowers above ground and fruits below ground.
  • Boost your Immune System with Broccoli

    Annette
    28 Sep 2013 | 6:36 am
    Broccoli is one of the best vegetables you can eat to promote good health, and help prevent many often devastating health problems including hypertension, diabetes, cancer, osteoarthritis and allergies. And the good news for people who struggle to grow broccoli in their own kitchen gardens (because it does have a tendency to bolt before the heads have formed) is that fresh broccoli sprouts are considerably more potent than the heads. Broccoli sprouts The Research Researchers at the University of East Anglia have found that including lots of broccoli in your diet can help slow down the…
  • Three Vegetables that Fight Cancer

    Annette
    30 Aug 2013 | 3:22 am
    Cancer is a killer, which is why it stands to reason we should be embracing every possible way to beat it. Millions of people die from cancer and cancer-related diseases every year; many more spend years fighting it. Artichoke, celery and parsley salad But the good news is that some vegetables can help you fight cancer and protect yourself from its potential onslaught. Three of the best are parsley, celery and artichokes. Prevention and Treatment of Cancer According to research, the key is something called apigenin, a common plant flavone (a colourless crystalline compound) found in lots of…
  • Trend-setting Vegetables

    Annette
    1 Aug 2013 | 3:59 am
    Portobello mushroom stuffed with yellow onion, red pepper, spinach and cheese. It’s not just fashion, hairstyles and interior design that have changing trends, even vegetables can be trend setters. The online Canadian foodie magazine, bon apptit traced vegetable trends over a period of more than four decades, and published there top ten list of trend-setting vegetables this week. Top Ten Trend-Setting Vegetables Avocado Pears were the greatest trend setters in 1969; they even inspired a decade of avo-green appliances. Beets made their culinary mark in 1982, and have stayed majorly trendy…
 
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    Appalachian Feet

  • How to Attend Hands-On Classes in Gardens, Kitchens, Forests, and Even a Late 1800’s Cabin

    Eliza Lord
    11 Feb 2015 | 9:16 pm
    It’s here. The garden classes are in gardens, the cooking classes are in kitchens, the nature study is in forests, the raspberries taste like raspberries, and the snozzberries taste like snozzberries! Photo Caption: My daughter and I inside the Hagood Mill cabin where I’ll be teaching sometimes. I worked for weeks on the lesson plans for these hands-on classes, workshops, and tours and am so excited to finally roll them out. Click here for my entire 2015 schedule. One of my favorite things about this year’s new classes is that some of them are going to be held inside of this…
  • Update: Public Permaculture Demo Garden Progress

    Eliza Lord
    9 Feb 2015 | 4:41 pm
    When I founded the SC Upstate Permaculture Society I had no idea we’d be this popular, but we’re up to 644 members with multiple people joining each week. If you live in upstate South Carolina (or nearby) we welcome you to join us. Last October we broke ground on a huge new garden that is already stacking functions by being outreach to the community, an educational opportunity for school children, a seed & plant bank for SCUPS members, a wildlife corridor (especially for the endangered Monarch butterfly), a form of erosion control, a place for SCUPS members to practice…
  • News: Eliza on TV, Upcoming Events, and Our Favorite “How To” Articles

    Eliza Lord
    12 Dec 2014 | 1:34 pm
    Eliza was on TV Wednesday doing a foraging recipe demonstration (involving a failed attempt to use a hammer) and talking about a couple things happening this weekend with Grow Journey and the Swamp Rabbit Cafe & Grocery’s Holiday Flea Market on Saturday from 11am – 3pm.  If you’d like to see Eliza’s segment during Wednesday’s Studio 62 on the CW channel, here’s the video (may not load immediately): The holiday flea is free to attend and there will be local vendors from all over the upstate. Eliza and Nathaniel will be at the Grow Journey booth selling…
  • How to Have Perennial Food Plants & No Disease for Your 2015 Garden

    Eliza Lord
    3 Nov 2014 | 9:57 am
    Okay, maybe not NO disease, but insignificant diseases and pests sounds good, right? Plus, perennial fruits and veggies mean less work for more harvest. Eliza loves teaching the two class topics available this week at the Swamp Rabbit Cafe & Grocery. Click here to sign up for class or click here to see the full 2014-2015 class schedule. Photo Caption: Passionfruit (Passiflora incarnata) are one of the perennial food plants that can be grown in this area — and they also happen to be native! Come Tuesday to learn more than 30 types of garden foods that only need to be planted once. We…
  • How to Attend Our Upcoming Garden Open House (& a Virtual Tour)

    Eliza Lord
    9 Jun 2014 | 12:59 pm
    Our garden open house (rain or shine) is THIS coming Saturday! APPALACHIAN FEET GARDEN OPEN HOUSE DETAILS: Drop-in June 14th, 9:00am – 5:00pm Recommended donation of $2-$5 440 Summit Drive, Greenville, SC You may also want to catch Eliza’s TEDx presentation at Zen on Tuesday, June 17th at 5:30pm. Additionally, Eliza wrote the feature article (on pawpaws) in the latest Edible Upcountry magazine, available for free at area locations like the Swamp Rabbit Cafe & Grocery, The Carolina Honeybee Company, or The Community Tap. Our plans for the garden open house are not as far along…
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    Lead up the Garden Path

  • Wildings.

    Pauline
    28 Feb 2015 | 7:52 am
    A few years ago I transferred some of my wild snowdrops, Galanthus nivalis, from the woodland to the front border by the drive. I planted them at the back of the border amongst the red stems of Cornus alba sibirica Westonbirt. They have now increased so much that I think some of them will need to be divided this year. The front of the bed is the bee and butterfly border which grows in the summer and hides the back of the border, but at the moment has been cut down for the winter. The back of the border has autumn and winter interest and the front spring and  summer  interest. There are a…
  • At last, the Hellebores are joining in.

    Pauline
    26 Feb 2015 | 7:15 am
    Each time I have been in the woodland lately, I have been concentrating on the snowdrops and hadn’t realised that the hellebores are later flowering than usual, probably due to the cold spell that we had recently.  As I went into the garden today  to photograph the hellebores, I promised myself that I wouldn’t take any photos of snowdrops, just hellebores this time, did I succeed ? This double hellebore is very pretty, dark pink on the outside and pale pink inside. I think the anemone centred ones are my favourite. Another anemone centred one. New last year is Hellebore Neon…
  • GBFD February Foliage.

    Pauline
    22 Feb 2015 | 7:16 am
    Wandering round the garden yesterday looking for interesting foliage, I had hoped to find lots of new shoots.  Unfortunately not, all our cold weather must have made the plants decide that it wasn’t time to put out new shoots yet. The only new leaves I could find were on the Osmanthus by the front door. Paeony mlokosewitschii has been at this stage for a couple of months now, it obviously doesn’t think it is warm enough to grow any further at the moment. Box balls form a bit of formality near the house. Pittosporum Tom Thumb not showing any new shoots yet, they will be bright…
  • The difference a day makes.

    Pauline
    19 Feb 2015 | 6:28 am
    The weather on Tuesday and Wednesday was perfect, lots of sunshine, blue sky, birds singing and the temperature up in double figures. Some time ago I had invited W.I members in the village to  see the snowdrops and enjoy a cup of coffee. It was just as well that I took the following photos yesterday (Wednesday) as today (Thursday) it has been raining non stop all day. I set up a slide show so that they could see what the woodland looks like when the sun is shining and the flowers were all open wide. More and more seedling crocus are opening each day. All the snowdrops in the sunshine had…
  • GBBD. The wild ones are catching up.

    Pauline
    16 Feb 2015 | 8:33 am
    First of all I must explain my absence for the last week or so, courtesy yet again of Talk Talk, don’t they realise how much bad publicity I give them?! We have not been able to access e.mails or any blogs, all I have been able to do is download my photographs. We have been told such blatent lies by Talk Talk, one person telling us that all customers in our phone area have been having problems, it would all be fixed by the next day. When speaking to them the next day, we were told that there were not any problems in our phone area, it just went from bad to worse. However, all clouds…
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    leavesnbloom

  • Ladybirds in Winter

    Rosie Nixon
    3 Feb 2015 | 11:45 am
    It's the 21st January.  Snow blankets the garden like a thick white woollen shroud.  The thermometer reads -6.8°C and daylight has finally arrived.  It's time to layer up and get out into the winter garden.  With every step you take there's a distinct crunch.   The air feels thick, raw and piercing.  It chills to your very bones.  You inhale and the lining of your nose starts to sting. You exhale and your breathe lingers in the air like fog.  Thickly gloved hands clumsily try to adjust the legs on the tripod.  It's no use ...the gloves have to come off as I…
  • If you were a ladybird where would You spend the winter?

    Rosie Nixon
    18 Jan 2015 | 1:19 pm
    Winter has finally made it's presence felt in the garden.   It's the time of year when you realise that wellie boots are not the best item of footwear to wear while out in the garden.  There's nothing worse than numb cold toes to entice you back indoors to the heat! At the weekend I wrapped myself up in lots of warm layers.  I put on 3 pairs of thick socks - in wellie boots much too big for me.  Two pairs of trousers, a hat with ear muffs, gloves, snood and coat.   l was well prepared this time for the bitter cold as I knew that the Jelena witchhazel and a few hellebores…
  • Best Ladybird / Ladybug Nature Macros from 2014

    Rosie Nixon
    28 Dec 2014 | 11:30 am
    It's that time of year when I look back on all of my photos from 2014 and try to pick a few of my favourites.   2014 was the year of the 7 spot ladybird  Coccinella 7-punctata / Coccinella septempunctata.  I'd never seen quite so many of these little beetles before in the garden.   When I was pruning the Potentilla fruticosa hedge after the winter I found quite a few nestled together on the lower branches. Though the majority of them seemed to have hibernated during the winter in the Picea glauca var albertiana 'Conica'.  That dwarf conifer is over half a metre in…
 
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    Garden Walk Garden Talk

  • Back Off Bud!

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    28 Feb 2015 | 6:05 am
    Sometimes rude people can really make one want to blow a gasket… especially if out photographing. While out in the park with my camera, I usually stop to feed the birds in the woods at Niagara Falls. The poor little … Continue reading →
  • Frozen Niagara Falls – 2015

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    26 Feb 2015 | 7:45 am
    View from the observation deck. Who was frozen was me, not the Falls. It was -6° F in the image above. Below, it was a balmy 35°F. View from the Rainbow Bridge of the Falls with the US observation deck … Continue reading →
  • The Beauty of Gardens Everywhere

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    23 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Does that title not make you hope for a beautiful post? A post I did a while back got a particular comment that made me drop my stylus. As you know, GWGT takes you on tour of gardens I visit, … Continue reading →
  • I Bet You Thought It Always Rains in Seattle

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    20 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    When I first flew into Seattle… it was a beautiful sunny day. I just arrived as the sun was setting over the Cascade Mountains, illuminating the sky in warm, comforting color. With prayers the next day would be radiant and … Continue reading →
  • Fog is So Storybook – Bloggers’ Fixation with Weather

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    17 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    People blame their problems on the weather, some are clever, some are amusing, but most whine and grouse with a huge dollop of negativity. Sure dense fog can numb your spirits. It can symbolize emotion like loneliness, sadness or be … Continue reading →
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    Gardenerd

  • Local: Gardenerd @ Venice Green Expo

    Christy
    25 Feb 2015 | 6:23 am
    This one is for Angelenos. If you don’t live here, go plant some seeds indoors and make sure all your tools are clean for spring. Soon it will be time to garden again. Now, onward… This Saturday, February 28, from … Continue reading → The post Local: Gardenerd @ Venice Green Expo appeared first on Gardenerd.
  • Ask Gardenerd: What don’t Squirrels, Gophers and Rabbits Eat?

    Christy
    24 Feb 2015 | 8:58 am
    A question came into Ask Gardenerd last week: “What don’t gophers, squirrels, and rabbits like, as I have no veggie luck. Renee” Oh, Renee, I wish I could say there is a food in the garden that these creatures don’t … Continue reading → The post Ask Gardenerd: What don’t Squirrels, Gophers and Rabbits Eat? appeared first on Gardenerd.
  • Wordless Wednesday: California Natives in Bloom

    Christy
    18 Feb 2015 | 6:05 am
    Everyone else’s winter is California’s spring. Check out these California natives in bloom. And not a California native, but certainly a trademark of California: More to come! The post Wordless Wednesday: California Natives in Bloom appeared first on Gardenerd.
  • How To Garden While Injured

    Christy
    17 Feb 2015 | 10:35 am
    It happens to everyone at some point, we get injured. Injury brings garden progress to a halt. All those plans for fruit tree pruning, rose pruning, turning compost piles, etc., stop dead while injuries heal. Or do they? I recently … Continue reading → The post How To Garden While Injured appeared first on Gardenerd.
  • New Seed Favorites for 2015

    Christy
    4 Feb 2015 | 6:59 am
    Now that we’ve finished combing through the pile of seed catalogs that came in the mail over the holidays, we’ve made our list of new seeds we’ll be planting this spring. It’s a Gardenerd tradition to share our new seed … Continue reading → The post New Seed Favorites for 2015 appeared first on Gardenerd.
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    Beautiful Wildlife Garden

  • National Invasive Species Awareness

    Loret T. Setters
    27 Feb 2015 | 2:28 pm
    It is National Invasive Species Awareness Week 2015.  Somehow the memo that came to my neck of the woods didn’t highlight the “AWARENESS” keyword in the promotional name.  As a result, it seems the invasive species around here thought it was an invitation to move in and celebrate…like Mardi Gras.  HARUMMPH!!!! Early in the week […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Invasives and Nuance

    Jesse Elwert
    26 Feb 2015 | 12:10 pm
    Invasives and Nuance I’ve had a long and complicated relationship with Cup Plant (Silphium perfoliatum), and we finally broke up for good this year. The opening photo shows C. perfoliatum’s cousin, Compass Plant (Silphium laciniatum). It’s Invasive Species Awareness Week, so I thought maybe it’s a good time to be open about my experience of […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Where Do Spiders Go in Winter

