Gardening

  • Most Topular Stories

  • What to do About Seedlings that Won’t Shed Their Coat

    You Grow Girl
    Gayla Trail
    7 Apr 2015 | 9:26 am
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  • Growing Ornamental Edible Beets (Beta vulgaris)

    Shawna Coronado
    Shawna Coronado
    13 Apr 2015 | 4:20 am
    Beets are one of my favorite ornamental edible plants. They make excellent ground covers, beautiful container plants, and of course, brilliant living wall gardens. Incredibly easy to grow from seed or vegetative plant, it was one of my first suggestions as an annual plant that crosses over to the ornamental edible category of plant growing in one of my latest books, the Indiana Getting Started Garden Guide. Below is a page from my book that addresses ornamental edible beets and how to grow them. Beet Botanical Name – Beta vulgaris Bloom Period and Seasonal Colors – Grown for its…
  • Bugs, they make a garden good!

    clay and limestone
    Gail
    9 Apr 2015 | 6:00 am
     It's Golden Ragwort time in the gardenEach spring when Packera aurea blooms there are always a few stalks that are covered with aphids! I don't worry about a few aphids since the flowers never seem to decline because of them. (The Happy Flower Trinity)I didn't always feel that way when I saw aphids sucking the juices out of a plant! Way back when I was less experienced about the role of insects in the garden, I would grab the hose and spray them to oblivion. Now, I recognize them as an important food for predator bugs. In fact, aphids are a primary food source for predator bugs.
  • The Garden Comes ALIVE! A Spring Garden Tour

    You Grow Girl
    Gayla Trail
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:47 am
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  • The Very First Blooms: Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day April 2015

    Cold Climate Gardening
    Kathy Purdy
    15 Apr 2015 | 11:01 am
    In other years, I’ve had the first blooms in March. Once, I managed snowdrops in February. But this year, I almost wondered if I’d have crocuses blooming for Bloom Day. Thankfully, this past week Spring finally arrived and I have a respectable showing. I’ve seen pictures of large patches of spring snowflakes, so I hope […]
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    You Grow Girl

  • The Garden Comes ALIVE! A Spring Garden Tour

    Gayla Trail
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:47 am
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  • 2 Compact Tomatoes with WOW Factor

    Gayla Trail
    8 Apr 2015 | 9:56 am
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  • What to do About Seedlings that Won’t Shed Their Coat

    Gayla Trail
    7 Apr 2015 | 9:26 am
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  • Green Things Watch

    Gayla Trail
    31 Mar 2015 | 9:10 am
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  • Food Worth Growing: ‘Golden Nugget’ Hot Pepper

    Gayla Trail
    24 Mar 2015 | 10:30 am
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    Shawna Coronado

  • Growing Ornamental Edible Beets (Beta vulgaris)

    Shawna Coronado
    13 Apr 2015 | 4:20 am
    Beets are one of my favorite ornamental edible plants. They make excellent ground covers, beautiful container plants, and of course, brilliant living wall gardens. Incredibly easy to grow from seed or vegetative plant, it was one of my first suggestions as an annual plant that crosses over to the ornamental edible category of plant growing in one of my latest books, the Indiana Getting Started Garden Guide. Below is a page from my book that addresses ornamental edible beets and how to grow them. Beet Botanical Name – Beta vulgaris Bloom Period and Seasonal Colors – Grown for its…
  • How To Plant a Drought Tolerant Living Wall Garden

    Shawna Coronado
    9 Apr 2015 | 10:02 pm
    Your home is small; you only have a very tiny balcony area to grow a garden and you dream of a brightly colored garden filled with herbs and plants that require minimum fuss and care. I have the solution for you — a drought tolerant living wall garden that requires absolutely no weeding. This garden is created from a bookshelf style unit and several EarthBox® Junior™ gardening systems, which have a special water reservoir in the planting container to help you water less. Below are a few excerpts from Grow a Living Wall; Create Vertical Gardens with Purpose, my latest book. GREAT…
  • Will More Hummingbird Feeders Attract More Birds?

    Shawna Coronado
    6 Apr 2015 | 4:30 am
    Over the last several years we have had one hummingbird. Just one. While there are about 20 different species of this bird in North America, I have no idea his variety. I just love his little self flitting about my garden. There are many perennials in the garden they love, such as late tulips, iris, and hosta. I planted a large stand of bold red Will Rogers Zinnia this year which the little guy went crazy for. I also set out a little hummingbird feeder for him and we celebrate in his adorable antics. Then I started thinking about one hummingbird feeder for one hummingbird. Perhaps if we place…
  • An Outdoor Garden Potting Bench Room

    Shawna Coronado
    2 Apr 2015 | 4:04 am
    BEFORE PICTURE Back in 2013 I posted the story on my blog for Better Homes and Gardens about how to renovate your potting bench area into an outdoor room. As you can see by the original photo to the right, my old patio was a hot mess. Way too crowded, difficult to navigate, a cut-off view of the garden and pathway, and thoroughly unattractive. My goal was to transform the potting bench area into an outdoor garden potting bench room that could be used dually for entertainment and work. Happily, it was a brightly colored success. When sitting in the Adirondack chairs you would get a whiff of…
  • Advantages of Glass Teapots and an Herbal Tea Recipe

    Shawna Coronado
    30 Mar 2015 | 4:05 am
    It’s Spring – welcome to allergy season! As soon as the snow melts I pull out my favorite teapots and rotate a series of daily tea drinks in the home and office to help combat the pain and drama of sinus problems. Without my faithful tea pots I would be doomed to even more allergy pain – hot drinks seem to help me fight the mold allergies a little better. Just last week, while the snow was still on the ground, I took some photos of my latest tea pot discovery – the Teaposy. It’s made of 100% glass and the TeaPosy team sent out a pot for me to review. That got me…
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    Cold Climate Gardening

  • The Very First Blooms: Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day April 2015

    Kathy Purdy
    15 Apr 2015 | 11:01 am
    In other years, I’ve had the first blooms in March. Once, I managed snowdrops in February. But this year, I almost wondered if I’d have crocuses blooming for Bloom Day. Thankfully, this past week Spring finally arrived and I have a respectable showing. I’ve seen pictures of large patches of spring snowflakes, so I hope […]
  • What’s That?: When A Gardener Neglects Her Garden Journal

    Kathy Purdy
    11 Apr 2015 | 7:15 pm
    I actually like keeping records. I can get obsessive about it, and that has gotten me into trouble in the past. So last fall, when I was frantically planting out the plants I had kept in containers–some of them for two years–I left the documenting of that planting for “later,” applauding myself for not getting […]
  • Spring Flowers Grow Under the Snow–Really!

    Kathy Purdy
    7 Apr 2015 | 12:17 pm
    The calendar says it’s spring, but you’re still looking out on a vast expanse of snow: You look at it and think, “Before any flowers will bloom, first that stuff has to melt, then the soil has to thaw, then the leaves will emerge, and then–finally!–I’ll have flowers. Not so, dear gardener. Not so. The […]
  • Ten Things to Do While You’re Waiting For the Snow to Melt

    Kathy Purdy
    4 Apr 2015 | 9:09 pm
    Watching the snow pack melt is sort of like watching the tide recede–in slow motion. It is tempting to grit your teeth, clench your hands and mutter “C’mon, already!” but since that really doesn’t get you anywhere, here are some things to do instead. Some of them I’ve already done, some of them I’ve done […]
  • Adventures in Flower Arranging

    Kathy Purdy
    23 Mar 2015 | 3:46 am
    Anyone can plunk a handful of flowers into a vase and call it an arrangement, and in the past, this is what I have done. True, I had made some attempt to arrange the flowers attractively, but the results could at best be described as rustic or primitive. I wanted something a little more polished […]
 
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    A Way To Garden

  • doodle by andre: the casualties of garden design

    margaret
    13 Apr 2015 | 6:40 am
    THEY UNDERSTAND every word. Don’t think they don’t. As we gardeners walk around muttering, pondering new homes (or the compost!) [read more…] The post doodle by andre: the casualties of garden design appeared first on A Way To Garden.
  • growing annual vines, with marilyn barlow

    margaret
    11 Apr 2015 | 9:14 am
    IT’S PREPOSTEROUS just how many feet of stem and foliage sprout from each little annual vine seed, and even wilder [read more…] The post growing annual vines, with marilyn barlow appeared first on A Way To Garden.
  • is the perfect bamboo leaf rake extinct?

    margaret
    8 Apr 2015 | 4:24 am
    WANTED: Bamboo leaf rake that doesn’t lose teeth or handle for at least one season. Preferably with a padded sleeve [read more…] The post is the perfect bamboo leaf rake extinct? appeared first on A Way To Garden.
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    Plant Whatever Brings You Joy

  • The Rustic Quiche

    Kathryn
    17 Apr 2015 | 7:53 am
    rustic quiche with roasted red peppers and kalamata olives Back when Antonia was a little girl a lovely Asian woman in San Francisco gave me a recipe for quiche which I vaguely recall making successfully a couple of times, and then, inexplicably, the recipe failed. I have no idea why. But I concluded that I “didn’t know how to make quiche.” (How many times do we do this one way or another?) I moved on to other endeavors in the kitchen. Making yogurt. Crafting tortillas. Baking bread. Astoundingly it’s taken me decades to get back to making quiches. And even that began…
  • Fire Pits: Part Two

    Kathryn
    19 Mar 2015 | 6:44 pm
    As some of you will recall my last blog post was afire with enthusiasm for fire pits, inspired by gardening author Helen Yoest, who wrote a guest post about her own fire pit in her garden. Kindled in my new found passion was the realization my 72nd birthday was upon me, nearly, and that if I applied myself aptly I might actually combine the two, making a new fire pit the center of my birthday festivities. I began researching fire pits and made the decision to purchase one made by Landman and to purchase it locally. All that was left was to decide which design. I chose the vine pattern since I…
  • Fire Pits: Part One

    Kathryn
    19 Jan 2015 | 1:22 pm
    It is probably fitting that following a post on leaving wild corners in your garden I would be drawn to a recent post I saw on author Helen Yoest’s blog Gardening with Confidence regarding her organic creation of what she calls her Fire Garden. I found I kept thinking of her post and had the occasion to inquire about a possible guest post after she most generously reviewed my book Plant Whatever Brings You Joy! We have some things in common other than writing about our gardens. She’s a Pisces lady living in North Carolina who owns a Border Collie! As many of you know, so much of…
  • Leave Wild, Undisturbed Corners in Your Garden

    Kathryn
    31 Dec 2014 | 10:41 am
    There is an irony that Plant Whatever Brings You Joy: Blessed Wisdom from the Garden must ultimately carry a caveat, being that as a conscious gardener we learn that our immediate landscapes, the ones we play with, plant things in and recreate, are not, as we thought, blank canvases to reconstruct to our own liking. Not really. They are pieces of something, a larger something of which we are all a part. And that as loving stewards of that reality we are rather obliged to consider what came before, as in the last several millions of years, and to consider that carefully as we make our mark…
  • Winter Butternut Squash Soup!

    Kathryn
    17 Nov 2014 | 1:08 pm
    Most likely because neither my mother nor grandmother, as I recall, ever baked or in any way prepared a winter squash for our family, it’s taken me quite awhile to familiarize myself with the many varieties–and then to learn what I can do with them! I’m imagining if I set my mind to it I could write an entire book about winter squashes and their infinite possibilities. What is more likely, and what appears to be happening, is that each fall and winter, as the squashes come into their splendid season–just in time for the winter holidays, how convenient, and no accident,…
 
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    May Dreams Gardens

  • Tweaking and experimenting in the garden

    Carol
    16 Apr 2015 | 9:05 pm
    Star flowers. They capture the color of the sky and bring it to earth in a flower. It's been a spring of tweaking the garden a bit because, well, not all the plants are where I want them and I wanted some new plants. So far... I had a crew come in and take out two gigantic Viburnums that had grown well, served well, but were on the decline. In their places, I planted pawpaw trees, two
  • Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day - April 2015

    Carol
    14 Apr 2015 | 9:05 pm
    Brunnera macrophylla Welcome to Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day for April 2015. Here in my USDA Hardiness Zone 6a garden in central Indiana, it is most assuredly spring and every day something new is blooming. When I went out to take pictures for bloom day, I almost missed the pretty little blue flowers of False Forget-me-not, Brunnera macrophylla.  The plants are hidden from view,  but I caught
  • An Update from the Vegetable Garden Cathedral

    Carol
    12 Apr 2015 | 6:45 pm
    Vegetable Garden Cathedral I spent some much needed time in the Vegetable Garden Cathedral this weekend.  Both the garden and I needed it. The garden needed it because it was quite a weedy mess, with henbit (probably Lamium amplexicaule) growing in nearly every bed. Henbit is a winter annual which generally shows up in early spring.  The trick to controlling it is to pull it out before it
  • The Controversial Violet

    Carol
    11 Apr 2015 | 5:14 am
    Viola sp. grown from seed many years ago.  Oh, the controversy over violets! There are some people who consider violets of any species to be lawn and garden weeds which should be pulled out, or worse, obliterated with herbicides. There are others, and I am in this group  of others, who think violets are the most charming of flowers, which should be allowed to flourish just about any place
  • Quince

    Carol
    6 Apr 2015 | 6:58 am
    Memories are triggered by many things, the snippet of a song, the whiff of a scent, a few sentences in a book... I was reading along through Sissinghurst: Vita Sackville-West and the Creation of a Garden by Vita Sackville-West and Sarah Raven and came to a section about ornamental quince growing in the garden. "Their fruits, which in autumn are as handsome as their flowers, make excellent jelly;
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    Backyard Gardening Blog

  • First Flower of Spring 2015

    Administrator
    3 Apr 2015 | 7:58 am
    On March 31st I noticed the first bloom of the Spring, a crocus as always, same spot as last year. The first bloom last year was also March 31st. Here is my Michigan Misery Index over time: 2009: March 15th 2010: March 16th 2011: March 15th 2012: March 10th 2013: Forgot 2014: March 31st 2015: […]
  • Squish This, Not That: Confusion over Bugs

    Administrator
    3 Jan 2015 | 8:38 am
    Sometimes a little bit of knowledge is a bad thing. I’ve talked, multiple times, to novice gardeners, hobbyists (and, lets face it, I’m a hobbyist too, I don’t have a degree in horticulture, I am not a professional landscape architect, but I’m a garden blogger, gardening is serious business to me), laypeople, or just people […]
  • Frugal Gardening: Starting Perennials from Seed

    Administrator
    14 Dec 2014 | 7:23 am
    I think everyone loves a nice mass planting. Mixed plantings look nice too, but it is hard to beat the statement of a mass planting. A whole bed of lilies, a whole bed of hostas, a whole bed of daylilies, or cone flowers, or rudbeckias, or phlox, or whatever. Maybe not all the same exactly […]
  • Growing a Bee Friendly Garden

    Administrator
    27 Nov 2014 | 2:26 pm
    In the inland empire of California is a vast stretch of hundreds of square miles of almond trees. Every spring 1.6 million beehives, 60% of the managed beehives in the country, are trucked to California to pollinate these almond trees. It is the largest pollination event on earth, and is responsible for 80% of the […]
  • Growing William Shakespeare’s Garden

    Administrator
    16 Oct 2014 | 6:13 pm
    So there was a guy, you may have heard of him, William Shakespeare, he was sort of a big deal. He was of course an English writer and his works have been popular for almost 500 years, that is some staying power. I actually like his stuff, I’ve read Shakespeare for pleasure, I’m that sort […]
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    Bloomingwriter: Gardening in Nova Scotia

  • Those rare blue flowers

    Jodi DeLong
    1 Apr 2015 | 5:02 am
    For those of you wondering where I've gotten to...I'm here, and I'm fine, just really, really busy as we get ready for our 10th anniversary Saltscapes Expo. Lots to tell you about while we're also still waiting for the 87 feet of snow that fell in the past two months to melt, but for now, a blast from the past....We all know that in flowers, blue is the rarest colour. Which means some of us go koo koo for cocapuffs over it. Quite a few of us, actually. That number would include me, of course. From the glorious of the difficult, divaesque, but oh-so-beautiful blue poppy...To the stately cobalt…
  • End of year roundup--favourites and more

    Jodi DeLong
    28 Dec 2014 | 10:52 am
    Slightly belated Christmas greetings to all--we had not a drop of snow in Nova Scotia, and in fact had record breaking mild temperatures and torrential rains this year. It made travel easy, and we spent a very happy Christmas day with family. Since then I've been on an actual time-off from work, allowing myself a few days of just doing whatever I want, which has mostly been playing with photography, sorting through my image libraries, reading, and catching up with people I care about. We often have end-of-year retrospectives on many topics, including, of course, on gardening. I decided…
  • Gold foliage for brighter gardens

    Jodi DeLong
    15 Dec 2014 | 8:00 am
    Hello, fellow gardeners! Where have I been, you ask? Well, it's been a busy, busy few months, with lots of projects on the go. Now, with only 10 days til Christmas, the main deadlines are under control so I can do some catchup tasks, including updating my neglected blog. It's like that for gardeners, though, so often: during the main gardening months we're outside in our gardens, planting, weeding, harvesting, puttering, designing. Now that frost has come and things have stopped growing and we've gotten our bulbs planted (yes! I did! Before December, even!) we turn to the season of indoor…
  • Falling into autumn...

    Jodi DeLong
    22 Sep 2014 | 8:02 am
     Suddenly, it's September 22 and I haven't posted for a month. Why is that, you ask? Well, for sure I'm always busy and never bored, but there was a lot going on in August, some of it personal in support of a friend, and given that my friends have always been there for me when I need them, I pay it forward gladly. And the days are getting shorter, and suddenly, autumn is but hours away. (Top photo is of blue leadwort, Ceratostigma plumbaginoides, a terrific groundcover with gorgeous fall colour).Autumn is not without its beauty, to be sure--some would say that the coming month or…
  • A Midsummer Miscellany of Colour

    Jodi DeLong
    22 Aug 2014 | 6:55 am
     It's now beyond 'Half Past August' and I thought you might need some encouragement because this is the time of year that I hear "there's no colour in my garden" from some folks. Sure there is--and you can add more! I keep adding as I see things I want to change or acquire plants that I have been looking for.You may remember I talked about plants that I purchase and treat as annuals, including this 'Cherry Brandy' rudbeckia. THIS is why I buy this plant every year if need be--look at that colour. Nothing else quite like it.Amazingly, all the buddleia I had…
 
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    Digging

  • Classical beauty with a modern edge in Sprout’s Rollingwood Garden

    Pam/Digging
    17 Apr 2015 | 5:36 am
    I’ve been fortunate this spring to visit a number of new-to-me gardens. One of my favorites is this one, the creation of talented landscape architect Jackson Broussard of Sprout. Located in the Rollingwood neighborhood, the garden is a refresh of an existing garden that, according to Jackson, had plenty of cottage color but not much structure or interest once the flowers faded. To provide structure and year-round appeal, Jackson carved out space for a dining patio in the heart of the garden. Low limestone walls define the space and offer extra seating as well as a place to display…
  • Twilight garden for Foliage Follow-Up

    Pam/Digging
    15 Apr 2015 | 11:13 pm
    Last evening the garden was bathed in the soft glow of a spring twilight. After a day of planting, mulching, and general tidying, I was glad for a quiet moment to just stop and enjoy the garden. The new “monolith” wall has made a handy spot to display a ‘Color Guard’ yucca, I’ve found. I love those stripey, sunshine-yellow leaves. In front of the wall, and behind the others, I’ve planted ‘Blonde Ambition’ grama grass in sun and Texas sedge in shade, accented with a couple of Indian mallows (Abutilon palmeri) that are tiny right now but will, I…
  • Twilight garden on Bloom Day

    Pam/Digging
    15 Apr 2015 | 9:18 pm
    I was putting together my Foliage Follow-Up post for tomorrow when I realized that I had pictures for a Bloom Day post too. The flowers of spring can be fleeting, and I want to give them their due, starting with a velvety, wine-colored pond iris that Rock Rose shared with me. This flower opened the day after I brought it home. Thank you, Rock Rose! Shoshana’s iris, a long-ago passalong from Tina at My Gardener Says…, just started blooming. The ruffled, lilac flowers are so beautiful. Showy in a more Dr. Seussian way, the false red yucca (Beschorneria septentrionalis) I bought at…
  • Meadows abloom and a swingin’ arboretum at the Wildflower Center

    Pam/Digging
    14 Apr 2015 | 9:25 pm
    For my third and final post about last Saturday’s visit to the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, I’ll lead with the state flower and inducer of innumerable spring photo ops: the Texas bluebonnet (Lupinus texensis), pictured here with a smattering of Indian paintbrush (Castilleja indivisa). Flower peeping is what visitors were there for (if they weren’t at the plant sale), and there was plenty of it. Prairie penstemon (Penstemon cobaea), I think People atop the cistern tower were enjoying a bird’s-eye view of the wildflower meadow. An aqueduct funnels runoff from a…
  • A blooming good time at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

    Pam/Digging
    14 Apr 2015 | 10:03 am
    Spring is the Wildflower Center‘s showiest season, and last Saturday I shared the gardens with many other flower-peepers. (Click for part 1 of my Wildflower Center visit.) In this post we’ll revisit the nearly 1-year-old Luci and Ian Family Garden, where Gulf Coast penstemon (Penstemon tenuis) was in full bloom. Gulf Coast penstemon is one of my favorite spring-blooming perennials for part shade in my garden, and it’s beautiful in a full-sun rain garden here. An extended gutter carries rainwater off the roof of a shade pavilion and into a large cistern. Excess water…
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    Blithewold Blogs

  • Fresh air and excercise

    Kristin Green
    17 Apr 2015 | 7:46 am
    This past week was just what the doctor ordered. Sunshine and temperatures in the 50s and 60s made being up and out absolutely irresistible — for us and the spring flowers we’ve been waiting so (im)patiently for. Everything that, as of last week, still seemed tightly budded and winter-stunted is suddenly busting to bloom. The daffodils have started opening and, depending […]
  • Seeing flowers

    Kristin Green
    10 Apr 2015 | 8:26 am
    I don’t want you to get too excited by the title of this post. Signs of spring are popping out, bit by bit, but we’re not seeing many flowers yet. We’re still waiting for the daffodils to make an appearance. That said, feel free to do a little dance if you want to (I do) because it won’t […]
  • Awakening spring

    Kristin Green
    3 Apr 2015 | 7:51 am
    This week the temperatures softened just enough to keep spring from hitting the snooze button again and made being outside in the gardens totally irresistible. We didn’t leave a lot in the Rose or North Gardens to cut back (we adhere to the tradition of putting those gardens “to bed” in the fall for the sake of […]
  • Bristol Phoenix, Tuesday, June 22, 1897: Opening of a New Golf Club House

    Margaret Whitehead
    31 Mar 2015 | 8:42 am
    *Article from the Bristol Phoenix, Tuesday, June 22, 1897* The formal opening of the new club house of the Bristol Golf Club took place Saturday afternoon and proved to be a very pleasant occasion. The president of the club, Mr. A.S. Van Wickle, and Mrs. Van Wickle were assisted in receiving by Mrs. W. Fred […]
  • Sight for sore eyes

    Kristin Green
    27 Mar 2015 | 7:13 am
    Winter’s mess has me craving tidiness (I understand the whole spring cleaning thing now and have gone a little nuts clearing surfaces at home) and its palette of whites, greys, browns, and bronzy greens has made my eyeballs hungry for super-saturated rainbow colors. You too? I had both wishes fulfilled during one dark, rainy day yesterday. Betsy and I […]
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    Ellis Hollow

  • More Iris ‘Katharine Hodgkin’

    Craig
    12 Apr 2015 | 6:21 am
    Nice drift of Iris 'Katharine Hodgkin' backlit by sinking sun. Shot with iPhone, as most of my shots this spring have been.  
  • Chilly blooms

    Craig
    5 Apr 2015 | 5:06 am
    Same clump that was in prevous post at dawn after a little overnight snow. Another clump of 'Katies' nearby.
  • First flowers actually flowering

    Craig
    3 Apr 2015 | 5:35 pm
    A couple days up in the 60s have pushed the early spring ephemerals along.
  • First flowers

    Craig
    30 Mar 2015 | 3:32 pm
    Yes. I shoveled 3 feet of snow off this bed a couple weeks ago because I wanted to give the Eranthis and Iris 'Katharine Hodgkin' a head start.  
  • Picture This – Best of 2014

    Craig
    1 Feb 2015 | 1:13 pm
    Kudos to Saxon Holt for reviving the Picture This photo competition at Gardening Gone Wild. I hesitate to call it a competition. I think of it more like a challenge to improve my own garden photography skills. And I've missed it dearly. It was great motivation to get out in the garden with a camera. I hope others join in so that the feature enjoys a long life. And I had the privilege to judge one of the early contests when Nan Ondra had the courage to challenge participants to try out scanning plant material, a technique that I've been known to fiddle around with. I'll admit that my…
 
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    Flatbush Gardener

  • This Season's Schedule

    Flatbush Gardener
    2 Apr 2015 | 5:48 pm
    Lots of native plant events from April to June which I hope to attend. And I'll be speaking, hosting, or tabling at three of them. Me in my front yard last year, hosting a NYC Wildflower Week Pollinator Safari during Pollinator Week 2014. Photo:... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Invasive Plant Profile: Chelidonium majus, Celandine, Greater Celandine

    Flatbush Gardener
    23 Feb 2015 | 7:58 pm
    Revised 2015-02-23: This was one of my earliest blog posts, first published in June 2006. I've overhauled it to 1) meet my current technical standards, and 2) improve the content based on the latest available information. Chelidonium majus,... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • An Elegy for Biophilia

    Flatbush Gardener
    23 Feb 2015 | 5:35 am
    I was moved to write this by a short missive from Reverend Billy: When I go to pray, which is sometimes difficult being so without any god, I think of that time in my life, because the natural world was overwhelming the god that my family insisted... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Pollinator Gardens, for Schools and Others

    Flatbush Gardener
    20 Feb 2015 | 8:29 pm
    I got a query from a reader: I’m working on a school garden project and we’d like to develop a pollinator garden in several raised beds. Can you recommend some native plants that we should have in our garden? Ideally we’d like to have some... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • World Wetlands Day

    Flatbush Gardener
    2 Feb 2015 | 6:52 pm
    Not only is it Imbolc, aka Groundhog Day (Flatbush Fluffy did NOT see his shadow today. You're welcome.), it's also World Wetlands Day. After seeing some of the photos shared by others on Twitter, I thought I would share my Flickr photo albums of... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
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    Ledge and Gardens

  • The Week in Review

    Layanee DeMerchant
    17 Apr 2015 | 12:52 pm
    The snow has left the gardens but there are still a couple of mounds in the drive from the winter snowplowing. No matter since now the garden work can begin. The crocus are up and taking turns debuting their outfits. The snowdrops have almost finished blooming which means that in spite of all the raking to be done, they need to be moved around right after the flowers fade. I have found that this is an easy transition time for them and they spread quite readily when given a helping hand. I just lift the larger clumps and carefully pull apart the bulbs. It is then an easy matter to pop them…
  • A Walk in the Garden at Follers Manor

    Layanee DeMerchant
    7 Apr 2015 | 5:22 am
    On this cool spring day in New England, I invite you to travel with me to a garden which overlooks the village of Alfriston in the Cuckmere Valley located in the eastern portion of the South Downs in Great Britain. I had the great fortune to visit this garden in the summer of '13. It was one of many lovely gardens which I saw that trip. It is an exceptional garden. Designed by the noted Landscape Architect, Ian Kitson, and owned by Anne & Geoff Shaw it is a garden which has been sculpted out of the hillside. It has a maturity which belies its youth. The Shaw's purchased the…
  • The Forgotten Spring

    Layanee DeMerchant
    30 Mar 2015 | 6:30 am
    On Monday, March 30, 2015, it is snowing yet again and this March morning has all the steel gray warmth of an early January day. I did miss most of the snow of this remarkable winter but upon returning to New England in mid-March I have been privileged to witness the effects of the many snow storms of 2015. There is still a foot of snow on the ground in many places and the driveway has five foot piles of snow from the plow. The temperatures are quite chilly with the current temp of around 32F. There will be no raking in March. There will most probably be no garden…
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    Garden Rant

  • Dumbarton Oaks in April by Susan Harris

    Susan Harris
    17 Apr 2015 | 4:19 am
    Yesterday was the perfect day to visit Dumbarton Oaks, the Beatrix Farrand-designed garden and research facility in DC’s Georgetown neighborhood. Cherry trees and magnolias were still blooming, under blue skies.  I was reminded why the National Geographic named it the 6th best garden in the world. Above, the garden’s most iconic feature. The Pebble Garden is also justly famous. The same swirls are repeated in other parts of the garden. Kitchen Garden. The Forsythia Dell leads to the Dumbarton Oaks Park below. The North Lawn features a series of ha-ha’s. The pool looks…
  • A Grower of Regionally Appropriate Plants is Hard to Find by Evelyn Hadden

    Evelyn Hadden
    15 Apr 2015 | 10:41 am
    On a recent drive through California, I stopped at the locally famous Sierra Azul Nursery, where I wandered through their 2-acre demonstration garden and met some Australians. “Nothing will grow here if you don’t water it.” That sentence, which I hear everywhere and not just here in the desert, points out a person who has not yet met the right grower(s). Growers are a bottleneck in this business of changing the way Americans landscape. If a person wants to make an ecologically sound garden — by which I mean a fairly self-sustaining plant community that will also sustain local wildlife…
  • In Japan, “The flowers only bloom for a week, so let’s party!” by Susan Harris

