Gardening

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  • Gardening Mad

    You Grow Girl
    Gayla Trail
    9 Jun 2015 | 9:36 am
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  • OMango Restaurant Review and a Quinoa Salad Recipe

    Shawna Coronado
    Shawna Coronado
    1 Jul 2015 | 4:39 am
    OMango is a restaurant near my home which I have fallen madly in love with. It is located at 1056 North Route 59, Aurora, IL 60504, which is right across the street from the local Target and right smack in middle of all the construction on 59. This construction (see photo to the right) has prevented customers from seeing the restaurant from the street. However, I encourage you to go and experience this yummy Indian restaurant which has a healthy twist – it offers vegan and regular cuisine all with a lower fat and high-nutrition mentality. With a contemporary, green, and quick eat-in…
  • Hobblebush, A Native Shrub That’s Easy To Love: Wildflower Wednesday

    Cold Climate Gardening
    Kathy Purdy
    27 Jun 2015 | 7:03 pm
    At first glance, I thought it was a hydrangea. But I don’t know of any hydrangea that blooms with the trilliums. And the large, exquisitely puckered leaves were unlike any hydrangea leaf I’d ever seen. Turns out it was a viburnum–Viburnum lantanoides–to be precise. This native shrub likes it cool and moist–perfect for northern climates. […]
  • meet the moths: free moth-night walk july 23

    A Way To Garden
    margaret
    28 Jun 2015 | 5:17 am
    I’M MAD FOR MOTHS, and hope to convince you to be, too. Want to come mothing by night, with a [read more…] The post meet the moths: free moth-night walk july 23 appeared first on A Way To Garden.
  • Blooming Stress

    The Occasional Gardener
    8 Jun 2015 | 8:38 am
    "Your cactus is flowering, it must be under stress" a friend said. I looked up at the tall blue green column and holy moly there were about 20 buds on it. There were a couple of buds on the other column last week but I was dissapointed not to have seen it become a flower. Maybe it blooms at night, it suddenly registered, and there it was a huge white bloom when I rushed outside to check.Do cacti flower under stress? Its certainly a stressful situation, hot dry sunny slope and the plant has become huge and quite crowded, I recently cut out a few of the less attractive parts. The other plant…
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    You Grow Girl

  • Gardening Mad

    Gayla Trail
    9 Jun 2015 | 9:36 am
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  • Recipe: Chocolate Cherry Almond Smoothie

    Gayla Trail
    2 Jun 2015 | 9:38 am
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  • D.I.Y Tomato Protection

    Gayla Trail
    20 May 2015 | 11:07 am
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  • The Lost Language of Plants

    Gayla Trail
    6 May 2015 | 2:19 pm
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  • Tumbling Composter Update

    Gayla Trail
    4 May 2015 | 4:05 pm
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    Shawna Coronado

  • OMango Restaurant Review and a Quinoa Salad Recipe

    Shawna Coronado
    1 Jul 2015 | 4:39 am
    OMango is a restaurant near my home which I have fallen madly in love with. It is located at 1056 North Route 59, Aurora, IL 60504, which is right across the street from the local Target and right smack in middle of all the construction on 59. This construction (see photo to the right) has prevented customers from seeing the restaurant from the street. However, I encourage you to go and experience this yummy Indian restaurant which has a healthy twist – it offers vegan and regular cuisine all with a lower fat and high-nutrition mentality. With a contemporary, green, and quick eat-in…
  • How To Build a Living Wall Pocket Garden

    Shawna Coronado
    29 Jun 2015 | 10:58 am
    Many of the living walls featured in my book, Grow a Living Wall; Create Vertical Gardens with Purpose, are focused on pre-made systems. Yet a few are homemade systems built with a bit of creativity and modeled into something that will work just for the purposes you need them for. This is one such garden, created as an aromatic therapeutic fabric pocket garden that can be mobile if you would like. It is charming and absolutely perfect for small areas like gates, doors, and feature areas. Excerpts from my book are below – showing you how to make it yourself. HOW TO BUILD A LIVING WALL…
  • Backyard Garden Room Makeover – Before and After

    Shawna Coronado
    23 Jun 2015 | 6:36 am
    It is time to continue our three months of AE Outdoor “Creating the Perfect Patio” garden room makeover project – the last redecorating project is focused on making a blank, awkwardly shaped flagstone patio into a sweet entertaining area. In the photo to the right you can see the last makeover project results, where I remade the front patio area into a sitting area with a living wall and a succulent wok. It transitioned into a boldly happy entry! Our first patio makeover, seen in the photo to the left, was an outdoor garden potting room re-do. It became a colorful potting…
  • Delicious Herb Broth Recipe

    Shawna Coronado
    22 Jun 2015 | 4:50 am
    Chris McLaughlin is a super-dee-duper author friend of mine famous for her passionate growing stories and tales of how she dyes her own wool and lives in the country with her family (as well as rabbits, chickens, goats, and more). She is amazing and has all sorts of fantastical homesteading, farming, and gardening ideas to share. Today she sharing one of her best recipes with you — how to make herb broth. I have tried it and am absolutely in love because it is very yummy! Laughing Crow and Company is Chris’s wonderful website and blog which features her family flower farm. She…
  • Garden With Drought Tolerant Creeping Sedum Stonecrop

    Shawna Coronado
    15 Jun 2015 | 4:36 am
    There’s a little garden room at the Chicago Botanic Garden that is regularly rotated with breathtaking plants that form amazing garden designs. Above you see a photo of the outdoor garden room filled with a mix of raspberry angelonia, lemon coral creeping sedum, and agave that blew my mind a few years ago. I used it as the primary example of creative design utilizing groundcover in the Illinois Getting Started Garden Guide. Using creeping sedum, or stonecrop, in your garden means less watering and more success in hot, dry, neglected garden sites.  Below is an excerpt from my book which…
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    Cold Climate Gardening

  • Hobblebush, A Native Shrub That’s Easy To Love: Wildflower Wednesday

    Kathy Purdy
    27 Jun 2015 | 7:03 pm
    At first glance, I thought it was a hydrangea. But I don’t know of any hydrangea that blooms with the trilliums. And the large, exquisitely puckered leaves were unlike any hydrangea leaf I’d ever seen. Turns out it was a viburnum–Viburnum lantanoides–to be precise. This native shrub likes it cool and moist–perfect for northern climates. […]
  • Summer Is Here: Garden Bloggers Bloom Day June 2015

    Kathy Purdy
    15 Jun 2015 | 11:08 am
    We know it’s summer when the frost-tender mosaic bird bath (pictured above) takes its rightful place in the front garden. That move from winter storage was delayed because I was attending the Garden Bloggers’ Fling in Toronto. (There’s a good story about the bird bath here.) All the usual suspects are blooming, so I’ll just […]
  • More Than One Kind of Forget-Me-Not: Wildflower Wednesday

    Kathy Purdy
    29 May 2015 | 1:51 pm
    I have grown forget-me-nots for many years. I even got them to naturalize a bit in the secret garden at our old house. At our new house, I noticed some forget-me-nots intermixed with hostas growing alongside the garage. The hostas loved it there in spring but looked pretty sad in summer’s heat, so I dug […]
  • Roadside Yellow Daffodils Brighten My Day

    Kathy Purdy
    10 May 2015 | 7:59 pm
    We’ve been suffering from meteorological whiplash. We had snow on April 23 and a low of 22 (-5C) on April 25 . Thirteen days later it got up to 88F and we’ve been sweltering ever since. The Roadside Yellow daffodils that I planted last fall have been delivering their sunshine almost as soon as the […]
  • A Dream Come True: My New Weather Station

    Kathy Purdy
    23 Apr 2015 | 8:47 pm
    Ever since I realized that the National Weather Service at our local airport under-reported both the lows and the highs at our first house, ever since I discovered we were a lot more likely to have frost than our region at large, I’ve wanted to track the weather in my yard, the uber-local weather. For […]
 
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    A Way To Garden

  • meet the moths: free moth-night walk july 23

    margaret
    28 Jun 2015 | 5:17 am
    I’M MAD FOR MOTHS, and hope to convince you to be, too. Want to come mothing by night, with a [read more…] The post meet the moths: free moth-night walk july 23 appeared first on A Way To Garden.
  • cultivating ‘good garden bugs,’ with dr. mary gardiner

    margaret
    27 Jun 2015 | 6:34 am
    HOW CAN YOU KILL this “bad” bug or that one? Well, here’s a thought that does not involve buying some [read more…] The post cultivating ‘good garden bugs,’ with dr. mary gardiner appeared first on A Way To Garden.
  • adventures with my battery lawn mower

    margaret
    23 Jun 2015 | 4:57 am
    I HAVEN’T PULLED a starter cord all season, for which my tricky right shoulder thanks me. I haven’t needed oil [read more…] The post adventures with my battery lawn mower appeared first on A Way To Garden.
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    The Occasional Gardener

  • Blooming Stress

    8 Jun 2015 | 8:38 am
    "Your cactus is flowering, it must be under stress" a friend said. I looked up at the tall blue green column and holy moly there were about 20 buds on it. There were a couple of buds on the other column last week but I was dissapointed not to have seen it become a flower. Maybe it blooms at night, it suddenly registered, and there it was a huge white bloom when I rushed outside to check.Do cacti flower under stress? Its certainly a stressful situation, hot dry sunny slope and the plant has become huge and quite crowded, I recently cut out a few of the less attractive parts. The other plant…
  • Room to Grow

    27 Apr 2015 | 8:02 am
    The arbor in the tropical potager is now fully covered with the Passiflora Coccinea. What a great job its doing of that. Very nice even cover over the bamboo trellis  trailing over the edge with a string of red flowers. I was recently offered a rattan coffee table that made me rethink things and bring the table over from the verandah, which I don't know why I didn't do earlier, its slatted and matches the slatted bench I already have here. Then I found a bamboo gate that concertinas, allowing me to gate off entry into this area, see left pic, from my dogs who love to dig in the beds…
  • Green Flowers

    28 Feb 2015 | 9:37 am
    I don't often see green flowered orchids at the farmers market but I did today and two spectacular ones at that. Dendrobium Callophyllum on the right is a native of Java, Lesser Sunda Islands and the Moluccas. Hallelujah it likes  sun and I have just the spot for it. I will be moving it out of its pot (growing on charcoal) to attach to a branch to hang on the Dark Verandah. Most of the epiphytes I have, similarly set up are clustered around the shady bits so its great to have this filling one of the sunnier gaps. And fill nicely it will as it has 5 or 6 fairly lanky arched leaf…
  • False Rue

    24 Feb 2015 | 4:39 am
    As I often complain, I'm in ownership of a quite a few plants that remain unidentified as that's how plants are sold here- without any kind of label. Occasionally the seller might be knowledgeable enough to identify the plant- sometimes it even helps just to know the local name. Otherwise its a google search that might take a while to track down. Let me just say though, it is astonishing what google can do with a few keywords. I now also have about three textbooks written by local authors and make it a morning habit to flip through them, cup of coffee in hand. This is the other method that…
  • Lightning Orchids

    30 Jan 2015 | 1:03 am
    My dad called these Lightning Orchids, which I've discovered is not correct, the plant is Dendrobium Crumanatum and the common name for them is Pigeon Orchids. He said that they flowered after a lightning storm and he's not completely wrong about that. This orchid forms buds after there is a temperature drop, usually due to a thunderstorm. Nine days later long necklaces of white flowers with a yellow throat bloom gregariously with members of this species in its vicinity. The blooms are fragrant, particularly in the morning and last only a day.This ephemeral quality perfectly suits where these…
 