    Carole Sevilla Brown
    25 Feb 2015 | 9:20 am
    Do spiders hibernate in winter? Do spiders come inside your house in winter? Where do spiders go in winter? These are questions I’m frequently asked by our readers and also from audiences at conferences and workshops as I travel to speak about Ecosystem Gardening around the country. So lets take a look at how spiders […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers

    Brenda Clements Jones
    24 Feb 2015 | 4:08 am
    Beautiful patterns, holes in tree bark, looking like a sort of Morse Code, is not the work of Martians leaving us a message, or wood boring insects. These holes are the work of a brightly colored, medium sized woodpecker, the Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, Sphyrapicus varius. The photo, above, is a cluster of holes (called sapwells) that I discovered less […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Dreaming of Spring

    Judy Burris
    23 Feb 2015 | 11:56 am
      I think it’s safe to say that those of us who do not live in Florida are sick and tired of shoveling snow this winter. I for one am dreaming of Spring in a big way! So I was looking through some of my photos from years gone by and thought I would share […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
 
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    Vegetable Gardener - All featured posts

  • Winter's Passing

    28 Feb 2015 | 8:58 pm
    Posted by cookinwithherbs Today is the last day of February--gardeners take heart and prepare for spring! Although it might not seem like it with these frigid temperatures and snow and sleet still in the forecast--it will happen. Be sure to still feed our fine feathered friends in this weather! March brings all sorts of spring and green celebrations from the full worm moon, daylight saving time, St. Patrick's Day and the vernal equinox--hallelujah!
  • 4 Easy Steps to Your First Vegetable Garden

    28 Feb 2015 | 5:51 pm
    Posted by ChrisMcLaughlin All it takes is couple of successful gardening experiences to make you a vegetable gardener for the rest of your life.
  • Planting for Scent, Touch, and Sound

    25 Feb 2015 | 5:06 pm
    Posted by ChrisMcLaughlin Our gardens should be a feast for all of the senses.
  • Rethinking the Spring Vegetable Garden

    23 Feb 2015 | 11:27 am
    Posted by WesternGardener When the vegetable garden is covered by a thick, fluffy blanket of snow, the blank slate gives gardeners a chance to think. And rethink. Here are four vegetable gardening ideas to consider for your garden this spring.
  • How to Create Vegetable Centerpieces

    16 Feb 2015 | 10:52 am
    Posted by WesternGardener Vegetables aren’t just for eating, they make beautiful decorations, too. Here’s how to create tasty table centerpieces using fruits and vegetables in place of fresh flowers.
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    Miss Rumphius' Rules

  • Green Gardens

    Susan aka Miss. R
    27 Feb 2015 | 4:34 am
    Green is a thing. Right now it’s a missing thing. It’s what I miss most during winter and what makes me smile first in the spring–those small green shoots pushing up through frigid earth. I’ve been thinking about making flowerless gardens. Gardens that are mostly green. Gardens that rely  on scale and texture and subtlety of hue and maybe some skilled pruning. In New Jersey, where I practice landscape design, this may prove to be more difficult than it is in warmer climates where there are bolder choices and plants with immense architectural leaves. Many of the…
  • My Award Winning Garden Design

    Susan aka Miss. R
    16 Feb 2015 | 6:51 am
    Last fall, I entered a garden I designed in New Jersey in 2015 APLD International Landscape Design Awards in the Planting Design category. It was awarded the highest honor, a Gold Award. To be honest, I knew the value of the design, but since it is the antithesis of current planting trends, I was really pleased. Current trends in planting design seem to require ornamental grasses and meadow-like qualities. This garden has neither, but that doesn’t make it unsustainable or unfriendly to all  but deer. The garden’s underlying structure of boxwood hedging and pyramids gives it…
  • Design vs. A Sense of Place

    Susan aka Miss. R
    11 Feb 2015 | 3:29 am
    I’m not an architecture critic.  I am someone who loves great architecture both contemporary and historic. In my work as a landscape designer part of my focus is to create landscapes and gardens that surround the attendant architecture in such a way that the design partnership between them is timeless and seamless.  As a designer this may seem counter intuitive, but I believe that the best design has a sense of place and that my hand in that should be less, rather than more, visible. Last week I visited Frank Gehry’s new building for the Fondation Louis Vuitton in Paris.  It…
  • Garden Travel: Back and Forth

    Susan aka Miss. R
    17 Jan 2015 | 4:59 am
    Next week I’m travelling again. This time on a search for garden antiques and vintage in the markets in Paris and parts of Belgium. I am continuing on to Rome for a few days of play after that. For the first time in many, many years, I won’t be taking my laptop with me.  I’ve traded the bulk and weight for my camera stuff and a tablet, so please follow my Instagram account for what I see and off the cuff inspiration. I’ve also been waiting a while to post about a visit to Vizcaya when I was in Miami in November so here it is.  I was enchanted.  For a landscape…
  • A Year beyond Miss R…

    Susan aka Miss. R
    27 Dec 2014 | 3:53 am
    When I become this inconsistent, something is going on.  What has it been?  Life and work. Yes, Miss R has been part of that mix, but 2014 has been an odd year. It’s been an awakening of sorts. I love to write, but there are things that are more important to me than that.  I’ve rediscovered my three happiest places –at the drawing board, indulging my gypsy feet, and my newest obsession, photography. I made a yearlong commitment to be the President of APLD and I wrote some interesting (I hope) stories for Garden Design magazine. I organized a European Objects and Oranments…
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    Native Plants and Wildlife Gardens

  • What’s the Impact of an Early Spring?

    Mark Turner
    1 Mar 2015 | 6:00 am
    Here on the west side of the Cascades in the Pacific Northwest it sure feels like spring arrived before Valentine’s Day this year. We’ve had unseasonably warm days, been blessed with blue skies and sunshine, and have had mostly mild nights with just an occasional light frost. I’ve had a couple of days working in […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Wildflowers, Real Imagination and Disability

    Kevin Songer
    28 Feb 2015 | 2:24 am
    Perspective is a great teacher. I used to hike into Florida wilderness and swamps, deep into the flat woods in search of the occasional rare and unusual wildflower beauty. Many times my hard efforts were rewarded with surprise filled joy of witnessing a bloom of seldom seen ephemeral glory. My google drive library is filled with such […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Native Plant Solutions

    Suzanne Dingwell
    23 Feb 2015 | 3:21 am
    In a world where we are so often focused on problems, what a pleasure it is to discover solutions, especially solutions provided by native plants. This spot, once a source of many problems, is now an ecologically functional wetland providing habitat for plants and wildlife, and a learning laboratory for students of a Title One […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Ground-Nesting Bees – Why You Should Let These Bees Nest in your Garden

    Heather Holm
    19 Feb 2015 | 5:47 am
    We often base our model on how bees nest, forage, and communicate on the honey bee. Honey bees nest in large, social colonies whereas most native bees have solitary nests, and the majority of native bees nest in the ground. Now before you start thinking about a past encounter that involved being stung multiple times by a ground-nesting insect, […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Plants for Gardening for the Birds in the Desert

    Jacqueline Soule
    17 Feb 2015 | 7:08 am
    On our sister site, Beautiful Wildlife Gardens, I discussed gardening for desert birds. On this site which is more about native plants, I an going to discuss a few of the plants you can consider for your bird garden. The plants can fall into two categories – plants for food, and plants for shelter. Like […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
 
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    Big Blog Of Gardening

  • Birds: A Gardener’s Best Pest Control

    Todd Heft
    8 Feb 2015 | 2:36 pm
    Big Blog Of Gardening As we've moved away from our agrarian roots, we seem to have lost sight of the fact that birds are helpers, not pests, for gardeners. Continue reading → Birds: A Gardener’s Best Pest Control
  • Garden Design: Incorporating a pond into your landscape

    Guest Author
    2 Feb 2015 | 6:32 am
    Big Blog Of Gardening With some careful planning you can easily incorporate a pond into your outdoor space, no matter how small or large your landscape. Continue reading → Garden Design: Incorporating a pond into your landscape
  • How to Start Garden Seeds Indoors – Basic Technique

    Todd Heft
    29 Jan 2015 | 3:27 pm
    Big Blog Of Gardening Starting seeds indoors is a great way to shake off the winter blues and to get a jump on the gardening season. Continue reading → How to Start Garden Seeds Indoors – Basic Technique
  • How to Overwinter Perennials in a Greenhouse

    Guest Author
    20 Dec 2014 | 7:36 am
    Big Blog Of Gardening With proper planning and light study, you can succesfully overwinter perennials in a greenhouse during winter, even in the northeastern U.S. Continue reading → How to Overwinter Perennials in a Greenhouse
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    The Pond Blog

  • 5 Things You Need to be Ready for Spring

    Bill Dubert
    24 Feb 2015 | 8:28 pm
    Spring is coming at us fast, and I can’t wait for it to get here (and not only because my kayak paddle is in the corner, mocking me). One thing that I’m NOT looking forward to, though, is the inevitable scramble to get those last-minute items that I forgot to have ready ahead of time, before the pond warms up. Since I was already making a list for myself, I figured that I’d point out a few items for my readers that will be necessary sooner than you think, all of which I’ve forgotten at some point in the past. 1. Pond Vacuum I’ve talked before about the importance…
  • Why the Lotus Flower is So Important

    Bill Dubert
    23 Jan 2015 | 9:23 pm
    “Padma” is the Sanskrit word for the Lotus plant, which is also called the Sacred Lotus or Indian Lotus. The Lotus Temple in Delhi is the Mother Temple of the Bahá’í faith in India and draws as many as 150,000 visitors in a day. Image copyright Jeremy Vandel. The lotus flower, Nelumbo nucifera, occupies a huge space in the minds of many pond owners and designers. Deciding whether or not to include a lotus among a pond’s flowers can be a big decision when choosing pond plants and even layouts. Many water gardeners consider their lotus flowers the pride of their pond,…
  • Where do Bullfrogs Go in Winter?

    Bill Dubert
    18 Sep 2014 | 6:36 pm
    The American Bullfrog and his various amphibious friends are some of the great unexpected pleasures of pond ownership. The question many pond owners find themselves wondering, though, is where they go in winter, and how they survive the freezing cold. Frogs are true cold-blooded animals, unable to internally unable to regulate their body temperature. Generally, when they’re cold they seek out sunlight, and when they’re hot they seek out shade or water. But what do they do in winter, when it’s far too cold for the sun to keep their temperature up, even below freezing? Well,…
  • Is My Koi Pregnant?

    Bill Dubert
    28 May 2014 | 9:38 pm
    Well, this time of year, it’s definitely possible. Spring is when koi generally spawn. I’ve written before about how to determine the sex of your koi as well as how to get your koi to spawn, but how do you decide if your koi have decided to get spawny without your intervention? Well, first off, it’s worth noting that a koi that appears pregnant is not, one way or the other, pregnant in the same way that a human would be. They don’t give live birth, and the eggs are fertilized outside of the body, so there really aren’t baby koi in your fish either way. However,…
  • Pond Snails: Good for Your Pond?

    Bill Dubert
    8 May 2014 | 12:04 pm
    Pond snails can be a beautiful addition to your pond’s ecosystem. Pond snails can be a fun & interesting addition to your pond’s ecosystem. In very large ponds, snails can even be necessary to create a balanced, natural ecosystem. I’m very fond of snails, certainly. However, I do think that how much snails improve the health and clarity of the average pond has been blown out of proportion. The wisdom is generally that pond snails eat algae and some organic debris. They’re the little scavenging janitors of your pond. In a well-kept pond, though, I disagree with this…
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    Nigel Gnome grows a vegetable

  • The end of the road for three tomato plants

    Nigel Gnome
    5 Feb 2015 | 6:35 pm
    Waitangi Day! Lovely having a Friday off. :)The tomato plants began looking sickly and quickly went yellow. I suspected it may have been from spraying with Neem oil but that may be coincidental. All the plants got blight but we did get quite a few tomatoes in the end. The Romas were probably the best. I have pulled them all out and harvested as many of the tomatoes that will still ripen.Final harvest of the romas and the sweet 100's I planted the sweet 100 on September 22 last year, so they have been going for four months. There is still a small tub tomato doing well and a lateral baby…
  • The end of the road for Mr Chilli

    Nigel Gnome
    26 Jan 2015 | 10:56 pm
    Gone, but not forgotten, a small pile of peppers survive to heat up another day. The garden looks much better without the sad thing the plant had become.Rescued chilliesThe plums are looking lovely with their soft grey bloomFortune plums ready to drop
  • Endless summer

    Nigel Gnome
    25 Jan 2015 | 11:23 pm
    The weather has been perfect for what seems like weeks. Keeping things watered is a bit of a mission especially when feeling guilty about the water usage, it's expensive!Disaster on the larger chilli plant, it just started to wilt, I watered it and then watered it some more.It wilted even more, they can be susceptible to overwatering. :( There is a waterfall of sweet 100 tomatoes and a good supply of nice heavy roma toms, they will be made into sauce any day.cascade of sweet 100 tomatoesQuick pickplums are happening, now they are manyFirst zucchini, one plant makes very pale ones
  • 2015 like it or not

    Nigel Gnome
    5 Jan 2015 | 11:04 pm
    2015 doesn't really feel like the future, the jet packs and instantaneous travel are missing, same with decent batteries, c'mon guys. We do have some sort of global consciousness as long as you stick to cats and coffee.In the meantime my tomatoes are doing just fineToo many :)Sweet 100 tomatoes The roma tomatoes looking goodTub tomatoes starting to colour upA set of bean seeds popping up over 4 days, amazing growth, just planted them in the garden this eveningpop up dayDay 2Day 4
  • Post Christmas post

    Nigel Gnome
    26 Dec 2014 | 8:28 pm
    A very pleasant Christmas it was as well.Tomatoes have been had and now the plants are starting to get to good size.sweet 100 tomatoesTying the top of the sweet 100The plums a re pinking upPulled all the garlic, not bad, not good
 
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    Flowerona

  • Flowerona Links : With hellebores, apps & a bloom-filled car…

    Rona
    28 Feb 2015 | 4:01 pm
    Are you ready for this week’s round-up of floral inspiration from around the globe? General The Hellebore Appreciation Society via Floret 24 hours in the life of an event florist 10 essential flower apps to ID plants & leaves Early spring flowers to make your heart sing Lisa Cox’s garden design for the RHS Cardiff Flower Show Weddings Wild garden wedding inspiration with florals by Intertwine Fabulous florals in this Jane Austen inspiration shoot Beautiful white, cream & pale apricot wedding flowers Colorado engagement with an abundance of florals Green and ivory organic…
  • Flowerona Reflects Video : 28/02/15