    Susan Harris
    14 Apr 2015 | 3:43 am
    Stories about cherry blossoms in Washington can be pretty boring, but this report about how they’re celebrated in Japan is anything but. Click here to view the embedded video. In Japan, “The flowers only bloom for a week, so let’s party!” originally appeared on Garden Rant on April 14, 2015.
  • A bell that tolls for all of us—with different tunes by Elizabeth Licata

    Elizabeth Licata
    13 Apr 2015 | 5:03 am
    Lake Superior image courtesy of Shutterstock The drought news from the West and Southwest combined with watching Interstellar over the weekend has me thinking about water and the lack thereof. We don’t have a drought threat here in Western New York, but, just as the article I linked to above says, “Nothing about water is easy.”  Given the spring thaws and storm-related flooding that regularly occurs here, and even more in coastal areas, one might presume that the Northeast suffers from too much water. It’s actually just a different side of the problem of water mismanagement. Water is…
  • The Art of Digging and Where we Learn It by Susan Harris

    Susan Harris
    10 Apr 2015 | 5:22 am
    Avid gardeners, I bet you love your tools as much as I do, especially the ones for digging. Gloves I buy by the dozen but digging tools I expect to last forever, which of course they don’t. I recently destroyed my long-handled shovel by treating it like it was a crowbar, expecting it to extract something big and heavy by brute force. The wooden handle punished me for my misuse by splitting in two. I’ve since reminded myself that shovels are for cutting and then lifting, not doing both tasks at the same time. I replaced it with a short-handled spade, which cuts, lifts, and edges,…
 
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    Transatlantic Gardener

  • Himalayan blue poppies: A stupendous new book

    Graham Rice
    12 Apr 2015 | 3:40 am
    The blue poppies are amongst the most tantalizing plants we grow – or try to grow, at least. These exotic relatives of the corn poppy and Oriental poppy instantly attract visitors in any gardens where they’re in bloom. The Himalayan blue poppy… the very name is exciting. We’re almost in Indiana Jones country… But there’s no doubt that not only are many species difficult to grow but their classification and naming has all been more than a little baffling. So the arrival of this fat – nay, enormous – new book from the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and the expert on Meconopsis,…
  • Lettuce, golf courses and gardens - wasting precious water

    Graham Rice
    5 Apr 2015 | 5:07 am
    So, it’s finally dawning on California that there’s a water shortage. Better late than never, I suppose. But where does all the water go? Well, spectacularly inefficient irrigation of crops and golf courses, not to mention gardens, is one way it gets wasted. Like watering wheat - wheat! - above (click to enlarge) I remember, years ago, the PR guy from one of Britain’s top garden watering companies telling me – in a tipsy moment after a press party – that 85% of the water that came out of his company’s sprinklers evaporated. Wasted. Gone. Vanished into thin air. Research at the…
  • Anniversary pansies span the years and the river

    Graham Rice
    1 Apr 2015 | 4:12 am
    Now here’s a way to celebrate! British seed and plant company Thompson & Morgan celebrates its 160th anniversary this year and to mark the occasion they’ve done something rather amazing. They’ve hung 320 hanging baskets from a bridge over the river near their headquarters in Suffolk, 160 on each side (click the picture to enlarge). And they’re all planted with T&M’s brand new, own-bred, fragrant, trailing viola mixture – ‘Waterfall’ (Brits will be able to order it in May). First, they hired specialist highway contractors to fix the 320 heavy-duty hanging brackets in place,…
  • Classic tree and shrub reference goes online

    Graham Rice
    16 Mar 2015 | 5:49 am
    The five volume Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles by W. J. Bean, usually referred to simply as “Bean”, is a monumental work running to over 4,000 pages. It does what it says: it describes in detail the woody plants (including climbers) that can reasonably be expected to grow outside in Britain (mostly zone 8, some zone 9). The four A-Z volumes were last revised almost forty years ago, then a supplement appeared in 1988 (see below, click to enlarge), so it does not include recent classification and name changes and recent introductions. Otherwise, it's impressively comprehensive…
  • The Philadelphia Flower Show

    Graham Rice
    10 Mar 2015 | 8:02 am
    We were at the Philadelphia Flower Show on Friday and it was quite an eye opener. Though quite why the country’s best known flower show is held in a dark and dingy exhibition hall when there’s 2ft/60cm of snow on the ground is baffling. But both the landscapers and the individual exhibitors rose to the occasion, as they have done since 1829, with spring bulbs, orchids, tropical foliage and begonias in particular providing color. There are two main types of horticultural exhibits: displays of plants staged by landscapers and the competitions for individual plants in staged by home…
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    WashingtonGardener

  • Washington Gardener Magazine April 2015 issue features a Bluebell Growing Guide and Best Local Spots for Viewing Virginia Bluebells and much more

    WashingtonGardener
    17 Apr 2015 | 2:21 pm
      The April 2015 issue of Washington Gardener Magazine is now out and is posted at:  http://issuu.com/washingtongardener/docs/washingtongardenerapr15 This issue includes:~ Bluebell Growing Guide  and Best Local Spots for Viewing Virginia Bluebells~ Arrest the 10 Most Unwanted Weeds~ April-May Garden Tasks~ Small Space Solutions  for Growing Edibles~ Groovy Ground Beetles~ Spring Tonics from the Garden~ How Hormones Help Plants Respond to Stress~ EXPANDED! Local Garden Events Listing~ Reader Contest to Win Passes to Lewis Ginter Garden's A Million Bloomand…
  • Fenton Friday: Seedlings Up!

    WashingtonGardener
    17 Apr 2015 | 9:22 am
    Arugula seedlingsThis week at my community garden plot we had several days of rain and wind, so it was hard to get over and do too much. We are still awaiting our compost and mulch delivery so we can re-do our common pathways and add leaf compost to the raised beds, so I'm keeping the straw cover in place for now.Most of the seeds I planted last week are now up including arugula and radish. I'm also seeing a hint of the carrots.The pea seedlings are coming along nicely and are starting to form tendrils and reach out for their supports. I was able to harvest another couple handfuls of…
  • Spring has Sprung for this Garden Blogger's Bloom Day

    WashingtonGardener
    15 Apr 2015 | 9:03 am
    Daffodils 'Curly Lace'Garden Blogger's Bloom Day again! On the 15th of each month, we gardeners with blogs share a few bloom photos from our gardens. Here in the Mid-Atlantic USA (USDA zone 7) on the DC-MD border, we finally have entered spring!I have so much blooming in my garden now that I don't think I can list it all, here is a partial list and a few quick photos: regular Hyacinth and Muscari (Grape Hyacinth), Daffodils (many varieties), Hellebores, Weeping Cherry Tree 'Higan,' Flowering Plum Tree 'Thundercloud,' Forsythia, Primula, Tulips are just starting, Violets, Lungwort, Veronica,…
  • Cherry Blossom Viewing Alternatives in the DC Region

    WashingtonGardener
    11 Apr 2015 | 5:00 am
    (One of our most popular and imitated annual blog posts -- updated for 2015.)It is Cherry Blossom Festival madness again in Washington, DC. If you have been there/done that, hate the crowds, or just can’t get enough of those dainty pink and white blossoms and want more, here are a few local alternatives to the Tidal Basin display:Public Gardens~ The National Arboretum has a splendid and more varied display and LOTS or parking. Stroll around Fern Valley and the other gardens as well while you are there. Take the Self-Guided Tour: Beyond the Tidal Basin: Introducing Other Great Flowering…
  • Fenton Friday: April Asparagus

    WashingtonGardener
    10 Apr 2015 | 1:00 pm
    Rejoice! I was able to get a real harvest Asparagus this week for the first time from my community garden plot! Having to three years from the initial planting date was a real test of my patience, but the wait is worth it. They are so tender fresh from the garden that I do not bother to cook them in any way, I just snack on them raw.If I had to do it all over again, I definitely would have started off the first year in the plot with asparagus, instead of waiting for year two. I also would have planted much more of it. I started with only three rootlets and I am harvesting a decent amount, but…
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    A Tidewater Gardener

  • Bloom Day - Last Minute Filing

    Les
    15 Apr 2015 | 5:39 pm
         When I got home from work today I took my usual stroll around the garden to see what might have opened or may have leafed out today. In the middle of my inspection I had an aha moment when it dawned on me that today was not only tax day, but was also Bloom Day. I didn't need to worry about the taxes, so I went inside to get my camera. (If you hover over the photos, the plant's name should
  • Out to Lunch

    Les
    8 Apr 2015 | 4:52 pm
         I've been trying to keep my camera close for the past few weeks, hoping to be inspired by the unfolding spring. Although we have had some beautiful weather lately, I just haven't been able to enjoy the season like I thought I would. I am sure being under the weather probably has had something to do with it. Today that changed, and it wasn't blue skies that brought me out of my funk; it was
  • Magazine Worthy

    Les
    30 Mar 2015 | 5:44 pm
         Late last summer I had a chance to visit the garden of a co-worker. Hearing others talk about how nice it was, and knowing the garden had been on a tour sponsored by the Norfolk Botanical Garden, I pestered her into letting me come see for myself, camera in hand. As much as I love seeing what other gardeners have created, I also had been on the lookout for an opportunity to write another
  • 2015 Winter Walk-Off Wrap-Up

    Les
    22 Mar 2015 | 12:13 pm
         So finally it is spring. I know in some more northerly places that just means a new mark on the calendar, and real change in the landscape may be weeks away, but around here there is every indication that the seasons are changing. Yesterday I took a much needed bike ride, and my route took me downtown to the harbor and back home again. Along the way strollers were being pushed, couples were
  • Bloom Day - Delayed Development

    Les
    15 Mar 2015 | 12:15 am
         My garden is retarded, and I only mean that in the original sense of the word. Since February's Bloom Day it has snowed three times with the last one being heavy and wet, flattening many of my emerging plants. We also had a night where temperatures dropped to the single digits (thank goodness for an insulating layer of snow), giving us a zone 7b winter instead of our designated zone 8a. For
 
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    clay and limestone

  • Bugs, they make a garden good!

    Gail
    9 Apr 2015 | 6:00 am
     It's Golden Ragwort time in the gardenEach spring when Packera aurea blooms there are always a few stalks that are covered with aphids! I don't worry about a few aphids since the flowers never seem to decline because of them. (The Happy Flower Trinity)I didn't always feel that way when I saw aphids sucking the juices out of a plant! Way back when I was less experienced about the role of insects in the garden, I would grab the hose and spray them to oblivion. Now, I recognize them as an important food for predator bugs. In fact, aphids are a primary food source for predator bugs.
  • Wildflower Wednesday: Spicebush

    Gail
    24 Mar 2015 | 11:00 pm
    Lindera benzoin is one of the earliest blooming trees in my garden. I love how the sulphur yellow flowers  light up the dark corners of the woodland. It's a wonderful small understory tree and you'll find it on my list of perfect native plants that ought to be in more gardens.What makes it a perfect plant?It's easy peasy to grow. Spicebush's ideal habitat is a moist woodland with fertile, leaf covered soil in partial shade. You're more likely to see Spicebush growing in wooded bottom lands, low swamps, and also along streams in Eastern North America. But, don't let all the talk of…
  • Winter annuals for a native plant garden!

    Gail
    20 Mar 2015 | 8:50 am
    Two of my favorites, Entireleaf Western Daisy andBlue-eyed Maryare showing off their attractive rosette stage.  (A Passalong Plant:Blue-eyed Mary)We have a tendency to think of winter as a dormant season with plants at rest, but there really is a great deal of growing going on all winter. Just take a walk in your garden and you'll see signs of active life! Mosses, fungi and lichens are alive and thriving and the weedy winter annuals are reminding you that weeding isn't too far away! (go toThe Fascinating World of Fungi for more on them)Edible Auricularia auricula/Jelly Ear growing on…
  • Won't You Join Us For Garden Bloggers Fling In Toronto!

    Gail
    9 Mar 2015 | 5:00 am
     Westwind Farm Studio, Portland Fling Summer 2014I probably don't have to tell you that Garden Bloggers Fling is an annual event for garden bloggers that is held in different cities around the US or that we've been garden-touring and socializing every year since 2008 when 30+ garden bloggers got together in Austin, TX! Since that first Garden Blogger Fling get together, we've been to Chicago, Buffalo, Seattle, Asheville, San Francisco, Portland and this June 5, 6 & 7, 2015 we're heading north to Toronto, Canada and I hope you can join us.Lurie Garden, Chicago Fling Summer 2009 I…
  • Wildflower Wednesday: Fifth Anniversary!

    Gail
    24 Feb 2015 | 11:00 pm
     I can hardly believe that 5 years have passed since the first Wildflower Wednesday meme post. I want to thank each of you for joining me on my continuing journey to create the best wildlife garden possible.Verbesina virginica At first I wasn't sure what I wanted to do to celebrate this anniversary and then it occurred to me that I could share that first official Wildflower Wednesday post with some updated text and photos. So that's what I've done. If you like you can link back to earlier Wildflower Wednesday posts by clicking on the plant name. Panicum virgatumHere it is~a trip…
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    Dirt Therapy

  • April Beauties

    Phillip Oliver
    11 Apr 2015 | 6:07 pm
    Azalea "Coral Bells"A florist azalea that I received when my father died 14 years ago.Unknown azaleaChinese SnowballViburnum macrocephalum)Deutzia gracilisEpimedium rubrumSolomon's Seal, Jacob's Ladder, EpimediumLeatherleaf Viburnum (Viburnum rhytidophyllum)Persicaria microcephala Red DragonSpanish Bluebells (Hyacinthoides) Bridal Wreath Spiraea (Spiraea prunifolia) White Chinese Wisteria (Wisteria sinensis 'Alba') White Chinese Wisteria (Wisteria sinensis 'Alba') Text and photos by Phillip Oliver, Dirt Therapy
  • Latest blooms

    Phillip Oliver
    6 Apr 2015 | 1:01 pm
     Kerria (Easter Rose) Lilac "Declaration"Money Plant (Lunaria) Hardy Orange (Poncirus trifoliata) Tree Peony foliage and Euphorbia "Despina" Viburnum "Mohawk" Viburnum "Mohawk"Viburnum "Mohawk"  Darwin Tulip Darwin TulipText and photos by Phillip Oliver, Dirt Therapy
  • The garden is waking up

    Phillip Oliver
    27 Mar 2015 | 12:12 pm
    Yoshino CherryMy last post was exactly one month ago and I was posting photos of the snow. A lot has changed in just a few weeks and it is beginning to look a lot like Spring! A cold front brought rain and colder temperatures today but the first part of the week was great. I have been pruning and mulching. Here are a few photos taken yesterday -Jacob's Ladder "Stairway to Heaven" Star Magnolia Anenome nemerosaEpimediumEpimedium Saucer Magnolia "Rustica Rubra"Camellia "Taylor's Perfection"Text and photos by Phillip Oliver, Dirt Therapy
  • Snow today, gone tomorrow

    Phillip Oliver
    27 Feb 2015 | 5:11 pm
    It was here one day and gone the next! That is okay - it was beautiful while it lasted. A reader was telling me that she had not seen her ground for two weeks because of snow. I know that it can get old. It was strange though seeing everything covered in white yesterday morning and all gone by the afternoon.I said in the previous post that I did not want to get out in it. I changed my mind and did venture out briefly to take more photos. It was a very sunny morning and so beautiful but very cold. The snow was melting fast and falling from the trees in heavy thuds. From inside the house, it…
  • Snow Day

    Phillip Oliver
    26 Feb 2015 | 7:44 am
    After weeks of near hits and misses, we finally got our snow day. And it was a significant one. We got about 3 inches but areas to the south of us got up to 10 inches. It arrived late in the day and continued through the early evening. It is beautiful. However, I guess I am just getting old but I had no desire to get out in it. In fact, all of these photos were taken from the windows inside the house! The sun is out this morning and it is falling off the trees. I suspect it will be gone by this afternoon. I still do not want to get out in it. These photos will have to suffice!Text and…
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    Natural Gardening

  • Creating a new space and garden

    Lisa Wagner
    15 Apr 2015 | 4:29 pm
    Consolidating to a smaller house is an "interesting" process. We're going to good space.We've enjoyed it as a weekend and summer home, so we've gradually been changing things to suit it better to be our new space as home.  (It was built by an architect as his own eco-friendly house, so it was full of somewhat unusual personal choices). We've changed some things to suit us better over the years, but the blending with the move will bring a more dramatic change, definitely pushing it even more towards a more rustic feel, adding a few favorite old pieces we've had for many years,…
  • Native plants used as "foundation" plantings

    Lisa Wagner
    10 Apr 2015 | 2:12 pm
    From left to right:coral honeysuckle, fothergilla, Euonymus, mountain laurel, Leucothoe, Aquilegia, with Christmas ferns and bloodroot, and Carolina jessamine on the front porch railAnd lots of water oak catkins on the front path!
  • A flourishing woodland garden

    Lisa Wagner
    9 Apr 2015 | 6:33 pm
    It's been wonderful to see how the front woodland garden along the path is flourishing this spring, along with the "foundation" plantings in front of the house.Even the assessor (from the bank of our buyer) on Tuesday (admittedly a plant enthusiast) admired the nice combination of mountain laurel, rhododendron, fothergilla, and coral honeysuckle in front of the house, as well as the native crested iris, green and gold, Christmas fern, and pussytoes.He also noticed the wild ginger (he told me his grandmother showed him the small flowers - the "little brown jugs."  He thought they were…
  • A woodland garden

    Lisa Wagner
    4 Apr 2015 | 6:39 pm
    It was so nice to see the woodland border thriving, in spring guise, returning from the mountains to the Piedmont in the final stages of relocation.This was a created woodland spot; it was shallow dry grass beneath a water oak when we bought this house.  And there was no pathway to the front of house, either. We put one in ourselves.Crested Iris in flowerNow the space is full of Christmas ferns, crested iris, bloodroot, pussy-toes, and green and gold - it's a lovely small drought-tolerant woodland patch.Lonicera sempervirens flowering on the fence nearbyThe bloodroot is reseeding…
  • Paring down books

    Lisa Wagner
    1 Apr 2015 | 5:36 pm
    I've been paring down my gardening and natural history books, with upcoming consolidation to a smaller living space.It's an interesting process (not without angst).I think about and weigh (based on my de-cluttering inspirations):  have I looked at this field guide lately?  Do I really want to know as much about dragonflies as this very nice guide provides?  Ditto about caterpillars?  Hmm.My gardening companion and I don't need duplicates, either, so extras are being shed.And doesn't the internet now provide access to virtual field guides of all sorts, I'm thinking?This is…
 
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    Outside Clyde

  • No Garden Envy

    Christopher C. NC
    17 Apr 2015 | 8:27 pm
    I could have phlox envy if I was the sort to have garden envy. But I am the one responsible for all this phlox and get to see it a couple times a week. I don't have to have it myself. That is one of the perks of being a peasant gardener. I spend all my days in gardens. I may covet a particular plant and those are easy enough to come by, but I never really covet a garden or
  • Twice A Day

    Christopher C. NC
    16 Apr 2015 | 6:47 pm
    I wander slowly through the garden twice a day. It is thrilling to find something new coming up. You might say I am being a bit impatient. I want to know who is coming back now, not tomorrow. The wild transferred trilliums have been taking their sweet time. I have finally started to spot them. They can be hard to find in the emerging cacophony of green, even when I know
  • A Very Moist Bloom Day

    Christopher C. NC
    15 Apr 2015 | 5:19 pm
    Rain, rain, rain, rain, rain, rain, rain, rain, rain, rain, rain. It's still raining. Harder. There is rain in the diagnosis until Tuesday. During the short hour and a half without rain, more of a mist, I got some editing done. At least the weeds come out easy. There is more clematis on the slope below the roadside vegetable garden than I thought from my first round of editing. I started weeding
  • What Will It Be

    Christopher C. NC
    14 Apr 2015 | 7:36 pm
    I plant things with some notion of what they will grow to be, what they will look like with their neighbors and how it all fits into a bigger picture. Some things grow so slow here it could be decades before an egregious error shows itself. But then I have a chainsaw. There are a lot of things in the wild cultivated gardens over which I have little or purposely take no
  • Appearances

    Christopher C. NC
    13 Apr 2015 | 5:48 pm
    As the world turns green I roam the garden looking to see what will be returning this year. Coming back and looking good after the first winter is critical to establishment. Returning bigger after two winters is even better. After that I don't fret so much about new plants, unless it looks like crap barely clinging to life. Then it starts getting shifted into the "it's not gonna make up here"
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    Growing The Home Garden

  • Redbuds in the Spring Garden (Cercis canadensis)

    2 Apr 2015 | 6:13 am
    Spring in many ways is just like listening to your favorite song. The parts of the song that make it special to you are those that make you replay it countless times over and over again. The chorus of springtime is very much the same. Old favorites pop up again and again for us to enjoy. One of my favorite trees here in Tennessee is the redbud (Cercis canadensis). It's native to our area and blooms prolifically in the spring. There are areas of our state where the redbuds grow in such quantities that you feel like you are inside of a painting. Nature's artwork is hard to top!It's a special…
  • Springtime in the Garden (Photos)

    22 Mar 2015 | 3:21 pm
    Spring is here and the garden is most certainly coming alive! Unfortunately some freezing temperatures are in the forecast for later in the week here in Tennessee. Here's a quick look at what you will find in my garden at the moment!Purple leaf plum and forsythia  I trimmed the forsythia back after it bloomed last year into more of a small shrub. They can get very large if you let them grow. Forsythias are an easy plant to propagate if you want more of them. Just take a cutting 4-5 inches long and place it in a pot of soil and keep moist. There is no need for rooting hormone to propagate…
  • Planting Azaleas from Monrovia

    15 Mar 2015 | 6:49 pm
    Today was a fantastic day to be outdoors, and of course for most of the time being outdoors means I'm planting something! Today I planted three azaleas into one of my gardens courtesy of Monrovia. Monrovia gave me an opportunity to try out these 'Savannah Sunset' azaleas in my garden. 'Savannah Sunset' is a part of Monrovia's Bloom N' Again collection of repeat blooming azaleas. They will bloom in the spring then produce more blooms in the fall!When planting any plant the location is very important. Azaleas generally prefer a part sun location with an acidic soil. If your soil isn't acidic…
  • Spring IS Coming

    4 Mar 2015 | 6:22 am
    Despite what the weather may lead us to believe Spring will arrive soon. Maybe it will help us believe it if we repeat that phrase: Spring will arrive soon! (Repeat as needed) It's March and during March we can expect a number of tumultuous and turbulent weather systems that will toy with our psyche. Have faith gardeners because spring and the gardening season will be here soon, but before Spring arrives there are a number of things that gardeners can to to prepare for the busiest time of the year!Yoshino Cherry in BloomPre-spring is a GREAT time to mulch. A GREAT time! Why? Because…
  • Nashville Lawn & Garden Show 2015: Wine Festival

    18 Feb 2015 | 12:14 pm
    26th Annual Nashville Lawn & Garden Show 2015Nashville Lawn & Garden Show Announces Wine FestivalWine Festival occurs on Saturday, March 7 during the 4-day Show Nashville, TN – The Nashville Lawn and Garden Show will partner with the Tennessee Farm Winegrowers Alliance to present a one-day-only Wine Festival during its traditional four-day Show at the Tennessee State Fairgrounds.  The Show will incorporate locally produced wine from more than a dozen of the state’s most celebrated wineries on Saturday, March 7.  Wine Festival wrist bands will be available inside the…
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    Sharing Nature's Garden

  • What's down there inside of all these bluebonnets?

    Diana
    12 Apr 2015 | 8:36 am
    Who knew that dogs were so interested in bluebonnets?  She's my sniffer girl - part long-legged hound, part catahoula and part husky.Truth be told, she's not really that interested in the bluebonnets - but she does like having a nice winecup snack.Last year, she uprooted all of my winecup plants in this flagstone and decomposed granite path.  Apparently this beautiful trailing wildflower's tuberous roots are quite tasty!Side note:  Dakota has also been known to dig up and eat other bulbs, like agapanthus.  I dug it out of the front garden because the deer were eating…
  • Brilliant bluebonnets brighten the spring countryside in Central Texas...

    Diana
    11 Apr 2015 | 7:30 am
    It's a banner year for Texas wildflowers.  Just the right amount of fall and spring rain has bluebonnets, Indian paintbrush, Indian Blanket and a slew of other wildflowers cover Central Texas.This burst of blooms even made the national news; I was delighted to see it on Monday night's NBC Nightly News.  We're so proud of our wildflower displays that have their roots in the beautification efforts started by Lady Bird Johnson while her husband was president.Lady Bird wanted to clean up Washington D.C. and the country's highways by regulating billboards, junkyards and other unsightly…
  • Dazzling color in the spring garden...

    Diana
    29 Mar 2015 | 7:06 am
    We all love the spring garden -- the awakening of plants that herald the arrival of spring and provide a foreshadowing of more  to come.As the sun shifts in the sky and the breezes begin to warm up, I'm enjoying some rejuvenating time in the garden.I bought these sweet glass daffodils to bring a pop of color into the garden before the daffodils were ready to open up. The 'Kate Izzard' irises are loaded up and several of them are opening every day.  You can tell that I should have divided them last fall, which I fully intended to do, but I seriously need to do that this…
  • Tropical plumeria has a sweet surprise in the greenhouse...

    Diana
    6 Mar 2015 | 3:07 pm
    If you ask me to envision myself in my happy place, you'll find me on a beach somewhere, enjoying balmy breezes with a book in one hand and an umbrella drink in the other.So when the weather warms up, I spend my time creating a similar happy place in my own garden.  Around our pool, I plant things that are lush -- some tropical, some native.  The tropicals typically live in very large ceramic pots that overwinter in the greenhouse.For many years, I've been growing plumeria, or frangipani.  I've been given some by my parents, who brought them back from Hawaii, and from friends…
  • Winter warm up -- hot colors in the garden...

    Diana
    4 Mar 2015 | 10:11 pm
    Even here in Central Texas, our winter's freezing temps and cold, damp, grey skies are hanging on.  I'm done with it.  And  I know my gardening friends to the north are exasperated by the volume of snow that continues to plague them.At the Garden Bloggers Fling in Portland last spring, I was struck by the overwhelming use of color in the gardens there.  Plants, pots, furniture, you name it, vivid colors perked up each and every garden.  With a climate filled with its share of grey days, these pops of color  their gardens not only brightened up the space, they…
 
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    Vert

  • Go Big or Go Home

    vertie
    1 Apr 2015 | 10:47 am
    Wow, I know it's been a long time since I updated this blog but I think you'll understand why shortly. Besides raising the World's Cutest Baby™(who unbelievably just turned five), I've been working on some stone work in our yard. For years now one of my favorite places in my neighborhood has been Jill Nokes's fence. The rest of the yard is lovely too but the fence mesmerizes me. It offers
  • A Trip to Natural Gardener

    vertie
    12 Oct 2011 | 2:01 pm
    This weekend's rain inspired me to think about gardening again. I would usually be planting a fall vegetable garden now, but with more rain not in this winter's forecast, I decided instead to focus on replenishing my herb garden. So the World's Cutest Baby (who has now become the World's Cutest Boy) and I headed out to Natural Gardener this morning. I remembered it was Support Your Independent
  • Amazing Anole

    vertie
    21 Apr 2011 | 7:36 pm
    Earlier this evening the World's Cutest Baby™ was exploding the meaning of cuteness as he splashed with his dad in the wading pool. I was able to tear my eyes away only because I spied the World's Cutest Anole™.Look how cute he is, stretching his legs, testing them not unlike the World's Cutest Baby™.He's either stretching his legs here or trying to get away from me. (For now, I'm going to
  • Gone Fishin'

    vertie
    1 Apr 2011 | 7:20 am
    If you follow me on Twitter, you already know that my husband, baby, and I recently spent 10 days in Puerto Rico. My husband has been traveling there for a few months now on business.What you wouldn't have learned on Twitter is that that trip was a dry run for a much longer stay. A two- to three-year stay, depending on my husband's project.While Puerto Rican beaches are not as beautiful as the
  • The Secret of My Tomato Success

    vertie
    1 Dec 2010 | 12:03 pm
    Or, Why I May Never Again Give a Hoot About Spring TomatoesThat's almost 15 pounds of tomatoes you're looking at, harvested two days before Thanksgiving from two plants. I only harvested them because I wanted to spare my Austin gardening buddies a freeze over the holidays. (While it didn't actually freeze, some gardeners did have some frost damage. I lost my green beans.)MSS of Zanthan Gardens
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    In the Garden

  • I’m so excited, I wet my plants!

    Ellen Leigh
    24 Mar 2015 | 9:24 am
    My husband and I are currently house hunting for a whole new way of life. That’s right- we’re moving out of a condo and into a house on some property, maybe a lot of acreage, maybe just a couple of acres. A new farm. Al is retiring before the end of this year, and we’ll […] The post I’m so excited, I wet my plants! appeared first on In the Garden.
  • July out at the ‘Farm’

    Ellen Leigh
    25 Jul 2011 | 12:19 pm
    I’ve been a bad girl and have failed to keep you up-dated on the progress of our ‘Farm’. Almost everything planted has done amazingly well, especially the weeds, and we have started harvesting crops already. We had a good start with the zuchini, and got a bunch of them all at once, but one plant […] The post July out at the ‘Farm’ appeared first on In the Garden.
  • Out at ‘The Farm’

    Ellen Leigh
    14 Jun 2011 | 11:01 am
    Things are coming along nicely out at ‘The Farm’. We got our plants in and our seeds planted just after Memorial Day, and spent the next several evenings making sure everything was well watered to ensure a good start. Before planting the beans, we constructed tee-pees of bamboo poles and twine for them to grow on, and […] The post Out at ‘The Farm’ appeared first on In the Garden.
  • Opening Day!