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    May Dreams Gardens

  • I will when Mother Nature says I can

    Carol
    29 Jun 2015 | 4:00 am
    When will I next be able to head out to the garden to weed or perhaps mow and trim the lawn? When Mother Nature says I can. And right now Mother Nature is speaking the language of rain. When it is flat-out raining, she is saying "No, do not go out to the garden." When it rains in the morning or overnight, that's her way of saying, "You can garden this evening, but please put on a good
  • Our heroine vanquishes the giant thistle, and other tales of weeding

    Carol
    26 Jun 2015 | 7:16 pm
    Thistle growing up thru a rose I quite admired the audacity of the gigantic thistle which had the good fortune to germinate at the base of one the few roses in my garden and grow tall enough to rise above its thorn-covered stems. A thorn among thorns. As I looked at the thistle, I wondered how I would get back to there to pull it out. Should I get as close as possible to the rose and then
  • 'Fantastico F1' Cherry Tomatoes

    Carol
    23 Jun 2015 | 7:53 pm
    'Fantistico F1' Cherry Tomatoes I do believe my grandmother's antique salt cellars are the perfect little dishes to display some of the first cherry tomatoes of the season. This display of cherry tomatoes lasted as long as it took to take the picture. Then I ate the tomatoes and put the salt cellars back in the cabinet. They were quite good and ripened earlier than the other cherry tomato
  • Garden Fairies Discuss How Weed Situation is Becoming Dire

    Carol
    21 Jun 2015 | 6:34 pm
    Garden fairies here. We are garden fairies and we like to think we've been missed on this blog and that every day when people come here and see we haven't posted, they are disappointed. But now we are here, and we are posting, and it is the summer solstice and we have so much to tell we don't even know where to begin. Well, we mostly will begin by saying that our work which consists
  • Why I still need more plants in my garden

    Carol
    18 Jun 2015 | 5:47 pm
    Borage - a new plant in my garden this season I was browsing through some plants for sale at a nearby nursery, contemplating, once again, which plants I should buy for my garden. A thought flashed through my mind. "The owners of this nursery know me. I've been coming here for years. I've purchased a lot of plants from them.  I'm getting ready to buy more plants from them.  They might be
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    Backyard Gardening Blog

  • Last Trip to the Tree Store

    Administrator
    26 Jun 2015 | 1:36 pm
    For Father’s Day I took the family to the tree store here, probably for the last time, since we’re moving next month. In Chattanooga, where we are moving, I’m sure there are nurseries with a large variety of stock, but I haven’t found them yet, and I didn’t want to risk moving there and not […]
  • How to Divide Ornamental Grass

    Administrator
    6 Jun 2015 | 8:35 am
    Step 43 of my preparation to move to another state was digging and dividing my ornamental grass today. But even if I weren’t moving it was past time to do this. Miscanthus, the sort of grass I have (miscanthus sinesis ‘Morning Light’) also called maiden grass, grows from a rhizome and as it gets older […]
  • Use Impatiens to Brighten up Shady Spots

    Administrator
    31 May 2015 | 4:53 pm
    I just did a search on my blog for impatiens, I found 0 results, I can’t believe I’ve never mentioned this plant in a post before. It is my firm belief that every ornamental gardener (and even vegetable gardeners – to attract pollinators) should plant both perennials and annuals. I love perennials because you plant […]
  • How to Divide Daylilies and Other Perennials

    Administrator
    21 May 2015 | 2:57 pm
    My move gets ever closer, less than 2 months now and I say goodbye to the garden I’ve built over the last 12 years and… well… its traumatic. But one thing is for sure, I don’t want to have to buy a lot of these plants again. So I’ve been busy taking divisions and otherwise […]
  • Mantis Tiller Review: Making Quick Work of My Garden

    Administrator
    19 Apr 2015 | 12:44 pm
    So I’m sure we’ve all seen these commercials. The Mantis tiller, plowing through soil, I never bought into it. My only memory of using a tiller was when young, at my parents, a big tiller, twice as big as the mantis easy, and it’d have trouble breaking through the soil. Plus in the commercials it […]
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    Bloomingwriter: Gardening in Nova Scotia

  • The BEST season for gardeners

    Jodi DeLong
    12 Jun 2015 | 7:14 am
    Life is never boring in my world. It's suddenly nearly the middle of June, almost summer, and I haven't posted here at all of late. There are good reasons for this, none of them alarming--I'm simply so busy with work projects that I haven't had time to do the stuff that doesn't pay me. Plus it is the season for playing in the dirt, so when I'm finished my writing, photo and editing work for the day, I head for the garden; sometimes with camera in hand, of course, so I can catch delights like 'Francesca' primula in bloom!  Tomorrow I'm doing a talk at Louisiana Pacific's East River…
  • Those rare blue flowers

    Jodi DeLong
    1 Apr 2015 | 5:02 am
    For those of you wondering where I've gotten to...I'm here, and I'm fine, just really, really busy as we get ready for our 10th anniversary Saltscapes Expo. Lots to tell you about while we're also still waiting for the 87 feet of snow that fell in the past two months to melt, but for now, a blast from the past....We all know that in flowers, blue is the rarest colour. Which means some of us go koo koo for cocapuffs over it. Quite a few of us, actually. That number would include me, of course. From the glorious of the difficult, divaesque, but oh-so-beautiful blue poppy...To the stately cobalt…
  • End of year roundup--favourites and more

    Jodi DeLong
    28 Dec 2014 | 10:52 am
    Slightly belated Christmas greetings to all--we had not a drop of snow in Nova Scotia, and in fact had record breaking mild temperatures and torrential rains this year. It made travel easy, and we spent a very happy Christmas day with family. Since then I've been on an actual time-off from work, allowing myself a few days of just doing whatever I want, which has mostly been playing with photography, sorting through my image libraries, reading, and catching up with people I care about. We often have end-of-year retrospectives on many topics, including, of course, on gardening. I decided…
  • Gold foliage for brighter gardens

    Jodi DeLong
    15 Dec 2014 | 8:00 am
    Hello, fellow gardeners! Where have I been, you ask? Well, it's been a busy, busy few months, with lots of projects on the go. Now, with only 10 days til Christmas, the main deadlines are under control so I can do some catchup tasks, including updating my neglected blog. It's like that for gardeners, though, so often: during the main gardening months we're outside in our gardens, planting, weeding, harvesting, puttering, designing. Now that frost has come and things have stopped growing and we've gotten our bulbs planted (yes! I did! Before December, even!) we turn to the season of indoor…
  • Falling into autumn...

    Jodi DeLong
    22 Sep 2014 | 8:02 am
     Suddenly, it's September 22 and I haven't posted for a month. Why is that, you ask? Well, for sure I'm always busy and never bored, but there was a lot going on in August, some of it personal in support of a friend, and given that my friends have always been there for me when I need them, I pay it forward gladly. And the days are getting shorter, and suddenly, autumn is but hours away. (Top photo is of blue leadwort, Ceratostigma plumbaginoides, a terrific groundcover with gorgeous fall colour).Autumn is not without its beauty, to be sure--some would say that the coming month or…
 
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    Digging

  • Wildlife garden with an artful touch: Toronto Garden Bloggers Fling

    Pam/Digging
    30 Jun 2015 | 8:10 pm
    On our last day of the Toronto Garden Bloggers Fling in early June, we visited a private garden described as a wildlife garden. I didn’t end up taking photos of its wildlife-attracting features, however. Instead I was drawn to the artful touches found throughout, many of them composed of natural materials. Most prominent was a blue-painted dead tree, centered like sculpture in the back lawn. What an incredible focal point, don’t you think? I also admired this cross-section of a tree stump, set on edge to become a sculptural accent in a shady bed. And this egg-shaped stone, cradled…
  • Evergreen Brick Works community greenspace: Toronto Garden Bloggers Fling

    Pam/Digging
    30 Jun 2015 | 10:49 am
    For nearly 100 years, Don Valley Brick Works supplied Toronto with masonry bricks and helped the city rebuild and grow after a devastating fire. By 1984, however, the kilns were closed down, and the factory buildings languished. Urban explorers and partying teens found their way in, and graffiti soon covered the brick walls. The derelict factory might eventually have been torn down. Instead, Toronto brought it back to life in the form of a community environmental center that includes a farmer’s market, a small garden shop, a cafe, a bike shop, a children’s playground, a lake and…
  • Cabbagetown garden art and Hugh Garner Co-Op Green Roof: Toronto Garden Bloggers Fling

    Pam/Digging
    29 Jun 2015 | 8:04 am
    The teeny tiny gardens of Toronto’s Cabbagetown neighborhood of Victorian homes kicked off our final day of Toronto Garden Bloggers Fling in early June. Due to the tight quarters, pictures of artful vignettes were easier to take than overview photos, and I’m sharing my favorites here. Cabbagetown neighborhood gardens Mossy Buddha holding white stones Another Buddha tucked amid greenery Asian-style bamboo fountain in a “lake” of flat river rocks A metal heron strides through chartreuse grasses. Could he be hunting for koi? I loved this screen of painted wooden laths in…
  • Golden brocade garden of Marion Jarvie: Toronto Garden Bloggers Fling

    Pam/Digging
    28 Jun 2015 | 1:24 pm
    All that is gold does not glitter, especially in the Toronto, Ontario, garden of designer and speaker Marion Jarvie. Her home garden was our midday stop on the 2nd day of touring at Toronto Garden Bloggers Fling. High and bright, the sun flattened and shadowed my photos of her richly textured, foliage-focused, collector’s garden, which she ties together through the repetition of color, particularly gold and burgundy. I’m sure the garden simply glows in the mellower light of morning or late afternoon. But it was pretty amazing even at high noon. For 40 years Marion has been tending…
  • Simple lines, big impact in Forest Hill contemporary garden: Toronto Garden Bloggers Fling

    Pam/Digging
    26 Jun 2015 | 5:30 pm
    One of my favorite gardens on the recent Toronto Garden Bloggers Fling was a contemporary garden of massed grasses and alliums in the upscale Forest Hill neighborhood. Nearly all of the gardening space is located in front of the house (the back and side gardens are very narrow). The inner garden, pictured here, is separated from the street with layers of screening, including a steel-rod fence, a naturalistically planted outer garden, and this horizontal board fence. Pennsylvania sedge (Carex pensylvanica), outlined by a stone path, makes an emerald throw rug in the enclosed courtyard. In the…
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    Blithewold Blogs

  • Transition into summer

    Kristin Green
    26 Jun 2015 | 7:25 am
    The to-plant list is getting shorter and we are beginning to transition into a summer-full of deadheading/staking/weeding/enjoying. Right on schedule too: we always aim to be *done by July 4th. (*No garden is ever done.) This week we got the last of the plants out of the greenhouse, tucked in a few final packs of seedlings here and […]
  • The longest days

    Kristin Green
    19 Jun 2015 | 6:47 am
    June is full to bursting. Every plant that isn’t already blooming to beat the band is growing gangbusters (weeds included), and to say there’s a lot to do would be the understatement of the season.The long days leading up to the longest have been so busy that I have been feeling ready for a weekend as early as Tuesday. –Monday afternoon, even. Since […]
  • Plant by plant

    Kristin Green
    8 Jun 2015 | 5:38 am
    Gardening is purported to be one of the best stress relievers — and it is! — but the weeks we spend planting the Blithewold gardens always make me feel a little panicky; my blood pressure rises as the to-do list lengthens. We have so many plants to get in the ground, so many more to get […]
  • June Exhibit in the Billiard Room

    Margaret Whitehead
    4 Jun 2015 | 12:48 pm
    This month the changing exhibit in Blithewold’s Billiard Room focuses on silver commemorative spoons. Bessie and Marjorie both purchased silver spoons on their travels around the United States and Europe, resulting in an impressive collection of more than 100 pieces. The small selection in this exhibit includes souvenir spoons from Europe, some of them highly […]
  • Blithewald by the Sea