    Rona
    27 Feb 2015 | 4:01 pm
    This week’s Flowerona Reflects video features a ‘behind the scenes’  look at our third Social Media for Florists workshop, including footage of setting up and styling the venue on Monday and the actual workshop on Tuesday. I hope you enjoy watching the video and don’t forget, if you’d like to subscribe to my YouTube channel, please click here and then click on Subscribe. I hope you have a lovely Saturday and I’ll see you tomorrow with Flowerona Links! P.S. Don’t forget, if you receive this blog post via email and would like to view the video, simply go…
  • Florist Friday : Interview with Nick Priestly of Mood Flowers

    Rona
    26 Feb 2015 | 4:01 pm
    Today, as part of my Florist Friday blog post series, I’m delighted to feature an interview with Nick Priestly of Mood Flowers. Nick is co-hosting the upcoming Chapel Designers Conference in London in April. Could you tell us what prompted you to become a florist? A complete case of serendipity. I got a degree in Marketing with French and German, moved to London to work in the expatriate tax department of one of the big five accountancy firms and met a girl called Vivienne in that office. Five years later, she was my girlfriend and announced to me she wanted to become a florist. And we…
  • Wedding Wednesday : A Most Curious Wedding Fair, London : March 7th-8th 2015

    Rona
    24 Feb 2015 | 4:01 pm
    Next month, A Most Curious Wedding Fair is taking place in London. On Saturday, 7th March and Sunday, 8th March, over 100 exhibitors will be at The Old Truman Brewery in the East End. Florist Clare Robinson from Love Blooms created the beautiful floral designs that feature in these photographs by Laura McCluskey, which are currently being used to promote the fair. Clare said: “I was asked to keep the flowers simple yet beautiful for this year’s A Most Curious Wedding Fair shoot. After initial chats with Becky Hoh-Hale and the mention of the flowers having a white and austere…
  • Flowerona Links: With dahlias, cakes & a floral recipe…

    Rona
    21 Feb 2015 | 4:01 pm
    I hope you’re having a lovely weekend. Here’s this week’s collection of floral inspiration! General Tidal – A styled shoot with florals by The Garden Gate Flower Company 10 Top florists to follow for every flower junkie Dahlia Grow Along 2015 with Green & Gorgeous Blooms in Season – February – by Natalie Bowen Designs Flower adorned cakes by baker Gillian Bell Weddings A special bridal bouquet by Stacy Anderson Design Floral recipe by Amy Osaba Events Beautiful florals at this wedding in San Francisco Valentine’s Day shoot with florals by The…
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    Your Easy Garden

  • Easy Homemade Body Butter

    Guest Bloggers
    19 Feb 2015 | 12:57 pm
    All natural body butter or lotion is easy to make and great for both children and adults! I don’t know about you, but up here in Vermont we are in the midst of a real New England winter. For my family, that means dealing with very dry skin, of course our pellet stove doesn’t help the situation. My latest experiment has been to create the most luxurious, super-soothing, all natural body butter.  As testers, my three young children have been of late lubed up with various mixtures of coconut oil and shea butter, but I’ll save you this trouble and share with you the very best one we’ve…
  • Low Maintenance Landscaping in New Hampshire

    Guest Bloggers
    19 Feb 2015 | 5:57 am
    Steve Mitchell, owner of Natures Elite Landscaping of Guilford New Hampshire, knows the importance of implementing low maintenance landscape designs. With the unique weather and temperatures that one must endure in New England, it does not take long to figure out what works and what doesn’t. One of Steve’s “go-to” plants is Flower Carpet rose… “We use flower carpet roses because they are very tough plants that require very little maintenance, they seem to do well even with the extremely cold winters that we have, they just seem to keep thriving. They…
  • Flower Carpet – 20 Years Young

    Phillip Townshend
    17 Feb 2015 | 4:00 am
    Normally at this time of year I tend to focus my blog post on the key horticultural industry show –  IPM Essen – held in Germany. Once again I dragged myself away from the beach with sun, surf and fun in Australia to attend the show.  However this year, rather than write about what is new & happening in horticulture, I thought I would take the time to pay my respects to a true gardening stalwart . . . our Flower Carpet® range of roses. Flower Carpet Amber is perfect around a deck or patio 2015 sees us celebrating our 20th Anniversary since the launch of Flower Carpet in…
  • Three Great Plants for Eco gardening

    Anthony Tesselaar
    16 Feb 2015 | 11:51 am
    Have you seen that great dialogue between God and St Francis of Assissi? The one where God asks for an update on his Great Landscape Design (i.e. the natural landscapes on Earth) and St Francis finds the reporting a bit tricky. . . GOD: So, how are the prairies going? Boy was I on a roll when I thought to combine some lovely grasses and wildflowers. Those plants have been tough enough to look after themselves for millennia, and they’ve been a lovely home for all the butterflies and birds. ST FRANCIS: Well…. there have been a few changes. People have been moving in over the years and…
  • The perfect California landscape solution!

    Your Easy Garden Team
    10 Feb 2015 | 9:58 am
    We’re asking landscape designers across the country to tell us how they’ve used Flower Carpet roses and other easy-care Tesselaar Plants to help solve a landscape challenge.  We’d love to share these tips with our readers! These first photos show a commercial project designed by Genevieve Schmidt Landscape Design and Fine Maintenance, in Arcata, CA. Flower Carpet Pink Supreme adds a touch of color to this Tuscan style building. Flower Carpet roses aren’t bothered by harsh coastal winds and tolerate sandy soil. Flower Carpet Appleblossom mixed with Mexican feather…
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    The Mini Garden Guru - Your Miniature Garden Source

  • Who Else Wants to Garden in Miniature?

    Janit Calvo
    26 Feb 2015 | 4:53 pm
    Who Else Wants to Garden in Miniature? Now don’t get me started singing ‘It’s a Small World After All’ because that ear-worm usually lasts for days – but it is, and in more ways than one. We are tickled pink to introduce the German version of our Gardening in Miniature: Create Your Own Tiny Living […]
  • Miniature Garden Plants: Miniature Settings Vs. Miniature Gardening

    Janit Calvo
    19 Feb 2015 | 3:16 pm
    Miniature Garden Plants: Settings Vs. Gardening The Philadelphia Flower Show is home to the only major Miniature Garden Settings exhibit in the world – and it happens to be one of the most well attended exhibits at the show too. I’m on my way there at the end of this month where I will be speaking […]
  • Miniature Garden, Why Do I Love Thee?

    Janit Calvo
    12 Feb 2015 | 3:25 pm
    Miniature Garden, Why Do I Love Thee? Ahhh, love is in the air! I like to approach Valentine’s Day as a time to appreciate all the people you love and all things you love to do. Taking a wider approach to the day makes more sense so everyone can experience and appreciate love in its […]
 
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    Garden Landscaping Ideas

  • Top Landscaping Ideas for Front Yard

    admin
    15 Feb 2015 | 6:03 am
    Landscaping ideas for front yard : You can transform your front yard into a stylish and nice looking yard. The scent and scenario that flowers have make your yard a welcoming place. Bright and bold flowers make a big impact even when planted in a small place. They attract insect and birds that seek nectar,making your yard more lively. Adding a patio to your front yard make your yard feel part of your home.You can have breakfast in your front yard with your family and even have a barbecue with your friends in the evening. You can also let your landscaping ideas front yard take a natural…
  • Small Backyard Landscaping Ideas and Suggestion

    admin
    14 Feb 2015 | 8:22 pm
    If you’re struggling to come up with small backyard landscaping ideas, simplify the issue by thinking of it as a choice between two options. You can either embrace the size of your yard for what it is, or you can try to hide it by drawing attention to a particular feature or making the lawn look expanded. Embrace The first approach to small backyard landscaping is arguably the easiest. Small backyard landscaping can be quite simple if you simply plant some flowers, keep the landscape relatively flat, and maybe put out a small bench or a couple of chairs where you can sit outside and read a…
  • Cool Desert Landscaping Ideas For Your Backyard Landscape Design

    admin
    10 Nov 2014 | 6:32 am
    If you are looking for some cool desert landscaping ideas and design for your backyard landscape, here we will bring to you a collection of specially selected design and ideas which might be suitable for your need. For those who love the beautiful and relaxation touch to their garden landscaping ideas, desert landscaping style will make your dream come true. Is it backyard or front yard, you are free to choose and decorate your outdoor space by your own ideas. Comprise of several beautiful desert landscaping ideas for front yard or backyard in our Cool Desert Landscaping Ideas For Your…
  • Small Backyard Landscaping Ideas On A Budget

    admin
    17 Aug 2014 | 9:05 am
    Many families have been found to spend most of their time in either front or backyards, while at home. Yards should then be well designed and decorated to offer a conducive and friendly spaces for kids and their parents. Although landscaping design and implementation might require a lot of funds allocation, a simple small backyard landscaping ideas can be applied to achieve the desired aesthetic value of the yards. There are a number of simple landscaping ideas for backyard that if put in use while designing backyard improvement, they can help home owners save on their budgets and at the…
  • Top 10 Unique Container Gardening Ideas

    admin
    8 May 2014 | 7:11 am
    Top 10 Unique Container Gardening Ideas Container gardening is a brilliant way when talking about front or backyard gardening aspecially if in a small space. Back to the basic container gardening can be defined as the practice of growing plants in containers instead of in the ground.Lets enjoy those brilliant and unique container gardening Ideas below: The post Top 10 Unique Container Gardening Ideas appeared first on Garden Landscaping Ideas.
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    Organic Gardening Tips - Smiling Gardener

  • It's Winter...

    27 Feb 2015 | 9:58 pm
    Click for video transcription Hey, it’s Phil from SmilingGardener.om. I apologize in advance for the wind noise - I don’t have a wireless mic on today so i just have to use the camera mic. I haven’t been making any videos this time of year because this is what my garden looks like under two feet of snow right now, but I wanted to share a couple of things with you today. First is if you follow me on facebook and especially on youtube, you’re not really seeing anything from me this time of year, but if you come over to SmilingGardener.com, I am still writing an article every Saturday.
  • Starting Plants From Seeds - A Few Tips To Ensure Success

    20 Feb 2015 | 9:58 pm
    Click for video transcription Phil: Welcome to my bedroom. If you haven't picked up my free online organic gardening course you can do that right on the home page of Smilinggardener.com. Today we're talking about starting plants from seeds. I like going right into something like this that has the trays and then you can grow the plants individually and then you pull them right out of here and put them into the garden. So this has holes in it for drainage, then I can plop it into this guy which doesn't have holes in it, and that can capture the water - so that's how that works! In terms of what…
  • How To Get Rid Of Moles And Voles

    14 Feb 2015 | 3:00 am
    A mole. So, you want to know how to get rid of moles and voles? First of all, moles are great! They plow the soil and eat insects such as grubs. Of course, they do leave behind some tunnels. And while they don’t eat your plants, they can disturb them. We may not mind a few tunnels, but when it gets to be too many, it can leave an unsightly mess of molehills, uneven soil and brown ridges in the lawn.
  • You Are Going To Fail

    30 Jan 2015 | 9:58 pm
    A photo from an Academy member of a tomato hornworm (explained below). You are going to fail this year... Hornworms will eat your tomatoes. A loved one will get sick. The bindweed you thought was finally under control will spring up again. Someone will make you feel bad about yourself just for being who you are. But…
  • Where To Grow Your Garden On This Planet

    23 Jan 2015 | 9:58 pm
    Let’s say you’re the type of person for whom establishing a big, organic, food-producing permaculture garden is a major goal. And fortunately, you’ve just come into a windfall - a huge sum of money. You can finally buy or build that house you’ve been dreaming of and then get to work on planting your organic garden. The question today is: where should you build it?
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    Sow and So

  • T is for Topiary – Word Up!

    Bridget Elahcene
    26 Feb 2015 | 10:35 pm
    Topiary \ˈtəʊpɪəri\ The word topiary refers to the clipping of trees, shrubs and ornamental plants into shapes and designs using evergreen plants such as yew, box and ivy – the latter of which would have to be grown over a topiary frame.
  • The Rose Throws the Woes of the Snows

    Rogier Noort
    25 Feb 2015 | 8:27 am
  • New Growth in the Polytunnel

    Laila Noort
    22 Feb 2015 | 11:31 pm
    After all the snow, fiercely cold winds, icicles and slippery roads we were suddenly pleasantly surprised by a surge in temperatures and….sunshine! The snow melted in just a few days revealing an extremely soggy garden …but a garden nonetheless. Slipping and sliding across the sticky clay I have been going back and forth with the wheelbarrow, between the compost heap and the polytunnel, adding another layer of compost in preparation for things to come. The Chinese cabbage plants which have been severely damaged by mice are fighting back by growing new leaves, getting stronger with…
  • S is for Sawfly – Word Up!