    Ellen Leigh
    2 Jun 2011 | 8:12 am
       Finally! After one of the wettest springs in my memory, the community gardens at Greenmead are finally open! We were able to check in with Brad, the head gardener there, find and mark our assigned 25 by 25 plot and plan on setting to work in it as soon as the weather and soil […] The post Opening Day! appeared first on In the Garden.
  • They grow up so fast!

    Ellen Leigh
    20 May 2011 | 12:49 pm
    It seems like just yesterday that Mr. and Mrs. Robin built their nest on the porch light and dropped 4 perfect little eggs in the bottom. In no time the little ones hatched out and started to grow as momma and daddy brought them juicy worms and other insects. Follow their progress below as they triple […] The post They grow up so fast! appeared first on In the Garden.
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    Kiss my Aster!

  • Hey girl, what's your garden fantasy?

    Kiss My Aster!
    17 Apr 2015 | 10:03 am
  • Hey Girl: Spring Clean Up Edition

    Kiss My Aster!
    14 Mar 2015 | 1:29 pm
    For the record, I only make these because you like them.If it were up to me, it'd be Ewan McGregor.I hardly know who Ryan Gosling is. Go figure!
  • Things That Are Going DOWN

    Kiss My Aster!
    10 Mar 2015 | 8:44 am
    1. All of a sudden, spring is here. The snow is melting and I should be able to actually SEE my garden by the end of the day. It hasn't been accessible in a loooooong time. It's either been too cold or required a snowsuit. I don't play that shizz.2. I've opened a vintage shop at kissmyaster.com after some soul searching. It has been a great process so far but now my house is filled with vintage crap, everywhere. I'm not embarrassed to say that Hazel's old pack n play is in the living room and filled with clothing to photograph and measure. Soon I'll have plants and planters available, I…
  • Hey Valentine!

    Kiss My Aster!
    13 Feb 2015 | 8:55 am
    I have a soft spot for Valentine's day, even though I'm far from romantic. So I made these for you. Cut, sign and distribute as needed.
  • The Beauty of The Armpit Garden

    Kiss My Aster!
    23 Jan 2015 | 11:56 am
    This house came only with a very small back garden. It’s oddly situated, tucked around the back of the house, where none of my neighbors can see it but I get great views from inside the house. Because the whole garden is tucked in a nook a) it’s my “armpit garden” b) it’s also got great protection and serves as a pretty bitchin’ microclimate. But the best part is that this garden is for no one but me. It’s mostly dark and moody- the dream garden of my inner 19 year old. Dark dahlias and way too much bronze fennel, Redbor kale is bolting all over town, towering like Godzilla,…
 
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    Our Little Acre

  • Wordless Wednesday: Winter Jewels™ 'Painted Doubles'

    Kylee Baumle
    15 Apr 2015 | 8:01 pm
    I picked this up today at The Anderson's in Maumee, Ohio, making it the first official plant purchase of the 2015 season. A fine choice, don't you think?Helleborus Winter Jewels™ 'Painted Doubles'Hybridized by Marietta O'Byrne, owner of Northwest Garden Nursery in Oregon, this fully double hellebore is just one of the Winter Jewels™ series.Of course, I want all of them.
  • Weekend Wisdom: I Like the Way the Greeks Do It

    Kylee Baumle
    12 Apr 2015 | 7:19 am
    Having been the guest in homes outside the U.S., I know that different locations and cultures have what they consider to be proper guest etiquette. I try to take my cues from my hosts, but sometimes you just don't know what to give your host as a thank you gift for having you in their home, whether it be for a meal or for a few days.Huffington Post to the rescue! Photo of Aglaonema from my book, Indoor Plant Décor: The DesignStylebook for HouseplantsA cut flower bouquet is always in good taste for your host, now matter where you live, but in Greece, a potted plant is a common gift.Despina…
  • The Trees of Our Little Acre: Cornelian Cherry

    Kylee Baumle
    11 Apr 2015 | 8:13 pm
    Several years ago, I visited the historic home of Gene Stratton-Porter (1863-1924), Indiana author of more than 20 books, and a celebrated naturalist. In the latter part of her life, Gene and her husband built a home near Rome City, Ind., on Sylvan Lake, which they called "Cabin in the Wildflower Woods." There, she worked on her nature studies and her writing, before moving to Los Angeles about 1920, so that she could be more involved in the making of movies based on her books.Cabin in the Wildflower WoodsHome of Gene Stratton-PorterWhen I visited the cabin, I was given a tour of the gardens,…
  • 65 Gallons of Sap on the Wall...

    Kylee Baumle
    7 Apr 2015 | 7:42 pm
    Mmmmm...The second year of maple syrup making is now completed. We were first-timers last year and we beat ourselves on the noggins for not doing it before then. Eating real maple syrup made from the sap of your own trees is like a taste of heavenly nectar.We were just a tad late getting the trees tapped last year, so I watched the weather closely this year in order to take advantage of the sap season as long as possible. Sap begins to flow when the daytime temperatures are above freezing, but the night temperatures are below.Our first taps went into the trees on March 2nd and we found that…
  • Weekend Wisdom: Spring Officially Started Three Weeks Ago

    Kylee Baumle
    22 Mar 2015 | 10:59 am
    You thought spring started on Friday, didn't you? Well, you would be right, IF you're talking about spring based on the tilt of the earth on its axis. Astronomically, spring began on Friday, March 20th this year, when the earth was halfway between its extremes of tilt towards and away from the sun.This is what we've all been taught as soon as we were old enough to understand the seasons. Never mind that it doesn't always occur on the same calendar date; it's usually within a couple of days of each other no matter which year we're talking about.Some years (most years, if we're honest), that…
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    Our Twenty Minute Kitchen Garden

  • Planting your first garden — without Pinterest!

    20 Minute Jan
    10 Apr 2015 | 2:15 pm
    Is 2015 going to be your year, the year that you are going to make that dream of a first garden into a reality? Growing a first garden can be a scary proposition, one full of expectations and unknowns. Your first inclination might be to run to Pinterest for inspiration. The site is chock full […] The post Planting your first garden — without Pinterest! appeared first on Our Twenty Minute Kitchen Garden. Related posts: 5 Reasons to plant a vegetable garden this year… even if you’ve never done it before! If you’ve ever wanted to have a vegetable garden, this... How…
  • Belated Easter Chocolate Stout (13)

    20 Minute Jim
    26 Jan 2015 | 11:26 am
    ———— Posted on April 23, 2012 by halzpal I *thought* I’d get a chance to brew on Easter weekend, though in retrospect I can’t imagine why. I even planned to be cute about it and whip up a clone of the Rogue Chocolate Stout. Get it? Chocolate Easter Bunnies? There’s a secret about this batch […] The post Belated Easter Chocolate Stout (13) appeared first on Our Twenty Minute Kitchen Garden. Related posts: “Father and Son Stout” – A Family Brew Day "...In case anyone is following along at home, this is... My First Rocket Stove: 3 Ways It…
  • Why Green Home Brewing

    20 Minute Jim
    26 Jan 2015 | 9:09 am
    Posted on June 7, 2011 by halzpal Green home brewing? I have brewed beer since the very early 1990’s and I love the hobby dearly, but a couple years back, I nearly gave it up. The soaring price of propane nearly drove me away. This series of posts is the direct result of my decision […] The post Why Green Home Brewing appeared first on Our Twenty Minute Kitchen Garden. Related posts: “Father and Son Stout” – A Family Brew Day "...In case anyone is following along at home, this is... Food Gatherers welcomes harvest donations, including green tomatoes! As the…
  • Dead Robin Rocket Baltic Porter (12C)

    20 Minute Jim
    26 Jan 2015 | 9:07 am
    Posted on June 24, 2012 by halzpal It’s officially summer so I trimmed the spirea bushes around the front porch, in hopes of clearing a little most working space to renovate our grand old outdoor sitting space later in July. When I saw those heaps of brush, I thought the same thing you probably did: […] The post Dead Robin Rocket Baltic Porter (12C) appeared first on Our Twenty Minute Kitchen Garden. Related posts: Belated Easter Chocolate Stout (13) ———— Posted on April 23, 2012 by halzpal I *thought*... My First Rocket Stove: 3 Ways It Rocks + 3 Ways It…
  • Ice Distillation — A New Use for Old Beer

    20 Minute Jim
    26 Jan 2015 | 9:05 am
    The cold weather equivalent of “Make Hay While the Sun Shines” might very well be “Make Ice While the Winter Rages” and this is a sentiment a buddy of mine takes to his brew-house. When it’s cold, especially the Polar Vortex kind of cold we’ve been enjoying recently, he makes “Ice Beer,” or more specifically, […] The post Ice Distillation — A New Use for Old Beer appeared first on Our Twenty Minute Kitchen Garden. Related posts: Beer Cupcakes ...I was inspired by the recent appearance of a delicious... Hops ...Hops are a truly amazing plant......
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    The Gardens of Petersonville

  • An Old Friend Takes a Tumble

    Sheila
    11 Apr 2015 | 2:20 pm
     Way down at the bottom of the Laguna garden is a grove of eucalyptus trees, two of which are silver dollar eucalyptus, one of my favorite trees. This is a picture taken eight years ago and you can see the one in the center of the photo has a definite "lean" to it. it has been this way since we moved in and it gives it a lot of character and makes for a good tree to climb and sit on. Hawks, peregrines, and many other birds frequent these branches. These trees have held up many hammocks over the years, still hold up odd little bird houses that were occupied again this spring, and ten…
  • Down in the Laguna Garden

    Sheila
    4 Apr 2015 | 12:34 pm
     Most of the time I am overwhelmed and months behind (if not years) as far as projects go in my homes and gardens. I guess I have learned to live with the feeling that there is always more to do and to embrace the beauty of imperfection. The past few years I have focused on bringing the grounds of our house in SJC up to the vision I had for them when we moved in here eight years ago. With the drought getting worse and the water restrictions there is still more work to do. I admit that I do not spend any time in my Laguna garden these days after putting 20 years into it while we…
  • Admiring Clivia

    Sheila
    29 Mar 2015 | 2:15 pm
    There are few flowers more showy in the shade gardens this time of year than the clivia.I know I am always singing their praises every year, but they truly do deserve to be considered for their ability to thrive where almost no other plants will in deep shade with little water. To prove it, here is a picture of some that are planted at the base of a eucalyptus tree way down at the bottom of our Laguna garden. They are lived like this for years.  The only thing that these troopers do not like is direct sun. Their beautiful green strappy leaves that look good all year long will turn…
  • Spring Bulbs

    Sheila
    27 Mar 2015 | 11:34 am
     There is all kinds of color in the gardens these days. Some wonderful and carefully planned. Others random and serendipitous. Like this beautiful red amaryllis bulb that was just kind of stuck in the ground and is now showing off year after year. However this year it is surrounded by a bed of yellow kalanchoe that my garden helper added in to cover the bare ground. Red and Yellow? Not my first choice in garden colors combinations, but it is healthy and happy and a bit out of the way so who am I to critique?  And then going from the biggest boldest bulbs to the tiniest, little…
  • Buddha in the Garden

    Sheila
    13 Mar 2015 | 7:38 pm
     Sitting quietly, way on the back of the gravel garden, is Buddha. Most of the winter he is surrounded by white azaleas. The rest of the year, by various cool shades of green succulents and tropical plants. It is hard to see in this picture, but there is a perfect umbrella of duranta over his head. Duranta, if you are not familiar is a flowering shrub that has arching sprays of blue flowers (at least this one does). I always seem to miss it in bloom back here. Buddha's hands form a perfect cup to hold enough water from the sprinklers to keep blooms fresh for a few days and I try to…
 
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    Blog the blogging nurseryman- The Golden Gecko Garden Center

  • San Marzano, the best paste tomato

    Trey Pitsenberger
    16 Apr 2015 | 5:12 pm
    Considered by chefs as the best paste tomato in the world.  Compared to the Roma Tomato, San Marzano tomatoes are thinner and more pointed. The flesh is much thicker with fewer seeds, and the taste is stronger, sweeter and less acidic. Also, unlike the Roma Tomato  San Marzano vines are indeterminate and have a somewhat longer season than other paste tomato varieties. As is typical of heirloom plants, San Marzano is an open-pollinated variety that breeds true from generation to generation, making seed saving practical for the home gardener or…
  • Our organically grown summer vegetables have arrived!

    Trey Pitsenberger
    15 Apr 2015 | 9:02 am
    Our first organically grown summer vegetable starts have arrived. Tomatoes, peppers, eggplant and more. While I still think its a bit early to plant for me, lots of people have warmer microclimates, or just want to give it a try. We also still have plenty of spring vegetables like lettuce, broccoli, pak choi, and peas. So whatever you decide, its time to get planting! 
  • Earwigs are out to destroy your seedlings!

    Trey Pitsenberger
    9 Apr 2015 | 9:46 am
    With new vegetable and flower seedlings going in some people are reporting what appears to be chewing going on. No pests are seen, but the leaves start to look like swiss cheese with all the holes. This pictures shows the classic damage from "earwigs", or "pincer bugs". The reason they are not seen during the day is they are nocturnal (operate at night) and come sunrise they hide under rocks, hay, potted plants, just about anywhere it's dark.  Here at the nursery we use "Sluggo Plus" to get prevent and get rid of earwig damage. Sluggo Plus is the safest and most effective killer and…
  • Vegetables or lawn during drought?

    Trey Pitsenberger
    6 Apr 2015 | 7:59 am
    Interesting article in The Sacramento Bee concerning whether to garden this year because of the drought.  It follows the same thinking we have here at the nursery. Use water to grow your food, and make cut backs in the ornamental side of the garden. From the article, "How much water do tomatoes need? Or more specifically, how much does a full-size fruit-bearing tomato plant need to get through a Sacramento summer while providing a good crop of flavorful tomatoes? The average is 5 gallons a week – less than that needed by a square foot of lawn." Wow!The article continues, "In the…
  • Soil Moist Natural Water Storing Granules

    Trey Pitsenberger
    4 Apr 2015 | 8:58 am
    Soil Moist Natural is a grafted starch polymer designed to reduce plant waterings by 50% and last in the soil for an entire season. The organic starch in Soil Moist Natural is derived from corn. Soil Moist Natural is completely safe and biodegradable. The product will hold several hundred times it weight in tap water and readily releases it back to the plant as the soil dries out. Ideal for hanging baskets, annual beds and vegetables.Use 1 teaspoon per 10" container. The product must be incorporated into the soil at the root level.3oz. 4.99, 8 oz. 9.99, 1 lb. 16.99, 3lb. 39.99
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    Skippy's Vegetable Garden

  • bee hives are in place

    kathy
    15 Apr 2015 | 12:57 pm
    Well, the boxes were in place. They had a great place by my garden, then noticed they don't get any morning sun there. So I moved them to the opposite side of the yard. Still checking if that spot get's good sun and no sprinklers. Its the driest edge of the yard and grass struggles there, so that's probably a good sign that its the warm and sunny. Oh, I'll probably move them again. That white one looks like its sticking out in the yard. I could move it closer to the green one and tuck it in more.
  • spraying my cherry tree

    kathy
    15 Apr 2015 | 12:57 pm
  • winter sowing seedlings

    kathy
    15 Apr 2015 | 12:56 pm
  • spraying fruit trees

    kathy
    13 Apr 2015 | 9:31 am
    All of a sudden it's warm! How does that happen. The snow and ice are suddenly gone. Time to spray my fruit trees. I use horticultural oil. The info sheet from UNH Cooperative Extention is great. Pears, Two applications to control psylla, mites and scale. First, spray at swollen bud stage, on 3rd or 4th warm spring day, use 3% oil. Spray again between green cluster and white bud stage. Apples, Spray once between tight cluster and pre-pink stage. (Use two applications if you've had previous trouble.) Cherry, One application at swollen bud stage. Blueberries, One application, apply before buds…
  • getting ready for bees

    kathy
    13 Apr 2015 | 9:26 am
    I have collected all my bee equipment. Jacket, hat, smoker, boxes, inserts etc. Yesterday I painted the boxes. White and two shades of green. Next I'll position the boxes down by my garden and make sure the sprinklers don't hit them. I have two packages of bees arriving next Monday.
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    Home Garden Companion

  • A Nice Early Spring Visit To Inniswood

    Ilona Erwin
    28 Mar 2015 | 6:41 pm
    I keep working on trying to make videos of garden subjects. Early spring in the morning meant a quiet visit with no distractions, as my husband and I walked around the garden.
  • Brand New Post On The New Site

    Ilona Erwin
    21 Mar 2015 | 8:00 am
    Here we are… the first post in a new season. It inspires me. The first inspiration is to update my garden as well. For years I have renovated, and renovation is always somehow lacking. I want to return to some of the joy that comes from creating something new. My idea is to redo some of the gardens in a ways that identifies and places focal points inside the garden rooms, and indeed make more of a room from some of the gardens. The entire place needs sprucing up, and I think adding more design and worrying less about weeds is the direction I want to take. This, of course, is secondary…
  • Here Is Hope For A Beautiful Spring

    Ilona Erwin
    10 Mar 2015 | 2:23 pm
    From a previous year It turned the corner here in the Central Ohio area. Patches of snow are all that are left after the warming temperatures and rains. I will have to post some of my older, but still beautiful, spring photos in celebration. Outside it is a bit dreary and I need to pick up the remainder of the hot tub canvas cover, etc. I will, as soon as I am done working on what seems to be mushrooming work both on the computer and inside the house. That is where we get that old saying: “When it rains, it pours”. Everything is building up and can just wait so long before it…
  • It Is Still Freezing, Cold, And Snowing

    Ilona Erwin
    3 Mar 2015 | 10:29 pm
    Yes, playing with Picmonkey. What else on the rainy/snowy/frozen days we are having? Housework, you say? What is that? Yes, the weather again. We are still in the throes of winter. Throes I say! Everyone says they are tired of it, but we really don’t have any say in the weather, do we? It will affect how soon we will be able to plant out our seeds and new plants. The ground will stay frozen for longer than we are used to in this part of the country. That is my prediction. Vegetable plants like peppers, and most especially tomatoes, need warm soil to thrive. This will be one year to not…
  • Everyone Talks About The Weather

    Ilona Erwin
    25 Feb 2015 | 6:39 pm
    I ventured out between the pine and the spirea Wherever I go (the few times I can venture out), everyone is talking about the weather, how cold it is, how tired they are of it, etc, etc. Depending on just how cold it is I either find lots to do on my computer, or I have an excuse to sit and watch a favorite show with a hot cup of something. Watched plenty of the British detective shows I like so well – I’ve watched most all of them. All of “Vikings”, caught up with “Grimm”, “Walking Dead” …  I won’t bore you with the long list of…
 
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    Garden Ideas

  • How to Select Awesome Ceramic Garden Stools

    DeneWood
    18 Apr 2015 | 1:00 am
    Now, you may want to apply your garden with something nice, like ceramic garden stools. By choosing the best style of garden decoration, you will be able to get the things you need. Many people dream of having the best house appearance with a fresh garden in it. When you can apply the best style […]
  • How to Make Decorative Garden Fencing Yourself

    DeneWood
    17 Apr 2015 | 9:00 pm
    Having a nice style of decorative garden fencing is a good idea. When you want to apply the best appearance to your garden, you will be able to make your house appear fresher with it. It is obvious that many people like to have the best appearance of garden for their house. When you have […]
  • More Benefits of Stone Garden Bench

    DeneWood
    17 Apr 2015 | 1:00 pm
    We will get a lot of benefits of a stone garden bench, especially if you choose a strong design. Perhaps, you always consider about the price, since it is made of quality materials. Indeed, a stone is a perfect element for durability while creating an elegant atmosphere. In fact, you can spend a lot of […]
  • How to Choose the Best Garden Work Bench

    DeneWood
    17 Apr 2015 | 9:00 am
    What will you do with a garden work bench? The typical furniture can only be found in the exterior. Also, not all homeowners are stripped to put it in their garden because they are too busy to manage plants or design other decorations. In fact, putting something different in a location will change a concept. […]
  • Making Your Best Exterior Decorations with Garden Wind Spinners

    DeneWood
    17 Apr 2015 | 5:00 am
    You need to know that the garden wind spinners are not just decoration. Most people assume that they are not important decoration to the exterior. Indeed, they consist of many beautiful designs that always attract attention to be placed in the garden. But, if you live in a farming community, you will realize that they […]
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    Bananas.org

  • how do you eat a apple banana?

    jeffaroo
    17 Apr 2015 | 9:12 pm
    I bought some apple bananas at the store the other day. I tried to pick the ones that were the least green. Threw them on the counter to ripen. These things will not turn yellow. They are still green and now the browning is starting to set in. Any tips ??? I was trying to get optimum taste to see if I wanted to plant one
  • Did I kill my Musa Basjoo?

    fallvitals
    17 Apr 2015 | 6:01 pm
    I dug up 5 Musa Basjoo plants and stuck em in my grandmothers garage. Stupidly directly on the concrete floor. They looked fine a few months ago. Now all wilted, white mold on the base, soggy. Guess it's rotting.... Shoulda just stuck it under the house. So, are they done for? I'm thinking of buying new plants, and planting these to see if anything happens?
  • Bunchy top or another virus?

    Ryan.
    17 Apr 2015 | 10:19 am
    Noticed some strange appearance to some of the leaves on my double mahoi. It's a rippling appearance. Was wondering if there is something going on (bunchy top or other virus). Thanks for any insight you can share. [IMG][/IMG]
  • Cavendish super dwarf in UK

    silverman
    16 Apr 2015 | 9:00 pm
    Hi Does anyone know of any plants for sale in the UK please? Thanks, Martin
  • Looking for VC and other short cycle nanners

    Hammocked Banana
    16 Apr 2015 | 4:30 am
    Hey guys Im looking for a VC corn or pup, as well as any other short cycle bananas. I will pay for plants, shipping, and paypal fees. Please PM me if you can help out.
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    North Coast Gardening

  • Gardening Books on Kindle Unlimited: My Top Picks

    Genevieve
    28 Mar 2015 | 9:32 pm
    Since I’ve primarily become a digital reader, I’ve really enjoyed getting to dig into gardening books, both old favorites and new discoveries, with my Kindle Unlimited subscription. Kindle Unlimited allows you to read a wide selection of books from participating authors and publishers for free, with your subscription price of $9.99 a month. While the vast majority of Kindle Unlimited offerings are self-published, and therefore vary in quality, many great publishers such as Timber Press, Algonquin, etc. have also joined and provided a number of their best-selling books to subscribers. Just…
  • Kindle Gardening Books for $4 or Less

    Genevieve
    15 Mar 2015 | 3:40 pm
    After reading The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying up: the Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing by Marie Kondo, I’ve been even more enthused to simultaneously save money and space by reading digitally. Digital gardening books look fantastic on an iPad, or you can always read them on your computer screen, especially reference books which are easiest to search on a laptop or desktop. I dislike paying close to the cost of a paper book for a digital copy (given the limitations on reselling, gifting, and loaning), so when books from major publishers go on a steep discount, I jump on it.
  • Repairing and Preventing Snow Damage in the Landscape

    Linda
    8 Mar 2015 | 3:52 pm
    Split bark, broken branches, and winter burned foliage – it’s enough to make any gardener long to take refuge in a warmer climate. However, a little knowledge can go a long way towards preventing and repairing storm damage. By treating your plants properly in summer and fall, you can help plants harden off and become immune to much of the damage. And once the cold weather has had its way with your landscaping, there are things you can do to repair any problems. What snow damage looks like in the landscape Snow and freezing temperatures can cause your trees, shrubs and plants all kinds…
  • DIY Bird Seed Blends for Feeding Wild Birds (and a Guide to the Best Seeds)

    Linda
    19 Feb 2015 | 9:10 pm
    Feeding wild birds is a rewarding pastime and a wonderful way to identify different birds in your area, which is good information to have if you are planning to use native plants in your garden to attract specific species. It’s also a great way to share a love of wildlife with children who may be too young use binoculars or to properly enjoy birds in nature. However, if you’ve ever purchased seeds at the supermarket or hardware store, you’re probably aware that the blends they sell contain a lot of filler seeds which birds turn their beaks up at. This junky birdseed ends up all over the…
  • Landscape Designer’s Tools of the Trade: Best Measuring Tools

    Genevieve
    9 Feb 2015 | 2:01 pm
    We’re coming up on that time of the year when most of us are doing more armchair gardening and garden planning than actual outside, in-the-dirt gardening, and one of the biggest challenges people encounter when they start measuring or plotting out their garden to create an overall plan is that their tools are woefully inadequate and make the job feel much more intimidating than it has to be. When your rusty measuring tape only goes to 25 feet, but your yard extends out quite a ways, it can be tough to even know where to begin. Today, I want to share a few of the professional tools of the…
 
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    Ewa in the Garden

  • Impressive Dogwood Sibirica Hedge

    18 Apr 2015 | 4:09 am
    I have a chance to admire this hedge for last few weeks and every time I am passing by I simply have to take a minute to take a closer look. Since first little fluorescent green buds appeared on the red wood of that variety of  dogwood (Cornus alba) Sibirica, entire hedge is really  showing off.        Deciduous hedges have one big defect – their leaves are disappearing in the winter time.
  • Happy Easter 2015! and no snow! (like here)

    5 Apr 2015 | 10:35 pm
    Happy Easter my dear readers! On the photo there is a twig of decorative prunus cut one week ago and put in the vase with warm water. Flowers opened right on time. I had to do is, because there is lazy spring this year. And this morning it was snowing! Have look below. I hope we all have more sun this Easter. And less snow :( 
  • Growing Air

    2 Apr 2015 | 9:43 pm
    Literally. You grow fresh air indoor. If there is enough plants at home or in the office space and they are properly selected, you may literally grow air indoor. The modern new buildings are designed in such a way that there is enough plants to support the oxygen production and support the healthy working and living space. So, why exactly to grow fresh air indoor? More plants indoor less
  • Could you help ID this small amazing tree

    24 Mar 2015 | 12:00 am
    This little tree was found by me in December in southern part of Portugal. Do you know maybe what it is? It is so lovely... flowers resemble those of Hydrangea's... if this could help...
  • Ewa in the Garden on Facebook

    20 Mar 2015 | 4:00 am
    Dear Readers and Friends, decided finally to open own page on Facebook. You don't know how great it would be to see you over there as well. Just click here to hop over and let's stay in touch in the place where you naturally gather anyway. It doesn't mean Ewa in the Garden will be publishing less, it only means I want to see you in other places. This is like with dating - you don't want to meet
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    Your Small Kitchen Garden

  • Hen and Chicks?