    Margaret Whitehead
    4 Jun 2015 | 12:28 pm
    Blithewald – a gracious 45-room mansion by the sea, surrounded by extensive tree plantings and formal gardens, including a sunken European-style garden with a marble shell fountain. Does this description sound familiar?  The slight difference in spelling notwithstanding, this is not our Blithewold, but the house on the New Jersey Shore that Augustus and Bessie […]
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    Ellis Hollow

  • Scape season

    Craig
    30 Jun 2015 | 5:49 pm
    More fiddling from last weekend...
  • Heucheras in the rain

    Craig
    28 Jun 2015 | 3:27 pm
    Rainy weekend left time for indoor pursuits.
  • R.I.P. Don Featherstone …

    Craig
    23 Jun 2015 | 2:48 pm
    ... Inventor of the Pink Flamingo lawn ornament. I've got a pair that stay out year-round, complementing my tropicals in summer and warming my heart during the winter. (They do look chilly. But, hey. They're plastic.) I posted back in 2007 about the move of Pink Flamingo manufacturing from Massachusetts to Upstate New York. I don't know the state of Pink Flamingo manufacturing today. But I suspect that mine just doubled in value and maybe I should enjoy them less and take better care of them. Not. Nice tribute at NPR. Including story that he had to use National Geographic photo to model his…
  • Scans are back

    Craig
    21 Jun 2015 | 5:11 pm
    Finally got my hands on some vintage scanners that do a decent job, for what I'm shooting for in scans. But I have to admit, I'm a little rusty in the scanning and photoshopping. Am looking forward to polishing my efforts. Meantime, I did get one of my scans published full page in the print edition of the Dutch magazine Eigen Huis & Interieur.
  • Timelapse video: Titan arum bloom at Cornell last week

    Craig
    21 Jun 2015 | 2:01 pm
    We had a second titan arum bloom at Cornell last week. Got timelapse video edited processed and posted today: View more timelapse videos or learn more about 'Stinky Science' on our YouTube channel, or visit the Cornell Titan Arum blog.
 
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    Flatbush Gardener

  • Pyrrhalta viburni, viburnum leaf beetle (VLB)

    Flatbush Gardener
    1 Jul 2015 | 5:24 am
    Pyrrhalta viburni, the viburnum leaf beetle, or VLB for short, is native to Europe. It was first discovered in North America barely two decades ago, in Maine in 1994. Both larvae and adults eat leaves. Our native Viburnum species are extremely... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • What I'm About

    Flatbush Gardener
    22 Jun 2015 | 6:40 pm
    Notice anything different about me? Until a few minutes ago, the by-line at the header of this blog read: Adventures in Neo-Victorian, Wild, Shade, Organic and Native Plant Gardening, Garden Design, and Garden Restoration.It now reads: Urban... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Native Plant Acquisitions: LINPI 2015 Plant Sale

    Flatbush Gardener
    14 Jun 2015 | 3:30 pm
    Saturday, June 13 was the last open day in 2015 for the Long Island Native Plant Initiative (LINPI) Plant Sale. I picked up another 13 species to add to my list, which has already grown this Spring to over 200 species of plants native to eastern... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Ripley, 2000-2015

    Flatbush Gardener
    21 May 2015 | 12:20 am
    Our Ripley died with us around 1:30 this morning. It's still the middle of the night. We had an 8am appointment with the vet for an ultrasound exam to find out what was going on. Instead, I'll be taking his body in for cremation. I need to try to... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Native New Yorkers: My Garden's NYC-Native Plant Checklist

    Flatbush Gardener
    14 May 2015 | 7:56 am
    This is a checklist of just the plant species native to New York City I'm growing in my garden. I'm posting this for the benefit of anyone attending the NYC Wildflower Week tour of my garden, Friday, May 15, from 1-3pm. It may also be of... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
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    A Leafy Indulgence

  • June 2015 Bloom Day

    Swimray
    15 Jun 2015 | 4:52 am
    Lots of things are popping out of the gardens - 'Never Looked So Good' should be the theme applied to many garden inhabitants this month. Onion and green beans comprise the bounty to date, and go well together in a three bean salad. Fresh basil and oregano work wonders on a grilled pizza. More hot weather is on the way, though.The datura is off to a great start and has never looked so large this early. This is the second time I have grown this moonflower, and hope it does better than the first which was in a more shady spot.'Night of Passion' is what I think this daylily is called, after…
  • Skyscrapers of Poppies

    Swimray
    7 Jun 2015 | 5:54 am
    The purple poppy towers are blooming. Papaver somniferum have transformed the front garden, with pop-up poppy skyscrapers sprouting randomly: tall, slender, and crowded together.These are opium poppies, single flowering in a strong magenta. They are not really tall, but their habit of springing up all over and their slender appearance remind me of a skyscraper skyline. They are also not really good for making opium or heroin, since these do not produce the large seed pods that are needed. There are cultivars bred for that purpose.Some internet sources identified something like these as…
  • Green-Eyed Monsters

    Swimray
    1 Jun 2015 | 5:59 am
    Their eyes do not stay green. After a few weeks, they begin turning brown and go completely black - just like vampires in horror films. They do not, however, glow red, at least not yet.Green-eyed susans are what I call them in the presence of my neighbors, allowing them to understand this plant as a form of black-eyes susans. Rudbeckia Hirti - Irish Eyes concluded my second attempt at growing from seed, and a successful lesson in persistence. In the first attempt, all seeds were sown directly in the ground, some germinated, and all passed on for no apparent reason. (Apparent to me.)I thought…
  • Three Year Wait Is Over

    Swimray
    19 May 2015 | 7:12 pm
    The 2012 plant swap peony has finally bloomed today. It was the only peony (Paeonia lactiflora), and I got it. Its owner did not remember its color or variety.In its third year now, the thing sent out several stalks this spring, and there was hope in the air. One of the stalks had three buds, and the first opened to a deep magenta, double-ruffled flower. There is a nice fragrance. We had a violent rain downpour last night, and it survived without incident.It was planted in the side garden bed, the newest and therefore the one with the poorest soil. I placed a wire support disc as it grew,…
  • May 2015 Bloom Day

    Swimray
    15 May 2015 | 5:08 am
    Garden Bloggers' Bloom DayWhat's blooming in the garden on the 15th of the monthProjects (including working in the garden,) have been taking time away from blogging this spring.Nothing much on this bloom day, my 16th since blogging. Bearded iris galore, but you've seen them last year. May is a dead time in my garden before most impressive perennials get going and after the spring bulbs. So I tried for some smaller closeups, but need to get a new camera - this pocket Cannon Elph I used for all my photos over the past 12 years is beginning to show age with less and less clarity.Kalmia latifolia…
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    A Leafy Indulgence

  • June 2015 Bloom Day

    Swimray
    15 Jun 2015 | 4:52 am
    Lots of things are popping out of the gardens - 'Never Looked So Good' should be the theme applied to many garden inhabitants this month. Onion and green beans comprise the bounty to date, and go well together in a three bean salad. Fresh basil and oregano work wonders on a grilled pizza. More hot weather is on the way, though.The datura is off to a great start and has never looked so large this early. This is the second time I have grown this moonflower, and hope it does better than the first which was in a more shady spot.'Night of Passion' is what I think this daylily is called, after…
  • Skyscrapers of Poppies

    Swimray
    7 Jun 2015 | 5:54 am
    The purple poppy towers are blooming. Papaver somniferum have transformed the front garden, with pop-up poppy skyscrapers sprouting randomly: tall, slender, and crowded together.These are opium poppies, single flowering in a strong magenta. They are not really tall, but their habit of springing up all over and their slender appearance remind me of a skyscraper skyline. They are also not really good for making opium or heroin, since these do not produce the large seed pods that are needed. There are cultivars bred for that purpose.Some internet sources identified something like these as…
  • Green-Eyed Monsters

    Swimray
    1 Jun 2015 | 5:59 am
    Their eyes do not stay green. After a few weeks, they begin turning brown and go completely black - just like vampires in horror films. They do not, however, glow red, at least not yet.Green-eyed susans are what I call them in the presence of my neighbors, allowing them to understand this plant as a form of black-eyes susans. Rudbeckia Hirti - Irish Eyes concluded my second attempt at growing from seed, and a successful lesson in persistence. In the first attempt, all seeds were sown directly in the ground, some germinated, and all passed on for no apparent reason. (Apparent to me.)I thought…
  • Three Year Wait Is Over

    Swimray
    19 May 2015 | 7:12 pm
    The 2012 plant swap peony has finally bloomed today. It was the only peony (Paeonia lactiflora), and I got it. Its owner did not remember its color or variety.In its third year now, the thing sent out several stalks this spring, and there was hope in the air. One of the stalks had three buds, and the first opened to a deep magenta, double-ruffled flower. There is a nice fragrance. We had a violent rain downpour last night, and it survived without incident.It was planted in the side garden bed, the newest and therefore the one with the poorest soil. I placed a wire support disc as it grew,…
  • May 2015 Bloom Day

    Swimray
    15 May 2015 | 5:08 am
    Garden Bloggers' Bloom DayWhat's blooming in the garden on the 15th of the monthProjects (including working in the garden,) have been taking time away from blogging this spring.Nothing much on this bloom day, my 16th since blogging. Bearded iris galore, but you've seen them last year. May is a dead time in my garden before most impressive perennials get going and after the spring bulbs. So I tried for some smaller closeups, but need to get a new camera - this pocket Cannon Elph I used for all my photos over the past 12 years is beginning to show age with less and less clarity.Kalmia latifolia…
 
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    Garden Rant

  • Gardener’s Guide to the National Mall by Susan Harris

    Susan Harris
    30 Jun 2015 | 8:08 am
    Here’s a blog post I wrote for two general-interest blogs, in which I review a fabulous new way to see the sights around the National Mall and illustrate with images of the gardens and landscape memorials along the way. It’s a garden tour with tips from a local gardenblogger’s perspective. As digital content, a story like this – that any gardenblogger could easily put together – is valuable not just to visitors but to the gardens, the memorials, the bus system, and the entire business sector that benefits from tourism. At least here in D.C., that sector is…
  • Colors of equality by Elizabeth Licata

    Elizabeth Licata
    29 Jun 2015 | 5:00 am
    Those lanterns weren’t nearly gay enough. In celebration of Friday’s SCOTUS marriage equality decision, and in solidarity with all of my friends and colleagues who have already availed themselves of this freedom or who are now able to, here is some rainbow/garden imagery I found on Shutterstock. Like Susan, I am not at all sure what a “relentlessly gay” yard is supposed to look like; like our commenters, I think that the “hate note” may have been a hoax; and, finally, like many straight gardeners everywhere, I find myself in awe of the garden magic many of my LGBT friends are able…
  • Amy Stewart on the Road with her First Novel! by Garden Rant

    Garden Rant
    27 Jun 2015 | 10:17 am
    GardenRant’s smart and funny co-founder Amy Stewart is sorely missed here, but she’s gone on to bigger things – novels! Her first, “Girl Waits with Gun,” will be out this September, so Amy’s hitting the road. Come on out!  One fellow Ranter will definitely be there for the DC event on September 12. You’ll be reading more about “Girt Waits with Gun” right here on GardenRant – because we’re shamelessly proud of Amy, and love a good novel. Amy Stewart on the Road with her First Novel! originally appeared on Garden Rant on June…
  • Don’t go see “A Little Chaos” for the gardens by Susan Harris

    Susan Harris
    26 Jun 2015 | 4:54 am
    A movie about the gardens of Versailles starring Kate Winslet opens today! Imagine my excitement when one of the many publicists who contacted me about it invited me to a free screening. It’s titled A Little Chaos and here’s the synopsis: “A romantic drama following Sabine, a talented landscape designer, who is building a garden at Versailles for King Louis XIV. Sabine struggles with class barriers as she becomes romantically entangled with the court’s renowned landscape artist.”  (Um, isn’t a “landscape artist” someone who paints them?) I was…
  • Tales From the Droughtside or THE DROUGHTPOCALYPSE!!! by Ivette Soler