    Bridget Elahcene
    20 Feb 2015 | 4:05 am
    Sawfly \ˈsɔːflʌɪ\ Leaves that become skeletonised with just their veins remaining tend to be the work of sawflies, which eat through the tissue of the leaf until it has almost completely disappeared. The larvae can often be seen around the edges of the leaves and most curl up into an S-shape when disturbed.
  • Start of a New Growing Season – Wordless Wednesday

    Laila Noort
    18 Feb 2015 | 6:44 am
 
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    Color Your World Blog

  • Unusual Indoor Houseplants

    Paul Guzman
    8 Feb 2015 | 1:39 pm
    Fabian Aralia – Polyscias scutellaria This is a great plant for small sized pots.  The root system is small thus only needs occasional watering.  It resembles a stump with round foliage. Use a bonsai pot for a great looking Bonsai indoor plant. I would suggest water once maybe twice per month.  Make sure to keep … Continue reading Unusual Indoor Houseplants The post Unusual Indoor Houseplants appeared first on Color Your World Blog.
  • What is composting and how does it work

    Paul Guzman
    24 Jan 2015 | 12:29 pm
    So what the heck is compost anyway?  Good question…and I’ll try my best to answer that question on this post. Compost is decomposing matter that turns into nutrients that all plants need in order for them to maintain healthy growth.  This matter is what all plants need to survive. You can use chemically made fertilizers … Continue reading What is composting and how does it work The post What is composting and how does it work appeared first on Color Your World Blog.
  • How to start a container garden

    Paul Guzman
    18 Dec 2014 | 6:25 am
    Planning Your Container Garden  The first thing you need to decide when planning a container garden is whether you’d prefer to grow your plants indoors or outdoors.  A lot of people think container gardening is only for indoor growing and patios, but containers can actually be useful for any garden situation. Containers are great for … Continue reading How to start a container garden The post How to start a container garden appeared first on Color Your World Blog.
  • Getting your plants ready for winter

    Paul Guzman
    29 Oct 2014 | 6:16 am
     Here in the Southwestern part of the U.S. the summer and fall seasons are long.  As we know fall in this part of the country produces some of the best eye pleasing color for all to enjoy.  Getting your plants ready for winter should be done every year. The fall colors in the Southwest are … Continue reading Getting your plants ready for winter The post Getting your plants ready for winter appeared first on Color Your World Blog.
  • How to start seeds indoors

    Paul Guzman
    20 Oct 2014 | 9:18 am
    Article by: by By Diane Linsley Check out Diane’s outstanding website at: Dianeseeds.com- Diane’s Flower Seeds Heirloom flowers, rare perennials, daylilies and Starting Indoor Seeds This is a lot easier than it sounds. Even inexperienced gardeners can start seeds with just a bare minimum of equipment. There are as many ways to start seeds as … Continue reading How to start seeds indoors The post How to start seeds indoors appeared first on Color Your World Blog.
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    Chicken Waterer

  • Classic Eggs Benedict Recipe

    ChickenWaterer
    22 Feb 2015 | 11:29 am
    According to one account, eggs Benedict were first created in 1942 by Lumuel Benedict, a retired Wall Street broker, looking for a cure for his hangover. Whatever the origin, eggs Benedict are our favorite breakfast egg dish and a real luxury.Cooking eggs Benedict is not difficult but there are lots of steps.  It's probably a recipe you'll want to keep for the weekend when there's a little more time to prep breakfast.Ingredients:8 Eggs4 English Muffins1 tablespoon vinegar8 slices Canadian Bacon (You can substitute sliced ham or even regular bacon if you can't get Canadian bacon)2…
  • Love Chickens Valentines Day Sweepstakes

    ChickenWaterer
    14 Feb 2015 | 7:02 am
    To celebrate Valentines Day Weekend, we're giving away "I Love Chickens" button to 10 lucky winners.Just Create A TweetTo participate, create a tweet with the following elements: A reason why you love chickensInclude the hashtag #LoveChickens Include the link to this web page (http://goo.gl/Ft7zgC) where we will post a list of entires during the course of the sweepstakes.Here's a Sample Of A Qualifying Tweet:I love chickens because they make me laugh. #LoveChickens http://goo.gl/Ft7zgCSweepstakes RulesYou can enter as many times as you like.  Contest begins Saturday…
  • Chick Shortage 2015

    ChickenWaterer
    13 Feb 2015 | 7:06 am
    What’s your opinion?Our local news is reporting that a chick shortage in the San Francisco bay area is driven by higher commercial egg prices.  (Last year California passed a law that requires that caged hens have increased space and this has in fact increased the price of eggs) However, I'm somewhat skeptical of the report.  Backyard eggs aren't necessarily cheaper when you factor in the cost of a coop, equipment and feed.  I think demand for chicks is driven by a general increase in interest in chicken keeping driven by a desire for fresher eggs and more humane…
  • Deflated

    ChickenWaterer
    28 Jan 2015 | 7:06 pm
    Good luck to Patriots & Seahawks! BriteTap chicken waterer. Clean water made simple! Visit us at ChickenWaterer.com.
  • Chicken Feed Infographic

    ChickenWaterer
    25 Jan 2015 | 12:56 pm
    For more information about chicken feed, check out our article: Chicks To Chickens. How to Choose Their Feed. BriteTap chicken waterer. Clean water made simple! Visit us at ChickenWaterer.com.
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    Moreni Garden

  • Growing Big Trees From Small Seeds

    Georgiana-Florina Mihalache
    19 Feb 2015 | 5:19 am
    One of my neighbours in the countryside has a super apple tree. We noticed that it grows lots and lots of small and tough red apples - it's both beautiful in autumn and useful as these apples are so strong and healthy that now in February we still have a few kilos left and they look as they have just been picked from the tree yesterday. Moreover, they don't need any chemicals to grow and stay on the tree and I can give them to my 1-year-old son without being scared of any pesticides.We wanted details and we found out the following: the apple tree was planted about 50 years ago by our…
  • Winter Ideas: Cooking Your Garden Products

    Georgiana-Florina Mihalache
    24 Feb 2013 | 10:59 am
    Well, one more thing to do during winter - cook and eat what you have grown during summer and autumn.Here's one recipe inspired from Moroccan cuisine -  Tagine meat balls (without the tagine and the eggs) using mostly products we gathered from our garden.Step 1: preparing the meat balls: pork and beef meat (finely chopped), onions, garlic, paprika (sweet or hot depending on how hot you like the meat balls), black pepper, parsley and eggs (to keep the meat together in one piece) - all ingredients are mixed together and finely chopped. You can also use lamb or any kind of meat you like.
  • Winter Ideas: Seeds Organizer

    Georgiana-Florina Mihalache
    24 Feb 2013 | 10:35 am
    Winter is soooo long and days pass slowly one at a time. Spring still seems far even if we are one week away from March. We are preparing our seeds for seedling growing, but time still passes slowly, sooooo slowly.So, what to do in the meantime to make time pass a bit faster? I saw an idea in a gardening magazine - prepare a seeds organizer. We improvised it from a shoe box, making separators from pieces of cardboard stuck to the box with adhesive tape. We wrote the month on each cardboard piece and there we had it - our very own seeds organizer.We selected seeds according to the month…
  • Awaiting Spring - To Do List

    Georgiana-Florina Mihalache
    15 Jan 2013 | 11:01 pm
    Since it's still winter, too long if you asked me, we have plenty of time to make plans and prepare everything for spring. So we decided to make a list of activities in order to organize our spring tasks.Missing springHere it is:February:- make a list of vegetables to plant this year (add onions and garlic, loose some of the peppers);- plant spinach;- order all the seeds we have by months to be planted in (they start from February and some end in May); we must have them organized not to miss anything;- create a draft of the vegetables garden on paper to decide which plant goes where this…
  • Winter Is Already Here

    Georgiana-Florina Mihalache
    22 Dec 2012 | 6:39 am
    Dear all,It seems that a successful year is ending and a new one coming.We managed to finish work in the garden just in time - winter is already here:Our pond is already half-frozenNew trees, covered in straw, already full of snowRoses prepared for winterSnow is slowly piling upTroti in the snowSo what's still left to do this year is wish you a Merry Christmas and a Wonderful and Happy New Year.Take care,Geo
 
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    Balcony in Berlin

  • topsy-turvy tulips

    sophos
    9 Feb 2015 | 11:47 am
    I put a vase of tulips out on the balcony to cool off and make them last a bit longer – but I forgot them overnight and it was -5° Frozen solid.
  • winter update

    sophos
    8 Feb 2015 | 2:11 am
    Like last year, the winter has been rather gentle. A light layer of snow now and then, but none of those Russian weather fronts I’ve grown accustomed to here. And like last year, it was February before we had several consecutive days of frost. With hindsight, then, my pelargoniums would probably have been ok in a hibernation station on the balcony, but they’re spending winter in the stairwell, by no means dormant, practically basking in light and temperatures between 8 and 15°C.Out in the cold, there are signs of life from some of the bulbs, but I’ve forgotten what I planted…
  • hellebore hero

    sophos
    8 Feb 2015 | 2:01 am
    An unpublished post from December: Just inside the entrance of my local, underground, supermarket, there are potted plants for sale in various degrees of distress. Wilting from lack of water and light, and this time of year sometimes sprayed with glitter or gold paint for that festive look… Every once in a while I get the urge to save one of them and give it a good home (though admittedly that doesn’t always work). My latest protg is this ivory christmas rose (Helleborus niger). I hastily repotted it in what I had at home: a mix of cactus soil, leaf mulch and a few nettle…
  • …and it’s gone

    sophos
    8 Nov 2014 | 8:39 am
    Summer, that is. I spent a lot of time on the balcony this year, but forgot to post. Of course, like everything else, it’s about the journey; the blog is a way to pass the time when growth is slow and anticipation high. For now, a look back: The blue and orange colour scheme worked ok, but truth be told I missed the pink and red. In August, they had already crept back onto the balcony… It only takes a couple of trips away for the vegetation to get a bit out of control and unquenchably thirsty, but despite some neglect the chilis and tomatoes did well. Late summer sunset When the…
  • it’s on

    sophos
    25 May 2014 | 8:04 am
    First tiny tomato flower buds. Almost June. Aphid year! My homemade aphid spray contains nothing deadlier than washing up liquid with onion and garlic as deterrents, but I pick the critters off like a sniper with the stream nozzle. Chinese Lantern from flower to calyx in three steps, left to right:  white bell flower, sepals starting to close up, a calyx beginning to inflate.
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    The Foodie Gardener™

  • Grapefruit and Rosemary Water: Fresh From the Foodie Garden

    Shirley Bovshow
    4 Feb 2015 | 2:15 pm
    I mixed fresh grapefruit peel and flowering rosemary sprigs to make a delicious flavored water. It’s what’s fresh in my garden, so I put it to work for me. The beauty of the flowers and invigorating grapefruit scent is all I need to entice me to drink more water. What’s fresh in your foodie garden today and how are you using it? Shirley  
  • Grow Lights For Beginners: Start Plants Indoors

    Shirley Bovshow
    29 Jan 2015 | 11:42 pm
    When I was a beginner gardener, I made a lot of mistakes and spent too much money on products that were supposed to ensure success in the garden but didn’t. This was especially true with anything involving indoor plants or indoor gardening, particularly with starting seeds.   I learned to keep things simple and to invest only in products that truly made a difference because it respected what plants needed to grow. Correct lighting is one of those things. You have to buy the right lights in order to see your seedling establish roots, sprout and begin to leaf out.    …
  • Organic Vegetable Seed Sources

    Shirley Bovshow
    20 Jan 2015 | 2:26 am
    Foodie Gardener Shirley Bovshow shares her tip for organic heirloom vegetable seed sources with Sophie Uliano of “Gorgeously Green.” An organic vegetable garden begins with organic seeds!  
  • Seeds 101: 4 Pre-Germination Techniques Before Planting Seeds

    Shirley Bovshow
    16 Jan 2015 | 3:12 pm
    Growing vegetable plants from seed can save you lots of money IF your seed sowing is successful. Do you really want to sow seeds in the ground or in a container with no “game plan,” while you pray that your seeds will germinate? I’m not down for that. I did that for years and I’m okay rolling the dice for some vegetables like beets and carrots, but for some of those coveted tomato, pepper and gourmet herbs, I want to stack the dice in my favor!   Understanding the fundamentals of what causes a seed to germinate and begin its life as a plant can shift the control…
  • Foodie Gardener Community Garden Progress!

    Shirley Bovshow
    16 Dec 2014 | 9:42 am
    The fence for the Foodie Gardener Community Garden to benefit the “News From Heaven” outreach ministry is up! Next step is building the raised garden beds and planting the crops. Thank you to American Soil in Simi Valley, California, who will be providing our nutrient-dense soil!
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    Urban Gardens

  • Bike-Powered Coffee Shops Serving the Mobile Generation and the Environment

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    27 Feb 2015 | 9:35 pm
    Step aside Starbucks. There’s a new caffeinated kid on the block and she’s on a roll. With 50 cafés sold to 12 countries in nine months, the world’s smallest but fastest growing coffee chain is coming to a corner, or a curb, near … Read More...The post Bike-Powered Coffee Shops Serving the Mobile Generation and the Environment appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Better Homes and Gardens Names Urban Gardens One of Top Ten Gardening Blogs

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    24 Feb 2015 | 10:51 pm
    We’re thrilled to announce that Urban Gardens is a top ten finalist in the Gardening category for the Better Homes and Gardens 2015 Blogger Awards. Editors received over 3,000 BHG reader nominations from which they selected ten finalists based on creativity, quality of … Read More...The post Better Homes and Gardens Names Urban Gardens One of Top Ten Gardening Blogs appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Design-Centric Indoor Plant Lights For Urban Living

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    12 Feb 2015 | 4:00 am
    I continue to be enamoured with Italian lighting design brand Bulbo, whose fashionably functional pieces I featured during my last BlogTour to Milan Design Week in April 2014. Bulbo will be exhibiting their design-centric LED-powered vegetable garden systems at LOFT, the future-oriented … Read More...The post Design-Centric Indoor Plant Lights For Urban Living appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Crazy In Love With These 10 Valentines Day Gifts

    Maggie Wells
    10 Feb 2015 | 8:49 pm
    Did the most romantic person on Earth swoop into a bathroom and create this swoon-worthy scene for the object of their adoration? Personally, I don’t care what the circumstances were. This is such a gorgeous idea, and it should get just … Read More...The post Crazy In Love With These 10 Valentines Day Gifts appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Elegant DIY Petal Vase From Plastic Spoons

    Tierney VanderVoort
    2 Feb 2015 | 2:43 pm
    Have a ton of left over plastic spoons from your last barbecue? Use them to make this chic petal vase! I was inspired by a ceramic  vase I saw at Zara and thought I’d give it a whirl using plastic … Read More...The post Elegant DIY Petal Vase From Plastic Spoons appeared first on Urban Gardens.
 