    Daniel Gasteiger
    5 Apr 2015 | 10:33 pm
    I spent a dollar to buy two Hen and Chicks plants at a yard sale in autumn. With snow predicted, I “heeled in” the plants in my vegetable bed. When the snow finally melted in March, I found this little family looking healthy and ready for action. Eventually, these will find a home in a rock garden I plan to build where the compost heap now rests. I’ve been a sucker for succulents since I grew a jungle in my bedroom during my high school years. So, despite my garden’s intense focus on food plants, I’ve mused for a long time about establishing a succulent garden in my yard. Near the…
  • Chili Pepper Seedlings Under Lights

    Daniel Gasteiger
    2 Apr 2015 | 12:09 pm
    My first chili pepper sprout of the year is a sweet pepper, but I don’t know what type. Last year I collected orange bell and sweet Italian pepper seeds from my harvest and managed to store them unlabeled. I’ve two distinct packs of seeds, and planted as many from one pack as from the other. Nearly all have sprouted. I’ll find out in August which plants are which. Just a week ago I reported on the success of my tomato starts (Tomatoes Under Lights). Two days later, my first chili pepper seedling of 2015 emerged. You might surmise I get a special rush when my seeds start each year. I…
  • Tomatoes Under Lights

    Daniel Gasteiger
    28 Mar 2015 | 12:51 pm
    It took just over four days for my first tomato seedling of 2015 to emerge. Saturday and Sunday, March 21st and 22nd, I planted 73 tomato seeds in five planters. The planters are under lights in my office. The 73 seeds represent 18 varieties of tomatoes – six varieties I brought back from last year’s garden, and 12 I bought from seed companies this spring. The first seedling emerged on March 26, just five (or four) days after planting. I snapped photos but here it is about 36 hours later and I’m just creating a post. A lot happens in 36 hours! At last count, 67 seeds had…
  • First Crocus, 2015… and Figs

    Daniel Gasteiger
    24 Mar 2015 | 4:27 pm
    Perhaps as hardy as the other crocuses in my yard, this one sneaked under my fig tree lean-to and managed to get a head start on spring. This is an awkward “first crocus of spring” post. The photo dates back to March 9, but the crocus plant it shows cheated. Overwintering Figs In late fall of 2014, I had two young fig trees I’d bought at the end of a garden center’s retail season. These had been in containers on my screened porch and I wanted them in the ground before temperatures plummeted… but I didn’t want them to freeze back to the soil if we had another polar vortex like the…
  • Unlikely Starters in my Kitchen Garden

    Daniel Gasteiger
    20 Mar 2015 | 12:24 am
    It’s still cold enough in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania for ice to form on the water in my “rain garden.” I use quotes because I dug a hole several years ago and it has been wet only in spring thaws and heavy storms—it’s dry most of the year. Haven’t yet decided what to plant in it. Being a garden writer has changed me. Before I posted my first blog entry, I’d plant almost exclusively things intended for my stomach. I’d joke (and I still joke) that if the plant doesn’t come with a recipe, I won’t waste energy growing it. There were exceptions. For example, I came across zinnia…
 
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    Tangled Branches: Cultivated

  • The Springing of the Year

    entangled
    9 Apr 2015 | 4:52 am
    It’s been a long dry spell. I don’t mean rain. The garden is a real mess but with the spouse’s help and good weather and not-too-hungry critters, we plan to coax it back into shape this year. We’ve been weeding and digging, and I began to sow seeds indoors about two months ago and transplanted seedlings into the garden a week ago or thereabouts. So, this is the makings of the first salad of the year entirely of our own greens. First Salad Greens 2015 I made a simple vinaigrette of pink wine vinegar, a couple drops of Datil pepper vinegar, salt, black pepper, a small…
  • Black Widows

    entangled
    26 May 2012 | 3:45 am
    … another public service announcement … I saw my first black widow spider many years ago – in a box of mail-order plants I was unpacking. Nothing bad happened. I smashed it with a trowel and it made a good story and I assumed I’d never see another. I saw my second black widow spider here in the woods of central Virginia. It was a few years ago, maybe 2007 or 2008. I probably should have killed it. I saw my third black widow spider on Monday of this week. On my front porch! I knocked it down and stomped on it with my garden clogs. The Monday front porch spider I saw my…
  • A Change Will Do You Good

    entangled
    16 May 2012 | 4:53 am
    I’m bored. With this blog I mean. It was fun when I started it in 2003 (over nine years ago!), and even more fun when I found out that people were actually reading it. But now, and forgive me if I’m repeating myself, but I find that I’m struggling to come up with something original to say about gardening. Especially in this year of the downsized vegetable garden. I looked over my last year’s posts for the Garden-to-Table-Challenge at GreenishThumb.net and see that I made exactly the same food this year in exactly the same week last year. Should I write about it again?
  • Venomous Caterpillars

    entangled
    11 May 2012 | 5:39 am
    …a public service announcement… Buck Moth Caterpillar Venomous caterpillars? Yes. If you see one of these things, don’t touch it. Even if it’s dead. If you want the graphic version of the warning, click here. I suspected this might be one of the several types of venomous caterpillars, even though I didn’t know what it was when I took these photos. Those spines just look ominous. Buck Moth Spines Click the photo above to enlarge it. You’ll see that each spine looks like a micro hypodermic needle and that is essentially what it is. These critters were…
  • Herb of the Year

    entangled
    4 May 2012 | 4:55 am
    Herb of the Year? Says who? The International Herb Association will have you know that the 2012 Herb of the Year™ is the Rose. They’re a trade organization so I suppose that little trademark symbol is inevitable, but it still made me squirm. And this upcoming week is National Herb Week—as declared by the International Herb Association. Or if you don’t want to spend a whole week on it, there’s HerbDay—May 5 this year—brought to you by a consortium of various herb organizations. Isn’t there some kind of official proclamation for these things? I couldn’t…
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    Veggie Gardener: Organic Vegetable Gardening Tips

  • Grow Onions if You Want a Versatile Veggie

    Veggie Gardener
    12 Apr 2015 | 9:29 pm
    Onions are delicious in many meals. Whether it is a robust salad or hamburger steak you crave, adding onions can enhance the experience and make it even more enjoyable. Depending on the meal you have in mind, selecting the right onion is key. Of course you want to use onions that are firm to the […]
  • Growing Corn in a Limited Space Garden

    Veggie Gardener
    3 Apr 2015 | 10:13 pm
    Being a veggie gardener sometimes requires us to make choices, at least in the case of those of us with limited space. It could be that you have many more vegetables on your list than your available gardening area will allow, which means having to sacrifice something you’d really like to grow. A good example […]
  • Medicinal Plants: Better Health from the Veggie Garden

    Veggie Gardener
    28 Mar 2015 | 3:29 am
    Injuries and illnesses happen despite our best efforts. When these things befall us, we often turn to modern medicine to fix that which ails us. Although the medical treatments that are commonplace in the world today are successful, there was a time when we did not have such innovation to rely on for health and […]
  • 5 Tips to Enhance Tomato Health, Growth, and Taste

    Veggie Gardener
    22 Mar 2015 | 6:33 pm
    Tomatoes are universally popular in gardens everywhere. Whether you are new to gardening or very experienced, chances are tomatoes are on the list of things you wish to grow. If you purchase a pack of seeds, you can simply read the instructions for basic planting information. While this is useful, it is a mere glimpse […]
  • Out of Garden Space? Burlap Sacks Can Help!

    Veggie Gardener
    15 Mar 2015 | 8:25 pm
    There are a lot of different ways to grow a veggie garden in a small or limited amount of space. Where it can get tricky, however, is with larger plants such as tomatoes. In many cases, pots or other containers can fall in the realm of too much or not enough. A good universal option, […]
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    Miss Rumphius' Rules

  • Trials and Neglect in my Home Garden

    Susan aka Miss. R
    17 Apr 2015 | 7:53 am
    I’m not a landscape designer who has a wonderfully designed garden that is a terrific advertisement for my craft at my home. I should, I live on a corner, but as I’ve shared here before it’s mostly a neglected mess with good bones and a rotating cast of plants. My home garden is quirky and in a constant state of flux. Since my landscape design practice is design only, I don’t have a crew I can ‘borrow’ for the big tasks, so they wait and are ignored for as long as possible. I’m mostly not very motivated to work in my own garden after spending my…
  • Garden Visit: Filoli

    Susan aka Miss. R
    24 Mar 2015 | 11:43 am
    My visit last week to one of the great American gardens, Filoli, in northern California, was a revelation in many ways.  I have wanted to visit since I first saw pictures of it years ago. The garden was designed in the early 20th century by its original homeowners with a team of architects, artists, and horticulturists. There is no known master plan yet it has survived largely in tact which is a rarity for American estate gardens of this size and scope. Sometimes my travels are guided by my desire to experience specific places firsthand. My trip to Marrakesh and Majorelle was one of…
  • Green Gardens

    Susan aka Miss. R
    27 Feb 2015 | 4:34 am
    Green is a thing. Right now it’s a missing thing. It’s what I miss most during winter and what makes me smile first in the spring–those small green shoots pushing up through frigid earth. I’ve been thinking about making flowerless gardens. Gardens that are mostly green. Gardens that rely  on scale and texture and subtlety of hue and maybe some skilled pruning. In New Jersey, where I practice landscape design, this may prove to be more difficult than it is in warmer climates where there are bolder choices and plants with immense architectural leaves. Many of the…
  • My Award Winning Garden Design

    Susan aka Miss. R
    16 Feb 2015 | 6:51 am
    Last fall, I entered a garden I designed in New Jersey in 2015 APLD International Landscape Design Awards in the Planting Design category. It was awarded the highest honor, a Gold Award. To be honest, I knew the value of the design, but since it is the antithesis of current planting trends, I was really pleased. Current trends in planting design seem to require ornamental grasses and meadow-like qualities. This garden has neither, but that doesn’t make it unsustainable or unfriendly to all  but deer. The garden’s underlying structure of boxwood hedging and pyramids gives it…
  • Design vs. A Sense of Place

    Susan aka Miss. R
    11 Feb 2015 | 3:29 am
    I’m not an architecture critic.  I am someone who loves great architecture both contemporary and historic. In my work as a landscape designer part of my focus is to create landscapes and gardens that surround the attendant architecture in such a way that the design partnership between them is timeless and seamless.  As a designer this may seem counter intuitive, but I believe that the best design has a sense of place and that my hand in that should be less, rather than more, visible. Last week I visited Frank Gehry’s new building for the Fondation Louis Vuitton in Paris.  It…
 
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    Journal

  • A Review of "Garden Design, a Book of Ideas"

    Allan
    15 Apr 2015 | 11:28 am
    Garden Design, a Book of Ideas, Heidi Howcroft & Marianne Majerus, Firefly Books Glance at the image above to appreciate the shape and color of the Eupatorium flower head close-up in the foreground. Let your eyes caress the feathery texture of the upright ornamental grass in the background and notice how it contrasts with the smooth bark of the vertical trees while delineating the horizontal border of the pool. The book cover photo captures an example of garden design at its best and is an indication of the quality of information to be found inside. In an age of sensory overload, authors…
  • Lespedeza Gibraltar Is A Waterfall Flowering Perennial

    Allan
    18 Mar 2015 | 9:53 am
    Extreme close up of a Lespedeza floret in my garden. With normal viewing, it isn't as attractive as it appears above.Whenever I receive a catalogue from an online nursery, my first action is to search for perennials I’ve never seen before. I pay attention to those that are considered hardy in USDA Zone 4 [Canada Zone 5]. I delve into details to select only flowering plants with a long bloom period. Finally, for those that appear to have potential, I evaluate for attractiveness and for colors that work well in the English-style flowerbed. Photos used in the above-mentioned publications…
  • Fran Sorin's Inspirational Garden Guide Has Been Reissued.

    Allan
    22 Feb 2015 | 10:05 pm
    Digging Deep: Unearthing Your Creative Roots Through Gardening,  Fran Sorin,   Braided Worlds Publishing.              There is one book in my library that I can never part with: Fran Sorin’s Digging Deep. When it was published ten years ago, it validated the personal creativity I discovered when I first began to garden. On its pages, I also found a lifetime mentor in the author’s warm, inspiring voice and I return to her words whenever I need to refresh my creativity. Recently, the book was republished in a revised tenth anniversary…
  • The Flower Garden Style of Piet Oudolf

    Allan
    1 Feb 2015 | 10:24 am
    Image copyrighted by Scott Weber. Used with permission Scott Weber, of Portland, Oregon, has been designing and planting flowerbeds around his property for several years. Above and below are two of the many stunning photos he shares with readers on his blog Rhone Street Gardens. The images of his mini meadow-like plantings always take my breath away no matter how frequently he posts. Scott once mentioned that Piet Oudolf inspires the spirit and design of his garden. Image copyrighted by Scott Weber. Used with permission. For over one hundred years, the English flower garden remained the…
  • A Purple Autumn Perennial That Pops: Vernonia Lettermannii

    Allan
    4 Jan 2015 | 11:44 am
    Photo credit:The University of Tennessee, Institute of Agriculture A client gave me a mandate to enhance her flowerbed whenever I find a reliable perennial that blooms in purple. To please her, I scour my suppliers’ catalogues every spring looking for purple blooming plants. Then I test grow them for a few seasons to determine how they perform. Most are disappointing.  A few become messy or invasive. Some are short-lived plants lasting one or two seasons while others are unable to survive climate conditions in my growing zone. Happily, this year I discovered that the recently…
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    Garden Therapy

  • How to Clean Garden Pots

    Stephanie
    17 Apr 2015 | 3:05 pm
    Growing a garden in containers is an increasingly popular way to adorn your outdoor space. Small space dwellers have the option to create a garden on a patio, deck or even a fire escape. Start the season off right by properly preparing your pots for the growing season whether they are terracotta, resin, glazed ceramic or plastic doesn’t matter.  Here is ... The post How to Clean Garden Pots appeared first on Garden Therapy.
  • This is the Best Home and Garden App and Here is Why

    Stephanie
    14 Apr 2015 | 3:33 pm
    Reading in the garden on a warm summer day. Soaking in a hot bath. Waiting at the doctor’s office. What do these three things have in common? They are the times I look forward to sitting back and reading home and garden design magazines. I love to be swept away to a world of beauty and dream about how it ... The post This is the Best Home and Garden App and Here is Why appeared first on Garden Therapy.
  • The Essential Organic Lawn Care Guide

    Stephanie
    10 Apr 2015 | 3:54 pm
    Lawns are evil. Ok, perhaps that is a harsh generalization. I like a picnic on soft blades of grass as much as the next person. At the same time, I don’t like wasteful practices that are harmful to the earth.  I would much prefer if everyone would replace their water-guzzling lawn with drought-tolerant gardens, native plants to attract pollinators, or zero-mile vegetable ... The post The Essential Organic Lawn Care Guide appeared first on Garden Therapy.
  • The Top Allergy-Fighting Plants for the Home Gardener

    Guest Blogger
    7 Apr 2015 | 10:37 am
    Allergy sufferers rejoice! You needn’t be afraid of the garden. You can stop allergies and asthma with smart landscaping. You read that right: you can STOP allergies and asthma with the right plants in your home garden. If you are one of the millions of people with allergies or asthma, then you are going to want to read what horticulturist Thomas Ogren has ... The post The Top Allergy-Fighting Plants for the Home Gardener appeared first on Garden Therapy.
  • Home Grown Lollipop Flowers

    Stephanie
    1 Apr 2015 | 7:32 pm
    Gardeners are curious and experimental. We appreciate beauty and want to grow delicious flavours right in our backyards. So when I was sent a package of magic jellybeans, I couldn’t wait to see what they would grow! I know what you are thinking: “there is no such thing as magic jellybeans!”. Well, you may be surprised at what happened when I planted ... The post Home Grown Lollipop Flowers appeared first on Garden Therapy.
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    Urban Organic Gardener

  • How to Grow Perfect Peppers & Tomatoes in a 5 Gallon Bucket

    Sari Sari
    8 Apr 2015 | 11:26 am
    Short on growing space but still yearn for homegrown tomatoes and peppers? Is your garden located on a balcony or terrace and you’re afraid you can’t savor the taste of vine ripened tomatoes or experience the heat of your favorite variety of pepper? Well you can, and all you need is a 5 gallon bucket, nutrient rich soil, a few amendments, water and your favorite variety of heirloom seeds. Start by finding a 5 gallon bucket. Make sure it is clean and food grade, meaning there’s never been any nasty chemicals stored or shipped in your container.   Usually you can acquire…
  • The Hell’s Kitchen Farm Project an Urban Rooftop Farm

    UOG
    31 Mar 2015 | 10:32 pm
    The Hell’s Kitchen Farm operates on a 4,000 square foot roof & is growing in 52 raised beds. What they’re doing is quite amazing… According to their website, “HKFP is an urban rooftop farm in Hell’s Kitchen, managed and run by volunteers. HKFP is the outgrowth of community discussions concerning nutritional security, especially scarcity of affordable fresh produce, in Hell’s Kitchen.”  
  • NEW! Join the Urban Organic Gardener’s Monthly Seed Club

    UOG
    30 Mar 2015 | 8:24 pm
    The Urban Organic Gardener’s Monthly Seed Club is here and we’re ready to start shipping seeds. With Spring season right around the corner now is the best time to join.  We’ll automatically send you the best seeds to plant – at the right time of the year – specific to where you live. Sign up now for  $10 and receive a custom collection of NON-GMO Heirloom seeds every month.  Start by answering a few questions about your garden:  Click here to get started Easy as 1 – 2 – 3       Frequently Asked Questions Q: What is it? A: Members…
  • 5 Container Gardening Tips for Beginners (+ Giveaway!)

    UOG
    17 Mar 2015 | 3:05 pm
    Julie from homereadyhome.com just published a great article highlighting important Container Gardening Tips (for Beginners).  Click here to view the original post: http://homereadyhome.com/5-container-gardening-tips-for-beginners/ Here’s a quick preview of what she has has to say about container gardening: 1. Don’t “grow” overboard. “Container gardening requires a time commitment. You’ll need to be more hands-on (ie. watering and fertilizing) with plants in pots than plants in the ground. Your container garden will require daily attention so you want to make sure you…
  • 66 Things You Can Grow In Containers

    UOG
    22 Feb 2015 | 7:40 pm
    Bet you didn’t know you could grow all these different plants in containers!  Give it a try.  You might just be surprised!  
 
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    The Garden Plot

  • 2016 Garden Trends Report: Sneak Peek!

    Garden Media Group
    1 Apr 2015 | 6:05 am
    For the first time in the company’s history, Garden Media is offering a sneak peek into its 2016 trend research. Below are a few of the trends on the company’s radar for 2016.Urine Luck! "Peecycling:" the Next Trend in SustainabilityYou’ve heard of recycling, and even upcycling, but there’s a new cycle in town. "Pee-cycling" is the gateway to truly living a sustainable lifestyle. This sterile human waste can be converted into a valuable fertilizer. And 2016 is the year it will happen in the U.S.The stuff that makes up plant food: nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium, are all secreted…
  • New Vibrant Garden Plants & Products for Spring 2015

    Garden Media Group
    25 Mar 2015 | 9:38 am
    Warm weather and blooming foliage are on the horizon. In anticipation, Garden Media Group has released its much awaited 2015 Garden Superstars for Spring. Making an appearance on this year’s list are breathtaking patio plantings, chemical-free lawn care products and a new spin on a traditional garden flower.Much of the winter is spent wishing for warmth and color. Now, it’s time to grow! These low maintenance and durable plants and products leave a lasting impression with their easy outdoor style and vibrant appeal.Garden Superstars will inspire and influence gardening and…
  • Crown Bees Launches Crowdfunding Campaign to Help Save the Bees

    Garden Media Group
    18 Mar 2015 | 5:30 am
    Social networks aren’t just for people anymore. Today, March 18, Crown Bees is launching its solution-driven Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign to build a network of native Bee Boosterswho support and raise native bees that can later be shared with local farmers.“Since one out of every three bites of food we eat depends on bees, we need more native bees to help take the stress off of honey bees,” says Dave Hunter, CEO of Crown Bees, a supplier of gentle, solitary bees such as mason bees and leafcutter bees as well as American-made bee houses and supplies. “Together, native bees and honey…
  • Crown Bees is building a network of Bee Boosters

    Garden Media Group
    27 Jan 2015 | 11:19 am
    Bees are responsible for one out of three bites of food we eat — and Crown Bees works to safeguard the planet’s future food supply by increasing the population of native bees in North America.   Although the plight of the honey bee has been well publicized, many people are unaware that there are more than 4,000 other species of bees. These native bees can work side-by-side with honey bees to pollinate home gardens as well as major food crops such as cherries and almonds. Crown Bees is on a mission to increase public awareness about native bees and to build a network of “Bee…
  • Crown Bees Signs with Garden Media Group for 2015

    Garden Media Group
    13 Jan 2015 | 1:31 pm
    Garden Media Group is buzzing with excitement as it announces its newest client for 2015, Crown Bees. The gentle bee company partners with Garden Media in an effort to raise awareness about the importance of mason bees to the world’s food supply.  This spring, Garden Media will oversee Crown Bees’ dynamic crowdfunding effort to raise awareness about how native bees can supplement the work of our troubled honey bees and solve a key threat to our planet’s food sustainability. “No question Garden Media has the experience we need to create support for our mission,” says Dave…
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    Gardener's Journal

  • Railing Planters Hold Tight on High-Rise Balcony

    gscadmin
    13 Apr 2015 | 1:04 pm
    The Balcony Railing Planters seem to float on the glass walls of this high-rise garden. Photo is from Paul and Dedra Diehl, who have five planters on the railings of their balcony. From a review of the Viva Balcony Railing Planter by Paul and Dedra Diehl in Iowa: Last winter I went to Gardeners to buy balcony “saddle” planters. Once there, I saw these stunning planters and crossed off the saddles. I was skeptical that the actual item would look as good as the photos but ordered them anyway. Am I ever glad I did! I’d expected thin, tin-like metal with a cheap finish that had…
  • 12 Tips for Water-Wise Vegetables

    gscadmin
    8 Apr 2015 | 10:09 am
    Self-watering planters have hidden reservoirs that allow plants to use water more efficiently and go longer between waterings. With this drip irrigation kit, you can efficiently water a series of six plants. California’s ongoing drought recently prompted the first statewide mandatory water use reduction there, and it’s likely that water restrictions will be imposed in other areas of the country that are experiencing unusually dry conditions. You can still grow vegetables — even during water restrictions — if you plan, plant and tend plants wisely. And drought or no drought, it…
  • There’s Still Time to Start Seeds!

    gscadmin
    31 Mar 2015 | 6:46 am
    Kale seedlings, just starting to show their frilly “true leaves.” Shop Seed Starting & Lights Seed Starting Pots and Kits Soil Mixes for Seeds Related Articles Seed-Starting FAQs Growing Tomatoes from Seed to Harvest Find your average last spring frost date After a wild winter filled with abundant snow and unusually cold temperatures, I’m itching to get out in the garden. But the garden won’t be ready for me for weeks; it’s still covered in snow and the ground underneath is frozen. So I’m satisfying my need to grow by starting seeds indoors. In many…
  • When it’s Time for ‘Potting Up’

    gscadmin
    25 Mar 2015 | 12:26 pm
    Artichoke seedlings that have been growing in long Rootrainers are well-rooted and ready for potting up. With such a well-developed root system, this tomato seedling should be potted up so it can grow further in a larger pot. If you start plants from seed, eventually you’ll have to master the technique of potting up. It’s what you do when a seedling gets too big for the pot or cell it’s growing in. Usually it’s too early to plant outdoors, and the seedling still needs a few more weeks of coddling indoors. Not all seedlings require potting up, but many do. A good…
  • Geranium Seedlings Bring Spring into our Call Center

    gscadmin
    6 Mar 2015 | 5:03 am
    A seedling that has been “potted up” into a 4″ pot. From now (late February) until late-May, the seedling will grow slowly in the same pot. Valerie waters the geranium seedlings, which are set up under lights, just outside our call center. Winter can be a difficult time for gardeners. Sure, there are seed catalogs to get us through January, but February arrives, and it’s still winter. Is it too early to start seeds? Not at all, especially if you aspire to grow plants that have a long lead time, such as artichokes or onions. Valerie Ryan, who works in our call center,…
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    This Grandmother's Garden

  • Serendipity in Spring

    Carolyn ♥
    16 Apr 2015 | 2:53 pm
    Snowing!!!  Sometimes, SPRING gets a little confused. Rebuds in SnowPerhaps she's so busy painting the pastels that she doesn't see Old Man Winter rushing in for a final fling.Periwinkle taking a Peek Such a SERENDIPITOUS event, don't cha think?Boomerang Lilac with SnowcapsNo worry.The moisture is always welcome!Pincushions in CrystalAnd the colors peeking through the snow...simply MAGICAL!Besides... Winter always enjoys it's last beautiful blast!And the budding trees and flowers...always seem to survive.( This snow storm gathered 3 inches in my gardens…
  • This is What I Believe... He Lives!

    Carolyn ♥
    3 Apr 2015 | 6:39 am
    The quiet change taking place within my gardensare divine testimonyand an inspiration to behold.Our Snow-capped Mountains in Spring As every Leaf, Bud and Bloom ariseto join the celebrationand joyously declare...HE LIVES! The Birth of a Maple LeafRed-buds in Glorious SplendorA Grand Celebration!It happens every Spring.And it always fills my soul.All the EARTH is celebrating LIFE... because JESUS CHRIST Lives.♥   ♥   ♥   View this short video... your heart will be filledwith His love for you!All content created by…
  • Spring is Here!

    Carolyn ♥
    20 Mar 2015 | 7:23 am
    The warmth of the Radiant Sun has enticed my redbuds to POP! Proudly proclaiming to all the little birds Spring is here!  You can now move in... please?(Redbuds have never popped this early in my gardens... all my world is loving this Sunshine!)All content created by Carolyn Bush | Copyright © 2010 - 2015 All Rights Reserved  This Grandmother's Garden | Highland, Utah, USA All content created by Carolyn Bush | Copyright © 2010 - 2014 All Rights Reserved | This Grandmother's Garden | Highland, Utah, USA
 
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    Annie's Gardening Corner

  • Curves, Texture, Color

    17 Apr 2015 | 8:32 am
    Curves + texture = beautiful design (Landscape design by Bilowz Associates Inc.#WLAM2015.)What are curves without texture? Curves + texture = beautiful design. Seems simple enough but there's a lot to making that equation work right. If you like a bit of vibrancy to brighten up the monotone effects of hardscape details, make sure you design for plant pockets. Why? Because adding color is hands-down, the play and fun. Plus, all those benefits of bees, butterflies and wildlife. Before you dash off with some design inspiration, a couple more snippets that might help. Notice that one tree, its…
  • Thursday's Throwback Tips

    16 Apr 2015 | 5:44 am
    Prune for structure before bud breaks.   Some quick Thursday landscape and garden tips without too much fluff.  1) Prune - late winter to early spring is pruning time. Before the spring season truly wakes up, this is the time to inspect all your trees and shrubs for damaged or diseased branches and structural problems (i.e., crossed, rubbing branches and damaged or split crotches from heavy snow loads). Without foliage, trees and shrubs are very easy to evaluate. And remember to use clean, sharpened tools to avoid spreading diseases. 2) Aerate, thatch and fertilize the greens.
  • Early Bird Garden Tips

    13 Apr 2015 | 7:46 am
    As Leonardo da Vinci once said, “Water is the driver of nature.”  So let’s tackle that number one water guzzler right off the bat.  1) If you water your lawn frequently, it actually becomes less drought-tolerant. Do you remember this tip shared earlier in the month? Improve your soil and make conscious efforts to reduce your chemical and water usage. And when seeding or reseeding your lawn, use varieties that are drought, disease and insect resistant.2) Water early in the AM.3) Use drip irrigation whenever possible.4) When watering with a hose, irrigate the roots, not the…
  • Heck Heuchera – Is it Spring yet or not?

    9 Apr 2015 | 7:06 am
    Is it Spring yet or not? Ask this Heuchera; confused for sure. Do you think this snowy Heuchera wonders where it woke up this morning? Snow on April 9th is not part of what we call ‘spring’ but in New England, yes, anything goes, which leads us to a #ThrowbackThursday look at an extremely versatile and great perennial. Click here for the archived post. Find out why we love this plant. It's all about the Heuchera; an easy addition to your perennial borders. Plus, it fits into the celebration of #WLAM2015 (World Landscape Architecture Month.) with a top landscape design trend –…
  • Spring's Sage

    6 Apr 2015 | 5:46 am
    For the wise gardener, you must plant Sage.What herbs will you be planting in your soon-to-be kitchen garden? A sunny position and well-drained soil - that's all you need to garner yourself some sage leaves.  Herbs are easy to plant, grow and use for its culinary and medicinal uses. Why do we love sage? It's a comeback kid even after this worse-for-wear New England winter. In the early stages of the garden, it's ready for use. And while sage compliments many culinary recipes, here's a sage and vinegar concoction for bruises, swellings and stings. We might be getting a few of those as we…
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    Serenity in the Garden

  • The Iris Walk in Giverny - Garden Photo of the Day

    Jan Johnsen
    17 Apr 2015 | 3:37 am
    Iris walk at Monet's Giverny  No words! A master painter's eye transplanted to the garden. I wonder if Monet  dug up the plants as they bloomed to move the colors around? (I don't know who took this wonderful photo)
  • The Wonderful Fortex Pole Bean

    Jan Johnsen
    16 Apr 2015 | 3:01 am
    Fortex Pole Bean - Full Circle SeedsDo you, like me, have limited space for a vegetable garden? Then pole beans are the answer and Fortex is the one I suggest to start with. This extraordinary French slender 'filet' bean grows over 10 inches long and has a delicious nutty flavor. It starts yielding early and the pods are completely stringless.Fortex from Johnny Selected SeedsBest of all it can be harvested early or late, small or large, and still be as super tasty as ever.  So early beans at 6" long are delicious and so are the more mature, longer ones!Fortex offers long…
  • Milk Carton Gardening - Build those Memories

    Jan Johnsen
    15 Apr 2015 | 4:58 am
    When did we abandon the simple pleasures of growing carrots in milk cartons, planting hollyhocks along old fences or having fragrant lilacs at the corner of a house? We should reclaim this as part of our ordinary life...HollyhocksWe all have such memories - even city kids like me...It might be the 'weed' that smelled like licorice (anise hyssop), or the buttercups that you put under your chin, or the honeysuckle that you could suck a teeny drop of 'honey' from, Honeysucklethe sweet smell of roses as you walked past a certain house, or the bright yellow daffodils in…
  • My One Day Class on Water in the Garden, 4-17-15

    Jan Johnsen
    14 Apr 2015 | 3:04 am
    “If there is magic on this planet, it is contained in water.” - Loren EiseleyI am teaching a one day class on Water in the Garden on April 17, 2015 - I have developed it to inspire, provoke and stimulate you to think about including some water - in one of its many forms - in a garden.It is at the NY Botanical Garden in the Bronx, NY. I offered it last year and the response was so positive that they want me to offer it again. Hope you can come! GO HERE to register. CEUs provided.
  • Spicy Wasabi - cool summers required.