    Ivette Soler
    24 Jun 2015 | 9:36 am
    This is what the drought looks like. This yard has been like this since last October. It is pretty bad out here, folks. People seem to be using the drought as an excuse to GIVE UP. Clothed in the the dry, tattered, unwashed rags of self-righteousness (they only run their washing machines once a month), they zealously save water, and they let their yards go fallow. They preside over parched, dry earth. They walk around the neighborhood, chastising those who hand water their trees and tomato plants. They can hear a sprinkler turn one one minute past the morning irrigation cut-off time, and they…
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    Transatlantic Gardener

  • The Welsh poppy gets a change of name

    Graham Rice
    14 Jun 2015 | 1:00 am
    As I mentioned here recently, there’s a plan to change the classic botanical name of the Welsh poppy, Meconopsis cambrica. Chris Grey-Wilson, the world’s leading expert on Meconopsis, first proposed the idea of restricting the name Meconopsis to the Himalayan poppies in the botanical journal Taxon in 2012. He repeats the suggestion in his stunning new monograph on Meconopsis, which was published recently, and proposes a new botanical name for the Welsh poppy. Actually, what he says, basically, is this: if you apply all the legitimate and agreed botanical rules, the Welsh poppy is in fact…
  • Big Flower in Arkansas

    Graham Rice
    7 Jun 2015 | 1:00 am
    Guest blog by judywhite I was in Bentonville, Arkansas recently, my first time in that state, and the first time in the town where Walmart got its start. It today dominates the landscape, culture and mindset. The drama-comedy film I wrote, "Lies I Told My Little Sister," had been chosen an Official Selection of Geena Davis' inaugural film festival, Bentonville Film Festival (BFF)  and I was invited for the events. What I did not expect – until I read up on Bentonville before going – was that a world-class museum opened there on 11/11/11. Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art was…
  • Powerhouse Plant wins Chelsea Plant Of The Year award

    Graham Rice
    31 May 2015 | 1:51 am
    A couple of years ago I published a book called Powerhouse Plants. It was my choice of individual plants that have two, three or even four different features that bring colour and interest to our gardens at different seasons of the year. Now, a Powerhouse Plant has won the sixth Chelsea Plant of The Year award. Announced recently at the Chelsea Flower Show, Viburnum plicatum f. tomentosum Kilimanjaro Sunrise (‘Jww5’) (above, click to enlarge) won this year’s award, its four seasons of interest marking it out from the other entries. The white lacecap spring flowers, developing pink tints…
  • New plants on the Royal Horticultural Society website

    Graham Rice
    10 May 2015 | 1:00 am
    As we approach the mass launch of new varieties at this year's Chelsea Flower Show, I just thought you might like to see the new plants I've been writing up over the last few months on my New Plants blog on the Royal Horticultural Society website. Lots of goodies... And news of the newcomers at Chelsea will be here soon. 'Black Truffle': a superb new dark-leaved perennial lobelia Heavenly (more or less) hardy begonias A new star Is born: Clematis Astra Nova New blue-and-white flowered brunnera New double-flowered Christmas rose (left) The first golden-leaved pyracantha Nandina Blush Pink: new…
  • A Tale of Two Corydalis

    Graham Rice
    3 May 2015 | 4:00 am
    This is a tale of two corydalis. One spreads steadily, but very slowly, the other is worrying the invasive plants people. Corydalis solida ‘Blushing Girl’ (above) is a spring ephemeral for woodland conditions, at its peak today. It comes and goes relatively quickly in spring, then its little tubers sit and wait to do it all again the following year. The soft pink of its crowded flower heads is lovely, but it spreads only slowly. Corydalis solida has a wide European distribution and this form originates from the great Latvian plantsman Janis Ruskans. It was available in the US from the…
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    WashingtonGardener

  • Fenton Friday: Weedy Warning

    WashingtonGardener
    26 Jun 2015 | 4:55 pm
    So this week I got the dreaded the inspection warning that I needed to weed my plot. No big surprise. Almost half of the other plots received the same warning. I knew it was coming -- two weeks ago, my plot was weed-free and inspection-ready. But, for the same reasons the inspection were delayed, so has my weeding been put off since then -- those reasons are two weeks of brutal heat interrupted by several monsoon-like rainstorms -- the result of which is hip-high garden growth and monster weeds. I'll try to hack it back into submission over the weekend, but more rains are forecast, so we…
  • Win Vintage-style Poster Art in Washington Gardener Magazine Reader Contest

    WashingtonGardener
    26 Jun 2015 | 10:14 am
    For our June 2015 Washington Gardener Magazine Reader Contest, Washington Gardener is giving away 3 limited-editon poster prints from our recent DC Plant Swap (prize value: $10 each).   Ben Schifman of the Wangari Gardens in Washington, DC, designed this vintage-feel poster to commemorate and promote our 8th annual plant swap. The poster is 11x17 and is numbered on the back. It is suitable for framing and sure to become a collector’s piece.   To enter to win one of the three remaining DC Plant Swap Posters, send an email to WashingtonGardener@rcn.com by 5:00pm on…
  • ADVERTISER OF THE WEEK: Behnke Nurseries

    WashingtonGardener
    25 Jun 2015 | 12:47 pm
    Behnke Nurseries today reflects the same old-fashioned principles set by our founders. We offer the widest practical selection of top quality plants, with knowledgeable staff to assist in plant choices and educate in plant care.Behnke Nurseries now enjoys nationwide recognition as Washington’s premiere plant and garden center. Here you will find all kinds of great articles and tips on a wide variety of plants and products from our staff of seasoned horticulturists. See: http://behnkes.com/website/ADVERTISER OF THE WEEK Details:Every Thursday on the Washington Gardener Magazine Facebook…
  • Swapping Plants and Tips with DC-area Gardeners

    WashingtonGardener
    24 Jun 2015 | 2:40 pm
    Guest Blog by Daven Desai The 8th annual DC Plant Swap byWashington Gardener Magazine took place on Saturday, June 13th at the US National Arboretum in DC. Dozens of folks drove in from Virginia, across the District, and Eastern Maryland to take part in the plant swap.       Every year, people bring out their own plants, from edibles to perennials, these gardening enthusiasts love exchanging what they have grown for something entirely different.  When Kathy Jentz, editor-in-chief of Washington Gardener Magazine Magazine blew her whistle, folks eagerly rushed…
  • Fenton Friday: Okra Babies

    WashingtonGardener
    19 Jun 2015 | 5:08 pm
    Another Fenton Friday post and another seedling picture for you all. This is 1 of 3 baby Okra that I planted today at my community garden plot. They were left at the cistern by another generous gardener, whom I'm assuming started one too many plants.They are just wee little things now, but soon enough they will be the tallest things in my plot. Knowing that, I planted them up at the front in the bare spots between a few older strawberry plants. That way they will not shade anything actively growing in my plot, nor in my neighbors (I hope).The strawberries have abruptly stopped producing - boo…
 
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    A Tidewater Gardener

  • Biking at the Beach in Three Parts

    Les
    27 Jun 2015 | 7:39 am
         One of my favorite weekend activities is to take my bike to nearby Virginia Beach. I usually follow the same route, more or less, and the trip can be anywhere from 15-20 miles, but it is broken into three very distinct parts. The first leg of my journey begins appropriately enough at First Landing State Park. This is Virginia's oldest state park, and probably due to its beachfront campsites,
  • Bloom Day - Garden, Gardener, and Blogger are Still Here

    Les
    15 Jun 2015 | 2:00 am
         I've been a bad blogger. I missed May's Bloom Day, it's been more than a month since my last post, and there are over 500 new posts from other bloggers waiting for me to read at Feedly. The problem is that my actual life is interfering with my virtual life. It's still spring, and I come home from work drained (in a good way), both mentally and physically and want nothing more than to sit and
  • Briefly Back in Retail

    Les
    11 May 2015 | 5:14 pm
         My work colleagues and I have lately been consumed with preparing for and running this past weekend's annual plant sale at the Norfolk Botanical Gardens. We began meeting shortly after last year's sale to decide which plants to carry. Some of our offerings came from cuttings or divisions taken from the garden's collections, while others we bring in as plugs or as bare-root plants to grow on.
  • A Weekend in Williamsbug

    Les
    19 Apr 2015 | 2:42 pm
         I spent last weekend at the Williamsburg Garden Symposium. I have always wanted to attend this event, but its timing and my money never aligned. However, I was invited to speak at this year's event, and I agreed before self-doubt had a chance to step in and sway me otherwise. While I am not adverse to public speaking, and in fact do it frequently, this talk was my highest profiled gig to
  • Bloom Day - Last Minute Filing

    Les
    15 Apr 2015 | 5:39 pm
         When I got home from work today I took my usual stroll around the garden to see what might have opened or may have leafed out today. In the middle of my inspection I had an aha moment when it dawned on me that today was not only tax day, but was also Bloom Day. I didn't need to worry about the taxes, so I went inside to get my camera. (If you hover over the photos, the plant's name should
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    clay and limestone

  • Wildflower Wednesday: Embrace imperfection in your garden!

    Gail
    23 Jun 2015 | 11:00 pm
    That's what I've done!When you commit to a pesticide free garden you have to be prepared for chewed on petals and foliage.Are you ready to embrace imperfection?You won't be sorry when you do.  Bees, butterflies, skippers, beetles and hoverflies will move into your garden. It will be alive with critters. Your garden will not be magazine perfect, but, pollinators don't care if your flower petals are chewed on.  They need flowers bursting with pollen and nectar. Your garden will be teeming with life. Spiders will build webs; the beneficial insects will keep aphids in check; pollinators…
  • Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day-June 2015

    Gail
    16 Jun 2015 | 3:02 pm
    Garden Bloggers Bloom Day with a nod to our pollinator friends for Pollinator Week!Butterflyweed/Asclepias tuberosaConsolida ambiguaHypericum frondosumHydrangea arborescens 'Ryan Gainey'Verbena bonariensisMagnolia grandiflora 'Little Gem'Just a few of the beauties in my garden that are beloved of the pollinators. Thank you for stopping by!xoxogailInspired by the words of Elizabeth Lawrence, “We can have flowers nearly every month of the year,” Carol of May Dreams Gardens started Garden Bloggers Bloom Day. On the 15th of every month, garden bloggers from all over the blogosphere celebrate…
  • Pollinator Week: Xylocopa virginica

    Gail
    15 Jun 2015 | 5:53 am
     Pollinator Week  has been proclaimed throughout the land! Here to help us celebrate is one of my favorite pollinators, the Eastern carpenter bee. Five interesting facts about this gentle giant.1. These big beautiful, noisy bees are excellent pollinators. In fact, they are being studied across the globe for pollinating green house crops like passionflower, blueberries, greenhouse tomatoes and greenhouse melons.2. They are generalist foragers and are known to pollinate garden crops and garden plants. Like eggplant (Solanum melongena), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), passion fruit…
  • Hoverfly Magic

    Gail
    3 Jun 2015 | 4:26 am
    You might have seen hoverflies in your garden hovering and darting about while feeding at flower blossoms. Hoverflies have a unique ability to hover, suspended in midair like miniature helicopters! They can also fly back wards.  Toxomerus geminatuson Phytolacca americana*These remarkable little critters have evolved to mimic the characteristics of bees and wasps to keep birds and other prey from eating them. Humans see the yellow and black stripes and stay away, too. However, they are all stripes and no sting! It's safe to take a closer look at these incredible creatures. Once you get…
  • Wildflower Wednesday: Goat's Rue, A Fabulous Fabaceae