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    Epic Gardening | RSS Feed

  • Baker Creek + Epic Gardening Rare Seeds Giveaway

    Kevin
    25 Feb 2015 | 4:33 pm
    The post Baker Creek + Epic Gardening Rare Seeds Giveaway is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog. If you don’t already know about Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds, I don’t know where you’ve been gardening!  They’re one of the coolest and best seed companies out there and have been for quite some time. I’ve been growing veggies with their heirloom seed varieties for a few years now and have not only had amazing […] The post Baker Creek + Epic Gardening Rare Seeds Giveaway is…
  • 25+ Plants That You Can Regrow From Your Kitchen Scraps

    Kevin
    25 Feb 2015 | 1:30 pm
    The post 25+ Plants That You Can Regrow From Your Kitchen Scraps is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog. Worried that you're generating too much organic waste at home? Before you take out the trash, consider if there are any uses for the waste you've created. Think about composting, making mulch, or, coolest of all, starting your own garden. That's right, you can start a garden using the organic waste in your home! Did […] The post 25+ Plants That You Can Regrow From Your Kitchen Scraps is by Kevin…
  • Plants Find a Way: 25 Examples of Plants Striving to Survive

    Kevin
    21 Feb 2015 | 1:42 pm
    The post Plants Find a Way: 25 Examples of Plants Striving to Survive is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog. It's a sad truth of life...We humans think we've mastered nature - that we can control it and bend it to our will.While that might have a grain of truth to it, the reality is that if we were to disappear tomorrow, it wouldn't take very long for nature to reclaim what is rightfully hers.These […] The post Plants Find a Way: 25 Examples of Plants Striving to Survive is by Kevin and appeared…
  • EXOBIOTANICA: Plants Photographed In The Stratosphere

    Kevin
    14 Feb 2015 | 2:59 pm
    The post EXOBIOTANICA: Plants Photographed In The Stratosphere is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog. ​ExobiotanicaIn one of the coolest projects that we've seen in a while, Japanese artist Azuma Makoto launched plants into the STRATOSPHERE.Of course, he couldn't just launch plants into space on his own.  He collaborated with John Powell of JP Aerospace and a team of ten to make the project a reality.They sent a bonsai tree and […] The post EXOBIOTANICA: Plants Photographed In The…
  • How To Make Seed Bombs

    Kevin
    12 Feb 2015 | 12:00 am
    The post How To Make Seed Bombs is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog. ​If you've never heard of seed bombs before, you're in for a treat.  They're a staple of guerilla gardeners around the world, enabling them to sow seeds in areas that they would otherwise be unable to reach.There are a lot of reasons to make your own seed bombs:Garden in hard-to-reach areasBeautify a barren lot with a […] The post How To Make Seed Bombs is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban…
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    Grow Our Way

  • Be My Buddy: Companion Planting Vegetables

    Safer® Brand
    27 Feb 2015 | 5:45 am
    Just like humans, some plants are more compatible together than others. As the gardener, you’re in charge of making sure each vegetable gets along with their garden mates. To help you learn which plants are friends or foes, we’ve created this companion planting chart for vegetables. What Vegetables Grow Well Together? Companion planting is the purposeful placement of certain plants near each other as a natural way to drive harmful pests away, help each other grow, and even improve the vegetables’ flavor. Of course, not all vegetables are buddies. For example, members of the bean family,…
  • Gardening For Beginners: Intro to Hydroponics

    Safer® Brand
    4 Nov 2014 | 8:45 am
    The term “hydroponic gardening” may sound fancy or high-tech, but the concept is really pretty simple. While the practice of hydroponic gardening dates back to ancient times, it wasn’t until the 1950s that it started to gain prominence. What makes hydroponic gardening different from traditional growing practices? It does not involve the use of soil. Instead, plants are grown using either a nutrient-rich water culture or a soilless medium such as clay aggregate, coconut coir, perlite, sand or gravel. Some of the benefits of hydroponic gardening include higher yields, reduced water…
  • What Your Office Is Missing

    Safer® Brand
    30 Oct 2014 | 9:29 am
    If you’re one of those people who are stuck working inside an office all day, adding a little green to the scene in the form of plants can do wonders for your work environment. Office plants can provide a long list of benefits including: Alleviating stress – If squeezing rubber balls or taking walks around the building aren’t helping you cope with stress at work, try adding a plant or two to your work area. According to one study, placing plants in an office reduced worker anxiety by 37 percent, while anger and hostility decreased 44 percent. Improved air quality – Although smoking…
  • How to Grow the Perfect Tomato

    Safer® Brand
    21 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    Have you ever marveled at the plump, juicy delicious tomatoes that your friends or neighbors seem to be able to grow so effortlessly? Do you wonder why your own tomato growing efforts don’t seem to deliver the same results? Growing perfect tomatoes isn’t always easy. A little luck and a lot of tender loving care are required. It also helps if you know how to overcome the obstacles that can prevent you from achieving the tomato growing success you desire. Poor soil quality – First things first, make sure that your soil pH is ideal for tomatoes. You can easily find a pH soil testing kit…
  • Fresh Fads

    Safer® Brand
    16 Oct 2014 | 3:00 pm
    These days, the concept of gardening encompasses much more than raising a few flowers and vegetables in the yard. While traditional backyard gardening is still a favorite pastime in the United States and around the world, the art of gardening continues to change and evolve. Let’s take a closer look at some of the “fresh fads” that are currently taking over today’s gardening world. Organic Gardening The focus on protecting the environment and consuming foods that are free of man-made preservatives and pesticides has continued to intensify in recent years. As a result, the popularity of…
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    Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden

  • Garden to Host Start of Richmond 2015 UCI Road World Championships

    Jonah Holland
    27 Feb 2015 | 2:11 pm
    by Jonah Holland,  Public Relations & Marketing Coordinator, Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden We are thrilled to announce that Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden will serve as the start venue for Richmond 2015‘s elite men’s and elite women’s team time trial events on September 20, 2015 during the 2015 UCI Road World Championships. The Garden’s involvement is a natural fit.  As you have likely read here before,  the Garden has  rich ties to cycling history.  Historic Bloemendaal House was originally the Lakeside Wheel Club, one of the nation’s first “wheel” or…
  • Snow Day — Take 2!

    Jonah Holland
    26 Feb 2015 | 10:11 am
    by Jonah Holland,  Public Relations & Marketing Coordinator, Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Japanese maple ‘Sango-Kaku’ in snow with the Conservatory. Thanks to Facility Maintenance Manager Steve Sawyer for the photo. Here’s a first look at the Garden after the snow storm. The Garden remains closed today, Feb. 26, 2015, due to snow and ice.
  • Beautiful & Useful too — Paperbush is Getting Ready to Bloom

    Jonah Holland
    25 Feb 2015 | 2:15 am
    Hilaire Ashworth, PR & Marketing Intern, Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Edgeworthia chrysantha ‘Gold Rush’ Whilst wondering around the Garden last week I came across this beauty, that is budding despite the chilly temperatures. Edgeworthia chrysantha, commonly known as oriental paperbush, Mitsumata, or simply paperbush comes from south western China, Nepal, and Japan. The plant has been incorporated into traditional Japanese papermaking called Washi, where bark fibers are combined with fibers from the gampi tree and the kozo plant to make this thin, but durable paper. Hence,…
  • Volunteer Manager Darlene Van Laan Retires

    Jonah Holland
    23 Feb 2015 | 11:51 am
    Plant sale chairs and volunteers Nancy Penick (left) with Helen Blencowe (center) and Darlene Van Laan. by Jonah Holland,  Public Relations & Marketing Coordinator, Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Earlier this month longtime staff member  Darlene Van Laan retired.  Van Laan has been Volunteer Manager at the Garden for 11 years,  and over that time has ushered in hundreds of new volunteers at the Garden and made them feel the love of this place in a way that only she knew how.  I’ve always seen Van Laan as a mamma duck, looking over her flock of volunteers. She has a gift with…
  • Happy Snow Day!

    Jonah Holland
    17 Feb 2015 | 6:16 am
    by Jonah Holland, PR & Marketing Coordinator, Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden At the start of the snowstorm, frogs in the fountain. Photo by Laura Flournoy We got a bit of snow last night, considerably more than is in this photo.  Visitor Service staffer Laura Flournoy took this image just before the Garden closed, about 4:30 p.m.  Six to 8 inches later,  with temperatures around 20 degrees, and with the Garden and paths covered, we will remain closed to visitors today, Tuesday, Feb. 17, 2015 and Wednesday, Feb. 18, 2015. Enjoy the snow day and stay safe! We’ll reopen as soon as…
 
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    The Diligent Gardener

  • Three Crucial Considerations before Buying a Conservatory

    Gaz
    18 Feb 2015 | 2:40 am
    If you’re anything like the rest of us, you want to enjoy your garden all year round. For most green-fingered Brits, however, the volatility of the weather in Dear Old Blighty is enough to make even the most serene gardener shake an angry fist at the threatening clouds above. At this time of year, even when the sun is shining, it’s normally cold enough to break the smoke off your chimney, which makes sitting outside in your garden akin to an Arctic expedition. But this is where a conservatory is worth its weight in gold. Whatever the forecast, conservatories offer an agreeable space to…
  • Garden Tool Care

    Gaz
    18 Feb 2015 | 1:24 am
    How often does this happen to you? After a heavy but satisfying day in the garden of weeding, pruning or digging, the hot bath and the drink with your name on it are calling to you. You know you really should clean your tools before putting them away, but surely that’ll wait until tomorrow? Carrying out simple maintenance directly after using your tools should make them last, but if you do need to replace, never buy ‘cheap and cheerful’. Clean dirt and debrisMake sure you wash the dirt off thoroughly. Use a hose and if you’ve let the dirt dry, have a stiff brush handy to remove…
  • Top 10 UK Gardening Blogs

    Gaz
    11 Feb 2015 | 3:02 am
    There are lots of Gardening blogs out there, but what to read when you have finished out latest articles?Here is a list of the top ten you really should include in your regular reading pleasure.1. Alternative Eden2. Fennel & Fern3. The Galloping Gardener4. wellywoman 5. Two Thirsty Gardeners6. The middle-sized garden7. Real Men Sow8. Veg Plotting9.  Loose and Leafy10. Grow Our Own
  • Iris reticulata Katharine Hodgkin

    Gaz
    30 Jan 2015 | 3:07 am
     Iris reticulata Katharine Hodgkin making an early appearance.
  • Planting Fruit Trees

    Gaz
    27 Jan 2015 | 3:06 am
    If you have never experienced the sheer unbounded joy of casually picking some apples or plums from your own fruit tree and then sharing them with friends and family then you’re missing out on an unique experience.Apple, pear and Victoria plum trees are all ideal fruit trees to plant in your garden. Not only will they enhance its natural beauty but they will also provide you with the most organic and natural fruit money can’t buy. The fruit is delicious in itself and can also be used to make delicious ciders, wines, moonshine, chutneys, preserves and jams. But it’s important to note…
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    Easily Grown Garden

  • How to Start a Garden Step by Step

    Kiesha Easley
    15 Feb 2015 | 9:00 pm
    It doesn’t matter if you’re a beginner, if you want to know how to start a garden, this post will help you do it, step by step. The idea of planting a vegetable garden can be exciting.  Most people dash off to the nearest garden center, load their carts up with plants, soil and a few […]The post How to Start a Garden Step by Step appeared first on Easily Grown Garden.
  • Gardening tips: You DON’T need a GREEN thumb

    Kiesha Easley
    12 Feb 2015 | 1:00 pm
    You don’t need a green thumb when you’ve got the basic gardening tips down.  Anyone can learn to garden. Over the years I’ve learned that you don’t have to know everything about gardening to have a fruitful season. It’s more about your level of commitment than about your knowledge.  If you can commit to the […]The post Gardening tips: You DON’T need a GREEN thumb appeared first on Easily Grown Garden.
  • 5 Benefits of Beekeeping

    Kiesha Easley
    7 Feb 2015 | 8:00 pm
    There are a lot more benefits of beekeeping than harvesting affordable, local, delicious honey (although I must say, that is the sweetest benefit of all).  In these high-tech times, people rarely think about keeping honeybees.  Most people think, why  keep bees when you can go buy a bottle of honey from the grocery store, with less hassle? If you […]The post 5 Benefits of Beekeeping appeared first on Easily Grown Garden.
  • Free Bee Removal in Columbia, SC – Don’t Kill those Honeybees!

    Kiesha Easley
    31 Jan 2015 | 8:00 pm
    Swarm season is just around the corner.  Spotting a swarm of bees in your yard can be scary! The first response for most people: Freak out! The second response: Grab some bug spray or call an exterminator.  I’d like to offer another option: Stay calm and call for a free bee removal. Free Bee Removal […]The post Free Bee Removal in Columbia, SC – Don’t Kill those Honeybees! appeared first on Easily Grown Garden.
  • Our Swarm Traps Worked – We caught some bees in a trap!

    Kiesha Easley
    7 Jun 2014 | 11:45 am
    It took a while – and if I can be honest, we actually gave up on those swarm traps we built back in March.  After all, it is the first week of June, and that seemed like ages ago. But today, just as we were about to inspect our top bar hive, I noticed some […]The post Our Swarm Traps Worked – We caught some bees in a trap! appeared first on Easily Grown Garden.
 
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    Grow Up Hydrogarden

  • The Veggie Haters Guide to Loving the Veg Life

    Amanda Kuhn
    25 Feb 2015 | 1:00 am
    We have all experienced dinners where they end abruptly because of a temper tantrum over eating your vegetables. How many times have you said (or heard), “You can’t leave the table until you finish your veggies”? Hiding your veggies in your milk can only last for so long. Most of us grow out of our picky eating habits once we leave our adolescence but whatRead More
  • The Great Big Home Show

    Erika Raia
    18 Feb 2015 | 7:05 am
    Thank you to everyone that visited our Grow Up Hydrogarden booth at The Great Big Home Show this year in Cleveland! We appreciate everyone that braved the record breaking cold outside (35 below windchill) to stop by our booth (#505) and make our week so special. SAY CHEESE! Here are some of our favorite moments inside our booth:             
  • Grow Aloe Vera In Your GrowUp Unit? Who Knew?