    Jan Johnsen
    12 Apr 2015 | 6:42 pm
    source - Pacific Coast wasabiWasabi has found its way into a broad range of culinary applications, lending zing to traditional sauces, dressings, rubs, cocktails, even ice cream!Have shade? Not to fear - Wasabi (Wasabia japonica) grows on cool, shady river banks high in the Japanese mountains so it has evolved to survive in very low light levels. Thus, wasabi makes a striking feature in a shady spot. The heart shaped leaves die back in winter and the plant's energy travels down into the  swollen stems that carry the plant through winter. Cool summers are key.Hardy to 27…
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    MySecretGarden

  • April Garden. Wordless Wednesday

    16 Apr 2015 | 6:59 am
    **
  • Abyssinian Banana Trees Overwintered

    11 Apr 2015 | 6:44 am
    August 2014 On November 28, 2014, I posted about preparing my three Red Abyssinian Banana plants (Ensete ventricosum Maurelii) for winter (Abyssinian Banana Overwintering). All three plants were dug out, placed in big plastic containers and moved into the garage.  November 2014 To Chop-Not To Chop The leaves were still beautiful in November, and I felt so bad chopping down one
  • RoozenGaarde Display Garden-2015. 150 pictures

    6 Apr 2015 | 6:24 am
    It's our family tradition to visit the Skagit Tulip Festival each spring. Every April for the past several years, I shared pictures of the daffodil and tulip fields, and also, the stunning displays of spring flowers at RoozenGaarde /Washington Bulb Company. This year, the blooms were ready for show unusually early, a month early to be exact. We traveled to the valley on the 27th of March. I was
  • Northwest Flower & Garden Show - Four More Display Gardens

    25 Mar 2015 | 6:07 am
    Slowly, but surely, I'm continuing to show my pictures from the 2015 Northwest Flower&Garden Show (NWFGS). Following are the pictures of four more display gardens with comments from their NWFGS description. Giovanni’s Grotto "The romance of Italy, both its people and environs, is captured here in this grotto hideaway. It has the feel of an outdoor room with its sitting area
  • My Garden (zone 8) - First Part of March

    19 Mar 2015 | 6:52 am
    In spring, I'm always excited to see that my plants have spread. Sometimes, it's good excitement - who doesn't like free plants? In other cases, excitement is followed by a question - am I playing with  fire? A few observations about some fast spreaders in my garden.    Petasites palmatus 'Golden Palms' , Northwest native This is the case when you should trust the label! "Spreads
 
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    Veg Plotting

  • A Poem for Salad

    VP
    17 Apr 2015 | 12:30 am
    @readersdigestUK @Malvernmeet 3 Places To Find Salad: 1. Eatery. 2. Kitchen. 3. Garden. === To set tone- Homegrown. pic.twitter.com/evyG1yxAT6— MaryElizabeth Rumsey (@MEinRhyme) April 15, 2015 On Wednesday morning I was delighted to find I've been gifted my first ever poem.Even better it's a) about one of my blogging obsessions - growing salad leaves, and b) April is National Poetry Month.I tend to gnash my teeth a bit when the online marketing 'experts' go on about the Return on Investment (ROI) for social media. For me, this kind of random connection and a gift from a stranger is all…
  • GBBD: Tulip 'St George'

    VP
    15 Apr 2015 | 12:30 am
    In 2000, one of the improvements our garden contractor added to our sketched garden design, was a plinth either side of the central steps leading off our patio. For many years these were topped with a couple of box balls in pots, but the 'sentinel conifers' encroached on them too much and pulled them out of shape. They're beyond rescuing.I'm undecided whether to start again with the box, so in the meantime I've gone much larger with the pots. Last summer saw them stuffed with a huge dahlia each, which I loved. This spring sees the classic combination of tulips and yet-to-bloom wallflowers,…
  • Latin Without Tears: Tomato

    VP
    13 Apr 2015 | 12:30 am
    Oops, forgot to add my regular Latin feature to last week's plant profile. As it was a long post anyway and I've found quite a bit of information, a separate post seems best.Our word for tomato is rooted in the Aztec one, tomatl which gives us a clue to this plant's origins from the Andes in South America. We had a quiz question a couple of weeks ago: What is the Peruvian 'love apple' commonly known as? and I was relieved I had the right answer - tomato - especially as the rest of the team didn't believe me I wonder if that's where the French Pomme d'Amour originates.According to…
  • Portland Inspiration: Lasting Impressions

    VP
    10 Apr 2015 | 12:30 am
    If the embedded show doesn't work, try this link instead.We've just booked our flights to this year's Garden Bloggers Fling in Toronto - it's less than 2 months away, squeeeee!I've looked at last year's photos to help me through the wait and it's interesting to see what has stayed with me. The sheer number and variety of gardens we visited; the bold use of art and orange in the garden; huge pots; serious plantsmanship and good design, which still has room for lots of fun and quirky detail; cheeky hummingbirds (holds back the green-eyed monster); lush planting with varieties I can use in my…
  • Plant Profiles: Tomatoes

    VP
    8 Apr 2015 | 4:45 am
    Some of last year's 'Sungold' and 'Indigo Rose' ripening on my windowsill. Every year I have a tussle with myself about growing tomatoes. Home-grown have the best flavour by far, but as I only have space to grow them outdoors, it's a much riskier venture. Too often the summer weather is indifferent, or blight wrecks them at the point of ripening. As a result it can be the most heartbreaking of crops.But then comes along a summer like last year and I fall in love with growing tomatoes all over again.Tomatoes are one of the mainstays of our salads and to get anything remotely like a good…
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    GrowBlog

  • Speedy Salads for Small Gardens

    16 Apr 2015 | 4:08 pm
    Speedy equals salad. This is true whether you're filling a simple sandwich, or growing the ingredients for one in your garden. Simple salad ingredients tick a number of boxes for gardeners growing in small spaces: they're compact in size, quick to grow, often repeat-cropping, and in many cases are suitable for the shadier parts of your garden. So if you're short on space but on a health kick, or just relish the prospect of a refreshing summer salad, make sure you prioritise salad growing in your garden plan.
  • Using Seed Tapes, Seed Mats and Seed Disks

    10 Apr 2015 | 2:02 am
    Twenty-plus years ago, several seed companies started making and selling seed tapes - ribbons of biodegradable paper upon which vegetable seeds had been mounted. Back then I was struggling to grow beets, and my first and only try with seed tapes failed. I moved on, ultimately did learn to grow beets, but looking back, it is entirely possible that the seed tape was not the problem. Time to give them another try.
  • Unusual Roots: How to Grow Salsify and Scorzonera

    2 Apr 2015 | 12:36 am
    While lovers of root vegetables will never tire of the likes of carrot and parsnip, there's certainly no harm in adding to the repertoire. Two curiosities often overlooked are salsify and scorzonera, also known as black salsify. (Scorzonera is easier to pronounce with practice!) Both are exceptionally easy-to-grow and make a welcome change to the usual suspects.
  • Warming Soil for Spring Planting (and Frogs)

    27 Mar 2015 | 12:44 pm
    Back when I was a new gardener, I would rush to plant cool-season veggies as soon as it felt like spring outside, mostly because all the books said I could plant peas, potatoes, onions and cabbage "as soon as the soil could be worked in spring."
  • Forcing Strawberries for an Earlier Crop

    19 Mar 2015 | 5:41 pm
    While I have nothing against preserves, the best fruit has to be ultra-fresh, eaten within minutes or even seconds of picking, while still warm from a sunny garden. And for me, strawberries are one of the most mouth-watering garden treats of all.
 
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    The Enduring Gardener

  • Feed on Friday

    The Enduring Gardener
    13 Apr 2015 | 11:21 am
    I was recently a panel member on a Q&A session with the wonderful Jekka McVicar – Queen of Herbs and font of much wisdom.  Jekka is a great communicator and has a way of imparting ideas in memorable ways.  On the day in question the advice that I came away with and have started to […]
  • No More Plastic Labels

    The Enduring Gardener
    11 Apr 2015 | 4:21 am
    I hate plastic labels, but I haven’t been able to find an affordable wooden alternative –  until now. Trawling the internet I scrolled past the lovely but pricey handcrafted wooden labels and came to a website offering packs of wooden tongue depressors (do you remember when the doctor would say ‘stick out your tongue and […]
  • A Consistently Good Potting Compost

    The Enduring Gardener
    7 Apr 2015 | 6:36 am
    Over the years I have tried many potting composts, some good, some bad and some that varied between the two.  If money was no object, or I was a commercial grower, I would definitely use GroChar from Carbon Gold as there is no doubt that it produces wonderful results, but at more than double the […]
  • King John’s Nursery & Garden

    The Enduring Gardener
    26 Mar 2015 | 5:31 am
    I’ve just been for my first outing with the East Sussex group of the Cottage Garden Society. The nursery and garden are tucked down a lane near Etchingam in deeply rural countryside and has been on my list to visit for some time. It was a jolly event (including tea and cake) despite the lack […]
  • An Exercise in Barricade Building

    The Enduring Gardener
    23 Mar 2015 | 12:21 am
    I’ve just prepared my bean trench and sown broad beans and peas – all quite straightforward and enjoyable. I then spent double the time erecting barricades to keep the foxes at bay. I used to find that twiggy branches laid across the soil was all that was needed to deter cats, but foxes will just […]
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    Urban Gardens

  • Reap What You Sow With AKER Urban Farming Kits

    Maggie Wells
    15 Apr 2015 | 4:48 pm
    You can picture it right? Starting your day by collecting a bounty of fresh eggs, herbs and other edibles, popping over to check on your buzzing bee hive, and then heading out to enjoy your day in the city with … Read More...The post Reap What You Sow With AKER Urban Farming Kits appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Frédéric Malphettes Trellis Vertical Garden

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    10 Apr 2015 | 1:46 pm
    One of my favorite French designers, Frédéric Malphettes, reaches new heights with Anno, his latest vertical garden trellis structure, a welcome addition to his family of modular vertical garden designs. Anno is playful from the start: the name is a … Read More...The post Frédéric Malphettes Trellis Vertical Garden appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • A Japanese Garden Hidden Behind LA’s Dodger Stadium

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    9 Apr 2015 | 3:55 pm
    Who knew? I grew up in Los Angeles, went to many baseball games, but never knew that there was a Japanese garden hidden behind Dodger Stadium. Yep, the story goes that back in 1962 when the ballpark opened, the team invited Japanese sportswriter, … Read More...The post A Japanese Garden Hidden Behind LA’s Dodger Stadium appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Interview: Architecture Student Designs Smart Home of the Future With On-site Food Production

    Tierney VanderVoort
    6 Apr 2015 | 3:32 pm
    When judges of the House 2020 Competition challenged Ontario, Canada architecture, engineering and environmental science students to come up with an innovative idea for the house of the future, they asked the question: what does ”smart” mean now? Competition winner, Peter Kitchen, Master of … Read More...The post Interview: Architecture Student Designs Smart Home of the Future With On-site Food Production appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Celebrating Slow Food and Slow Flowers at Local Flower Farm Dinner

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    4 Apr 2015 | 11:34 pm
    You know about farm-to-table dining and perhaps garden-to-glass cocktails. Now there’s Field-to-Vase–where the dining table’s flowers were freshly picked at the flower farm only a few feet from where you are seated. The Field to Vase Dinner Tour is series … Read More...The post Celebrating Slow Food and Slow Flowers at Local Flower Farm Dinner appeared first on Urban Gardens.
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    Busch Gardens in Virginia Blog

  • Happy Birthday, Lakota

    Emily Bea
    8 Apr 2015 | 11:33 am
    In their Natural Habitat, a gray wolf lives about 5-7 years. In a zoological setting, their life-span can more than double1 to 12-16 years2. If you have been visiting Busch Gardens and Wolf Haven for the past decade, you may have had the privilege to see one of our resident wolves, Lakota.  He will be turning 15 on April 10!     I’m sure as someone who cares for many animals, there is some unwritten rule that I shouldn’t have favorites, but Lokata is without a doubt my personal favorite. Even at 15 he still loves to interact with his trainers on stage and…
  • Spot the Daffodils at Busch Gardens Williamsburg

    Emily Bea
    6 Apr 2015 | 8:32 am
    Can you find all of these varieties around the park?   1. "Ice Follies"     2. "Pippit"   3. "Tete a Tete"   4. "Fortissimo"   5. "Dutch Master"   6. More "Ice Follies"   7. More "Fortissimo"   Jason, a supervisor in charge of landscape beds at Busch Gardens, estimates that over 1/3 of the 15,000 bulbs planted this season are daffodils, and some of the ones you enjoy throughout the park were planted years ago.  Thanks to Jason for the variety names, and the nice combinations with pansies and violas. Happy Hunting,
  • Lettuce Wraps Recipe from our Food & Wine Festival

    Kevin Crossett
    7 Mar 2015 | 8:20 am
    Whether you prefer chicken, pork, beef or tofu, these lettuce wraps are for you. Make them for yourself, or come and try them at the 2015 Food & Wine Festival.
  • Happy New Year - Celebrating the Year of the Sheep at Busch Gardens

    Emily Bea
    23 Feb 2015 | 8:54 am
    Happy New Year to All! You may wonder why I am wishing you all a Happy New Year, well last Thursday marked the beginning of the Chinese New Year.  As we say good bye to the year of the horse, we usher in the year of the Sheep (goat or ram).  This spring festival dates back more than 2000 years.  It is said that all of the animals were asked to meet on New Year’s Day to celebrate and only 12 animals arrived for the celebration.  To reward all of the animals that did show up, a year was named after each animal.     Grazing is a favorite activity for the…
  • Tastes of the Big Easy, Far East Coming to Busch Gardens Food & Wine Festival

    Emily Bea
    16 Feb 2015 | 9:05 am
    A taste of New Orleans is coming to Busch Gardens’ third annual Food & Wine Festival. The French Quarter is one of two new themed kiosks debuting at this year’s festival. The menu is still being developed, but Busch Gardens Executive Chef Justin Watson said it will consist of Cajun- and Creole-inspired recipes—think Gumbo—that will bring the flavors of the Big Easy right here to Virginia. Watson is also introducing guests to Eastern Asia cuisine, the second all-new menu debuting at this year’s festival, which opens May 22 and runs Fridays, Saturdays and…
 
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    Lead up the Garden Path

  • Fritillary Fest!

    Pauline
    17 Apr 2015 | 1:38 pm
    In response to some of you lovely people saying that they would like to see more photos of the fritillaries in the woodland, here are a few that have been taken at different times over the last week. The first ones show that I must have let my guard down a few times as there are big chunks taken out of the flowers, I’m sure we know who is to blame! I think that’s enough of damaged flowers. All the damaged ones are right by the path, the rest haven’t been touched, thank goodness. The pheasant must have been in the woodland while I was out one afternoon, I can’t stand…
  • April Flowers for GBBD.

    Pauline
    14 Apr 2015 | 11:16 pm
    More and more flowers are opening each day, making the garden very springlike. The weather has been beautiful since Easter, but last weekend was a lot colder, still sunny but colder. Because of the warmer weather, daffodils have been going over quite quickly, but more buds are opening each day extending the season. Narcissus St. Patrick’s Day was late again, I think he has only been flowering on time once since I bought the bulbs about 10 years ago, it was well into April before the flowers opened. Narcissus Geranium shows up well in the border. Narcissus Tete a Tete are on their last…
  • Woodland ephemerals.

    Pauline
    10 Apr 2015 | 6:37 am
    When we bought this house 25 years ago, I had no idea how important the little bit of woodland would become to me as I made a garden here. To start with we had the ancient trees with lots of brambles and nettles, bit by bit I managed to reclaim the woodland floor and as the years went by, more and more bulbs and spring flowers were added. I was aiming for a tapestry of flowers and leaves that would cover the soil and make it more interesting as the months of the year went by. Little spring ephemerals are plants that creep around on the woodland floor, flowers that come and go, they grow,…
  • Easter Monday sunshine.

    Pauline
    8 Apr 2015 | 12:02 am
    The sunshine on Easter Monday tempted us out to our first garden visit of the year. Having looked at the National Garden Scheme website for Devon, we soon found a garden the other side of Exeter which appealed with Magnolias, Camellias, Rhododendrons and Azaleas in bloom. A bit of history about the place. Originally Haldon House was built in 1735 by Sir George Chudleigh,  it was built in the style of Buckingham House in St. James’ Park -now Buckingham Palace – and had 36 bedrooms. The grounds were designed by Lancelot Capability Brown. After a lot of family misfortune, the house…
  • Temptation was too great!

    Pauline
    5 Apr 2015 | 6:27 am
    Looking at all the snakeshead fritillaries which are opening each day in the woodland, I couldn’t hold back any more, the temptation to photograph them was too strong! To start with there was just a couple, …then a few more. Each day more and more are opening. Lots more purple ones coming from the seeds that I have sprinkled over the years. This clump of  Leucojum aestivum beside the fritillaries is amazing, twice as tall as the rest of them in the woodland, they are at least 4 ft tall and have so many flowers along each stem. This part of the woodland is in a dip so the soil…
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    Garden Walk Garden Talk

  • How is the Perennial Plant of the Year Selected?

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    18 Apr 2015 | 4:00 am
    You have all heard of the Perennial Plant of the Year™ and most probably have them in your garden. Did you ever wonder how they got selected and by what criteria? The Plant of the Year was started in 1990 … Continue reading →
  • The House of Birds – Bird Nests

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    15 Apr 2015 | 4:00 am
    I am so stoked that Game of Thrones has resumed and Winter is Coming. At least on the TV show, winter is on its way, here we had 75°F on Monday, along with April showers. Birds have been busy everywhere … Continue reading →
  • Think Before You Meadow

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    11 Apr 2015 | 4:00 am
    Meadows are a desired garden type for those with anti-lawn sentiments and concern for diminishing pollinators. Large garden beds filled with perennials have been popular as well. I mentioned in yesterday’s post how a new wave of gardening is on … Continue reading →
  • Going Back to Grass?

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    8 Apr 2015 | 4:00 pm
    I was asked about popular gardening trends a week ago for a local newspaper article and I mentioned how gardeners across the nation are replacing turf grass with perennials and how traditional garden beds are partnering with edibles. While that … Continue reading →
  • What Will This Summer Bring?

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    6 Apr 2015 | 4:00 am
    As we march into spring trying to shake off a long cold winter… the show must go on. “Summer will be hotter than normal, with near-normal rainfall. The hottest periods will be in early June, mid to late July, and … Continue reading →
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    Gardenerd

  • Field Trip: Huntington’s New Education & Visitor Center

    Christy
    15 Apr 2015 | 7:11 am
    The Huntington Library and Gardens unveiled its new Education and Visitor Center on April 4th. Sadly we couldn’t attend that day, but we finally made a pilgrimage to see the site this past weekend to take it all in. First … Continue reading → The post Field Trip: Huntington’s New Education & Visitor Center appeared first on Gardenerd.
  • Interplanting Corn

    Christy
    14 Apr 2015 | 8:15 am
    You’ve probably heard of the Three Sisters Garden, where you plant corn, beans, and squash together for a symbiotic relationship that takes up less space for all three crops. But interplanting can work with other crops too. This year, we … Continue reading → The post Interplanting Corn appeared first on Gardenerd.
  • 7th Annual Mar Vista Green Garden Showcase

    Christy
    8 Apr 2015 | 7:15 am
    It’s garden tour time, folks, and this year Gardenerd HQ is on the Mar Vista Green Garden Showcase. We’ll be opening up the backyard vegetable garden for all to see. We’ll be sharing helpful tips and tidbits on how to … Continue reading → The post 7th Annual Mar Vista Green Garden Showcase appeared first on Gardenerd.
  • Bye, Bye Turf!

    Christy
    7 Apr 2015 | 7:32 am
    It’s time to highlight another turf removal project we’ve just completed. This one is primarily non-edible, but we were excited to transform another front lawn into a water catchment basin, and make it a home for native and drought-tolerant plants. … Continue reading → The post Bye, Bye Turf! appeared first on Gardenerd.
  • Native Milkweed Only, Please.

    Christy
    1 Apr 2015 | 7:17 am
    I’ve been hearing it for awhile, especially from the native plant enthusiasts and experts among us: pull out non-native milkweeds, it’s making our Monarchs sick. What? Aren’t we supposed to be growing milkweed for Monarch butterflies, you ask. The answer … Continue reading → The post Native Milkweed Only, Please. appeared first on Gardenerd.
 
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    A Verdant Life

  • A Native Son's Complaint

    17 Apr 2015 | 10:59 am
    It's come to my attention that I complain a lot about the place I live: Palo Alto, the Bay Area, California. Actually, I love it here. I was born here — Stanford Hospital, that is. Yep, that makes me a “California native,” just like Eschscholzia californica. It also makes me a “Native Son of the Golden West,” even though I’ve never really considered joining that club. I was moved from our
  • Massive Water Discovery Ends California Drought

    1 Apr 2015 | 1:25 am
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. - April 1, 2015 - Governor Jerry Brown and the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) today lifted the state's drought State of Emergency on the news that an enormous water reservoir has been discovered along California's western border. Although the exact size of the aquifer has yet to be determined, reports indicate it may be hundreds of miles across and more than
  • It's Raining! (Now What?)

    25 Sep 2014 | 7:07 am
    A reprise of a post from a few years ago seems appropriate given today's welcome visitor… I originally wrote this on January 18, 2010; and while some names and statistics may have changed since then, the core message remains the same.—JB It's been hard to miss the message over the past year that we're in a drought. And Californians have responded remarkably well: residential water use was
  • Inside the Designer's Mind: Selecting Plants

    19 Sep 2014 | 9:15 am
    A visitor to my Houzz.com page recently asked about one of my early, and still favorite, garden designs: Cupressus 'Tiny Tower' behindwhite spring annuals along a brickand bluestone walk in Palo Alto "I like [the] look of Italian thin trees… I have smaller house, would that look odd for privacy? Bamboo trees other option in my mind." And it occurred to me that landscape designers have a very
  • Summertime at the Home Office

    14 Jul 2014 | 10:01 am
    At the heart of it, my job is about improving quality of life: whether it's "just" a garden that's pretty to look at, or a landscape that invites — or even compels — us to spend more time out in the fresh air and sunshine. And while spring and fall are particularly easy on the eyes, summer can't be beat for truly living outdoors. Ironically, though, summers tend to be my busiest time of year,
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    Tangled Branches: Cultivated

  • The Springing of the Year

    entangled
    9 Apr 2015 | 4:52 am
    It’s been a long dry spell. I don’t mean rain. The garden is a real mess but with the spouse’s help and good weather and not-too-hungry critters, we plan to coax it back into shape this year. We’ve been weeding and digging, and I began to sow seeds indoors about two months ago and transplanted seedlings into the garden a week ago or thereabouts. So, this is the makings of the first salad of the year entirely of our own greens. First Salad Greens 2015 I made a simple vinaigrette of pink wine vinegar, a couple drops of Datil pepper vinegar, salt, black pepper, a small…
  • Black Widows

    entangled
    26 May 2012 | 3:45 am
    … another public service announcement … I saw my first black widow spider many years ago – in a box of mail-order plants I was unpacking. Nothing bad happened. I smashed it with a trowel and it made a good story and I assumed I’d never see another. I saw my second black widow spider here in the woods of central Virginia. It was a few years ago, maybe 2007 or 2008. I probably should have killed it. I saw my third black widow spider on Monday of this week. On my front porch! I knocked it down and stomped on it with my garden clogs. The Monday front porch spider I saw my…
  • A Change Will Do You Good

    entangled
    16 May 2012 | 4:53 am
    I’m bored. With this blog I mean. It was fun when I started it in 2003 (over nine years ago!), and even more fun when I found out that people were actually reading it. But now, and forgive me if I’m repeating myself, but I find that I’m struggling to come up with something original to say about gardening. Especially in this year of the downsized vegetable garden. I looked over my last year’s posts for the Garden-to-Table-Challenge at GreenishThumb.net and see that I made exactly the same food this year in exactly the same week last year. Should I write about it again?
  • Venomous Caterpillars

    entangled
    11 May 2012 | 5:39 am
    …a public service announcement… Buck Moth Caterpillar Venomous caterpillars? Yes. If you see one of these things, don’t touch it. Even if it’s dead. If you want the graphic version of the warning, click here. I suspected this might be one of the several types of venomous caterpillars, even though I didn’t know what it was when I took these photos. Those spines just look ominous. Buck Moth Spines Click the photo above to enlarge it. You’ll see that each spine looks like a micro hypodermic needle and that is essentially what it is. These critters were…
  • Herb of the Year

    entangled
    4 May 2012 | 4:55 am
    Herb of the Year? Says who? The International Herb Association will have you know that the 2012 Herb of the Year™ is the Rose. They’re a trade organization so I suppose that little trademark symbol is inevitable, but it still made me squirm. And this upcoming week is National Herb Week—as declared by the International Herb Association. Or if you don’t want to spend a whole week on it, there’s HerbDay—May 5 this year—brought to you by a consortium of various herb organizations. Isn’t there some kind of official proclamation for these things? I couldn’t…
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    Veggie Gardening Tips

  • Introducing the Troy-Bilt Saturday 6

    Kenny Point
    30 Mar 2015 | 6:52 pm
    My recent getaway to Charleston, SC wasn’t simply an escape from the long and cold winter, but the result of an invitation to participate in Troy-Bilt’s Saturday 6 program. I have had very positive experiences with the Troy-Bilt brand so it didn’t take long for me to accept the invitation, join the new Saturday 6 team, and head to South Carolina. Before I share the details about the program I’d like to introduce the other members of the group: Rochelle Greayer is the founder of Pith + Vigor and author of “Cultivating Garden Style.” She gardens in Massachusetts, is a…
  • A Look Back at the Fall Vegetable Garden

    Kenny Point
    9 Mar 2015 | 5:47 pm
    This winter has seen nothing but one wave after another of cold, ice, and snow, to the point that I haven’t been able to actually see the garden at all over the past couple months. That’s not entirely bad as the consistent snow cover provided insulation and will help protect over wintering plants from the bitter cold and biting winds. The coming week’s weather forecasts and rising temperatures provide hope for the reappearance of both Spring and the garden. In the meantime I thought I’d post some pics from the fall season and the last time that I could actually enjoy…
  • More Ideas for Cultivating Mushrooms in the Home and Garden

    Kenny Point
    9 Oct 2014 | 9:24 am
    The fall season is a perfect time to explore the fascinating world of backyard mushroom cultivation. I’ll start by sharing some of the delicious edible fungi that is currently springing up right outside in and around my garden. Then I’ll share some info on mushrooms picked up at the recent Mother Earth News Fair, and close with ideas for easily growing shrooms right inside your home. My oyster and shiitake logs are stacked up and have been fruiting for weeks even if their production does seem to be rather limited compared to recent years. Maybe that’s due to the dry weather and…
  • The Mother Earth News Fair Returns to Pennsylvania

    Kenny Point
    1 Oct 2014 | 7:26 am
    The 2014 Mother Earth News Fair that took place in Seven Springs, PA a couple weekends ago was a great event and I walked away with many new ideas and techniques to try out in the garden and to share with you here on the Veggie Gardening Tips website! Normally the downside of a fall gardening event is that you’re inspired to grow and enthused about gardening at precisely the time that nature is telling you that it’s time to shut things down for the winter. This Mother Earth News Fair was different because I walked away with so many things that I am excited about and can apply right…
  • A Weekend at the Herb and Garden Faire

    Kenny Point
    13 May 2014 | 5:02 am
    The 27th Annual Herb & Garden Faire took place over the weekend at the Landis Valley Village and Farm Museum in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. The two day event included plant sales, gardening lectures, arts and crafts, music, delicious foods, and garden themed displays. What started out as a small plant has grown over the years into what may be the largest event of this type in the northeast. There’s always an impressive lineup of nurseries, herb growers, and plant lovers offering an array of rare, heirloom, and unusual, plants for sale. From vegetables to fruits, and herbs to flowers,…
 
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    Perennial Meadows

  • The Vernal Garden

    Michael
    5 Apr 2015 | 9:04 am
    Seasonal Highlights in the Perennial Meadow Garden For more than three weeks the weather has been cold, wet and very windy here in the Netherlands, but now it is Easter and it feels like the gardening season has begun. The nights are still cold, but the days are calm and sunny and daffodils dominate the garden; finally it is the place to be. In every season I take the time to note which plants really make their mark and then try to build upon these highlights to improve the garden’s appearance in future years. Hellebores have been flowering in my garden for almost two months, but it is…
  • Looking back at a Perennial Meadow Scheme for Christmas

    Michael
    25 Dec 2014 | 1:11 am
    There is a small perennial border in the centre of my garden where for many years I grew a random mixture of plants – all interesting, but as a whole chaotic. Finally, I decided to bring order and a sense of design back to this section of the garden; a garden which is essentially a trial garden and where all design rules can be broken for the sake of trying out a new plant. The aim was for an open, relatively low planting scheme over which the eye can travel, but which nevertheless is interesting without screaming for attention. Why not lay a simple lawn you might be thinking and…
  • Gardening with Shrubs

    Michael
    20 Dec 2014 | 1:03 am
    Books For Christmas 2014 There are not many books around that will actually teach you to use shrubs effectively in your garden. Too many shrub books are written by experts and focus on the plants at the expense of design; how many magnolias, rhododendrons or Judas trees can the average person fit into their home garden? In my case possibly one of each; and although their flowers might be magnificent, the plants need to earn their keep all year round to justify a space in a small garden. Writers such as Beth Chatto and Christopher Lloyd have given us a lot of good advice particularly in…
  • Form and Structure within Perennial Planting Design

    Michael
    3 Dec 2014 | 3:10 am
    Perennials are by their very nature loose and informal especially when combined into contemporary naturalistic planting schemes. The traditional herbaceous border was created as a tableaux to be viewed from outside and was given structure by being given a framework of formal hedges and fronted with neatly mown lawn. Perennial meadows as an example of today’s interest in naturalistic planting invite their visitors inside, amidst the plants, to become engulfed and enraptured by their loose, expansive nature. Bringing structure to such informal arrangements of plants is of paramount…
  • Chasmanthium grasses tolerate shade