    Gail
    27 May 2015 | 3:00 am
    Isn't this a cool flower! It's Tephrosia virginiana also known as Goat's Rue and it's our Wildflower Wednesday star of the month. It's blooming in my garden and the fuchsia pink, creamy white and yellow blooms that resemble sweet peas are striking against the silvery stems and leaves. hairy stems and buds I am delighted and surprised that it is blooming in my garden. It is said to prefer sandy, loamy, acidic soil and as you all know that is no where near a good description of the soil at Clay and Limestone! It's been  growing nicely for the last two years on the rocky edge of the Susan's…
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    Dirt Therapy

  • Aralia cordata "Sun King"

    Phillip Oliver
    15 Jun 2015 | 1:11 pm
    Text and photos by Phillip Oliver, Dirt Therapy
  • Hydrangeas

    Phillip Oliver
    3 Jun 2015 | 11:17 am
    Oakleaf (unidentified cultivar)"Annabelle"Oakleaf (unidentified cultivar)"Quickfire""Invincibelle Spirit""Snowflake""Woodlander"Text and photos by Phillip Oliver, Dirt Therapy
  • Rosy close-ups

    Phillip Oliver
    22 May 2015 | 1:53 pm
    "Sweet Chariot""Petite Pink Scotch""Lyric""Daydream""Buff Beauty" Text and photos by Phillip Oliver, Dirt Therapy
  • May roses

    Phillip Oliver
    11 May 2015 | 11:20 am
    "Rambling Rector" on pergola"Sea Foam" and "Blaze" roses along with honeysuckle "American Beauty""Gartendirektor Otto Linne" (hedge) and "Tausendschon" on back of fence. "Veilchenblau" "Veilchenblau"Text and photos by Phillip Oliver, Dirt Therapy
  • April Beauties

    Phillip Oliver
    11 Apr 2015 | 6:07 pm
    Azalea "Coral Bells"A florist azalea that I received when my father died 14 years ago.Unknown azaleaChinese SnowballViburnum macrocephalum)Deutzia gracilisEpimedium rubrumSolomon's Seal, Jacob's Ladder, EpimediumLeatherleaf Viburnum (Viburnum rhytidophyllum)Persicaria microcephala Red DragonSpanish Bluebells (Hyacinthoides) Bridal Wreath Spiraea (Spiraea prunifolia) White Chinese Wisteria (Wisteria sinensis 'Alba') White Chinese Wisteria (Wisteria sinensis 'Alba') Text and photos by Phillip Oliver, Dirt Therapy
 
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    Natural Gardening

  • Mt. Mitchell view

    Lisa
    29 Jun 2015 | 6:17 pm
    The air was quite clear today, post cool front pushing the heat from the Southern Appalachians for a while.Here were two views from Mt. Mitchell today.Click to see the larger images!Posted with Blogsy
  • Trees in sunset light

    Lisa Wagner
    28 Jun 2015 | 5:43 pm
    The late evening light illuminated the ravine forest in sunset.  Neither of my cameras (iPhone 6 or venerable Nikon D100) did it justice -- not surprisingly.They were surprisingly equivalent in the flattened light that they captured.  This is a photoshopped version of the iPhone image.Still not what I saw in the magical evening light.
  • More fireflies

    Lisa
    26 Jun 2015 | 6:38 pm
    They're flashing from ground level to canopy again this evening. Magical.I poked around to see if I could find a decent image to share, with no luck (either highly enhanced images or not very good ones). Certainly my camera(s) can't do justice to the biological flashing in the dark, programmed by selection to attract mates. It's lovely to watch and an unexpected summer treat.Posted with Blogsy
  • A pop-up flower shop

    Lisa Wagner
    25 Jun 2015 | 5:44 pm
    My garden group (an eclectic federated garden club) recently had a meeting where we created flower arrangements to go to a local hospice care facility.One of our members is a nurse there, and a couple (that are new members) suggested the program.It was delightful.We all brought flowers and foliage from our own gardens, or snagged flowers from commercial outlets, and we created MANY lovely arrangements. It was a great experience, and hopefully brought some remembrance and respite to folks at the hospice facility.
  • Fireflies

    Lisa
    23 Jun 2015 | 6:22 pm
    It's not easy to get photos of fireflies, but just imagine their flashing from ground level to canopy.We've been treated to evening displays for days now. Lovely, and unexpected.Normally, we'd have sucessional waves, from ground to canopy over weeks, not days - so it's a treat to see the night sky full of flashes.Years ago, in Maryland, we saw similar views in the canopy forest below the house we rented in summer (while during field work). Nice to see that again in our urban ravine forest behind the house. Posted with Blogsy
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    Outside Clyde

  • With White Grasses

    Christopher C. NC
    30 Jun 2015 | 7:30 pm
    I have been adding grasses to the Tall Flower Meadow for several years now. Most of them have been white variegated cultivars. The height is needed to rise above the Lush. The color alone is a nice contrast when the meadow is still mostly green. The blooms also add a new texture in the mix.
  • Daylilies

    Christopher C. NC
    28 Jun 2015 | 7:17 pm
    Depending upon how you look at it I am either abusing or taking full advatage of this period of unfortunate transportation troubles. I have been decompressing mentally and physically. I haven't been working so manically and barely even thinking about work or the truck. It will be ready when it is ready. I walk through the garden now and my editing is only half hearted. Part of that is because I
  • Chaos And Wildness

    Christopher C. NC
    27 Jun 2015 | 6:53 pm
    I love my garden. It scares me a little too. I work all week long making other people's gardens manicured and tidy. I come home to wildness. I come home to plants that are in no way under my control. Chaos is the result. It isn't utter chaos. It has some rhythm created by large drifts of the same type of
  • Tales From The Scenic Byway

    Christopher C. NC
    26 Jun 2015 | 6:58 pm
    I went out for my now more than quarterly roadside trash pickup while I wait and wait for my truck's rear end to get reorganized. I always manage to get a full heavy sack of trash and that is after emptying the half drunk plastic bottles of pop and the brown liquid spit from many others. I've been going a little bit further down the road of late and cover a good half mile, both sides of the
  • Beneath The Wire

    Christopher C. NC
    25 Jun 2015 | 7:18 pm
    The one and only reason there is any full sun in this forest is because of the big gash that was cut through it for the utility lines. That sun allows for two very distinct sets of growing conditions on our mountain top. The Tall Flower Meadow is a direct result of gardening the land beneath the wire. The good thing is it is only a double strand, the
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    Growing The Home Garden

  • Daylilies in Bloom

    19 Jun 2015 | 6:51 am
    It's that time of year where the daylilies are becoming the showoffs of the garden. Daylilies (Hemerocallis) area very common collectable perennial here in the south. They propagate very easily through division and are a prime starter plant for people interested in learning how to hybridize plants. Here's a look at a little of what is blooming in our garden this summer:Daylily HybridizationThe first two photos are results of my hybridization attempts. While they are pretty, they never developed into a must have daylily. Hybridizing is fairly simple, just take pollen from the stamen and dab it…
  • Propagating Grape Vines Through Greenwood Cuttings - Video

    15 May 2015 | 3:43 pm
    I took a short video today of some grape vine cuttings I'm attempting to root. Grape vines root easily from greenwood cuttings or from hardwood cuttings. I prefer the greenwood cutting method just because they seem to root a lot faster and I get the pleasure of faster gratification! Hopefully in about 6 weeks I'll have some rooted grape vine cuttings that I can pot up then plant this fall. Here's the video, thanks for watching!Rooting Grape Vines from Greenwood CuttingsSubscribe to read more from The Home Garden Originally written by Dave @ The Home Garden Not to be reproduced or re-blogged…
  • Greenworks Pro 80V 18 Inch Chainsaw Review

    22 Apr 2015 | 6:44 am
    When you think about power tools do you think electric? Maybe it's time you should! Recently Greenworks sent me their battery powered Greeworks Pro 80Volt 18" Chainsaw to test. I had some doubts. Could a battery powered chainsaw actually cut through well enough to be a part of my arsenal of power tools? Would a charge last long enough to get through all the jobs I would need to attack in one day? Would the chainsaw be able to be recharged fast enough to get back to work when it did run out of energy? Those were the questions in my head and probably the questions anyone wanting to purchase a…
  • Redbuds in the Spring Garden (Cercis canadensis)

    2 Apr 2015 | 6:13 am
    Spring in many ways is just like listening to your favorite song. The parts of the song that make it special to you are those that make you replay it countless times over and over again. The chorus of springtime is very much the same. Old favorites pop up again and again for us to enjoy. One of my favorite trees here in Tennessee is the redbud (Cercis canadensis). It's native to our area and blooms prolifically in the spring. There are areas of our state where the redbuds grow in such quantities that you feel like you are inside of a painting. Nature's artwork is hard to top!It's a special…
  • Springtime in the Garden (Photos)

    22 Mar 2015 | 3:21 pm
    Spring is here and the garden is most certainly coming alive! Unfortunately some freezing temperatures are in the forecast for later in the week here in Tennessee. Here's a quick look at what you will find in my garden at the moment!Purple leaf plum and forsythia  I trimmed the forsythia back after it bloomed last year into more of a small shrub. They can get very large if you let them grow. Forsythias are an easy plant to propagate if you want more of them. Just take a cutting 4-5 inches long and place it in a pot of soil and keep moist. There is no need for rooting hormone to propagate…
 
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    Sharing Nature's Garden

  • Artful garden blends blooms and mixed media...

    Diana
    29 Jun 2015 | 8:22 pm
    In addition to the beautiful blooms and creative designs we enjoyed at the Toronto Garden Bloggers Fling earlier this month, we were also treated to some amazing mixed media art entwined into this landscape on the hilly shore of High Park’s Grenadier Pond.  Filled with the work of sculptor Wojtek Biczysko, the garden reflected upon itself through various metal sculptures that brought light and movement into the landscape. This piece evokes the image of a hammock in the trees (to me) -- a place I would love to spend time with a good book and the sounds of nature. Bordered by a vining…
  • Heavenly hillside gardens on Garden Bloggers Fling in Toronto

    Diana
    13 Jun 2015 | 8:04 pm
    Last week marked my participation in the 8th Garden Bloggers Fling.  Held this year in the lovely city of Toronto, I flew to Canada with Fling travel mate, Pam Penick, of Digging.The weather, at least 10 degrees or more cooler than back home in Austin, welcomed us as we prepared for 3 days of jam-packed garden tours.  On the bus at 8:30 a.m. each day, our itinerary was filled with eye-opening private gardens, public gardens and other interesting Toronto highlights.On our first day, we toured a series of hillside gardens located around High Park's Grenadier Pond.  Nothing says…
  • Delightful garden tour on a challenging slope ...

    Diana
    31 May 2015 | 8:20 pm
    It's a treat to get together once a month with other Austin garden bloggers to share stories, enjoy each others' gardens, eat, drink and pass along plants at our plant swap.On Saturday, we were treated to double the fun.  In addition to our monthly gathering at the stunning garden of David and Jenny of Rock Rose, we also ventured nearby to their neighbors and were given a guided tour of another beautiful garden.Located on approximately one and one third acre, this garden's hills and vales are interwoven with ribbons of rock and drainage solutions that blend into the landscape.  As…
  • El Nino is quenching the garden's thirst...

    Diana
    25 May 2015 | 7:26 pm
    Our devastating drought has altered the state of our gardens here in Central Texas and it's changed our mindset, too.We're not used to rain.  Not a little rain, not a lot of rain. We've had so much rain here this month that we don't know what to do with it.  There's so much green in my garden that I have to wear shades to walk through it.  My plants would now like a little sun to shine as well, but they've never been quite so lush.  A ribbon of catmint, Mexican feather grass and lamb's ears lines the front of this Southwest cottage-style bed. The lamb's ears make a…
  • Magical mulch transforms the garden...