    Amanda Kuhn
    4 Feb 2015 | 9:19 am
    Aloe Vera is the universal plant for anything and everything you need to live a healthy lifestyle. It is one of my favorite succulents and originated in Northern Africa. They can grow up to 90 cm tall and typically are born with spiked edges. But you know how they say that true beauty comes from the inside? That’s exactly what you get with aloe. TheRead More
  • The Food Movement is Growing

    Erika Raia
    28 Jan 2015 | 8:27 am
    For the first time in decades, people are second guessing their food choices and are asking important questions about where their food comes from and how it is affecting their health, family’s health and environment. Leaders are responding by empowering cities to work with local organizations to understand the food related issues in their community, protect consumers from potential hazards and provide equal access to urban farmsRead More
  • New Year, New You, New Greens

    Amanda Kuhn
    21 Jan 2015 | 1:00 am
    With a couple weeks into the New Year, it’s important to re-evaluate your goals and decide what it is that you want to achieve in 2015. Ringing in the New Year, the coined term “New Year, New You” becomes your inspiration to make the changes you wish to make in the New Year. Setting goals each year not only makes you feel like a betterRead More
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    Made with love and garlic

  • Front garden remodel

    Catherine: Made with love and garlic
    1 Mar 2015 | 1:01 pm
    I have decided to be charitable. Even though the caterpillars decimated my gooseberries and kiwi last year, I am continuing with my attempts to lure butterflies and bees to the garden. The small trellis pots that I had last year were broken by the gales that we experienced this winter and so I've replaced them with long, low raised beds that are much sturdier. They've been planted with various bulbs (daffodils and tulips) and wildflower seeds but at the moment they look really rather depressing. Fingers crossed that they sprout soon. The neighbour's cat has been spotted in the vicinity eyeing…
  • Front gardens are for the birds (and the bees...)

    Catherine: Made with love and garlic
    17 Feb 2015 | 11:28 am
    I don't blog much about my front garden, although I have replanted it recently (more details soon) but today I was able to snatch a couple of minutes for a quick project where the GarlicBaby agreed to play in his travel cot. The Scandis have some very good ideas, chief amongst them swaddling a baby until they can't really lower their arms and then taking them outside for some fresh air. With GarlicBaby distracted by his jingle bunny and teddy bear, I was finally able to put together my birthday present from my lovely in laws last year, a RSPB bird feeder. It had gotten put away during our…
  • Gardening book review: Adam the Gardener, a pictorial guide to each week's work by Cyril Cowell & Morley Adams

    Catherine: Made with love and garlic
    9 Feb 2015 | 12:10 pm
    For as long as I can remember, I've always had lots of books. So much so that my mother, when I was about 10, actually went to our local library to put a limit on the number that I could borrow at once. Mr Garlic and I have agreed that whilst we won't spoil the GarlicBaby, we will always allow him to have lots of books. Whilst we were at Hampton Court, I found a new addition to my gardening library, Adam the Gardener. It's a marvellous pictoral week-by-week guide to gardening, made of a collection of cartoons originally published in the Sunday Express in the 1940s. It's a rather…
  • Horticultural day out: Hampton Court Palace (including kitchen garden!) review

    Catherine: Made with love and garlic
    4 Feb 2015 | 6:00 am
    List of foodstuffs planted in the kitchen gardenMy husband and I try to ensure that we have a family day out every weekend. It's usually to somewhere within 90 minutes drive of our home in South West London because the GarlicBaby tends to get a bit squeaky on long car journeys, and we go everywhere from museums, to farms, to gardens, to National Trust properties. I'm going to start going reviewing the horticulturally linked adventures that we have.A couple of weeks ago, we spent our Saturday at the beautiful Hampton Court Palace. We'd only been there once before, for a magical summer picnic…
  • Snow joke when the weather confuses your plants

    Catherine: Made with love and garlic
    3 Feb 2015 | 12:05 pm
    First it was my poor Brown Turkey fig tree, getting completely confused because I brought it into my warm dining room. Now it's my poor garlic. Stupid weather. There's a lot of pity in me for my poor garden. My garlic, dutifully planted on the shortest day of last year so that it could have a nice long chill in the soil. But then the weather was both mild and warmer than usual in January of this year so it started to sprout at serious speed. And then today, wonder of wonders, snow! In London! The sheer pollution and warmth of the city, combined with our somewhat southerly position, usually…
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    Floyd Family Homestead

  • Homesteader’s Freedom Hop #1

    Modern Homesteader
    27 Feb 2015 | 6:00 am
    Come on over to the Homestead, choose your rocking chair…a glass of tea and sit a spell! This is a Homesteader’s Freedom Hop Y’all and there are plenty of posts & pages and blogs to keep your attention…entertain you, educate you or make you smile…all day long. Stay as long as you like; and vote for Read More... The post Homesteader’s Freedom Hop #1 appeared first on Floyd Family Homestead.
  • Apple Cider Vinegar Benefits

    Modern Homesteader
    26 Feb 2015 | 6:00 pm
    With all the virus’s and sickness currently going around the planet, we wanted to hit on an article that was previously written that is nature’s super medicine. How can apple cider vinegar help you and your family? Let me tell you the ways… Apple cider vinegar benefits have been known for a long time. For Read More... The post Apple Cider Vinegar Benefits appeared first on Floyd Family Homestead.
  • Knockers, Pot and Kraut

    Modern Homesteader
    25 Feb 2015 | 7:33 pm
    Got this recipe from my Father, we revamped it a bit and it is WOW!! In a large pot boil water, add 1 tbls kosher salt. Add 10 whole washed red potatoes, cook 10-15 min or until almost done. In another pot add Kraut and 1 cup apple cider, bring up to heat. In a Read More... The post Knockers, Pot and Kraut appeared first on Floyd Family Homestead.
  • FREEDOM – for Chickens!

    Modern Homesteader
    25 Feb 2015 | 6:54 pm
    Have you ever notice that we as homesteaders tend to give our animals better care than ourselves? We painstakingly go over detail to make sure that they are 100% all the time from their feed, to their housing to everything in between. We even get nervous when we are going to be exposing them to Read More... The post FREEDOM – for Chickens! appeared first on Floyd Family Homestead.
  • Chicken House Complete & Giveaway Winner

    Modern Homesteader
    25 Feb 2015 | 6:51 pm
    Here is quick video friends on our Chicken house, Orchard and Garden. I also wanted to Announce our Winner to our 5p.c Cast Iron giveaway. Congratulations to: Tyneisha Fondren of @luvmyhubz You are our Grand Prize Winner! You have 48 hours to get in touch with me via email at: sfloyd [at] modernhomesteaders.net to claim Read More... The post Chicken House Complete & Giveaway Winner appeared first on Floyd Family Homestead.
 
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    No Soil Solutions

  • Choosing Quality Seeds for Your Garden

    nosoilsolutions
    8 Feb 2015 | 2:26 pm
    Often times the importance of using quality seeds are overlooked when gardening. Choosing quality seed for your garden may be one of the least expensive aspects of your hydroponic garden but is just as important as quality nutrients and grow environment. Many gardeners are gardening for the fun, for more healthy produce, and also quality. The post Choosing Quality Seeds for Your Garden appeared first on No Soil Solutions.
  • Using Rockwool For Seed Germination

    nosoilsolutions
    7 Dec 2014 | 10:44 pm
    Rockwool is a popular starter medium that has been used a long time with hydroponics. Smaller rockwool cubes are used for cuttings or seed germination and then transplanted into hydroponic systems. Larger cubes or slabs can be used to grow larger plants. It works well as a grow medium because it’s great at both maintaining The post Using Rockwool For Seed Germination appeared first on No Soil Solutions.
  • Nutrient Lockout

    nosoilsolutions
    22 Nov 2014 | 8:43 pm
    If you notice your hydroponic plants becoming stunted or showing odd colors resembling nutrient deficiency your plants may be experiencing nutrient lockout. It’s easier to diagnose nutrient lockout with hydroponic gardens because nutrients are measured to the exact amount (or should be) to supply the plants with enough nutrients. Nutrient lock out is exactly what The post Nutrient Lockout appeared first on No Soil Solutions.
  • How to Adjust The pH Of Hydroponic Nutrient Solution

    nosoilsolutions
    14 Nov 2014 | 9:13 pm
    Proper pH levels are important with hydroculture gardening. Most hydroponic nutrients have a pH buffer that helps keep the pH level of your solution at its proper levels, but a spike or dip a spike or dip in your pH levels. When this happens, it’s important to adjust the pH levels back to the proper The post How to Adjust The pH Of Hydroponic Nutrient Solution appeared first on No Soil Solutions.
  • 3 Ways To Measure pH Of Nutrient Solution

    nosoilsolutions
    5 Nov 2014 | 5:28 pm
    When using hydroponics to grow your garden it is very important to measure the pH level  of your nutrient solution and keep it at the proper level. Without the proper pH levels your plants will not be able to take in all the nutrients it needs from the nutrient solution. When you measure the pH level The post 3 Ways To Measure pH Of Nutrient Solution appeared first on No Soil Solutions.
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    O'Connors Lawn Equipment

  • March Lawn And Garden Tips

    Verenice Torres
    1 Mar 2015 | 7:12 am
    Lawn Scalp Bermuda grass and catch clippings (never scalp fescue or rye!) Apply pre emergence to bermuda grass if not applied in February. Plant fescue and rye seed. Fertilize fescue and rye. Mow 2 ½ – 3” tall. Water weekly (est.) Treat for grubs.   Garden Plant shrubs, azaleas, pansies, cold –hearty vegetables (leafy and root crops) Prune climbing roses before growth starts. Prune azaleas before growth starts. Divide and replant summer and fall blooming perennials. Cut back liriope, pampass & ornament grasses. Remove tree wrap. The post March Lawn And Garden Tips appeared…
  • O’Connor’s is pleased to offer a military discount on 2015 residential zero turn riding products.

    Bridgett Davis
    27 Feb 2015 | 1:00 am
    In appreciation for the sacrifice and service of our military both past and present, O’Connor’s is pleased to offer a $100 military discount on all 2015 residential zero turn riding mowers. Just input the promo code “2015” at check out to receive $100 off your purchase of a 2015 Toro, Snapper or Simplicity residential zero turn rider.  The post O’Connor’s is pleased to offer a military discount on 2015 residential zero turn riding products. appeared first on O'Connors Lawn Equipment.
  • Free Cargo Carrier with purchase of any Toro SW series TimeCutter Zero Turn Mower

    Bridgett Davis
    19 Feb 2015 | 1:23 pm
    For a limited time… only at O’Connor’s Lawn and Garden get a Toro Cargo Carrier, ( A $200 Value) FREE with any purchase of a SW Series Timecutter Zero Turn Mower! That’s Right just BUY this..And GET this…. While supplies last. The post Free Cargo Carrier with purchase of any Toro SW series TimeCutter Zero Turn Mower appeared first on O'Connors Lawn Equipment.
  • February Lawn And Garden Tips

    Verenice Torres
    1 Feb 2015 | 7:03 am
    Lawn Water when dry. Mow fescue 3” tall. Fertilize fescue and rye. Spray weeds when 50F. Apply pre-emergence to Bermuda grass.   Garden Plant bare root trees. (Grape, Pecan, etc.) Prune summer flowering shrubs/vines: (Rose bushes to outward buds, Grape vines to 80%) Remove tallest 1/3 of canes from standard Nandinas. You can cut Nandinas low, they will sprout at roots. Trim groundcovers. Spray dormant oil The post February Lawn And Garden Tips appeared first on O'Connors Lawn Equipment.
  • January Lawn and Garden Tips

    Bridgett Davis
    29 Jan 2015 | 1:51 pm
    You may think there is not much to do in your garden right now, but with a little preparation and maintenance you can have a yard you can be proud of. Tips for January: Lawn Take equipment in for service. Water landscape when dry…especially before a freeze! Mow fescue 3″ tall. Spray weeds with glyphosate when temp is above 50F. Garden Prepare garden soil…(Till every two weeks) Spray horticultural oil for scale Prune shade trees, birch, elm, maples (Never top them!) Water when dry. Fertilize pansies The post January Lawn and Garden Tips appeared first on O'Connors Lawn…
 
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    Your Hub of Garden Creativity | Garden Buildings Direct Blog

  • Garden Activities For Kids

    Maria Karla Salinas
    20 Feb 2015 | 7:04 am
          What is more fun than incorporating gardening with your kids? With all the colors and activities you can find and do in your garden, it will surely be an endless amusement for the whole family.  Kids are always curious and love to play outdoors, they tend to observe and discover things as they grow. And for parents to watch and guide them in doing so would be an absolute pleasure. Here some activities you can provide for your kids to enjoy in your garden: 1. PLAYHOUSE Tall sunflowers, moonflowers and sticks with overgrown with pea pods are great mediums to enhance your…
  • Cold Weather Gardening

    Garden Buildings Direct
    20 Feb 2015 | 7:03 am
      Frost can easily damage any plants. Plants are easy to identify when they are frosted. They turned near black, distorted and limp. Even though that sparkling white effect by snow looks good, this could turnout to a major problem from damaging your crops to killing them after. Even the though plants barely survive this kind of weather because when the soil turn frozen, the roots will not have enough water to suck that will lessen the moisture that the plants need for growth. Damage Control An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Here are some tips to prevent damages on your…
  • 10 Fruits to Grow in your Garden

    Maria Karla Salinas
    20 Feb 2015 | 7:03 am
    “When it comes to growing fruit, don’t limit yourself to just a lonely apple tree at the end of the garden. There are an increasing number of tasty, unusual fruit that can be grown in the UK.” – Ken Muir, Expert fruit grower. When growing fruits, you have to be mindful of the full preparation needed such as the weather, the type of soil you’re dealing with and the kinds of fruits you choose you grow. Here are the following options: SALAD Growing Directions • You can grow salad all year inside. Try mixing different lettuces or adding rocket. Oriental varieties work best for…
  • Santa Grotto Challenge Winner

    Garden Buildings Direct
    18 Feb 2015 | 6:09 am
    Several months ago, we had the idea of running a Christmas Challenge to find the best designed playhouse from our favourite parent bloggers. Now… Garden Buildings Direct is proud to announce the winner, Laura Ramsden from Barnsley, United Kingdom!   Laura has selected The Radford Family playhouse design and have won this amazing playhouse with picket fence! Thank you for your interest in our Santa Grotto Challenge. Watch out for the next challenge!        
  • How to Attract Bees into your Garden

    Maria Karla Salinas
    12 Feb 2015 | 5:03 am
    Bee is the common name for the winged, flower-feeding, nectar-loving insect with branched body hairs. Of course, all living creatures needs to eat in order to live. In order to feed the colony, bees need pollen and collect nectar from our gardens. Bees pollinate the flowers that will later on produce fruit and seeds. Though bees stings like hell, but they are still good for our gardens. There are flowers, herbs, trees, shrubs and hedgerows to choose from. How to Attract Bees to your Garden • The best thing that you do to attract bees is to give them lots of flowers they can visit for…
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    A Garden for All

  • Connecticut Flower & Garden Show 2015

    Kathy
    24 Feb 2015 | 6:00 am
    Sir Peacock greets everyone at the entryway (photo by: Kathy Diemer) There’s only one way to fight a seemingly endless winter; enlist some serious flower power! In my neck of the woods this entailed taking a much needed break from the snow and frigid temps to attend the 34th annual Connecticut Flower & Garden Show, just an hour away at the Connecticut Convention Center in Hartford. If you didn’t have a chance to visit, there are other flower shows across the east coast such as Vermont Flower Show from February 27 through March 1, the Boston Flower and Garden Show from March 11 through…
  • Which Hazel?