    Michael
    26 Nov 2014 | 7:04 am
    Grasses are mostly used in our gardens in sunny sites to bring texture, contrast and movement to our planting schemes, but in shade their are few that will thrive and offer us the same qualities. Instead we tend to use similar looking alternatives such as sedges (Carex sp.) and woodrushes (Luzula sp.). Whilst very useful, these are generally low or rounded forms which are not the most dramatic for setting up contrast within a woodland floor situation which tend to consist of a low and flat perennial layer punctuated by understory shrubs. There are of course grasses adapted to shady situations…
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    Beautiful Wildlife Garden

  • Help for Hummers

    Ellen Honeycutt
    16 Apr 2015 | 5:00 am
    Putting up a hummingbird feeder is a fun way to bring hummingbirds close to a viewing space like a window. Like other types of bird feeders, it is often the first step in developing a love of our feathered friends and a desire to nurture them. So once you’ve taken the first step, I’d encourage […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Native Plant Appreciation Week, Osceola County Florida

    Loret T. Setters
    10 Apr 2015 | 8:41 am
    Today’s article is going to be about promoting the use of native plants, mostly because I forgot that today was Friday and didn’t do any critter research. I’ve been busy promoting The Central Florida Native Plant Sale (3rd annual) which is today, April 10, 2015 from 4-7 p.m. and tomorrow from 8 a.m. – 1 […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Ladies of the Day

    Loret T. Setters
    3 Apr 2015 | 4:50 pm
    Notwithstanding their common name, I’ll start by clarifying that they aren’t all ladies.  After all, in North America the order odonata need male and female to reproduce. I’m not clear how these insects acquired their common name.  Damselflies are an interesting group of insects. Predatory in both larval and adult stages, these are insects you […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Skink Wars and More on These Sleek Lizards

    Loret T. Setters
    27 Mar 2015 | 5:02 pm
    I was on the patio late one afternoon and the trashcan was rocking.  I glanced over since you never know what creature of nature will be visiting my place.  I figured that maybe a black racer or water snake had slithered underneath the wheels setting the rocking in motion. Then I heard thrashing and a […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Spring Garden Care

    Jesse Elwert
    26 Mar 2015 | 7:48 am
      Spring Garden Care People who care about attracting wildlife to their gardens usually learn over time about best practices for fall cleanup and especially the fact that it’s really beneficial for our birds if we refrain from relentlessly cutting perennials to the ground before winter. But what then happens in the spring for garden care?   Here in […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
 
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    Miss Rumphius' Rules

  • Trials and Neglect in my Home Garden

    Susan aka Miss. R
    17 Apr 2015 | 7:53 am
    I’m not a landscape designer who has a wonderfully designed garden that is a terrific advertisement for my craft at my home. I should, I live on a corner, but as I’ve shared here before it’s mostly a neglected mess with good bones and a rotating cast of plants. My home garden is quirky and in a constant state of flux. Since my landscape design practice is design only, I don’t have a crew I can ‘borrow’ for the big tasks, so they wait and are ignored for as long as possible. I’m mostly not very motivated to work in my own garden after spending my…
  • Garden Visit: Filoli

    Susan aka Miss. R
    24 Mar 2015 | 11:43 am
    My visit last week to one of the great American gardens, Filoli, in northern California, was a revelation in many ways.  I have wanted to visit since I first saw pictures of it years ago. The garden was designed in the early 20th century by its original homeowners with a team of architects, artists, and horticulturists. There is no known master plan yet it has survived largely in tact which is a rarity for American estate gardens of this size and scope. Sometimes my travels are guided by my desire to experience specific places firsthand. My trip to Marrakesh and Majorelle was one of…
  • Green Gardens

    Susan aka Miss. R
    27 Feb 2015 | 4:34 am
    Green is a thing. Right now it’s a missing thing. It’s what I miss most during winter and what makes me smile first in the spring–those small green shoots pushing up through frigid earth. I’ve been thinking about making flowerless gardens. Gardens that are mostly green. Gardens that rely  on scale and texture and subtlety of hue and maybe some skilled pruning. In New Jersey, where I practice landscape design, this may prove to be more difficult than it is in warmer climates where there are bolder choices and plants with immense architectural leaves. Many of the…
  • My Award Winning Garden Design

    Susan aka Miss. R
    16 Feb 2015 | 6:51 am
    Last fall, I entered a garden I designed in New Jersey in 2015 APLD International Landscape Design Awards in the Planting Design category. It was awarded the highest honor, a Gold Award. To be honest, I knew the value of the design, but since it is the antithesis of current planting trends, I was really pleased. Current trends in planting design seem to require ornamental grasses and meadow-like qualities. This garden has neither, but that doesn’t make it unsustainable or unfriendly to all  but deer. The garden’s underlying structure of boxwood hedging and pyramids gives it…
  • Design vs. A Sense of Place

    Susan aka Miss. R
    11 Feb 2015 | 3:29 am
    I’m not an architecture critic.  I am someone who loves great architecture both contemporary and historic. In my work as a landscape designer part of my focus is to create landscapes and gardens that surround the attendant architecture in such a way that the design partnership between them is timeless and seamless.  As a designer this may seem counter intuitive, but I believe that the best design has a sense of place and that my hand in that should be less, rather than more, visible. Last week I visited Frank Gehry’s new building for the Fondation Louis Vuitton in Paris.  It…
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    Native Plants and Wildlife Gardens

  • Garbage In, Garbage Out

    Jennifer Baker
    16 Apr 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Garbage in-Garbage out. I had never even heard this phrase until a meeting with a reputable design/build company at a landscaping brainstorming session at a mega water park in the Wisconsin Dells. I was part of the discussion, as they wanted to incorporate native plants into their African savanna-themed design. We all sat around in high-backed […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • A Bestiary: Part Forty ~ Songbirds: Rose-breasted Grosbeak

    Carol Duke
    11 Apr 2015 | 5:27 am
    Rose-breasted Grosbeak (Pheucticus ludovicianus) is a stoutly built songbird of the Cardinalidae family. The male’s beauty of black, white, and red is surprising especially below the black throat where red escapes a bib and trickles down the center of his breast like paint flowing free from form on a canvas. What is not visible in any of the portraits featured […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Lovin’ Lupine

    Kathy Settevendemie
    8 Apr 2015 | 7:01 pm
    It’s colorful. It spreads slowly. It’s fragrance is amazing. It fixes nitrogen in the soil. It attracts pollinators. It is the larval host for several species of moths. One of our most commonly found native wildflowers, Lupine is undoubtedly one of our most beautiful.  I am continually delighted by my friends from Texas who refer […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Pollinator Gardens do Double Duty

    Beatriz Moisset
    7 Apr 2015 | 4:00 am
    Pollinator gardens serve dual functions: they support pollinators and biological pest controls We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Planting Time

    Mark Turner
    1 Apr 2015 | 6:00 am
    Spring and fall are both good times to plant trees, shrubs, and perennials. There’s less transplant shock when the plants are mostly dormant, and our copious northwest rains keep everything watered well. I’ve been working through our mild winter to clear out some of the underbrush at the edge of our three acres of woods. […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
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    The Pond Blog

  • Save up to $100 off of Aquascape products today at Loch Ness Water Gardens!

    Bill Dubert
    26 Mar 2015 | 2:56 pm
    Need a new pump? A new pond vacuum? Stocking up on water treatment supplies? Now’s the time with one of the best deals you’ll see all year. From now until May 31, 2015, Aquascape is offering a fantastic mail-in rebate worth up to $50 off of their products. Now, that’s a great deal, but it gets better: Combine it with our Spring Savings coupon deal, also worth up to $50 off exclusively at Loch Ness Water Gardens, and you can save up to $100 off of a purchase of any combination of Aquascape products! Here are the details: From March 15th – May 31, 2015, Aquascape is…
  • Tips for your Spring Pond To-Do List

    Bill Dubert
    20 Mar 2015 | 1:41 pm
    Well, Spring is officially here after what has been, for much of the US, a particularly nasty winter. That means that it’s time to pull off the cover net, clean up around the pond, squirt various liquids into your water, etc. You know the drill. Here are a few quick tips to make things go more smoothly this year. Make an actual to-do list This is one of those tips that took me a long time to figure out, but has since been absolutely invaluable. Sitting down with a pen and pad to make out a physical list that you can check off is incredibly useful for a few reasons. First of all,…
  • 5 Things You Need to be Ready for Spring

    Bill Dubert
    24 Feb 2015 | 8:28 pm
    Spring is coming at us fast, and I can’t wait for it to get here (and not only because my kayak paddle is in the corner, mocking me). One thing that I’m NOT looking forward to, though, is the inevitable scramble to get those last-minute items that I forgot to have ready ahead of time, before the pond warms up. Since I was already making a list for myself, I figured that I’d point out a few items for my readers that will be necessary sooner than you think, all of which I’ve forgotten at some point in the past. 1. Pond Vacuum I’ve talked before about the importance…
  • Why the Lotus Flower is So Important

    Bill Dubert
    23 Jan 2015 | 9:23 pm
    “Padma” is the Sanskrit word for the Lotus plant, which is also called the Sacred Lotus or Indian Lotus. The Lotus Temple in Delhi is the Mother Temple of the Bahá’í faith in India and draws as many as 150,000 visitors in a day. Image copyright Jeremy Vandel. The lotus flower, Nelumbo nucifera, occupies a huge space in the minds of many pond owners and designers. Deciding whether or not to include a lotus among a pond’s flowers can be a big decision when choosing pond plants and even layouts. Many water gardeners consider their lotus flowers the pride of their pond,…
  • Where do Bullfrogs Go in Winter?

    Bill Dubert
    18 Sep 2014 | 6:36 pm
    The American Bullfrog and his various amphibious friends are some of the great unexpected pleasures of pond ownership. The question many pond owners find themselves wondering, though, is where they go in winter, and how they survive the freezing cold. Frogs are true cold-blooded animals, unable to internally unable to regulate their body temperature. Generally, when they’re cold they seek out sunlight, and when they’re hot they seek out shade or water. But what do they do in winter, when it’s far too cold for the sun to keep their temperature up, even below freezing? Well,…
 
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    Flowerona

  • Flowerona wins the Individual Wedding Category at the UK Blog Awards 2015!

    Rona
    18 Apr 2015 | 12:21 am
    I am SO thrilled to let you know that last night Flowerona won the Individual Wedding Category at the UK Blog Awards 2015 in London! Thank you so much to everyone who voted for me to get through to the shortlist and for all the wonderful messages on social media. I can’t quite put into words how much it means for me to have won. I’m completely blown away… Thank you very much to the judges Tina Reading of Ultimate Wedding Magazine and Lisa Hogg of The Wedding Affair. Many thanks to Phase Eight for the loan of the beautiful jumpsuit. And to make-up artist Amy at MAC…
  • Flowerona Reflects Video : 18/04/15

    Rona
    17 Apr 2015 | 4:01 pm
    This week’s Flowerona Reflects video features footage of the inaugural Chapel Designers Conference in London. I hope you enjoy watching the video and don’t forget, if you’d like to subscribe to my YouTube channel, please click here and then click on Subscribe. P.S. If you receive this blog post via email and would like to view the video, simply go to www.flowerona.com
  • Winner of the inaugural #floweronawedding initiative on Instagram!

    Rona
    16 Apr 2015 | 4:01 pm
    You may have read that I launched a new #floweronawedding initiative on Instagram on Wednesday? Thank you SO much to all the florists who took part. I was completely blown away by the beautiful designs which were posted. And it was a real challenge to choose my favourite image! Many congratulations to the winner, Katherine Craft of Florist in the Forest! This is her stunning floral arrangement above. I loved the pale peach, white and purple colour palette and the natural style of the arrangement! If you’re a florist, joining in this initiative is a great way to showcase your work. And…
  • Mary Jane Vaughan at the Quintessentially Weddings Atelier

    Rona
    14 Apr 2015 | 4:01 pm
    Last Friday, I attended the Quintessentially Weddings Atelier at Somerset House in London. It’s a spectacular showcase of wedding suppliers from florists and cake designers to photographers and wedding dress designers. And today on Wedding Wednesday, I’m delighted to feature my photos of florist Mary Jane Vaughan’s incredible installation. As you entered the building, you were greeted by two archways adorned with pink blossom. Mary Jane had created the breath-taking table design above in a pink, lilac, white, blue and green colour palette. The flowers in the arrangement…
  • New #floweronawedding initiative on Instagram starts this Wednesday!

    Rona
    12 Apr 2015 | 4:01 pm
    I hope you had a lovely weekend. I’m so excited to make this announcement today! I’m launching a new initiative on Instagram this coming Wedding Wednesday. It’s something I’ve been thinking of starting for some time now, but it was only yesterday that the idea all came together. From this Wednesday, if you’re a florist and create wedding flower designs, it would be wonderful if you’d like to take part in this new initiative to help promote your business. Simply post an image on Instagram every Wednesday…
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    Your Easy Garden

  • DIY Hammered Spoon Plant Markers

    Guest Bloggers
    9 Apr 2015 | 8:01 am
    Hammered spoon plant markers are easy and inexpensive to make! It’s a cold, spring day here in Vermont, but all I want to do is get out there and put my hands in the dirt! But it’s snowing, yes actually snowing, so that is obviously out of the question! If you are feeling the itch to get growing, but can’t actually get out there yet, here’s a garden project to help you make it to a long awaited warm day full of sprouts and blooms! It’s almost here, really! This project is another eco-friendly idea, reusing old silverware to create beautiful garden markers. It also gets some of that…
  • Spring Care for the Easiest Roses to Grow

    judieyeg
    4 Apr 2015 | 11:14 am
    Flower Carpet Pink Supreme roses – the easiest roses to grow – are planted along a New England road and they thrive even after being covered with road salt winter after winter! By now, most of the northern hemisphere is through the worst of the winter weather and gardeners everywhere are eager to get out and dig in the dirt!  We’ve watched snow plows bury our gardens, run over precious plants, fill the yard with road salt and worse. Plus, this winter’s extreme temperatures – combined with ice and snow and all that go with that – caused damage to many trees and shrubs. As…
  • Transplanting Seedlings To Larger Pots

    Guest Bloggers
    4 Apr 2015 | 9:06 am
    Oh, seedlings…they grow up so fast. This post came about because the seedlings we planted (and wrote about) a few weeks ago sprouted nicely and are now too big for their toilet paper roll containers. Well, it’s still very chilly up here in Vermont, only 21 degrees today to be exact, but my seedlings don’t care. They just keep growing, and have now gotten too big for their comfy paper roll containers. Good thing we also eat a lot of yogurt at our house! I’ve been saving those containers all winter, just waiting to put them to good use as a home for a growing plant!  Again, using…
  • Monrovia and Flower Carpet® Rose Giveaway!

    admin
    1 Apr 2015 | 7:49 am
    In celebration of Flower Carpet Rose’s 20th Anniversary, we’re giving away easy-care Flower Carpet roses and will be picking one winner each day till April 15!  Each winner will receive one Flower Carpet rose, delivered at no charge to their local garden center. All you need to do is repin from the official “Monrovia and Flower Carpet® Rose Giveaway!” contest Board and email contest@monrovia.com with your first and last name, zip code, and link to your repin. Thank you for participating in this giveaway and helping celebrate the 20th anniversary of Flower Carpet®!
  • Spring Into the Garden

    Phillip Townshend
    25 Mar 2015 | 11:05 am
    It is days like this that I recognize and really appreciate the benefits of my work which has me travelling between 2 of my favorite seasons – Spring and Autumn – enjoying  the best that a garden can offer. Whilst in the northern hemisphere spring is only just starting, some regions and warmer climes like Florida are already enjoying beautiful weather and beginning to see their gardens at their best.  Here in the southern hemisphere we are enjoying a very pleasant start to Autumn. Even in Australia you’ll find a wonderful array of autumn colors.   Brilliant Autumn garden…
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    The Mini Garden Guru - Your Miniature Garden Source

  • Miniature and Fairy Gardening Workshops and Classes for Spring

    Janit Calvo
    13 Apr 2015 | 4:19 pm
    Miniature & Fairy Gardening Workshops & Classes for Spring Whew! It must be spring! We are spreading the joy of miniature gardening even farther this spring with an art show and an online gig in New York. Come and see us if you can. We are working on more online fun for everyone so please stay tuned. […]
  • Miniature Gardening : What They Won’t Tell You But I Will

    Janit Calvo
    9 Apr 2015 | 2:16 pm
    Miniature Fairy Gardening : What They Won’t Tell You But I Will Ugh. It’s a pet peeve of mine. I should be a consumer advocate. I just hate seeing people set up for failure – especially in our beloved niche. A customer emailed the other day and complained that her moss smelled musty. After a […]
  • Sophisticated Fairy Gardening, Advanced Techniques, Ideas and Imaginings, eBook

    Janit Calvo
    2 Apr 2015 | 3:51 pm
    Sophisticated Fairy Gardening, Advanced Techniques, Ideas and Imaginings eBook Yay! It’s finally ready! Our new ebook on advanced fairy gardening is now available for download from our online store. It’s an addendum to the Gardening in Miniature: Create Your Own Tiny Living World book. Find out why your fairy garden isn’t enchanting. What’s wrong with […]
 
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    Organic Gardening Tips - Smiling Gardener

  • 9 Ways To Help The Beneficial Fungi In Your Soil

    10 Apr 2015 | 9:00 pm
    Starting seeds indoors for planting outside this spring - the inoculant goes on right before sowing the seed. Without sufficient beneficial microbes on (and in) our bodies, we get sick very fast. It's the same for plants. Perhaps the most beneficial fungi for plant health is a group of fungi you may have heard me talk about before called mycorrhizal fungi. This week, I received a fresh batch of mycorrhizal inoculant, a powder that brings these fungi onto the roots of my plants.
  • Vegetable Garden Layout - Rows, Square Foot Or Wild?

    2 Apr 2015 | 9:00 pm
    You may have noticed I don’t usually plant in straight rows. I prefer a much wilder garden:
  • My one regret in life is that I am not someone else*

    6 Mar 2015 | 9:58 pm
    *A quote by Woody Allen To start off, a question - where are you gardening? {loadposition pollwhere}
  • It's Winter...

    27 Feb 2015 | 9:58 pm
    Click for video transcription Hey, it’s Phil from SmilingGardener.om. I apologize in advance for the wind noise - I don’t have a wireless mic on today so i just have to use the camera mic. I haven’t been making any videos this time of year because this is what my garden looks like under two feet of snow right now, but I wanted to share a couple of things with you today. First is if you follow me on facebook and especially on youtube, you’re not really seeing anything from me this time of year, but if you come over to SmilingGardener.com, I am still writing an article every Saturday.
  • Starting Plants From Seeds - A Few Tips To Ensure Success

    20 Feb 2015 | 9:58 pm
    Click for video transcription Phil: Welcome to my bedroom. If you haven't picked up my free online organic gardening course you can do that right on the home page of Smilinggardener.com. Today we're talking about starting plants from seeds. I like going right into something like this that has the trays and then you can grow the plants individually and then you pull them right out of here and put them into the garden. So this has holes in it for drainage, then I can plop it into this guy which doesn't have holes in it, and that can capture the water - so that's how that works! In terms of what…
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    Sow and So

  • Woolly Willow – Wordless Wednesday

    Rogier Noort
    14 Apr 2015 | 11:38 pm
  • Surprise Appearances in the Garden

    Laila Noort
    13 Apr 2015 | 11:12 pm
    Gone is the last of winter, hello Spring! You have finally arrived. This year I have chosen two varieties of potatoes. One Dutch variety that should produce early potatoes and a salad potato called Rose of France. The Dutch variety I planted outside in one of the raised beds. I have also placed two compost bags about quarter filled with compost in the polytunnel. One for each  potato variety , I am going to add more compost to the bags as the leaves show, so more spuds can form. At the end I will cut open the bag and harvest the creamy potatoes. YUM! Chinese Cabbage The Chinese cabbage in…
  • Y is for Yellow Jacket – Word up!

    Bridget Elahcene
    9 Apr 2015 | 10:34 pm
    Yellow Jacket \ˈjɛləʊ ˈdʒakɪt\ Yellow jacket or yellowjacket is the common name in North America for predatory wasps of the genera Vespula and Dolichovespula. Members of these genera are known simply as “wasps” in other English-speaking countries. They get a bit of a bad press but are primarily beneficial in the garden because not only are they pollinators but they also help to control the insect population by eating caterpillars and other soft bodied pests.
  • Still Waiting for Spring to Arrive in our Garden…

    Laila Noort
    6 Apr 2015 | 3:58 am
    It seems that here in the Belgian Ardennes over the last few days, every minute of the day the weather changes. Sunshine is followed by a hailstones as big as grapes, followed by black clouds and angry howling winds …to have the sun return once again. As usual we are a bit behind when it comes to plant progress in the garden. My tulips consist of just a few leaves and a tiny flower head that is just edging above the soil. Luckily the apple trees are not showing any signs of life yet because I would hate to lose my blossoms to the inevitable night frosts that follow days like this.
  • X is for Hybrid – Word Up!

    Bridget Elahcene
    3 Apr 2015 | 1:30 am
    Hybrid \ˈhʌɪbrɪd\ X is the symbol that denotes that a plant is a hybrid species. Hybridized fruits and vegetables are developed by cross pollinating two or more similar cultivars within one species or closely related species of the same genus. The resulting fruit or vegetable has the nutritional profile of both the parent food. These are called F1 (first generation hybrids), because they are the direct product of a cross (X), for example the Pineberry which is a hybrid of Fragaria chiloensis and Fragaria virginiana (Fragaria chiloensis x Fragaria virginiana). Another F1 hybrid is…
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    The Hortiholic

  • Timely Tips for Spring Garden Cleanup

    Tony Fulmer
    24 Mar 2015 | 2:43 pm
    Are you itching to get out and start playing in your garden? Me too. It's time to: prune, mulch, stake and most important - plant! Here are a few things to consider as you head out in Slogger-shod feet and West County Rose gloved-hands armed with Felco pruners. Snow Mold1. Lawns - Check turf for this winter's gift - snow mold! You can't miss it (see picture). Symptoms look worse than their long term effect. Snow mold will disappear with fertilization and light raking once the ground warms and dries a bit more. Don't rake in deep shade where shallow-rooted fescues reside. You may pull them up…
  • Off to the Amaryllis Races

    Tony Fulmer
    23 Dec 2014 | 1:03 pm
    'Elvas'It's really easy to understand why amaryllis are so wildly popular. They grow quickly once awakened from dormancy, have flowers that are the epitome of spectacular, are practically maintenance-free (can be grown in water or soil) and are just plain fun to watch! I heard people are even having amaryllis races - they all pot them the same day, then keep track of whose grows fastest, tallest, or has the most flowers. But they're so-oo-o-o easy even a tot could grow them.Big bulbs!My first memory of amaryllis was shopping with Mom at the florist for an azalea. I saw a box on the counter…
  • A Year in the Life of a Fraser Fir

    Tony Fulmer
    25 Nov 2014 | 5:43 pm
    I was fortunate recently to have the opportunity to chat with a new friend, Fletcher, the Fraser fir. We talked long distance. He shared highlights of life on the Christmas tree farm before coming to Chalet. There's a lot happening down on the farm!Where I grew up in VirginiaWhere do you come from, Fletcher?Thanks for asking, Tony. My great-grandparents originally came from Mt. Rogers, the highest point in Virginia. I've kinda lost track, but I'm at least the 8th generation of Fraser fir coming from those cool mountains. I started out as a tiny seed from the cone of my parent tree. Did you…
  • The Garden Clock is Ticking....

    Tony Fulmer
    18 Oct 2014 | 11:50 am
    "The days dwindle down to a precious few" is so true for the October garden. As temperatures drop and you face the reality of rain becoming snow, the urgency to complete fall garden tasks becomes almost manic.You've probably already made the decision whether to cut your perennials now or let them stand as snowy winter sentinels. You've ripped the tired annuals out by their fuzzy little roots. What else could there possibly be to do? Want a few reminders?1) Don't let fall pass without planting bulbs. The soil temps are finally cool enough to put all the spring flowering beauties in. Who said,…
  • Conifers are the Cure

    Tony Fulmer
    30 Sep 2014 | 2:25 pm
    Does our Zone 5 plant palette ever seem limiting to you? Do you yearn for just one specimen plant that no one else in northern Illinois has? Do you ever look at your garden and think, "If I could just get a plant with year 'round interest for that spot I'd be so much happier with my garden?" I know I'm always thinking what would be hot in this or that spot. Do we need a support group for those of us looking for plants off the beaten path?If it existed I would suggest "Conifers are the Cure". For those that haven't been smitten or bitten yet, but want more landscape interest the world of…
 
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    Primrose Blog

  • Seeking an Experienced Plants Communicator – £35k per annum

    Primrose
    31 Mar 2015 | 11:30 pm
    One of the new Primrose developments – Pond in a Pot An online garden retailer based in Reading is seeking to recruit a talented and experienced plants communicator to join our team. Applicants need to be skilled and well versed with all flora. This is a great opportunity for an enthusiastic individual to join a company expanding their plants inventory. Established 12 years ago, the company is growing yet closely knit with a knowledgeable and friendly team. Key responsibilities: Able to hold one sided conversations with all types of plants. Able to multitask – we have thousands of…
  • Have you seen our Gazopy?

    Primrose
    11 Jul 2014 | 6:05 am
    What’s a gazopy? It’s what we think our Harlington gazebo-canopy should be called! Made from steel, it’s perfect for a party or simply to create an outdoor living space for your family and friends to enjoy whilst effortlessly adding style. Here’s why we think it’s marvellous: Powder coated steel frame – sturdy and long lasting Coated polyester roof canopy – durable and stylish Sleek ornate design – for a classic yet crisp finish Pegs for extra ground support – to make sure it remains firmly in place We’ve also got matching sidewalls…
  • Make your neighbours jealous!

    Primrose
    4 May 2014 | 1:28 am
    We’ve created our collections around what’s hot in trend this year. Whether you’re after deep mocha, sage or forest green, or a vibrant purple – we’ve got what you need to make Roger and Julie next door jealous. A selection of our collection is below and the other colours are easily found from each product. Get £5 for your photos! Have you recently purchased a product from us? We would love to see your photos and share them with other customers. If you send us pictures of your Primrose products in your home or garden we will pay you £5 for each photo that…
  • Here’s how to tackle your garden!

    Primrose
    2 May 2014 | 4:38 am
    Yes, we know it’s going to be bad weather this weekend, but you know as well as us that it’s time to get out there and get started in your garden! Here’s a selection of our Primrose garden hand tools which are designed by gardeners for gardeners and perfectly up to the job. We’re really quite proud of them and here’s why: Lightweight yet strong – perfect even for kids Durable and rustproof – so you can see your task through Weatherproof – just in case you forget it in the English summer Wood is FSC certified – wood is sourced…
  • Win a Cadac Gas BBQ worth £450!