    Diana
    4 May 2015 | 7:15 pm
    I love spring.  I love the first bulbs, buds and beautiful colors that emerge in the landscape.Once pruning is done, new plants are planted and the garden is basically on its way,  I'm ready for the next color in the garden -- brown.That's right.  Not dead brown, but bright, organic great-smelling mulch brown.  Native Texas hardwood much is my favorite.  It helps protect the plants from the heat and the cold, and it helps keep precious moisture in during the drought. And it is another color in the garden -- it provides a great deal of the contrast we want in our…
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    Kiss my Aster!

  • Pants off! Plants off!

    Kiss My Aster!
    18 Jun 2015 | 6:01 pm
    I don't do a lot of landscaping installs, although I like to design them and micromanage them to the end. Sometimes I do an install, here and there, if it's something I think I can hack.Recently I thought I could hack an install for a customer I've worked for for years setting up new planters at a new residence. It was really, really raining the day I set for the install. I was already there with all these plants, a local garden center had delivered 75 bags of compost (way too much compost, but that's another story) and I was determined to get the work done. However, I didn't realize that all…
  • Raising the Pink Flag

    Kiss My Aster!
    5 Jun 2015 | 8:27 am
    A long time ago, when I lived in Chicago's Avondale 'hood, there was a woman that had a "famous" native front yard and absolutely no grass. Famous/notorious, take your pick. Half the neighborhood thought it was gorgeous and half thought it was a rat-inducing nightmare. I liked it, but was consistently annoyed by the white landscape flag marking each and every plant. Also, she wore a black bathing suit to work in her garden every day and she looked like Mrs Claus. Those things were not annoying, just totally worth mentioning, for some reason. So, fast forward 10 years and I've got every…
  • Plant of Last Week: Dame's Rocket

    Kiss My Aster!
    26 May 2015 | 10:14 am
    I just spent a week winding through the weird back roads of Wisconsin and this plant, Hesperis matronalis, ruled the roadsides. You can call her Dame's Rocket. She screams at you to notice her in ditches and roadsides in bitchin' shades of neon violet. Invasive? Maybe. Depends on where you live so none of your sass.TRUTHS:1. Smells great2. Butterflies and bees love it3. I can't get over the color/height for this time of yearSo, yes, it's a crazy reseeder. So be the boss, deadhead or pull the whole plant, or stand back with your hands up. I sprinkled 30000000 Hesperis seeds on the borders of…
  • (Keep Feeling) Fasciation

    Kiss My Aster!
    6 May 2015 | 1:31 pm
    I remember seeing some seriously messed-up-by-Mother-Nature mutant dandelions when I was a kid, sometimes they looked like 15 stems melted together, sometimes just one giant tube. Although, I'm sure I saw them all the time because I took the time to study dandelions like it was my job when I was 6. Now that I've grown up (physically and not mentally) and actually made it my job, I see these super-sized dandelions less often (again, because I spend less time looking) but I've learned that the correct term for them is "fasciated" or "fasciation". I saw one in my yard today:In recent years, as…
  • Hey girl, what's your garden fantasy?

    Kiss My Aster!
    17 Apr 2015 | 10:03 am
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    Our Little Acre

  • I Saved a Life Today

    Kylee Baumle
    29 Jun 2015 | 7:24 pm
    I was mulching this afternoon, in a fine mist, thankful that we weren't getting a downpour of rain AGAIN. We've already set a new record for the most rainfall in a single month ever. (We're currently at just under 12" for the month.)There's still one more day left and it's supposed to...wait for it...RAIN. *sigh*But anyway, as I was mulching, I noticed OhNo, one of our outside cats, a short distance away, under the Japanese maple tree, being quite attentive. A little too attentive. That could only mean one thing, and after last week's rabbit parts being strewn all over the yard, I didn't want…
  • Fiskars PowerGear2: A Review and a Giveaway!

    Kylee Baumle
    22 Jun 2015 | 8:30 pm
    I love to prune. I mean LOVE it. Ask my husband and his face will cloud over, because he hates pruning. He gets ouchy about it not because he actually hates the act of pruning; he hates that I love it so much. He isn't convinced that pruning trees and shrubs is altogether good for them. It's one of the Top Ten Things We Argue About. (I know you have silly things that you argue about with your significant other too, so stop laughing.)When Fiskars, a company who has been in business for 365 years now (!!!), asked me if I wanted to try out some of their PowerGear2™ products, I got all giddy.
  • A New Way to Feed Hummingbirds: The Hummerbar® ( A Review )

    Kylee Baumle
    19 Jun 2015 | 2:37 pm
    Summer seems to be a busy season for so many things around here - taking care of the garden, going on trips, and receiving new products to try. Here's one I got a few weeks ago, just before I left for Toronto that has me intrigued. From Perky-Pet®, it's a hummingbird feeder extraordinaire!Called the Hummerbar®, the one I received is a two-foot long tube that holds the nectar for the hummingbirds, with 22 ports (11 on each side) that allow many hummingbirds to feed at one time.It hangs via two cords, which we attached to one of the crossbars on our pergola, right outside our family room…
  • Fruit-infused Water is a Refreshing Treat! (+ a giveaway!)

    Kylee Baumle
    18 Jun 2015 | 1:02 pm
    It's the height of strawberry season here and while I like my strawberries best just-picked off the plant, there's a plethora of ways to enjoy their ruby red juicy goodness. I just for the first time have started enjoying them another way - in water.When I was contacted about testing and reviewing the Fruit Infusion Pitcher by Kitchen Frontier, I jumped at the chance. I'd not used such a product before, although I'd had strawberry cucumber infused water in Seattle one time, when I was attending the Northwest Flower and Garden Show in 2012. It was delicious.My pitcher arrived and while I…
  • What Happened to Our Pine?

    Kylee Baumle
    15 Jun 2015 | 8:14 pm
    We've been inundated with rain this spring. I hate to ask for it to stop though, because it's about this time of year that it stops and doesn't return for a couple of months, which has me doing rain dances. But really... enough for now!We had a particularly windy storm pass through this afternoon that put an additional half-inch in the rain gauge, and except for a brief break, it's been raining ever since.During that break, I walked out to the garden to take a photo of something and noticed a large branch from one of the pine trees lying on the ground next to it.It almost looked as if it had…
 
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    Our Twenty Minute Kitchen Garden

  • Before and After: What 20 Minutes Looks Like (8) – Weeding the Wedge

    20 Minute Jim
    13 Jun 2015 | 12:43 pm
    It rained this week. At least, inclement weather is my excuse for waiting until today to head outside. I was glad to see the plants were not waiting for the weekend. The tomatoes that Jan placed in the “Wedge” bed were nice and stocky, signs that the soil is approaching the temperature of a comfortable […] The post Before and After: What 20 Minutes Looks Like (8) – Weeding the Wedge appeared first on Our Twenty Minute Kitchen Garden. Related posts: 20 Minute Weeding ...20 minutes of weeding is about all I can take...... Before and After: What 20 Minutes Looks Like (2)…
  • Before and After: What 20 Minutes Looks Like (7) – The End Cap Bed

    Jardinier
    12 Jun 2015 | 7:50 am
    Our gardens are divided into beds distributed around the property. Our design was to have the kitchen gardens integrated into the yards, rather than having one big rectangular plot, so we have squares and circles and pathways between. This gives us lots of flexibility with planting, with plot rotation, and with indicating which bed we […] The post Before and After: What 20 Minutes Looks Like (7) – The End Cap Bed appeared first on Our Twenty Minute Kitchen Garden. Related posts: Before and After: What 20 Minutes Looks Like (8) – Weeding the Wedge It rained this week. At…
  • Garden Inventory 2015

    20 Minute Jan
    9 Jun 2015 | 7:32 pm
    The 2015 Garden is in the ground and ready to grow! Here’s what we’ve planted so far: Tomatoes: Cuor di Buoi (Project Grow) — Red — Oxheart — 80 days Dunneaux (Project Grow) — Red — Paste — late Costolutto Genovese (Project Grow) — Red — Saladette — Mid Stupice (Project Grow) — Red — […] The post Garden Inventory 2015 appeared first on Our Twenty Minute Kitchen Garden. Related posts: A Fully Loaded Garden Today Jim and I went to the local farmers’ market... Support the Ypsilanti Farmers’ Market…
  • The Challenge of Record Keeping

    20 Minute Jan
    7 Jun 2015 | 8:00 am
    In the excitement of getting plants in the soil, don’t forget to make some notes about this season’s garden for your future self. You might think you’ll remember what varieties were planted or what plants went where, but odds are you won’t; there are just too many details to keep track of! Any method of […] The post The Challenge of Record Keeping appeared first on Our Twenty Minute Kitchen Garden. Related posts: Frost Bites ...A few tomato seedlings suffered tremendously...... Big Green Worm or ughhhhh, Tomato Hornworm ...I reached out and touched this weird…
  • Support the Ypsilanti Farmers’ Market — NOW!

    Jardinier
    6 Jun 2015 | 7:19 am
    Help put a roof on the Tuesday Ypsilanti Farmers’ Market to make it weather-resistant and year-round. Contribute at Patronicity NOW to help Growing Hope get a $65,000 matching grant. Jan and I are big-time kitchen gardeners but even we don’t grow all our own vegetables. We’d need an acre or two just for the onions […] The post Support the Ypsilanti Farmers’ Market — NOW! appeared first on Our Twenty Minute Kitchen Garden. Related posts: Farmers’ Market Foray #1 – Brassicas Yesterday I went to the Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market for... Garden…
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    The Gardens of Petersonville

  • Fruitful Gardening

    Sheila
    20 Jun 2015 | 11:09 am
    We have been enjoying peaches, grapefruit, lemons, oranges, blueberries, strawberries and one tomato from the garden this week. There are only a few grapes on the vines (need to prune next winter) but they are starting to ripen too. Fruit from the garden is almost too easy in some cases!
  • Big Love for Shasta Daisies

    Sheila
    19 Jun 2015 | 8:08 am
     I do love my Shasta daisies (Leucanthemum x superbum) that grow in the Moonlight Garden. They have been in the same spots for many years and never fail to produce lots of tall, cheerful blooms all summer.  My only frustration is that I have planted them in a few other spots, trying to spread their glory, but they have never taken off and in fact disappear. I suspect they must be very tasty to rabbits that don't venture this close to the house. They are practially pest free unless you have slugs and snails from what I understand (I don't have to deal with those pests, I am…
  • Lovely Ground Morning Glories

    Sheila
    18 Jun 2015 | 10:32 am
    It seems like the groundcovers that are not succulent in nature have a really hard time doing well with limited water. I'm guessing it is because they usually have very shallow roots. Convolvulus sabatius (Ground Morning Glory) is an exception. It is really more like a very short shrub, growing about three feet wide, along the ground, and I'm assuming it has deeper roots because of this. You buy it in one gallon containers and it doesn't naturally root, reseed or send out runners (unlike crazy vine morning glories) so maybe it isn't really considered a ground cover, more like a ground hugger!
  • Primroses in June

    Sheila
    16 Jun 2015 | 3:05 pm
    A shady nook in the garden that rarely is seen by most viistors still has a few English primrose blooms left thanks to the cool, overcast weather we have been having. The hellebores were done blooming months ago. These primrose were in a basket I used for some dining room arrangements in March and were just kind of stuck in the ground when they stopped blooming, but I guess they had more buds to show!
  • The Overlooked Daylily

    Sheila
    15 Jun 2015 | 7:55 am
     Daylilies are another flowering plant that seems rather unfazed by the reduced water. Although I guess the blooms may be sparser than usual, they do seem to just do their own thing day-in, day-out without much care from me, or Mother Nature. I have them sprinkled throughout the gardens, here and there. Some in full sun, others in a bit of dappled shade, but lots of light. I have them in all colors, shapes and sizes. Some do better than others. I typically buy them from Oakes Daylilies, a catalog/website that I frequent. Although not all of the hybrids I have purchased…
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    Blog the blogging nurseryman- The Golden Gecko Garden Center

  • Blossom end rot, a common problem

    Trey Pitsenberger
    29 Jun 2015 | 1:12 pm
    Starting to see Blossom End Rot on samples of tomatoes brought in by customers. We even have it on some of our tomatoes. It also occurs on squash, and peppers. Usually the "blossom end" of the fruit develops a black spot that eventually destroys the fruit. It's very common, and fortunately an easy cure. The number one reason for it is a "calcium deficiency". Calcium is an important nutrient, that is sometimes lacking in our soil, or in the soilless mixes we use. We use a product called, Foli-Cal, which when mixed with water and applied will quickly remedy the situation. The fruit that is…
  • We have organically grown herbs!