    Kathy
    17 Feb 2015 | 6:00 am
    Hamamelis Vernalis’s Winter Fringe (photo credit: Kathy Diemer) I’m confused.  There’s witch hazel and then there’s winter hazel . . . which is which, and what’s the difference? Vernal Witch Hazel in Bloom (photo credit: Kathy Diemer) Hamamelis virginiana is our Eastern North America native, also known as Common Witch Hazel and Hamamelis vernalis, Vernal Witch Hazel, is the central North America native, both of which are hardy to zone 4.  There’s Hamamelis mollis, the zone 5 Chinese native and Hamamelis japonica, the zone 6 Japanese native. To add to…
  • Dragon Claw Willow

    Kathy
    10 Feb 2015 | 6:00 am
    Dragon Claw Willow in Winter (photo credit: Kathy Diemer) Sounding like something straight out of a medieval tale, and looking like something from a Tim Burton movie, the dragon claw willow was a curious, yet welcome, addition to my garden.  After a severe hurricane took down two established locusts in 2011, I was left with a very unstable stream bank to contend with.  Luckily, I stumbled upon these two intriguing shrubs at a private plant sale, where I was assured they would not only grow quickly, but be tolerant of the tangle of existing roots I planned to plant them with.  Indeed, the…
  • Mourning Doves

    Kathy
    3 Feb 2015 | 6:00 am
    Mourning Doves Hanging Out in Metasequoia (photo credit: Kathy Diemer) The Mourning Dove, (Zenaida macroura), is one of my favorite visitors to the garden.  The genus name Zenaida comes from Princess Zénaide Charlotte Julie Bonaparte, the wife of French zoologist Charles Bonaparte (isn’t that romantic), and mourning was derived from what some consider its sorrowful song.  Mourning Doves don’t migrate, so I’m fortunate to enjoy their company throughout the year.  It’s not uncommon to have dozens of doves at my feeder, with many perched close by in the surrounding…
  • Cinderella

    Kathy
    27 Jan 2015 | 1:00 am
    Cinderella Crabapple’s golden fruit (photo credit: Kathy Diemer) When it comes to fabulous ornamental specimens that are equally content on a city lot or a multi-acre spread, look no further than the dwarf flowering crabapple.  There are many varieties to choose from; with sizes ranging from 8′ to 15′, all are ideally sized for the smaller landscape.  Years ago we chose a Malus ‘Cinzam’, commonly known as the Cinderella Flowering Crabapple, to introduce to our landscape.  We have been thrilled with its performance year after year, through every…
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    Tree Service Portland - Northwest Arbor-Culture » Blog

  • 5 Tree Pruning Tools You Need

    Jon Nash
    16 Feb 2015 | 2:18 pm
                      Are branches blocking your windows or walkways? Are you tired of that overgrown tree dropping twigs all over the yard? Or is an old tree simply growing out of control? Residents of the Pacific Northwest are no strangers to tree woes. With the right tools, you can solve many small tree problems with a little DIY pruning. (Save major tree issues for us professionals.) Trimming can keep trees healthy, add value to your property, and make you the envy of your neighbors. But which tree pruning tools should you use? The best tree…
  • What Is Arboriculture?

    Jon Nash
    26 Jan 2015 | 3:26 pm
    The simplest definition of arboriculture is tree care. This post will answer “What is arboriculture?” in more detail, explain how it’s different from forestry and landscaping, and explain what certified arborists do. People like Chris and I who plant and prune trees are arborists. But not all arborists trim trees. And definitely not all tree services use certified arborists. More on that below too. Arboriculture Definition Arboriculture means growing, tending, studying, or removing individual trees and shrubs. (It also encompasses woody plants and vines.) Here are a few different…
  • How to Kill Tree Roots Naturally

    Jon Nash
    15 Jan 2015 | 12:11 pm
    Most of the time, you want tree roots to thrive. But if you’re removing a tree and don’t want regrowth, or if tree roots are dangerously close to something underground, you may need to kill them. It’s something we handle here at Northwest Arbor-Culture, Inc., and some homeowners like to DIY as well. Here’s a basic primer on how to kill tree roots. How to Kill Tree Roots Naturally, Without Chemicals An easy way to kill tree roots is to spray chemicals like hexazinone or bromacil onto the soil above, then wait for rain to push the chemicals down to the roots and kill them. But here in…
  • Can Trees Prevent Flooding?

    Jon Nash
    2 Jan 2015 | 11:37 am
    Trees have a ton of benefits: clean air, beauty, fruit, and shade, to name a few. But did you know they can also prevent flooding? It’s true! “The typical medium-sized tree can intercept as much as 2,380 gallons of rainfall per year,” the USDA says. To understand how, let’s look at why flooding happens. Without trees, rain runs off soil and into rivers and streams, raising the water level. Trees help keep soil in place, and their roots soak up water. (This is called reducing erosion and anchoring topsoil.) Source: Greening.in Even trees’ leaves help prevent flooding. When raindrops…
  • What Is Tree Grafting?

    Jon Nash
    29 Dec 2014 | 10:47 am
    Tree grafting is kind of the tree equivalent of an organ transplant. It’s attaching a small, budding branch (called the “cultivar”) from one healthy tree onto the trunk (technically the “stock” or “rootstock”) of a different tree. Tree grafting usually happens in winter while the tree is dormant. That way it has time to heal and absorb its new branch. Sometimes tree grafting is as simple as one branch replacing another. But sometimes a cultivar is added in addition to existing branches. Sometimes two small branches are attached to an existing one. In that case, the branch that…
 
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    Floyd Family Homestead

  • Homesteader’s Freedom Hop #1

    Modern Homesteader
    27 Feb 2015 | 6:00 am
    Come on over to the Homestead, choose your rocking chair…a glass of tea and sit a spell! This is a Homesteader’s Freedom Hop Y’all and there are plenty of posts & pages and blogs to keep your attention…entertain you, educate you or make you smile…all day long. Stay as long as you like; and vote for Read More... The post Homesteader’s Freedom Hop #1 appeared first on Floyd Family Homestead.
  • Apple Cider Vinegar Benefits

    Modern Homesteader
    26 Feb 2015 | 6:00 pm
    With all the virus’s and sickness currently going around the planet, we wanted to hit on an article that was previously written that is nature’s super medicine. How can apple cider vinegar help you and your family? Let me tell you the ways… Apple cider vinegar benefits have been known for a long time. For Read More... The post Apple Cider Vinegar Benefits appeared first on Floyd Family Homestead.
  • Knockers, Pot and Kraut

    Modern Homesteader
    25 Feb 2015 | 7:33 pm
    Got this recipe from my Father, we revamped it a bit and it is WOW!! In a large pot boil water, add 1 tbls kosher salt. Add 10 whole washed red potatoes, cook 10-15 min or until almost done. In another pot add Kraut and 1 cup apple cider, bring up to heat. In a Read More... The post Knockers, Pot and Kraut appeared first on Floyd Family Homestead.
  • FREEDOM – for Chickens!

    Modern Homesteader
    25 Feb 2015 | 6:54 pm
    Have you ever notice that we as homesteaders tend to give our animals better care than ourselves? We painstakingly go over detail to make sure that they are 100% all the time from their feed, to their housing to everything in between. We even get nervous when we are going to be exposing them to Read More... The post FREEDOM – for Chickens! appeared first on Floyd Family Homestead.
  • Chicken House Complete & Giveaway Winner

    Modern Homesteader
    25 Feb 2015 | 6:51 pm
    Here is quick video friends on our Chicken house, Orchard and Garden. I also wanted to Announce our Winner to our 5p.c Cast Iron giveaway. Congratulations to: Tyneisha Fondren of @luvmyhubz You are our Grand Prize Winner! You have 48 hours to get in touch with me via email at: sfloyd [at] modernhomesteaders.net to claim Read More... The post Chicken House Complete & Giveaway Winner appeared first on Floyd Family Homestead.
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    DIY Backyard Gardening

  • Backyard Gardening Update

    Chellet
    12 Feb 2015 | 10:42 am
    Since we started gardening in mid 2012, I was truly determined to keep it alive and well no matter the weather and challenges. We’ve lost several plants because of my brown thumb and for lacking enough knowledge on how to properly choose and care for specific plant species. I’ve learned my lesson the hard way. […] The post Backyard Gardening Update appeared first on DIY Backyard Gardening.
  • Backyard Gardening Blog Update

    Chellet
    10 Feb 2015 | 8:55 am
      Dear readers, My sincerest apologies if you’ll find the DIY backyard gardening blog changing quite a bit. I’ve been updating the free theme I’m using in order for us to have a cleaner and more reader-friendly navigation. Thank you for your understanding. The post Backyard Gardening Blog Update appeared first on DIY Backyard Gardening.
  • Frogs in the Garden – Front and Backyard

    Chellet
    18 Jan 2015 | 8:00 am
    Wildlife such as tiny reptiles, butterflies, and bugs are indeed attracted into many home gardens. Whether we live in the urban area or in a forested valley, they find our gardens and stay there for a while. My theory as to why these frogs are here in the neighborhood is that the rainy months may have […] The post Frogs in the Garden – Front and Backyard appeared first on DIY Backyard Gardening.
  • Holiday Greetings 2014

    Chellet
    23 Dec 2014 | 8:01 am
    Holiday Greetings from DIY Backyard Gardening… Thank you for visiting my backyard gardening blog since its inception in 2012. It’s been an enjoyable experience to share what I’ve learned as a semi-green thumbed gardener. Also, many thanks to the generous contributors who’ve provided us with additional information about gardening and other useful, relevant resources. I hope you all […] The post Holiday Greetings 2014 appeared first on DIY Backyard Gardening.
  • What’s New: Gardening Infographics

    Chellet
    12 Dec 2014 | 7:17 am
     We have a new main menu (with sub-pages) on the DIY Backyard Gardening blog that’s dedicated to curated gardening infographics. Like other types of infographics, these were created by their original owners to provide informative illustrations on specific topics. My aim is to provide additional information that’s easier to read (especially for those who are busy […] The post What’s New: Gardening Infographics appeared first on DIY Backyard Gardening.
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    Mill Race Garden Centre Blog

  • Learn to Garden By Watching YouTube: 23 of the Best Gardening Videos

    26 Feb 2015 | 3:13 am
    Have you ever tried to figure out just how many hours you’ve spent watching cat videos on YouTube? I have, and it’s rather more than I’d care to admit. However, YouTube is filled with more than just cute animals. There is actually a huge amount of useful information on there, too. My favourite topic, naturally, is gardening! Whether you’re a complete novice in the gardening world, or you’re hoping to learn a particular skill, YouTube is a fantastic resource – especially for visual learners. I’ve gathered together some of the most useful videos here as a handy guide. Enjoy!
  • 20 Tips on Feeding British Wild Birds in Your Garden

    16 Feb 2015 | 9:03 am
    Whether you’re a wildlife enthusiast, a keen gardener, or you have young children who are learning about the environment, it’s a joy and a pleasure to feed our feathered friends a decent meal. But what exactly is a decent meal for British birds? And when should you provide food? In this bird feeding guide, we’ll unravel all of the dos and don’ts of wild bird feeding so that you’re equipped to feed with confidence. What to feed wild birds Perhaps the most pertinent question is just what to put out. There are a number of different foods that will provide great nutritional value: 1.
  • 8 Tips for Gardening Indoors In Winter

    28 Jan 2015 | 4:10 am
    As fans of Game of Thrones will no doubt have informed you, winter is coming. In fact, winter is already here. But the dark, dank days from December to February don’t necessarily mean that we have to hang up our gardening gloves until spring arrives. There is plenty for the keen gardener to do indoors over the winter period; and even newbies can get in on the action, too. Follow our tips and you’ll be growing in no time! 1. Go for herbs Root vegetables are delicious during the winter months, but growing them indoors isn’t often going to work as they need lots of light to grow (some…
  • 10 New Year's Resolutions For Your Garden in 2015

    19 Jan 2015 | 9:10 am
    This year, why not show your garden some love? Make a resolution now to ensure that your garden is the best it can be, and you can look forward to showing it off during a few fabulous garden parties during the summer! Investing in your garden is always rewarding, and a little time spent digging, weeding and pruning will result in a gorgeous garden that you can be proud of. Even if nothing at all grows, you’ll at the very least have benefited from some exercise! So, what are you waiting for? Here are 10 New Year's resolutions for your garden in 2015! 1. Become a gardener We know that we’re…
  • 9 Vegetables and Herbs to Grow in Winter

    29 Dec 2014 | 2:33 am
    Winter may seem like a time in the garden when everything is hibernating and nothing grows, but that’s not strictly true. There are several vegetables and herbs that you can grow during the winter, keeping your kitchen stocked with goodies and your fingers green… 1. Broccoli How to plant: Leave 45cm between each plant when placing in the soil; if you have grown from seed outside, thin the plants so that they are 30cm apart. Watering: During dry spells, water at week and a half / fortnightly intervals. Sow: June or July if you want an early spring crop. Harvest: When the spears are formed,…
 