    Primrose
    21 Apr 2014 | 3:24 am
    This Cadac gas barbecue is just one of the many we stock – there are over 125 barbecues on our site! – Cat works in the marketing team and is responsible for online marketing, social media and the newsletter. She spends most of her time reading about a variety of interesting facts, such as oddly named Canadian towns, obscure holidays and unusual gardening. She mostly writes about Primrose news and current events. See all of Cat’s posts. Filed under: Barbecues, Cat, Promotions Tagged: barbecue, barbecues, bbq, bbqs, cadac, competition, gas barbecue, primrose, primrose.co.uk,…
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    Chicken Waterer

  • The Way To Pick A Chicken Today

    ChickenWaterer
    11 Apr 2015 | 8:25 am
    This video of baby chicks just says "welcome to Spring." So cute! A Way To Pick A Chicken Today from ChickenWaterer on Vimeo.Also, the new BriteTap convertible chick & chicken feeder is now in stock. To learn more about our newest product for backyard chicken owners, check out the information on our Chicken Feeder Web Page. BriteTap chicken waterer. Clean water made simple! Visit us at ChickenWaterer.com.
  • Probiotics For Chickens: What They Do & When To Use Them

    ChickenWaterer
    15 Mar 2015 | 7:36 am
    What Are Probiotics Probiotics are foods or dietary supplements that contain live bacteria. They are given to animals (and people too) in order to add to, or replace, the bacteria that exists in the animals gastrointestinal tract.  Probiotics are said to provide health benefits but these benefits are generally not well explained or understood.So Whats Going On in the GutAnimal gastrointestinal tracts are populated by hundreds of different species of bacteria in mind-boggling numbers (There are billions and billions of bacteria in any animals gut). A chickens gut harbors…
  • Chick Starter & Grower Feeds Compared

    ChickenWaterer
    11 Mar 2015 | 4:47 pm
    We put this chart together for backyard chicken owners who are interested in comparing various chick feeds.Below are tables that compare some of the larger brands.  We've also included the manufacturer's descriptions to provide additional insight regarding the benefits of their feed.Feed ComparisonManufacturers Product DescriptionsA Place To Put Your FeedThe New BriteTap Chick Feeder keeps chicks feed clean and then converts into an outdoor feeder for scratch, grit and oyster shells.  BriteTap chicken waterer. Clean water made simple! Visit us at ChickenWaterer.com.
  • Cochin Chicken: The Amazing Backstory of the Chicken That Changed The World

    ChickenWaterer
    8 Mar 2015 | 7:14 am
     The Cochin chicken changed the world. Its history is the juiciest and most interesting of any breed we've ever profiled. Technically classified as a "meat" bird, the modern Cochin is generally kept primarily as a pet because of its beautiful plumage, feathered feet and docile nature.  While not of commercial importance today, the Cochin is of incredible importance in the development of both commercial and backyard chicken keeping. What follows is the back story behind the bird.White CochinMutiny on the ChickenThe first Cochin was brought to England in 1842 by Captain Edward…
  • Classic Eggs Benedict Recipe

    ChickenWaterer
    22 Feb 2015 | 11:29 am
    According to one account, eggs Benedict were first created in 1942 by Lumuel Benedict, a retired Wall Street broker, looking for a cure for his hangover. Whatever the origin, eggs Benedict are our favorite breakfast egg dish and a real luxury.Cooking eggs Benedict is not difficult but there are lots of steps.  It's probably a recipe you'll want to keep for the weekend when there's a little more time to prep breakfast.Ingredients:8 Eggs4 English Muffins1 tablespoon vinegar8 slices Canadian Bacon (You can substitute sliced ham or even regular bacon if you can't get Canadian bacon)2…
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    Balcony in Berlin

  • under construction

    sophos
    12 Apr 2015 | 8:32 am
    Not much happening here. The weather hasn’t been co-operating – occasional hail, snow and gales makes the balcony an inhospitable place. I have a few seedlings on the go, above a dwarf cherry tomato from the 2013 seed harvest. There are signs of life and regeneration, but I should probably replace this second-year parsley with a new sowing, and the hellebores have already moved to the kitchen window ledge, to be spared the increasing sun.          My herbs seem to have been tended by gnomes this winter. The Swedish pelargoniums definitely didn’t go dormant in the…
  • springwatch

    sophos
    15 Mar 2015 | 10:03 am
    Some veery skinny iris there, and a rosemary that may or may not have survived winter. The cat has his vantage point back, overlooking the street corner. The bargain bin tulips are taking their time, but I love the grey-green of the leaves and the squeaky noise they make. My old friend Mr Clematis and his new shoots. Hellebores still provide the only pop of colour. More bargain bin bulbs – mini hyacinths and tulips of unknown denomination. This is the first time I’ve kept a lavender alive over winter.  True, the weather was mild, but I think maybe I just didn’t water the…
  • topsy-turvy tulips

    sophos
    9 Feb 2015 | 11:47 am
    I put a vase of tulips out on the balcony to cool off and make them last a bit longer – but I forgot them overnight and it was -5° Frozen solid.
  • winter update

    sophos
    8 Feb 2015 | 2:11 am
    Like last year, the winter has been rather gentle. A light layer of snow now and then, but none of those Russian weather fronts I’ve grown accustomed to here. And like last year, it was February before we had several consecutive days of frost. With hindsight, then, my pelargoniums would probably have been ok in a hibernation station on the balcony, but they’re spending winter in the stairwell, by no means dormant, practically basking in light and temperatures between 8 and 15°C.Out in the cold, there are signs of life from some of the bulbs, but I’ve forgotten what I planted…
  • hellebore hero

    sophos
    8 Feb 2015 | 2:01 am
    An unpublished post from December: Just inside the entrance of my local, underground, supermarket, there are potted plants for sale in various degrees of distress. Wilting from lack of water and light, and this time of year sometimes sprayed with glitter or gold paint for that festive look… Every once in a while I get the urge to save one of them and give it a good home (though admittedly that doesn’t always work). My latest protg is this ivory christmas rose (Helleborus niger). I hastily repotted it in what I had at home: a mix of cactus soil, leaf mulch and a few nettle…
 
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    Urban Gardens

  • Reap What You Sow With AKER Urban Farming Kits

    Maggie Wells
    15 Apr 2015 | 4:48 pm
    You can picture it right? Starting your day by collecting a bounty of fresh eggs, herbs and other edibles, popping over to check on your buzzing bee hive, and then heading out to enjoy your day in the city with … Read More...The post Reap What You Sow With AKER Urban Farming Kits appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Frédéric Malphettes Trellis Vertical Garden

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    10 Apr 2015 | 1:46 pm
    One of my favorite French designers, Frédéric Malphettes, reaches new heights with Anno, his latest vertical garden trellis structure, a welcome addition to his family of modular vertical garden designs. Anno is playful from the start: the name is a … Read More...The post Frédéric Malphettes Trellis Vertical Garden appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • A Japanese Garden Hidden Behind LA’s Dodger Stadium

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    9 Apr 2015 | 3:55 pm
    Who knew? I grew up in Los Angeles, went to many baseball games, but never knew that there was a Japanese garden hidden behind Dodger Stadium. Yep, the story goes that back in 1962 when the ballpark opened, the team invited Japanese sportswriter, … Read More...The post A Japanese Garden Hidden Behind LA’s Dodger Stadium appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Interview: Architecture Student Designs Smart Home of the Future With On-site Food Production

    Tierney VanderVoort
    6 Apr 2015 | 3:32 pm
    When judges of the House 2020 Competition challenged Ontario, Canada architecture, engineering and environmental science students to come up with an innovative idea for the house of the future, they asked the question: what does ”smart” mean now? Competition winner, Peter Kitchen, Master of … Read More...The post Interview: Architecture Student Designs Smart Home of the Future With On-site Food Production appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Celebrating Slow Food and Slow Flowers at Local Flower Farm Dinner

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    4 Apr 2015 | 11:34 pm
    You know about farm-to-table dining and perhaps garden-to-glass cocktails. Now there’s Field-to-Vase–where the dining table’s flowers were freshly picked at the flower farm only a few feet from where you are seated. The Field to Vase Dinner Tour is series … Read More...The post Celebrating Slow Food and Slow Flowers at Local Flower Farm Dinner appeared first on Urban Gardens.
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    Epic Gardening | RSS Feed

  • How To Build Your Own Polytunnel

    Kevin
    17 Apr 2015 | 10:53 am
    The post How To Build Your Own Polytunnel is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog. ​Everyone and their grandmother seems to be building polytunnels these days - and for a good reason. They're an absolutely amazing gardening tool that extend the growing season, protect your garden from the elements, and ultimately increase the size of your harvest.And for all of these benefits, you don't even have to build a permanent […] The post How To Build Your Own Polytunnel is by Kevin and appeared first on…
  • How to Choose a Garden Fence

    Kevin
    15 Apr 2015 | 9:00 am
    The post How to Choose a Garden Fence is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog. ​Most of us think of garden fences as a way to protect the garden from pests - those deer, rabbits, and other critters that can wreak havoc on a garden. While that's exactly what they're used for, there's nothing that says you can't also have a beautiful garden fence.It can be a little bit of […] The post How to Choose a Garden Fence is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic…
  • 4 of the Best Plants to Grow in a Greenhouse

    Kevin
    13 Apr 2015 | 7:52 am
    The post 4 of the Best Plants to Grow in a Greenhouse is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog. Having a greenhouse gives you the advantage to grow some of the tastiest crops that can be later used for a variety of recipes. This also means that you will be able to reap all kinds of benefits from growing organically; however, if you are currently in the process of deciding exactly which vegetables to […] The post 4 of the Best Plants to Grow in a Greenhouse is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic…
  • How to Get Your Backyard Garden Ready for Summer

    Kevin
    9 Apr 2015 | 12:11 am
    The post How to Get Your Backyard Garden Ready for Summer is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog. ​ As the spring/summer season is now upon us, it is becoming prime time that we venture out in to the garden to bask in the warmer weather. For that reason, it is no wonder that you may want to clean up your garden, especially if you plan on entertaining friends and family.Improving your garden […] The post How to Get Your Backyard Garden Ready for Summer is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic…
  • How to Plant Onions: 3 Ways To Grow

    Kevin
    6 Apr 2015 | 12:30 pm
    The post How to Plant Onions: 3 Ways To Grow is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog. ​ If there is one veggie you want to grow a lot of in your backyard garden, it's onions! Onions are used in just about every meal--soup, stew, baked chicken, lasagna, even pizza. Without onions, food tends to be fairly bland and tasteless. You need onions for cooking, so it's definitely in your best interest […] The post How to Plant Onions: 3 Ways To Grow is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best…
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    Grow Our Way

  • How to Treat Powdery Mildew on Plants

    Safer® Brand
    7 Apr 2015 | 7:58 am
    Though the weather across much of the country may indicate otherwise, spring is on the horizon. That means it’s time to at least start thinking about what to plant in your garden this year and which types of diseases your plants may be susceptible to. Powdery mildew is a relatively common fungus that many plants can contract. If you find powdery mildew on your plants, it’s not necessarily fatal, but you don’t want it hanging around. Fortunately, there are many options for powdery mildew treatment. What Is Powdery Mildew? Powdery mildew thrives in conditions opposite those where you’d…
  • Be My Buddy: Companion Planting Vegetables

    Safer® Brand
    27 Feb 2015 | 5:45 am
    Just like humans, some plants are more compatible together than others. As the gardener, you’re in charge of making sure each vegetable gets along with their garden mates. To help you learn which plants are friends or foes, we’ve created this companion planting chart for vegetables. What Vegetables Grow Well Together? Companion planting is the purposeful placement of certain plants near each other as a natural way to drive harmful pests away, help each other grow, and even improve the vegetables’ flavor. Of course, not all vegetables are buddies. For example, members of the bean family,…
  • Gardening For Beginners: Intro to Hydroponics

    Safer® Brand
    4 Nov 2014 | 8:45 am
    The term “hydroponic gardening” may sound fancy or high-tech, but the concept is really pretty simple. While the practice of hydroponic gardening dates back to ancient times, it wasn’t until the 1950s that it started to gain prominence. What makes hydroponic gardening different from traditional growing practices? It does not involve the use of soil. Instead, plants are grown using either a nutrient-rich water culture or a soilless medium such as clay aggregate, coconut coir, perlite, sand or gravel. Some of the benefits of hydroponic gardening include higher yields, reduced water…
  • What Your Office Is Missing

    Safer® Brand
    30 Oct 2014 | 9:29 am
    If you’re one of those people who are stuck working inside an office all day, adding a little green to the scene in the form of plants can do wonders for your work environment. Office plants can provide a long list of benefits including: Alleviating stress – If squeezing rubber balls or taking walks around the building aren’t helping you cope with stress at work, try adding a plant or two to your work area. According to one study, placing plants in an office reduced worker anxiety by 37 percent, while anger and hostility decreased 44 percent. Improved air quality – Although smoking…
  • How to Grow the Perfect Tomato

    Safer® Brand
    21 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    Have you ever marveled at the plump, juicy delicious tomatoes that your friends or neighbors seem to be able to grow so effortlessly? Do you wonder why your own tomato growing efforts don’t seem to deliver the same results? Growing perfect tomatoes isn’t always easy. A little luck and a lot of tender loving care are required. It also helps if you know how to overcome the obstacles that can prevent you from achieving the tomato growing success you desire. Poor soil quality – First things first, make sure that your soil pH is ideal for tomatoes. You can easily find a pH soil testing kit…
 
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    Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden

  • Vegetable Gardening Help: Harlequin Bugs

    Jonah Holland
    17 Apr 2015 | 11:01 am
    by Laura Schumm, Community Kitchen Garden Horiculturist, Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden A recent Tweet from the folks over at Kersey Creek Elementary School in Hanover County got us thinking about Harlequin bugs and how we can help provide suggestions for combating them organically. There are many pesky insects pest that you will most likely run into sooner or later while tending a vegetable garden. The harlequin bug is one of them. These bright red-orange and black insects are close relative to the stink bug and they love to feast on your vegetables. Harlequin bugs are known to be a major…
  • We Dig Our Volunteers!

    Jonah Holland
    13 Apr 2015 | 11:32 am
    by Jonah Holland, PR & Marketing Coordinator, Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Happy National Volunteer Week! We are thankful for our 600+ volunteers this week — and every week. Volunteers were instrumental in the development of the Garden, and continue to play a major role here. In fact, we would not be the Garden we are today without them. Thank you! Our gratitude also goes out to HandsOn Greater Richmond for making Richmond a better place through volunteering. Each year HandsonRVA helps coordinate volunteers for our Community Kitchen Garden serving FeedMore. If you are…
  • Albert S. Tanner: A Bicycle Story

    Janet Woody
    11 Apr 2015 | 4:05 am
    by  Janet Woody, Librarian, Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Sample from the Lakeside Wheel Club exhibit Thousands of visitors enjoyed Dominion GardenFest of Lights this year, and many of those visitors stepped into the library and back to 1895 as they viewed our exhibit on the Lakeside Wheel Club. However, it is likely that only one visitor had a unique connection to the Wheel Club: her father was a member of the Wheel Club. Helen Tanner visited GardenFest with her friend Peggy Stallings. Peggy is a volunteer in the library and was very excited to learn of her friend’s connection to the…
  • How will Richmond Show its Spirit for Richmond 2015?

    Jonah Holland
    10 Apr 2015 | 3:17 am
    Editor’s note: What started as a nice email from Garden visitor Donna Copley after she enjoyed the Garden’s bicycle theme at this year’s Dominion GardenFest of Lights, A Legacy in Lights: 120 Years from Bicycle Club to Botanical Garden turned into a guest blog post. We enjoyed the photos and comments so much, we decided to share them with you. It’s exciting to see how a town might be transformed by a bike race and many of us are curious to see how Richmond will show its excitement. For our part, the Garden will host extended evening hours, weeknights during…
  • A Million Blooms on a Rainy Day

    Jonah Holland
    7 Apr 2015 | 1:37 pm
    by Jonah Holland, PR & Marketing Coordinator, Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden A Million Blooms are still just as beautiful with a bit of drizzle. Rainbow of blooms in the Central Garden Narcissus ‘Tahiti’ Narcissus ‘Tahiti’ in bud form Cherry blossoms and the Childrens Garden Tree House
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    The Horticult

  • Fiddle Leaf Fig Under the Roof: We Finally Get the Internet’s Favorite Houseplant

    Chantal Aida Gordon
    15 Apr 2015 | 3:00 am
    Kind of hard to believe we haven’t talked about this yet. About…you now…the fig thing. Nah, not those figs.… ► The post Fiddle Leaf Fig Under the Roof: We Finally Get the Internet’s Favorite Houseplant appeared first on The Horticult.
  • Flower Fests: Springtime Celebrations Around the World

    Chantal Aida Gordon and Ryan Benoit
    9 Apr 2015 | 3:00 am
    Winter in our neck of the woods may be mild beyond belief, but we don’t take spring for granted. Not only is spring equinox our blog-erversary, we’re excited for warm vibes to light up the cooler areas of the country and the world, because those regions go all out with events to celebrate the return of beloved blossoms.… ► The post Flower Fests: Springtime Celebrations Around the World appeared first on The Horticult.
  • Grow Pro: The Classes of ‘Garden Tribe’ Let You Learn From the Legends

    Chantal Aida Gordon
    3 Apr 2015 | 3:00 am
    The scent of soil, the feel of damp roots between your fingers, the taste of a guava flower as it dissolves on your tongue — on every level, gardening is pure therapy.… ► The post Grow Pro: The Classes of ‘Garden Tribe’ Let You Learn From the Legends appeared first on The Horticult.
  • ‘Better Homes and Gardens’ Blogger Awards: The Results Are In!

    Chantal Aida Gordon
    2 Apr 2015 | 3:00 am
    Monday morning on Twitter, across 45 extremely suspenseful minutes, Better Homes and Gardens announced the winners of its 2015 Blogger Awards.… ► The post ‘Better Homes and Gardens’ Blogger Awards: The Results Are In! appeared first on The Horticult.
  • Gardening 9 to 5: The Office Gets a Plant Makeover!

    Chantal Aida Gordon
    1 Apr 2015 | 3:00 am
    We’ve long suspected it…and now it’s been backed by science: that plants boost productivity. Yes, according to a study published last year, adding a ruffly fiddle leaf fig to your cubicle or a zamioculcas to your desktop could increase your creative output — and your happiness — by up to 15 percent.… ► The post Gardening 9 to 5: The Office Gets a Plant Makeover! appeared first on The Horticult.
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    The Diligent Gardener

  • Making the most of your Water

    Gaz
    9 Apr 2015 | 2:32 am
    With the latest water bill landing on the door mat recently, I thought it would be worthwhile to explore some of the many ways of saving water in the garden in particular. As well as the garden there are lots of ways to save water in the home as well. However being a garden blog we will concentrate on what you can do in the garden.Water buttsOne way to reduce the amount of tap water you use in watering is to collect rain water. Water butts added to the guttering on your greenhouse, shed or ever the drainpipes on your house will soon fill up and give you a renewable source of water for a one…
  • Three Crucial Considerations before Buying a Conservatory

    Gaz
    18 Feb 2015 | 2:40 am
    If you’re anything like the rest of us, you want to enjoy your garden all year round. For most green-fingered Brits, however, the volatility of the weather in Dear Old Blighty is enough to make even the most serene gardener shake an angry fist at the threatening clouds above. At this time of year, even when the sun is shining, it’s normally cold enough to break the smoke off your chimney, which makes sitting outside in your garden akin to an Arctic expedition. But this is where a conservatory is worth its weight in gold. Whatever the forecast, conservatories offer an agreeable space to…
  • Garden Tool Care

    Gaz
    18 Feb 2015 | 1:24 am
    How often does this happen to you? After a heavy but satisfying day in the garden of weeding, pruning or digging, the hot bath and the drink with your name on it are calling to you. You know you really should clean your tools before putting them away, but surely that’ll wait until tomorrow? Carrying out simple maintenance directly after using your tools should make them last, but if you do need to replace, never buy ‘cheap and cheerful’. Clean dirt and debrisMake sure you wash the dirt off thoroughly. Use a hose and if you’ve let the dirt dry, have a stiff brush handy to remove…
  • Top 10 UK Gardening Blogs

    Gaz
    11 Feb 2015 | 3:02 am
    There are lots of Gardening blogs out there, but what to read when you have finished out latest articles?Here is a list of the top ten you really should include in your regular reading pleasure.1. Alternative Eden2. Fennel & Fern3. The Galloping Gardener4. wellywoman 5. Two Thirsty Gardeners6. The middle-sized garden7. Real Men Sow8. Veg Plotting9.  Loose and Leafy10. Grow Our Own
  • Iris reticulata Katharine Hodgkin

    Gaz
    30 Jan 2015 | 3:07 am
     Iris reticulata Katharine Hodgkin making an early appearance.
 
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    Easily Grown Garden

  • When to Plant Vegetables

    Kiesha Easley
    22 Mar 2015 | 8:00 am
    I understand that people from all over the world might be reading this blog and because of this, there’s always a chance that there is some confusion about when to plant vegetables.  While I might be starting seeds for cool weather crops in late December or early January – that would be absurd for someone […]The post When to Plant Vegetables appeared first on Easily Grown Garden.
  • How to Start a Garden Step by Step

    Kiesha Easley
    15 Feb 2015 | 9:00 pm
    It doesn’t matter if you’re a beginner, if you want to know how to start a garden, this post will help you do it, step by step. The idea of planting a vegetable garden can be exciting.  Most people dash off to the nearest garden center, load their carts up with plants, soil and a few […]The post How to Start a Garden Step by Step appeared first on Easily Grown Garden.
  • Gardening tips: You DON’T need a GREEN thumb

    Kiesha Easley
    12 Feb 2015 | 1:00 pm
    You don’t need a green thumb when you’ve got the basic gardening tips down.  Anyone can learn to garden. Over the years I’ve learned that you don’t have to know everything about gardening to have a fruitful season. It’s more about your level of commitment than about your knowledge.  If you can commit to the […]The post Gardening tips: You DON’T need a GREEN thumb appeared first on Easily Grown Garden.
  • 5 Benefits of Beekeeping

    Kiesha Easley
    7 Feb 2015 | 8:00 pm
    There are a lot more benefits of beekeeping than harvesting affordable, local, delicious honey (although I must say, that is the sweetest benefit of all).  In these high-tech times, people rarely think about keeping honeybees.  Most people think, why  keep bees when you can go buy a bottle of honey from the grocery store, with less hassle? If you […]The post 5 Benefits of Beekeeping appeared first on Easily Grown Garden.
  • Free Bee Removal in Columbia, SC – Don’t Kill those Honeybees!

    Kiesha Easley
    31 Jan 2015 | 8:00 pm
    Swarm season is just around the corner.  Spotting a swarm of bees in your yard can be scary! The first response for most people: Freak out! The second response: Grab some bug spray or call an exterminator.  I’d like to offer another option: Stay calm and call for a free bee removal. Free Bee Removal […]The post Free Bee Removal in Columbia, SC – Don’t Kill those Honeybees! appeared first on Easily Grown Garden.
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    Grow Up Hydrogarden

  • April Showers Bring May Flowers, And Then Some.

    Amanda Kuhn
    15 Apr 2015 | 5:55 am
    It’s no surprise that when getting ready for the new seasons bloom, there is some initial hesitation when it comes to deciding what plants to pick. When Jack Frost finally chooses to melt away and you’re plants are all brown and dreary, your garden can look like a cemetery. But you can fix that. There are many varieties of plants that are perfect for plantingRead More
  • Florals in Fabric

    Amanda Kuhn
    1 Apr 2015 | 11:56 am
      Its no surprise that when it comes to spring fashion that gardening becomes on of the main muses of inspiration. Designers such as Oscar de la Renta, Balmain, Sam Mcknight and Fendi have all featured fashionable florals within their catwalks. Christopher Kane set the standard with futuristic petal cut-outs, biological depictions of the photosynthesis process and flower-motif sweats during the showing of his springRead More
  • The Road to Sustainable Living

    Amanda Kuhn
    25 Mar 2015 | 2:44 pm
    Recent studies show that children who are taught the proper education behind growing your own produce are more likely to increase their intake of fruits and vegetables. Food education is considered the entry point for learning because by growing your own food you are creating life. Urban cities are taking note of this trend and are now deciding to incorporate teachings within their curriculum thatRead More
  • Rumor Has It

    Amanda Kuhn
    18 Mar 2015 | 8:34 am
    Many novice growers share the common misconceptions when it comes to hydrogardening. That it is a simple do it yourself process and requires little to no time. When in reality, hydrogardening requires the same amount of tender love and care that a regular grow system would require. However, hydroponic gardening takes up no room and with a Grow Up system you can utilize space bothRead More
  • Laws of Attraction

    Amanda Kuhn
    11 Mar 2015 | 11:55 am
    The Farm-To-Table Restaurant Movement & How it’s Bringing in Customers from Various Areas. About almost every new wave, upscale restaurant you check into now a days promotes the fact that they support local farms and use ingredients that are considered “farm-to-table”. Now what exactly is this you ask? Farm-to-table is the coined term to better describe a restaurants use of locally sourced food and products.Read More
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    Made with love and garlic

  • Ask not fig whom the bell tolls...

    Catherine: Made with love and garlic
    11 Apr 2015 | 12:56 pm
    It finally happened. I was so thrilled by my Brown Turkey fig tree as it produced so many overwintering figs, you know, over winter. And as we're having such a warm snap at the moment, I thought I'd pop it outside so that it could enjoy some of this lovely bright sunshine. So I popped it in the garden, left it for a couple of days and then went out yesterday after the morning's rain and basically watched it die. It's sort of withered. The leaves and fruits curled up and died! Poor, poor fig. Another one for the failure list I'm afraid. What a shame. 
  • Photo Friday: White mustard

    Catherine: Made with love and garlic
    9 Apr 2015 | 11:58 pm
  • Slow sloes

    Catherine: Made with love and garlic
    9 Apr 2015 | 12:46 am
    I am so frustrated with my blackthorn bushes. I bought them from one of those "Send a tree as a gift" places as a gift for someone that couldn't make the Christmas party that I intended to hand them over at. So into the beds they went (and into some mulled apple juice went the accompanying sloe gin). But they're absolutely awful. They're growing at a snail's pace and occupying an entire raised bed as they do so. Last year I got cross and stuck in the peony that I bought at the Chelsea Flower Show sell-off. And this year I think I'm going to make the bed useful. It was supposed to provide me…
  • Sow many plans, sow little time

    Catherine: Made with love and garlic
    8 Apr 2015 | 5:06 am
    On Easter Monday the lovely Mr Garlic helped me to do a whole morning of gardening. Because I'm stuck on the knee scooter with a broken foot (and my stupid scooter doesn't fit into the side return), he was wonderful and shuttled back and forth with bags of soil and bean shoots and all sorts of other things whilst I sat and planted more seeds. I planted dill, sweet basil, borlotti beans, various squashes, leeks, broccoli and pumpkins and a couple more of the gourmet red peppers that failed last time. It's always messy because I'm so short of space, but I love sitting at the garden table and…
  • Taunting the slugs

    Catherine: Made with love and garlic
    7 Apr 2015 | 12:03 am
    One thing I've always been prone to do is put things off. I wait happily for harvest from my main plants, thinking that I'll have nothing until then. And to a certain extent, that's true because I have so little space in my tiny urban allotment garden. But this year I've decided to really try to get to grips with growing as much as possible all year round. So I'm starting off some tubs of spinach and lettuce. There's no space in the greenhouse so they have to grow outside and the only place they won't be in the way is on top of my storage box. But there's a problem. Invertebrates. Hundreds of…
 
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    No Soil Solutions

  • 6 Ways To Keep Your Hydroponic Nutrient Solution Cool

    nosoilsolutions
    3 Apr 2015 | 7:53 pm
    The temperature of your hydroponic nutrient solution is not something that should be overlooked. Too cold and roots will not form, the plant will grow slow and maybe die. Hydroponic nutrient solution that is too hot does not hold oxygen your plants need and can cause stress to your garden. Hydroponic nutrient solution should be The post 6 Ways To Keep Your Hydroponic Nutrient Solution Cool appeared first on No Soil Solutions.
  • Choosing Quality Seeds for Your Garden

    nosoilsolutions
    8 Feb 2015 | 2:26 pm
    Often times the importance of using quality seeds are overlooked when gardening. Choosing quality seed for your garden may be one of the least expensive aspects of your hydroponic garden but is just as important as quality nutrients and grow environment. Many gardeners are gardening for the fun, for more healthy produce, and also quality. The post Choosing Quality Seeds for Your Garden appeared first on No Soil Solutions.
  • Using Rockwool For Seed Germination

    nosoilsolutions
    7 Dec 2014 | 10:44 pm
    Rockwool is a popular starter medium that has been used a long time with hydroponics. Smaller rockwool cubes are used for cuttings or seed germination and then transplanted into hydroponic systems. Larger cubes or slabs can be used to grow larger plants. It works well as a grow medium because it’s great at both maintaining The post Using Rockwool For Seed Germination appeared first on No Soil Solutions.
  • Nutrient Lockout

    nosoilsolutions
    22 Nov 2014 | 8:43 pm
    If you notice your hydroponic plants becoming stunted or showing odd colors resembling nutrient deficiency your plants may be experiencing nutrient lockout. It’s easier to diagnose nutrient lockout with hydroponic gardens because nutrients are measured to the exact amount (or should be) to supply the plants with enough nutrients. Nutrient lock out is exactly what The post Nutrient Lockout appeared first on No Soil Solutions.
  • How to Adjust The pH Of Hydroponic Nutrient Solution

    nosoilsolutions
    14 Nov 2014 | 9:13 pm
    Proper pH levels are important with hydroculture gardening. Most hydroponic nutrients have a pH buffer that helps keep the pH level of your solution at its proper levels, but a spike or dip a spike or dip in your pH levels. When this happens, it’s important to adjust the pH levels back to the proper The post How to Adjust The pH Of Hydroponic Nutrient Solution appeared first on No Soil Solutions.
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    O'Connors Lawn Equipment

  • April Lawn And Garden Tips

    Verenice Torres
    1 Apr 2015 | 8:16 am
    Lawn Fertilize Bermuda grass with O’Connor’s. Address post –emergence weeds. (Apply weed n feed or spray with herbicide) Check dead spots for fungus or grub. Water 1 ½ “ per week (early morning) Mow Bermuda grass 1 ½ – 3” tall. Mow fescue 2 ½ – 3” tall. Garden Plant warm season vegetables: peppers, tomatoes, melons, after April 15th Prune winter kill, spring flowering vines after blooming. Pinch out growing tips of mums. Fertilize flowers and vegetables. Add iron for acid – loving plants. Spray fruit trees after blossom drop. Address pine blight, euonymous scale.
  • March Lawn And Garden Tips

    Verenice Torres
    1 Mar 2015 | 7:12 am
    Lawn Scalp Bermuda grass and catch clippings (never scalp fescue or rye!) Apply pre emergence to bermuda grass if not applied in February. Plant fescue and rye seed. Fertilize fescue and rye. Mow 2 ½ – 3” tall. Water weekly (est.) Treat for grubs.   Garden Plant shrubs, azaleas, pansies, cold –hearty vegetables (leafy and root crops) Prune climbing roses before growth starts. Prune azaleas before growth starts. Divide and replant summer and fall blooming perennials. Cut back liriope, pampass & ornament grasses. Remove tree wrap. The post March Lawn And Garden Tips appeared…
  • O’Connor’s is pleased to offer a military discount on 2015 residential zero turn riding products.