    Trey Pitsenberger
    11 Jun 2015 | 9:51 am
    Looking for fresh, organically grown herbs? Want to use them straight from the nursery? We have them! Here is a sample of our fresh basil plants. 
  • It's compost tea time!

    Trey Pitsenberger
    20 May 2015 | 4:07 pm
    We are brewing compost tea today! It will be available for sale Thursday, Friday, and Saturday. Bring your own clean container with tight lid, or buy 5 gallons and get a free container with lid, that you can use over and over again. $5 per gallon.
  • We are having a tomato sale!

    Trey Pitsenberger
    15 May 2015 | 1:58 pm
    Check out some of the great varieties we have available.
  • Floating row covers for frost and hail protection

    Trey Pitsenberger
    14 May 2015 | 12:24 pm
    Weather forecast for this afternoon includes the possibility of hail. See the video below for how we protect our tender plants. We carry the floating row cover here.
 
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    The Whispering Crane Institute

  • 6 Plants That Beat Butterfly Bush for the Wildlife Draw

    Rick Anderson
    26 Jun 2015 | 8:38 am
    Here’s a very interesting take on alternatives to the very popular “Butterfly Bush” that is/has become a go-to plant for many gardener’s. I am a big fan of finding a […]
  • The Xerces Society » Milkweed Seed Finder

    Rick Anderson
    17 Jun 2015 | 5:17 am
    Remember to check for plants native to your region and state. The Xerces Society » Milkweed Seed Finder.Filed under: animals, gardendesign Tagged: Asclepias, asclepias sp, common milkweed, milkweed, monarch butterflies, […]
  • Maxims and Mottoes from Masters of One-liners

    Rick Anderson
    30 Jan 2015 | 4:35 pm
    A list of great books, it’s a reading list but one worth taking a look at. Maxims and mottoes from masters of one-liners: A reading list | ideas.ted.com.Filed under: Einstein […]
  • Rules to Write By or ignore

    Rick Anderson
    27 Oct 2014 | 8:03 am
    Duane Kelly; playwright, author, produce, etc has posted rules to write by from 4 rather well known authors, including my favorite Elmore Leonard. Some really good stuff here. The link […]
  • 100 Wise Words For Everyone

    Rick Anderson
    25 Oct 2014 | 4:03 pm
    100 Wise Words For Everyone. | news – quickmeme.Filed under: Einstein, Whispering Crane Institute Tagged: common sense, life lessons, list, wisdom
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    Skippy's Vegetable Garden

  • today's harvest

    kathy
    30 Jun 2015 | 7:46 pm
  • me first bee sting

    kathy
    30 Jun 2015 | 7:23 pm
    I got stung by one of my bees last Saturday. Ouch. It really hurt. It made me hurry to finish the hive inspection. (more ...)
  • today's garden work

    kathy
    30 Jun 2015 | 2:59 pm
    - Weeding! of course- Removed suckers and added ties to tomatoes- Set up the last of the tomato support strings- Transplanted escarole and broccoli seedlings
  • honey bee flowers

    kathy
    30 Jun 2015 | 2:55 pm
    Today my sister helped me fill and plant flowers in four big "honey bee pots" in my vegetable garden. These fit at the end of the rows between my raised beds. I want to attract my bees to my garden to pollinate the vegetables. So I selected flowers at the nursery that had honey bees on them.I enjoyed walking through the nursery and noticing how different flowers attract different bees. The honey bee pots I ended up with are not a mix of flowers I would have selected otherwise. Sort of an unusual combination.An amazing plant is Campanula takesimana "Elizabeth". It is both beautiful and was…
  • nothing like big pretty tomato plants

    kathy
    29 Jun 2015 | 7:08 pm
    I hardly dared hope for great tomatoes as I planted my tomato seeds this spring. Last year, all my tomato plants had leaves that shriveled up, plants that grew spindly, and very few if any fruits on the plants. (Here's a link to the sad posts.)But  - Yeah!! - I have beautiful tomato plants so far. Big uncurled leaves. I planted in beds that did not have the compost that seem to cause the problem last year.
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    Home Garden Companion

  • It Is More Than Normal

    Ilona Erwin
    30 Jun 2015 | 11:41 am
    Whether it has been hot, cool, or rainy (and Ohio has been very rainy), what you can say about the weather so far this summer is that it is more than normal. When you get a little more than normal of anything… you sort of get concerned about the impact. Like, is it raining cats and dogs all week? I start thinking about whether the disease issues that such weather brings will crop up. Whether I can get out into the garden to weed, as muddy conditions around here can turn epic quickly. But after a certain threshold is hit, I come to sort of a resignation level: Que sera, que sera. We have…
  • Video Bits

    Ilona Erwin
    12 Jun 2015 | 7:25 am
    Since I started experimenting with video on youtube, and looked into its possibilities, there have been times I also posted a few such moments on Instagram, too. (Usually I would collect those bits and edit them in imovie for a longer length video). You might have seen the shorts I posted here on my chickens, but there are some farflung examples that I thought I would gather together… just so my readers could peek into what I’ve am up to in my off moments. Yes, I have gardened like crazy this spring and that meant I just didn’t have much left over to write the newsletter or…
  • My Rural Life

    Ilona Erwin
    27 May 2015 | 9:52 pm
    My husband and I bought and started homesteading this place in the mid 1980’s. I had no skills, and plenty of dreams. I never managed to have that flock of sheep I envisioned, but instead raised a flock of children. That became my main crop. We all worked hard. I sure wish we had used more mechanized equipment. I truly know what the old saying means, ” a hard row to hoe…” Chickens It was practical to have chickens, and there were two old coops on the property (everything was old, run down, dismantled or in the process of being dismantled when we moved here.) I used to…
 
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    Garden Ideas

  • Finishing Preferences of Iron Garden Benches Metal

    DeneWood
    29 Jun 2015 | 5:00 am
    The garden benches that are made of woods, metal, or even the combination, between those two materials are the most popular choice for outdoor benches. The ultimate reason behind their popularity is their comfort and durability. Additionally, the various designs give a wide variety of choices and some designs are so stunning and able to […]
  • The Metal Garden Sculpture Designs for Different Garden Large Scales

    DeneWood
    22 Jun 2015 | 5:00 am
    Placing sculpture in a garden is a way to create an additional decoration to your garden. Metal garden sculpture is one of the popular sculptures that are available in a wide variety of designs. Besides giving an additional decoration, the metal garden art in the form of sculpture adds an aesthetic touch to the entire […]
  • How to Make Small Garden Flag with Initials from Burlap

    DeneWood
    15 Jun 2015 | 5:00 am
    The spring is coming; the spring breeze is so refreshing. You can enjoy the breeze in your garden along with the fluttering of small garden flags on your small garden.  The small garden flags with initials fluttering will give a colorful addition into your green garden, and the good news is, you can make the […]
  • Bottle Tress for the Garden: The Art to Recycle your Bottle

    DeneWood
    8 Jun 2015 | 5:00 am
    The bottle trees for the garden are one of the ways to recycle a glass bottle that is very familiar for gardeners. The history of bottle tree mentions that it originally comes from southeastern America, which is brought from Africa by the African slaves. It is also called a ghost tree, which refers to its […]
  • The Garden Candle Lanterns for Brightening Your Summer

    DeneWood
    1 Jun 2015 | 5:00 am
    Summer is coming soon, it is the right time to spend more time in the open air and get ready to breathe the summer air in your garden. What is better than spending a summer evening in your garden, and breathing the fresh air of summer? Having a dinner in open air and releasing the […]
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    Bananas.org

  • Happy 4th of July!

    Snarkie
    1 Jul 2015 | 6:22 am
    With each season and holiday, I try and do something humorous with the cat and rabbit. The neighbors never know what to expect, and this is what I came up with this time. It's a little dark, but Kitty and Bunny are both wearing Uncle Sam hats, and Bunny is waving a flag. Have a safe and Happy Independence Day, and never forget that freedom is not free!
  • Errors in books about bananas

    geosulcata
    1 Jul 2015 | 4:46 am
    It has been mentioned in several posts that there are errors in the books Bananas You Can Grow and the Complete Book of Bananas. Could those who have spotted errors list them on this thread?
  • New leaves on gran nain twisted.

    Coug99
    30 Jun 2015 | 9:22 pm
    I have a large gran nain, 7 foot at the top of the pseudo stem, that is potted in a 50 gallon pot and is 3 or 4 years old I always store it in my sunroom during winter and then bring it back out during late spring. Usually the first leaf or 2 that comes out is smaller or cold burnt, but this year the new leafs that are coming out are really weird. They start coming out looking normal, but then the mid rib does not twist and straighten out so the leaf ends up looking twisted and short and bunched together. Any thoughts on what might be going on would be appreciated. Thanks in Advance. Chris…
  • Amazing

    a.hulva@coxinet.net
    30 Jun 2015 | 9:22 pm
    The attached picture below is of a corm that I bought from PR-Giants and planted temporally last Thursday morning. It was planted in a pot using coure sand only. Monday almost exactly 4 days (96) hours it had the roots as shown. When it was received it had no roots at all. This may be a normal occurrence but it seemed amazing to me. I planted this one and 5 more in the ground today. Any comments appreciated. :goteam: https://41.media.tumblr.com/c6e10fe5...if5o1_1280.jpg
  • Banana Core Quality

    servatusprime
    29 Jun 2015 | 10:10 am
    Anyone know what might affect the quality of the core of a banana? My recent harvest of Kandrian has a bit of a tougher core. The texture is also somewhat off. My current guess is that I harvested it a bit too earlier. Rather than wait for the first finger to turn yellow, I harvested a couple of weeks after the male flower died. I've seen other members do this with different varieties of banana and thought I would try it out. Thanks.
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    North Coast Gardening

  • Attracting Birds to the Pacific Northwest Garden

    Linda
    30 Jun 2015 | 12:02 am
    Watching birds swoop and listening to them sing are some of the many joys of gardening.  But hanging up a few feeders isn’t enough to create a true backyard habitat for birds; inviting them to come and “stay a spell” takes careful consideration of their needs. So what exactly do you need to do to keep birds hanging around your yard and garden? What birds need in a habitat garden Birds basically need three things to survive: water, food and shelter. So how can we, as gardeners, provide these necessities for the birds who visit us? Water sources: Birds need water for two main…
  • The Many Faces of Coreopsis: New Varieties to Love

    Linda
    23 Jun 2015 | 12:01 am
    Coreopsis is a staple of the traditional flower garden because it’s long-blooming, easy to grow, and the profuse little daisy-like flowers can cheer up anyone if they’re having a bad day. Yet most people haven’t looked beyond the old-school varieties to learn about the wide array of colors available in this favorite, adaptable plant. These aren’t your grandmother’s Coreopsis In Grandma’s day this plant was basically just yellow, but because gardeners are always on the lookout for something new, there are now many faces to Coreopsis, from cherry to melon colors, ones with golden…
  • How to Make Liquid Fertilizer from a Granular Organic