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    Organic Lesson

  • Heirloom Seeds vs. Hybrid vs. GMO Infographic

    gardenhero
    28 Feb 2015 | 5:30 pm
    When I bought seeds for the first time, I did not know what the difference was between heirloom, hybrid, and GMO. If you are in the same boat as I used to be then check out the infographic below to learn what the main differences are. Feel free to use the embed code below if you want to share it on your website or blog. Source: Organic Lesson What is Heirloom? Heirloom seeds come from open-pollinated plants that pass on similar characteristics and traits from the parent plant to the child plant. There is no concrete definition that every gardener uses to define heirloom plants. Some people…
  • Day 35: Growing Herbs Indoors – Cilantro, Chives & Basil

    gardenhero
    3 Feb 2015 | 8:53 pm
    Wow. What a great few weeks it has been since my last update. After seeing my first attempt at growing cilantro seeds fail in a matter of days, I decided to give it another go but with a slightly different method. Instead of putting the seeds in a germinating tray, I decided to give the seeds a nice soak for around seven to eight hours then put them straight into the soil. After three or four days, I saw the first sprouts appearing from the soil. During this time, I also decided to give the basil seeds a go and what you see in the image above is the amount of progress I have made so far.
  • Six Innovative Gardening Tools from CES 2015

    gardenhero
    24 Jan 2015 | 2:48 pm
    The Consumer Electronics Show (CES) isn’t just about showcasing the latest iPhones and TVs. We take a look at six awesome gardening devices that were showcased in CES 2015. The theme of these six devices has a lot in common with cloud technology. How can gardeners conserve water using real-time data? How can gardeners provide the most optimal growing conditions for their plants? Let these innovative tools answer those questions for you. Want to publish this infographic on your own blog or site? Feel free to use the embed code below. Source: Organic Lesson Gardening, particularly urban…
  • Day 17: Growing Garlic Chives Indoors – Baby Sprouts

    gardenhero
    16 Jan 2015 | 5:01 pm
    Apologies for the lack of update these past few days. I have been extremely busy so it wasn’t until today when I was able to find some time to post about the latest updates. Today, I have some good and bad news. Starting with the bad news, my cilantro project pretty much ended before it began. After transplanting the cilantro soils to potted soil, I saw no sign of life for almost a week. I am guessing the cilantro seeds got too bruised while it was getting transplanted. You really do have to be careful when you are dealing with seed germination! The good news is that there are plenty of…
  • Day 10: Growing Cilantro Indoors – Transplanting Seeds

    gardenhero
    6 Jan 2015 | 7:43 pm
    Hello fellow gardeners. Hope you have all been well. It’s been about four days since my last Cilantro report. On day 6, I reported that one of my seeds germinated. Unfortunately, that seed ended up dying after I mistakenly touched it. A day or two later, I was fortunate enough to see two other Cilantro seeds germinate. I have no clue if this is the right time to transplant the seed over but I decided to give it a shot. Here is a quick shot of the two seeds that have germinated. The one in the middle has yet to see any progress but I decided to put it into the pot along with the other…
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    Great Garden Supply: New Products

  • Green It Organic Lawn in a Box

    17 Feb 2015 | 8:14 am
    Organic Lawn Care Kit. Easy to use, pre-mixed program for organic lawn care. Unlike synthetic fertilizers that can harm soil life and cause rapid, disease-prone growth, these organic formulas nurture healthy growth and support the soil ecosystem. Just attach the pre-mixed bottle to your hose and s..Price: $39.99
  • Universal T5 Light Stand

    17 Feb 2015 | 8:14 am
    SunBlaster's new Universal T5 Fluorescent grow light stand (stand only) allows you to set the exact lighting height no matter what size your plants are from 1"-16" or up to 30" with the optional extensions. Get your seedlings or fresh cuttings off to their best starts ever by achieving the optimum..Price: $44.49
  • NanoDome Mini Greenhouse Kit

    17 Feb 2015 | 8:14 am
    This mini greenhouse kit is the perfect way to start your seeds or give your indoor plants extra light. The all-in-one kit has everything you need for indoor plant propagation or seed starting. Great for the hobby gardener, urban gardener, apartment-dweller, or the pro that wants to garden in a sm..Price: $53.48
  • Mosaic KaleidoLantern - Prism

    17 Feb 2015 | 8:14 am
    Mosaic Kaleidolantern - Prism. LED Solar-powererd hanging garden lantern. LED light automatically comes on at dusk creating a dramatic lighting effect. Has two setting, white for a static light or color for a changing pattern light effect. Display on a flat surface or hang from a soffit, wall brac..Price: $29.99
  • Green and Turquoise Mosaic Gazing Globe

    17 Feb 2015 | 8:14 am
    Add your personal flair to your garden with this artistic Very Cool Stuff Mosaic Gazing Globe. Designed with a tapered bottle style glove neck for mounting on a gazing globe stake or for securing into the ground or planter. 10-Inch Diameter Globe. Poly resin construction with weather resistant fi..Price: $49.99
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    How To Start A Garden

  • Indoor Vegetable Gardens

    GreenThumb
    9 Feb 2015 | 4:30 am
    No Backyard? Try Planting an Indoor Vegetable Gardens Inside your home! Absolutely nothing beats the fresh wholesome taste of veggies freshly selected from your very own garden. Growing veggie gardens can be a challenge if you don’t have a backyard, however you can still grow veggies inside your home. Just follow a couple of simple garden-smart guidelines. Pick Appropriate Veggies Different plants have various requirements and with indoor gardens the significant constraints tend to be offered area and available light. If you wish to grow fruit bearing plants, these will certainly…
  • Garden Design For Beginners

    GreenThumb
    4 Feb 2015 | 5:41 pm
    What is the Right Garden Design for You Garden Design is one of the most enjoyable and challenging aspects of learning how to start a garden.  When considering the style of your garden style keep in mind that it is possible to incorporate different garden types into one garden. Numerous vegetables have appealing foliage and can be grown in amongst your ornamental plants. In fact organic garden enthusiasts will frequently grow particular ornamentals in their vegetable plots in order to draw in parasites far from their vegetable crops. The quantity of space you have offered to you will…
  • Growing Tomatoes In Your Garden

    GreenThumb
    26 Jan 2015 | 6:41 pm
    Growing Tomatoes In You Garden Tomatoes are without a doubt one of the most popular vegetables in the home garden, and for good reason. Homegrown tomatoes are very nutritious and much more flavorful than those bought from a store. Tomato plants will produce an abundance of fruit for the home gardener if they are properly planted and cared for. Tomatoes require a fairly long growing season, and for this reason the seeds are typically planted indoors about six to eight weeks before they can be planted in the garden. The seeds can be sown 1/4″ deep in small pots or flats in a soil…
  • Gardening Videos for Beginners

    GreenThumb
    26 Jan 2015 | 5:53 pm
    The below is one of our favorite gardening videos. We hope that you enjoy it as much as we did and learn a bunch from it. Some of the tips are very helpful and easy to understand for all levels of skills. Thanks for watching and check out more articles here: ToStartAGarden.com The post Gardening Videos for Beginners appeared first on How To Start A Garden.
  • How To Start A Garden With Space Constraints

    GreenThumb
    25 Jan 2015 | 6:55 am
    How To Start A Garden With Space Constraints So much can be stated about gardening. It is a way to communicate nature, to breathe life into the earth, and so on. However, there are a variety of crucial indicate keep in mind when gardening in order to ensure a positive, trouble-free experience. This short article sets out a few of those points in an uncomplicated way.To keep cats, snakes, and other animals out of your garden, use moth spheres. Just spread a couple of insect spheres at the edges of your garden.To make birds keep away from the produce you’re growing in your garden, tie…
 
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    BackToMyGarden - Discover Your Passion For Gardening

  • BTMG 089: How To Build Harmonious Lucky Gardens with Shelley Sparks

    gardentips
    24 Feb 2015 | 9:26 pm
    Shelly Sparks is a talented garden designer and feng shui advisor.  Her company Harmony Gardens helps clients to create beautiful spaces and a lucky life.  Shelly is the author of "Secrets of The Land, Designing Harmonious Gardens With Feng Shui".  She teaches, is a landscape architect, lecturer and consultant, and garden blogger in Los Angeles California. [...]
  • BTMG 088: Secrets of The Northern Gardener with Melanie Watts

    gardentips
    22 Feb 2015 | 9:20 pm
    Melanie Watts loves growing food in a short gardening season.  She's passionate about sustainable, organic cold-climate gardening.  Like vegetables that mature in 60 days or less and perennials that survive in minus 40!  Melanie is a Master Gardener, an avid blogger and lives in northern British Columbia Canada. In This Episode You Will Discover: the unique [...]
  • BTMG 087: What Is The Strangest Thing You’ve Found In The Garden with Jenny Bowring

    gardentips
    19 Feb 2015 | 9:45 pm
    Jenny Bowring is a passionate grower of plants and has a love of vegetable gardening.  She is an avid keeper of chickens.  Food preserving is a big part of her life.  She gardens in all 4 seasons of weather in Lancashire, near Manchester in England on her allotment.  You won't believe what she found hidden [...]
  • BTMG 086: Studying The Future of Food in Eastern Europe with Karol Milaniuk

    gardentips
    17 Feb 2015 | 9:59 pm
    Karol Milaniuk is a horticulture student in Lublin Poland, southeast of Warsaw near the Ukraine border.  Karol loves Formula 1 racing, and studying the science of plants.  He is building a new Facebook community for lovers of plants, and is experimenting with growing plants new to eastern Europe.  After university Karol plans to become a cutting-edge [...]
  • BTMG 085: Meadows and Landscapes with Kathy Connolly

    gardentips
    15 Feb 2015 | 9:50 pm
    Kathy Connolly is a talented garden designer, writer, coach and speaker.  She has a fabulous gardening blog at SpeakingofLandscapes.com.  Kathy has worked with beautiful landscapes for 30 years, including meadows, woodland edges, shade plants and foundation gardens.  She loves working with native plants and organic techniques.  Kathy is a regular columnist for The Day Zip 06 [...]
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    Grow Our Way

  • Be My Buddy: Companion Planting Vegetables

    Safer® Brand
    27 Feb 2015 | 5:45 am
    Just like humans, some plants are more compatible together than others. As the gardener, you’re in charge of making sure each vegetable gets along with their garden mates. To help you learn which plants are friends or foes, we’ve created this companion planting chart for vegetables. What Vegetables Grow Well Together? Companion planting is the purposeful placement of certain plants near each other as a natural way to drive harmful pests away, help each other grow, and even improve the vegetables’ flavor. Of course, not all vegetables are buddies. For example, members of the bean family,…
  • Gardening For Beginners: Intro to Hydroponics

    Safer® Brand
    4 Nov 2014 | 8:45 am
    The term “hydroponic gardening” may sound fancy or high-tech, but the concept is really pretty simple. While the practice of hydroponic gardening dates back to ancient times, it wasn’t until the 1950s that it started to gain prominence. What makes hydroponic gardening different from traditional growing practices? It does not involve the use of soil. Instead, plants are grown using either a nutrient-rich water culture or a soilless medium such as clay aggregate, coconut coir, perlite, sand or gravel. Some of the benefits of hydroponic gardening include higher yields, reduced water…
  • What Your Office Is Missing

    Safer® Brand
    30 Oct 2014 | 9:29 am
    If you’re one of those people who are stuck working inside an office all day, adding a little green to the scene in the form of plants can do wonders for your work environment. Office plants can provide a long list of benefits including: Alleviating stress – If squeezing rubber balls or taking walks around the building aren’t helping you cope with stress at work, try adding a plant or two to your work area. According to one study, placing plants in an office reduced worker anxiety by 37 percent, while anger and hostility decreased 44 percent. Improved air quality – Although smoking…
  • How to Grow the Perfect Tomato

    Safer® Brand
    21 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    Have you ever marveled at the plump, juicy delicious tomatoes that your friends or neighbors seem to be able to grow so effortlessly? Do you wonder why your own tomato growing efforts don’t seem to deliver the same results? Growing perfect tomatoes isn’t always easy. A little luck and a lot of tender loving care are required. It also helps if you know how to overcome the obstacles that can prevent you from achieving the tomato growing success you desire. Poor soil quality – First things first, make sure that your soil pH is ideal for tomatoes. You can easily find a pH soil testing kit…
  • Fresh Fads

    Safer® Brand
    16 Oct 2014 | 3:00 pm
    These days, the concept of gardening encompasses much more than raising a few flowers and vegetables in the yard. While traditional backyard gardening is still a favorite pastime in the United States and around the world, the art of gardening continues to change and evolve. Let’s take a closer look at some of the “fresh fads” that are currently taking over today’s gardening world. Organic Gardening The focus on protecting the environment and consuming foods that are free of man-made preservatives and pesticides has continued to intensify in recent years. As a result, the popularity of…
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    In the Garden...with Mariani Landscape

  • Orchids in Detail

    Gina Iliopoulos
    27 Feb 2015 | 3:00 am
    We have shown you some amazing orchids this week, with many more to go.  To appreciate the details in each different orchid we wanted to give you a short anatomy lesson.  On the right is the stunning Nun’s orchid.  You … Continue reading →
  • The Many Orchid Hybrids

    Gina Iliopoulos
    25 Feb 2015 | 3:00 am
    Welcome back to our showing of orchids.  We introduced you last time to the concept of orchid hybrids and today we will show you multiple examples.  We will start with an excellent specimen, the dendrobium orchid.  Dendrobium is a genus … Continue reading →
  • All About Orchids

    Gina Iliopoulos
    23 Feb 2015 | 3:00 am
    This week we show you orchids, from the bold to the miniature, in all colors, and with incredible textures.  The orchid family consists of hundreds of genera and tens of thousands of species.  Genera and species are botanical terms that … Continue reading →
  • Restored Native Prairie and Oak Savanna

    Gina Iliopoulos
    20 Feb 2015 | 3:00 am
    Today we bring you the restored prairie and oak savanna we have been hinting at all week.  Imagine stepping out of the formal  garden we showed you last time and into this haven. There are not many words needed to … Continue reading →
  • Formal Rose Garden

    Gina Iliopoulos
    18 Feb 2015 | 3:00 am
    Welcome back to our landscape tour.  Last time we introduced you to this stunning landscape and began our visit with the pool and surrounding hardscapes.  Today we talk to you about the formal gardens that are part of the traditional … Continue reading →
 
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