    Bridgett Davis
    27 Feb 2015 | 1:00 am
    In appreciation for the sacrifice and service of our military both past and present, O’Connor’s is pleased to offer a $100 military discount on all 2015 residential zero turn riding mowers. Just input the promo code “2015” at check out to receive $100 off your purchase of a 2015 Toro, Snapper or Simplicity residential zero turn rider.  The post O’Connor’s is pleased to offer a military discount on 2015 residential zero turn riding products. appeared first on O'Connors Lawn Equipment.
  • Free Cargo Carrier with purchase of any Toro SW series TimeCutter Zero Turn Mower

    Bridgett Davis
    19 Feb 2015 | 1:23 pm
    For a limited time… only at O’Connor’s Lawn and Garden get a Toro Cargo Carrier, ( A $200 Value) FREE with any purchase of a SW Series Timecutter Zero Turn Mower! That’s Right just BUY this..And GET this…. While supplies last. The post Free Cargo Carrier with purchase of any Toro SW series TimeCutter Zero Turn Mower appeared first on O'Connors Lawn Equipment.
  • February Lawn And Garden Tips

    Verenice Torres
    1 Feb 2015 | 7:03 am
    Lawn Water when dry. Mow fescue 3” tall. Fertilize fescue and rye. Spray weeds when 50F. Apply pre-emergence to Bermuda grass.   Garden Plant bare root trees. (Grape, Pecan, etc.) Prune summer flowering shrubs/vines: (Rose bushes to outward buds, Grape vines to 80%) Remove tallest 1/3 of canes from standard Nandinas. You can cut Nandinas low, they will sprout at roots. Trim groundcovers. Spray dormant oil The post February Lawn And Garden Tips appeared first on O'Connors Lawn Equipment.
 
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    Your Hub of Garden Creativity | Garden Buildings Direct Blog

  • Most Effective Methods to Check your Garden Shed for Leaks

    Maria Karla Salinas
    15 Apr 2015 | 12:58 am
    While puddles and wet supplies may tip you off to the way that your shed has a hole, it is regularly not that simple to recognize a break. On the off chance that you aren’t consistently utilizing the shed it can be barely noticeable a hole, so it’s a smart thought to check occasionally to check whether water is getting in any place. Over the long haul, water inside a shed will harm whatever is inside it and can likewise cause harm to the shed itself. Strategy 1: Checking for Leaks 1. Look out for staining. To check for holes, you’ll have to pay special mind to staining within…
  • How to Prevent your Shed from Rotting

    Maria Karla Salinas
    6 Apr 2015 | 4:58 am
    Sheds are an essential part of everyone’s garden especially those who have tools or equipment to store. Sheds can make any scene look complete and they can even match the style of the home they are placed with. However, you must take proper care of the sheds if you are expecting them to last. One of the main problems people deal with is rotting wood. How to Prevent Rotting: • Place the shed off the ground on a strong sturdy foundation along with pavers if possible. With the shed above the ground, rain water will not sit against the outside walls which would cause possible rotting. • Use…
  • How to Prepare your Shed for Strong Winds

    Garden Buildings Direct
    29 Mar 2015 | 5:01 am
    Strong winds and gales are very common in the UK and when these storms hit, you need to make sure your home and sheds are prepared. Plan Ahead Making sure your sheds are in strong condition and you are keeping on top of repair work is essential for preparing against strong winds. Roofing The roof is very vulnerable with these types of conditions. Strong winds put a lot of pressure on the roof with the high spends and the quick changing of directions. The roof must be secure to prevent any type of damage. The main thing you must do is always check the status of the roof, both from inside and…
  • Re-Purposed Doors

    Maria Karla Salinas
    28 Mar 2015 | 5:01 am
    Re-purposed doors are a great way to use old or broken doors so they do not go to waste. You can create beautiful pieces and turn old doors into new and stylish ones! A look like this can add life to any room! This is very easy and simple to make and you can choose any type of style that suits the room. Just take the door and add some old vintage wallpaper, or any style of your choosing. Finally, find a nice place that suits it. This is very similar to adding a new painting to your room. Creating a shelf space for your books or items is a great way a door can be re-purposed. First off the cut…
  • Perfect Foundation For Your Shed

    Maria Karla Salinas
    27 Mar 2015 | 6:20 am
      Good Shed Foundation Qualifications The foundation will support the weight of the spread and will be evenly spread over the ground. It will prevent any type of moisture or seepage coming from the ground from entering the shed as well as protect the wood. There should be features that prevent vegetation or weeds growing underneath and around the shed. (For larger sheds) It should protect the shed against moving throughout its range, for sometimes soil will change in volume when exposed to moisture (Learn more about improving structure of wooden garden sheds). Price and Development…
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    A Garden for All

  • Recipe for a Low Maintenance Garden

    Kathy
    14 Apr 2015 | 6:00 am
    Itea ‘Henry’s Garnet’ w/ stachys (photo credit: Kathy Diemer) You’ve all heard the term “Low Maintenance Garden”, but in actuality many so called low maintenance gardens are way more work than anyone anticipated. I consider most of my gardens to be low maintenance; thanks to the shrub to plant ratio, but this particular garden really exemplifies the term low maintenance. The garden started simply enough.  We had a mass of dead elm trees removed from the corner of our property, which then provided this gaping hole in the landscape.  And you know me well…
  • Tool Time

    Kathy
    7 Apr 2015 | 6:00 am
    Although spring is officially here, it’s still a bit too early to get out and start digging. However, there are a few things we can do before our plants break ground: organize and tend to our tools.  Consider how many tools you actually use throughout the course of the gardening year, and the task may become a little more daunting than expected.  But don’t fret, there’s plenty of time to care for the tools you have, and I’ve provided a few of my favorites if you’re looking to replace anything else.  Start by checking your wheelbarrows and carts, often the…
  • Starting From the Ground Up

    Kathy
    31 Mar 2015 | 6:00 am
    The Rubble Remains (photo by: Kathy Diemer) The word foundation has several meanings; it can refer to a long time relationship built upon a solid foundation of love and trust, or it can mean the cosmetic foundation a woman applies to her face each morning.  In this case, foundation relates to my house, a house that was lost to an aggressive fire in January.  The fire that erupted at 4 a.m. on January 9th had an insatiable hunger and when it finally burned out nothing was left of our home.  Glass melted into ice flows.  Cookware was deformed as if viewed from a distorted mirror.  A few…
  • Exclamation Points!

    Kathy
    24 Mar 2015 | 6:00 am
    Skyrocket Juniper makes a Statement (photo credit: Kathy Diemer) There’s a lot of hub-bub amongst the literary hierarchy regarding the use, or contended misuse, of the exclamation point in a sentence. Use them after an interjection or an emphatic declaration. Use them as a tool to add punch to a statement.  But, use them sparingly, lest you be strung up for your grammatical faux pas!  Although the use of exclamation points dates back to the 15th century, we didn’t see them on our keyboards until the 1970’s.  Perhaps only groovy hipsters (that’s us) truly…
  • Tropical Punch

    Kathy
    17 Mar 2015 | 6:00 am
    Yucca with snow (photo credit: Kathy Diemer) If, like me, you crave a touch of adventure in your garden, then yucca could be the plant for you.  For those of us in colder zones, we can’t grow many of the desert dwellers such as agaves or cactus.  But yucca is a different story.  Quite cold hardy, not only do they add a spiky, prickly character to an otherwise oval leafed garden, they look good all year long.  Yes, that’s right.  When other cold climate plants have gone below for the winter, yucca happily stands up to whatever mother nature can dish out. Yucca w/summer annuals…
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    DIY Backyard Gardening

  • 2015 UPLB Garden Show Info

    Chellet
    3 Apr 2015 | 3:25 pm
    I have received quite plentiful inquiries via email and a new one on a comment section of the blog regarding any update on the 2015 UPLB Garden Show.   It used to be held around March and October, but as of today, we haven’t got any information as to when it will be held in […] The post 2015 UPLB Garden Show Info appeared first on DIY Backyard Gardening.
  • Jump-start Your Garden with End of Winter Gardening Prep

    Chellet
    22 Mar 2015 | 1:09 pm
    Here’s a very useful gardening infographic that can help you jump-start your garden next season… End of Winter Gardening Preparations and Tips     The post Jump-start Your Garden with End of Winter Gardening Prep appeared first on DIY Backyard Gardening.
  • My Published Contribution on Sage Living Wall

    Chellet
    21 Mar 2015 | 9:42 am
    A year ago I wrote a gardening article for Sage Living Wall: Gardening Tips for Small Spaces Share this post to your friends as well.   Also, check out their living wall products. They’re perfect for indoor and outdoor gardens – whether for you or as a gift for a friend.           The post My Published Contribution on Sage Living Wall appeared first on DIY Backyard Gardening.
  • Backyard Gardening Update – March 2015 Blooms!

    Chellet
    4 Mar 2015 | 10:57 pm
    I’ve been meaning to write and publish this post weeks ago, but I’ve decided that today’s the best day because I had to take very recent photos of our backyard garden. But first let me say that the start of the year looks good especially when it comes to our backyard plants. I think I’ve already conquered […] The post Backyard Gardening Update – March 2015 Blooms! appeared first on DIY Backyard Gardening.
  • Backyard Gardening Update

    Chellet
    12 Feb 2015 | 10:42 am
    Since we started gardening in mid 2012, I was truly determined to keep it alive and well no matter the weather and challenges. We’ve lost several plants because of my brown thumb and for lacking enough knowledge on how to properly choose and care for specific plant species. I’ve learned my lesson the hard way. […] The post Backyard Gardening Update appeared first on DIY Backyard Gardening.
 
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    Mill Race Garden Centre Blog

  • 7 Secrets to a ‘No Work’ Garden: A Guide for Lazy Gardeners

    16 Apr 2015 | 6:00 am
    Who wouldn’t like a ‘no work’ garden? Even if you enjoy gardening regularly, let’s face it, there are always times you wish it could just take care of itself! If your previous attempts at gardening have been unsuccessful, or your busy schedule doesn’t allow enough time to maintain a viable garden, today’s post will help. With a little planning and preparation, you may be surprised at what you can achieve without sacrificing much time or effort at all! So without further ado, here are our seven secrets to a ‘no work’ garden. 1. Choose companion plants One great way to reduce…
  • 8 Tips to Starting a Permaculture Garden: A Beginners Guide

    30 Mar 2015 | 4:46 am
    Are you hoping to get back to nature? Most gardeners are, but there are certain methods of gardening which are more sustainable and akin to nature than others – perhaps none more so than the permaculture method. The word ‘permaculture’ – or ‘permanent agriculture’ – was coined in the 1970s, and its focus is on creating agricultural systems based on natural ecosystems. In the domestic garden, it basically means using nature as an inspiration and guide, allowing you to create your own ecosystem in your garden. In today’s world of processed foods and waste, many gardeners are…
  • 12 Great Ground Covers for Sun & Shade (PLUS: Edible Ground Covers!)

    16 Mar 2015 | 4:25 am
    Any experienced gardener will tell you that ground cover plants can be worth their weight in gold for fending off weeds and helping to create a lush outdoor space that’s filled with gorgeous greenery. But which ones should you go for? Here, we run through some excellent contenders for each space in your garden, and offer tips on preparing the ground well so your plants will flourish. Ground Covers for Sun There are lots of ground covers to choose from that will thrive in full sun, from evergreens to annuals, and plenty in between. Here are a few of our favourites: 1. Cotoneaster…
  • Learn to Garden By Watching YouTube: 23 of the Best Gardening Videos

    26 Feb 2015 | 3:13 am
    Have you ever tried to figure out just how many hours you’ve spent watching cat videos on YouTube? I have, and it’s rather more than I’d care to admit. However, YouTube is filled with more than just cute animals. There is actually a huge amount of useful information on there, too. My favourite topic, naturally, is gardening! Whether you’re a complete novice in the gardening world, or you’re hoping to learn a particular skill, YouTube is a fantastic resource – especially for visual learners. I’ve gathered together some of the most useful videos here as a handy guide. Enjoy!
  • 20 Tips on Feeding British Wild Birds in Your Garden

    16 Feb 2015 | 9:03 am
    Whether you’re a wildlife enthusiast, a keen gardener, or you have young children who are learning about the environment, it’s a joy and a pleasure to feed our feathered friends a decent meal. But what exactly is a decent meal for British birds? And when should you provide food? In this bird feeding guide, we’ll unravel all of the dos and don’ts of wild bird feeding so that you’re equipped to feed with confidence. What to feed wild birds Perhaps the most pertinent question is just what to put out. There are a number of different foods that will provide great nutritional value: 1.
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    Organic Lesson

  • Vegan Diet: 3 Spring Vegetables to Add to Your Recipes

    gardenhero
    22 Mar 2015 | 1:22 pm
    Spring is finally here! These days, we have the convenience of having access to all types of seasonal fruits and vegetables regardless of the time of year. However, it can be said that these fruits and vegetables taste best during the season when they are naturally harvested. In this infographic, we showcase three great spring vegetables you can add to your vegan diet. We also provide three great recipe suggestions for each of the vegetables. Rhubarb lemonade? Fava bean hummus? I can’t wait to get started on cooking up a great feast. These vegetables may not always be available in your…
  • Day 78: Growing Herbs Indoors – Cilantro, Chives, Basil

    gardenhero
    18 Mar 2015 | 5:54 pm
    Hey everyone. Apologies for the lack of update but frankly there hasn’t been too many stuff to post about since my last Shoebox Gardening post. Now we are at around day 78 of growing cilantro, chives, and basil leaves indoors. If you remember what happened in the last update then you would know that I had quite a few sprouts appearing for each herb. Unfortunately, many of them have died due to a lack of watering. Here is the progress of my garlic chive plant. It hasn’t grown all that much but it is definitely looking a lot healthier than last time. Apparently, garlic chives are…
  • Heirloom Seeds vs. Hybrid vs. GMO Infographic

    gardenhero
    28 Feb 2015 | 5:30 pm
    As a new gardener, I was not aware that there were differences in seed types. As I was looking to purchase my first set of seeds, I noticed some were labeled as heirloom. As I researched further, I noticed there was a difference between heirloom, hybrid, and GMO. If you have also been having some trouble understanding the differences then check out the infographic below! It should help clear up some of the misunderstandings between the different seed types. Keep in mind, however, that GMO seeds are generally not available to home gardeners. What is Heirloom? Heirloom seeds basically come…
  • Day 35: Growing Herbs Indoors – Cilantro, Chives & Basil

    gardenhero
    3 Feb 2015 | 8:53 pm
    Wow. What a great few weeks it has been since my last update. After seeing my first attempt at growing cilantro seeds fail in a matter of days, I decided to give it another go but with a slightly different method. Instead of putting the seeds in a germinating tray, I decided to give the seeds a nice soak for around seven to eight hours then put them straight into the soil. After three or four days, I saw the first sprouts appearing from the soil. During this time, I also decided to give the basil seeds a go and what you see in the image above is the amount of progress I have made so far.
  • Six Innovative Gardening Tools from CES 2015

    gardenhero
    24 Jan 2015 | 2:48 pm
    The Consumer Electronics Show (CES) isn’t just about showcasing the latest iPhones and TVs. We take a look at six awesome gardening devices that were showcased in CES 2015. The theme of these six devices has a lot in common with cloud technology. How can gardeners conserve water using real-time data? How can gardeners provide the most optimal growing conditions for their plants? Let these innovative tools answer those questions for you. Want to publish this infographic on your own blog or site? Feel free to use the embed code below. Gardening, particularly urban gardening, has been…
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    Great Garden Supply: New Products

  • Barenbrug Turf Star RPR Perennial Rye Grass, 50 LBs

    13 Apr 2015 | 7:10 am
    Barenbrug’s innovative research and development has produced a new star; a tough perennial ryegrass. Regenerating Perennial Ryegrass, or RPR, stands up to heavy traffic while keeping its good looks. A creeping perennial ryegrass, RPR outper..Price: $139.99
  • Jonathan Green Fast Grow Grass Seed - Sun or Shade Mixture

    7 Apr 2015 | 4:42 am
    FAST GROW Mixture provides a hardy turf quickly in sun and shade. This is the perfect seed mixture where the fastest results are required. Germinates in just 7-14 days! Product Features:
  • CompoKeeper Replacement Filters

    2 Apr 2015 | 7:36 am
    Kitchens shouldn't smell like compost, they should smell amazing, like herbs and minty dish soap and whatever's in your oven right this second. Composting can be messy and smelly, but our activated charcoal filter is part of The CompoKeeper's quadruple-action odo..Price: $8.99
  • CompoKeeper Compostable Bags

    2 Apr 2015 | 7:26 am
    They're the perfect companion to the CompoKeeper® food scrap collector. These breathable compostable bags allow for airflow, which helps keep odors under control. CompKeeper has made them durable, because­- honestly- what’s wor..Price: $8.99
  • CompoKeeper Kitchen Composter

    2 Apr 2015 | 6:19 am
    Composting comes with all kinds of benefits. It's economical, environmentally friendly and it keeps the world healthy for future generations. Recycling food waste in the kitchen no longer requires adopting a family of fruit flies, living with weird smells or taki..Price: $98.99
 
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    BackToMyGarden - Discover Your Passion For Gardening

  • BTMG 096 – Heirloom Tomatoes with Andy Domek

    gardentips
    12 Apr 2015 | 10:49 pm
    Andy Domek loves the family aspect of gardening.  And tomatoes.  Delicious, ripe, heirloom tomatoes!  He gardens in West Sacramento, California, with more than 2 decades in the soil. Connect with Andy on Twitter  @AndyDomek Sponsor How healthy are you really?  Take the test at http://NutritionWeCanTrust.com
  • BTMG 095 – Noah Herron introduces us to Urban Farmer

    gardentips
    5 Apr 2015 | 10:47 pm
    Noah Herron introduces us to Urban Farmer.  Urban Farmer provides seeds, plants and garden supplies for home gardeners and farmers.  They have a large selection of non-GMO vegetable seeds, herbs, fruits, flowers and farm seeds.  I noticed on their web store they sell the world's hottest pepper, the Carolina Reaper, nearly 1.5 million Scoville units! [...]
  • BTMG 094: Endless Possibilities for Garden Design with Amy Whitworth

    gardentips
    29 Mar 2015 | 10:40 pm
    Amy Whitworth loves to connect with nature.  She works with clients to design beautiful, tranquil and inspired gardens.  Amy enjoys teaching, especially about intimate space design and native plant habitats.  She has a gift for helping people to adopt "new eyes" to see a garden as it could be, rather than how it is.  Amy [...]
  • BTMG 093: Alabama Gardening Tips with Deb Elliott

    gardentips
    22 Mar 2015 | 10:57 pm
    Deb Elliott gardens near Helena Alabama in zone 7b.  Her plants have coped with hard frosts, torrential rains, brutal droughts, strange fungal diseases, snowy blizzards and  the odd tornado.  Deb has a great garden blog where she shares her adventures and experiments with other plant and nature lovers.  She is often asked, "What Makes Moss Grow?". [...]
  • BTMG 092: Your Dream Garden with Heather McLean

    gardentips
    15 Mar 2015 | 11:39 pm
    Heather McLean loves helping people to rediscover and remember their connection to nature and the Earth.  She helps design personal garden environments and wonderful spaces for her clients.  It starts with a powerful question, "how would you describe your dream garden?".  Heather gardens in the challenging climate of Central Texas.  Heather believes an empty space [...]
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    Grow Our Way

  • How to Treat Powdery Mildew on Plants

    Safer® Brand
    7 Apr 2015 | 7:58 am
    Though the weather across much of the country may indicate otherwise, spring is on the horizon. That means it’s time to at least start thinking about what to plant in your garden this year and which types of diseases your plants may be susceptible to. Powdery mildew is a relatively common fungus that many plants can contract. If you find powdery mildew on your plants, it’s not necessarily fatal, but you don’t want it hanging around. Fortunately, there are many options for powdery mildew treatment. What Is Powdery Mildew? Powdery mildew thrives in conditions opposite those where you’d…
  • Be My Buddy: Companion Planting Vegetables

    Safer® Brand
    27 Feb 2015 | 5:45 am
    Just like humans, some plants are more compatible together than others. As the gardener, you’re in charge of making sure each vegetable gets along with their garden mates. To help you learn which plants are friends or foes, we’ve created this companion planting chart for vegetables. What Vegetables Grow Well Together? Companion planting is the purposeful placement of certain plants near each other as a natural way to drive harmful pests away, help each other grow, and even improve the vegetables’ flavor. Of course, not all vegetables are buddies. For example, members of the bean family,…
  • Gardening For Beginners: Intro to Hydroponics

    Safer® Brand
    4 Nov 2014 | 8:45 am
    The term “hydroponic gardening” may sound fancy or high-tech, but the concept is really pretty simple. While the practice of hydroponic gardening dates back to ancient times, it wasn’t until the 1950s that it started to gain prominence. What makes hydroponic gardening different from traditional growing practices? It does not involve the use of soil. Instead, plants are grown using either a nutrient-rich water culture or a soilless medium such as clay aggregate, coconut coir, perlite, sand or gravel. Some of the benefits of hydroponic gardening include higher yields, reduced water…
  • What Your Office Is Missing

    Safer® Brand
    30 Oct 2014 | 9:29 am
    If you’re one of those people who are stuck working inside an office all day, adding a little green to the scene in the form of plants can do wonders for your work environment. Office plants can provide a long list of benefits including: Alleviating stress – If squeezing rubber balls or taking walks around the building aren’t helping you cope with stress at work, try adding a plant or two to your work area. According to one study, placing plants in an office reduced worker anxiety by 37 percent, while anger and hostility decreased 44 percent. Improved air quality – Although smoking…
  • How to Grow the Perfect Tomato

    Safer® Brand
    21 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    Have you ever marveled at the plump, juicy delicious tomatoes that your friends or neighbors seem to be able to grow so effortlessly? Do you wonder why your own tomato growing efforts don’t seem to deliver the same results? Growing perfect tomatoes isn’t always easy. A little luck and a lot of tender loving care are required. It also helps if you know how to overcome the obstacles that can prevent you from achieving the tomato growing success you desire. Poor soil quality – First things first, make sure that your soil pH is ideal for tomatoes. You can easily find a pH soil testing kit…
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    In the Garden...with Mariani Landscape

  • Creating Landscapes with Hardscapes

    Gina Iliopoulos
    17 Apr 2015 | 4:00 am
    Today we show you a few images that are just one part of a much larger landscape design.  These focus on hardscapes.  We talked about the value of hardscapes in a previous post and here we show you how the … Continue reading →
  • Formal and Traditional Landscape Designs

    Gina Iliopoulos
    15 Apr 2015 | 4:00 am
    Last time we showed you the transformation of a small back yard into a wonderful outdoor living space.  Today we show you another small space, but this time the front yard.  When a property is one of many on a … Continue reading →
  • Small Space, Huge Transformation

    Gina Iliopoulos
    13 Apr 2015 | 4:00 am
    This week we take you through some incredible Mariani landscapes, large and small, to show you how a space of any shape or size can be turned into something extraordinary.  Today we start with a small back yard.  It doesn’t … Continue reading →
  • Formal Spring Bulb Gardens

    Gina Iliopoulos
    10 Apr 2015 | 4:00 am
    Last time we talked to you about formal naturalized gardens using spring bulbs.  Today we show you the truly formal.  These gardens are designed and planted every year.  Often they are in beds that will have seasonal rotations throughout the … Continue reading →
  • Formally Naturalized Bulbs

    Gina Iliopoulos
    8 Apr 2015 | 4:00 am
    We talked last time about naturalized bulb gardens, planting bulbs and allowing them to naturally dapple an area over time.  Well, this can take years, many even, and you might be looking for a more finished look much sooner than … Continue reading →
 
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    Harmony Gardens Landscaping

  • Over-seeding

    HGadmin
    15 Apr 2015 | 9:30 pm
    Over-seeding (sowing grass seeds on an established lawn) is one way to ensure your lawn stays dense from one season to the next. Thick grass will crowd out weeds. In the spring one should check for dying grass and repair it with over-seeding and possibly top dressing. Weed seeds are very opportunistic and will establish themselves wherever bare soil exists. It is not necessary to cover grass seeds with soil unless there are bare areas, then one needs top dressing to be done too. Over-seeding is done with a broadcast spreader to evenly apply the […] The post Over-seeding appeared first…
  • Core Aeration

    HGadmin
    8 Apr 2015 | 10:00 pm
    Core aeration is the process of removing plugs of soil from the lawn to: 1) increase oxygen flow around the root zone of the grass 2) stimulate microbial activity 3) to improve soil structure 4) to improve water flow 5) to decrease compaction 6) bring soil nutrients to surface Aeration is best done when the ground is moist in the spring and the fall. Spring core aeration should not take place until the ground has firmed up after the winter to avoid damage to new shoots of grass and further the compaction of the soil. […] The post Core Aeration appeared first on Harmony Gardens…
  • De-Thatching

    HGadmin
    1 Apr 2015 | 6:30 pm
    De-thatching is a process that removes thatch from the lawn. Thatch is a layer of dead and decaying organic matter located where the grass emerges from the ground. Thatch results when organic material collects faster than it decomposes. If thatch becomes too thick, it will not breakdown and forms a dense layer that tends to be impermeable to water, prevents light and nutrients from reaching the grass. Thatch is the perfect hiding place for insects like chinch bugs. Thus it is important that the lawn be assessed annually for thatch buildup and if there is […] The post De-Thatching…
  • Pruning

    HGadmin
    24 Mar 2015 | 6:33 pm
    Pruning is a very important part of plant, shrub and tree care that is performed for both aesthetic reasons and for plant health. Pruning is the cutting away of unwanted parts of a plant for more fruitful growth and shaping. You should prune a plant or shrub to remove crossed, damaged or diseased branches which will stress the plant. Pruning also improves air flow through the plant and can encourage better branch distribution which results in a healthier, more vigorous plant that is more disease tolerant. Post-bloom pruning maximizes the blooms for the following season. […] The post…
  • How to Maintain a Healthy Lawn in Seven Simple Steps

    HGadmin
    19 Mar 2015 | 10:46 am
    How to Maintain a Healthy Lawn in Seven Simple Steps Step 1: De-thatching and Core Aeration -use a de-thatching machine or contact Harmony Gardens Landscaping to de-thatch your lawns. -ensure to rake up the removed thatch from de-thatching and dispose of -thatch can harbor insects and disease -thatch prevents water and nutrients from reaching grass roots -healthy lawns have 1cm or less of thatch – more is not healthy -core aerate lawns after de-thatching in the spring and the fall and before top dressing, fertilizing and over-seeding -core aerators should have the weights on to […]…
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    Growing And Caring for Fruit Trees

  • How to Prevent Small Fruits And Fertilize Your Fruit Trees

    Lisa Richie
    31 Mar 2015 | 2:16 pm
    The one thing that usually shocks new tree growers is the fact that the fruits produced by their tree are much smaller than the ones they're used to seeing at the grocery store. "What is wrong with my tree?!", "My God! What have I done!?" are some cried you may hear from the disgruntled tree grower. However, small fruits are a natural occurrence. But while smaller fruits might be what nature originally intended, it is possible to attain larger fruits without any genetic altering or added chemicals. It is only through advanced techniques that the professionals reach such large sizes with their…
  • Selling Your Fruit Produce at Farmer's Markets

    Lisa Richie
    31 Mar 2015 | 1:27 pm
    Usually the main motivation for planting a fruit tree is just the joy of maintaining a tree and eating the delicious fruit that comes from it. However, in my personal experience it is possible to go on a quite lucrative venture with fruit trees by operating a fruit stand or participating in a farmer's market. When I moved to Florida, I was slightly depressed at the fact that I had just left behind years and years of hard work to get my lawn to the point it was. However, I was able to healthily channel this depression into the desire to get a new and more beautiful garden and lawn setup going.
  • Training Branches to go where You Want - Pruning Tips

    Lisa Richie
    31 Mar 2015 | 1:24 pm
    Many people associate pruning and trimming with changing the structure of your tree to fit a different shape or style. However, this is not the case. Altering the structure of the tree is known as "Tree Training". This is a much better way to develop an alternate form for your tree. Pruning should be used to prevent diseases, prevent lopsidedness, and encourage healthier fruit growth. Pruning is also used to maintain the proper shape for the tree. For example, if you have an abundance of branches on one particular side of the tree, then you will use pruning to get rid of the larger segments…
  • How to Start a Fruit Tree Orchard

    Lisa Richie
    31 Mar 2015 | 1:09 pm
    If you have a large amount of land that you have not put to use, you may consider planting an orchard. If you've had previous experiences with planting and maintaining trees, that is an added reason why you would be perfect for maintaining an orchard. It might seem like an overwhelming thing to undertake, but it is actually fairly simple. All it takes is some commitment. If you've never grown a tree on your property, you might not want to make the time and money investment of buying lots of trees. If you are inexperienced, you will want to start with just one or two trees so that you can get…
  • Shaping Trees for Different Situations From Nursery to Work ogf Art

    Lisa Richie
    31 Mar 2015 | 1:06 pm
    Through the use of pruning techniques, it is possible to shape your tree to a certain style. There are seven main tree shapes that all have their own benefits for certain situations. During the growth of the tree, simply cut off the unneeded branches, tie the wanted branches into the proper shape, and you will be able to shape it however you want. However, for some of the more advanced shapes, equally advanced pruning techniques are required. There are many books written on this subject. Usually, if you're trying to get your tree to a certain shape, all the tying and pruning should occur in…
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