    Genevieve
    16 Jun 2015 | 12:12 am
    After sharing recipes for making your own granular organic fertilizer from inexpensive bulk ingredients, I’ve gotten a number of questions from readers asking how to convert a dry organic fertilizer into a liquid. Why would you want to? Liquid fertilizer is fast-acting. A liquid fertilizer can be faster acting than a dry or granular fertilizer, because the fertilizer has already dissolved into the liquid and thus plants will take it up quickly in larger quantities. This isn’t appropriate for all landscape settings, such as when you are fertilizing shrubs, but when you are fertilizing…
  • Fabulously Fastigiate: Narrow Plants for Skinny Spaces

    Linda
    9 Jun 2015 | 2:00 pm
    Most gardeners have one of “those” spaces: an awkward, skinny location where you need that most unusual of plants, one that grows much taller than it does wide. We call these plants “fastigiate”, which means tall and narrow, or tower-like. Usually these spots in the garden are created by fences or walls, but you can also end up with little un-planted areas in the back of your border when you remove unsuccessful plants or otherwise adjust a mature planting plan. In addition, sometimes you want a tall, narrow focal point to flank an entry or act as a visual exclamation point in the…
  • Tomato Blight: Organic Treatment for Early and Late Blight

    Linda
    26 May 2015 | 2:50 pm
    You have visions of homegrown tomatoes dancing in your head. . . Homemade tomato sauce canned and stacked neatly on shelves, stewed tomatoes in jars, tomatoes on salads and just taking a big juicy bite out of one straight out of the garden – you can almost taste it! You go out to your garden to do your checkup and daily watering and see something odd on one of your tomato plants. The leaves are watery and rotten looking and there is a brown lesion on the stem. What is going on? You guessed it: you may have tomato blight. What is tomato blight? Early tomato blight is caused by a fungus…
 
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    High Altitude Gardening

  • Annoying Ants and Astonishing Blooms

    12 Jun 2015 | 10:06 am
    A beautiful garden in the Irish countryside. (From my travels, last month.) Great inspiration for what I'd like to do with my own garden. Of course, I need a centuries old farmhouse to complete the picture!In the last, exciting episode of the Long Neglected Garden... :) I was weeding and weeding... and weeding some more. Not much has changed.Though, I have moved onto the murderous activity of evicting ants from the property!A pretty Iris graces my own garden (planted many moons ago.)Ants, despicable ants. Depending upon where you live, ants are either a minor nuisance or a majorly painful…
  • Hello Old Friends

    9 Jun 2015 | 8:42 am
    Jacob's Ladder brightly blooming in a thicket of weeds.This summer's delightful task is to reclaim The Long Neglected Garden ~ my term of endearment for the garden I planted 12 years ago.And, subsequently abandoned when I turned the house into a rental property.Sassy little Columbine says: Hell no! We won't go! (Refusing to accept defeat from the weeds.) The garden is, of course, a disastrous bed of weeds. So thick and gnarly that it was just overwhelming in the beginning. I roto-tilled a lot of it.But, before I did that, I hand dug around all of the green shoots that I recognized as…
  • Mantis Rototillers and the Long Neglected Garden

    3 Jun 2015 | 6:27 pm
    Don't ya just love it when the world works in such wonderful ways ~ that it's hard to count up all those lucky stars?Take last night, for instance, when my awol farrier (horse shoe guy) finally paid his disconnected phone bill, returned my call, and agreed to give the girls a long overdue pedicure.~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Or, this spring, when I got an email from Steve, asking me to demo a Mantis Rototiller.*  At that precise moment I was gazing out the picture window, at deep drifts of snow, wondering what nightmares awaited me in The Long Neglected Garden. Saying yes to this goodie was a no…
  • Flowers for Your Hair

    26 May 2015 | 9:51 am
    I returned from my travels in the nick of time!In time to fall in love, once again, with my most beloved spring flowering shrub. That being the Flowering Almond.Flowering Almonds are hard to find but worth the effort. In early spring their branches are laden with pretty, pale-pink double blooms. (Zones 4-8.)Plant a row of these and you'll get to meet every little girl in the neighborhood. They'll sneak into your yard, steal the flowers and weave wreaths to wear in their hair. I know because I used to do that. And, so did all my elementary school gal pals.Those gorgeous pink blooms are…
  • Aching Back

    25 May 2015 | 9:35 am
    Yeah, yeah... I know. Blowing the seeds from a dead Dandelion is big fun. But, you could you please blow them in the opposite direction of my beloved garden? :DRaking, hoeing, weeding, mowing...Schlepping hundreds of pounds of compost and mulch...Digging halfway to China to find the roots of a stubborn dandelion...Whoever thinks gardening is 'easy labor' hasn't toiled in my yard.According to the calorie count website, this hard day's work burned off:3 Big Macs6 Snicker bars  OR! 10 glasses of wine. (Now you're talkin'... :-)I live across the road from a wild meadow. So, there is…
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    Ewa in the Garden

  • 37 Photos of the Absolutely Most Stunning Cactus Garden in Europe

    1 Jul 2015 | 5:41 am
    Most stunning xeriscaping cactus garden in Europe has roots deep in the past, when little Jacob was used to seat for hours and stare at his grandmother cactus collection… When I was a kid, my grandmother used to have a windowsill filled with cactus plants. I loved it! I have spend a  lot of time just looking at them…   So, give me your hand and let me take you today for a bewildering stroll
  • Algarve - Vegetable garden - Day 15

    17 Jun 2015 | 7:27 am
    This little vegetable garden in Algarve seems to be growing, but at its own pace. I am not sure how, in this heat, the veggies will be doing, but so far it seems that some of them do better, some of them not so excellent. I see that tomatoes and peppers are adjusting longer than expected – probably because when I bought them they were pretty big in size, but roots were kept small. They were sown
  • Searching for a missing doggie in Algarve!!!

    11 Jun 2015 | 12:59 pm
    Her name is Misia, she got missing few days ago. Owners in tears!!! If you see her somewhere around Loule or Frankeada, let me know by mail ewamariasz [at] gmail.com.
  • Starting new vegetable garden in Algarve - Day 2

    8 Jun 2015 | 9:03 am
    After making the plan of companion planting, I have decided to go two ways. First, to buy ready seedlings to make the vegetable garden producing sooner. Second, to use seeds in order to prolong the produce by at least 3 months and to grow vegetables that I haven't seen the seedlings on the market.   As you have seen, the irrigation system was placed before planting. In the days like now, when
  • Starting new vegetable garden in Algarve - Day 1

    2 Jun 2015 | 11:57 pm
    I am staying for 6 weeks here in Algarve in friend's house, so I decided to establish experimental vegetable garden. The space is not too big, just 23 m2 - which is enough for 2-3 people. Look at the photo, this poor soil which looks like sand, but is hard as rock. It needs to get softened with organic matter to feed the veggies. I have ordered 400 liters of  manure and it will be dug into
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    Your Small Kitchen Garden

  • Nine Tips for Growing Potatoes

    Daniel Gasteiger
    29 Jun 2015 | 9:36 pm
    These are some of my potato planters. There’s about 2 inches of soil in each. I set seed potatoes ON the soil, and then cover them over with straw or hay. That’s enough for the plants to thrive and produce a new harvest. With the Internet, you can learn all about growing potatoes: garbage can potatoes, potatoes in towers, potatoes in buckets, potatoes in straw bales… Of course, the old fashioned way, used by anyone with a rudimentary understanding of agriculture, was to bury a potato and harvest more, fresher potatoes from the same spot once potato plants had grown and withered.
  • Smart Pots® and Brazelberries®

    Daniel Gasteiger
    30 May 2015 | 10:03 pm
    A Smart Pot is a planter made of heavy fabric. Apparently, roots can grow through the fabric, but when they encounter air they naturally stop with minimal trauma to the plant. The first season I had a Smart Pot, I filled it on my deck with a mixture of topsoil and compost and planted it with cucumbers. The cucumbers didn’t impress; I’ve had way better results growing them in a planting bed. Quite possibly summer heat on the deck was too intense for cucumber plants. In winter of 2011, a company called High Caliper handed out 15 gallon Smart Pots at a trade show in Boston, and I got to…
  • Grubs and Birds

    Daniel Gasteiger
    29 Apr 2015 | 12:42 am
    I didn’t stretch to capture this photo; the robin’s nest is at shoulder level where two paths converge in my yard. A robin has nested in the spruce tree that stands just four feet from my compost heap. The spruce tree is quite large; the nest could be thirty or more feet above the ground—and it could be deep in the branches. But no! The robin chose stress. It built at shoulder level on a branch you almost have to brush as you walk between the compost heap and the house—or as you step off the front porch taking the shortest path from the kitchen to the compost heap. To live as I’m…
  • Mint Menace: the Herb that Takes and Takes

    Daniel Gasteiger
    26 Apr 2015 | 10:03 am
    In early spring, I had purchased two mint plants from the produce department of a grocery store—those plants sold as fresh herbs you’re supposed to throw out once you’ve removed the leaves to season your dinner. I left them on my screened porch, watered them as-needed, potted them up once, and eventually transplanted them into my herb garden. Cooped up in their tiny nursery pots, both plants had produced rhizomes with new plants emerging every half inch or so. I told some of the story here. Mint is dangerous. Yes, I’ve said it before. I’ve said it so many times I’m sure I’ve…
  • Hen and Chicks?

    Daniel Gasteiger
    5 Apr 2015 | 10:33 pm
    I spent a dollar to buy two Hen and Chicks plants at a yard sale in autumn. With snow predicted, I “heeled in” the plants in my vegetable bed. When the snow finally melted in March, I found this little family looking healthy and ready for action. Eventually, these will find a home in a rock garden I plan to build where the compost heap now rests. I’ve been a sucker for succulents since I grew a jungle in my bedroom during my high school years. So, despite my garden’s intense focus on food plants, I’ve mused for a long time about establishing a succulent garden in my yard. Near the…
 
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    Veggie Gardener: Organic Vegetable Gardening Tips

  • Crafting Cucumbers in Your Veggie Garden

    veggiegardener
    14 Jun 2015 | 9:12 pm
    Biting into a piece of crisp cucumber is sure to make any summer just that much brighter. No matter how you eat cucumbers, enjoyment is sure to be part of the package. Cucumbers are also fairly easy to grow, much to the delight of veggie gardeners everywhere, as they thrive in hardiness zones 4-11 and can be grown quickly in about any location regardless of space due to the plant’s tendency to climb upwards. If this is something you desire, a trellis is a good way to achieve such growth. Cucumbers like warm weather and should be planted outdoors in temperatures no lower than 70 degrees (65…
  • Pruning Tomatoes to Enhance Growth

    veggiegardener
    7 Jun 2015 | 12:24 pm
    Commonly seen in the veggie garden is the tomato. In addition to being delicious and having a place alongside or inside of many meals, tomato plants and seeds are widely available. Most everyone can appreciate a crisp tomato on their burger, in their salad, or as part of a pasta dish, and as a result tomatoes are usually the first plant people invest in when they decide to start growing their own food. Despite the popularity of the tomato, they do not always come easy. Depending on your climate, certain varieties may thrive while others do not. Sometimes your best, most determined efforts are…
  • Enchance Your Summer Salad by Growing Your Own Fruit

    veggiegardener
    30 May 2015 | 12:20 am
    At long last, summer is upon us! With summer comes delicious food offerings from the veggie garden for us to enjoy. One of the many great ways to use your garden veggies is in salads. If you find yourself looking for exciting new salad recipes this time of year, however, you will likely find that many of them involve fruit as well. Regardless of your fruit preferences, there are many salad options to cater to your taste. Whether it is apples and pears that suit your fancy or perhaps watermelon, there is a salad for that. Should your belly be begging for blueberries or sweet-talking you into…
  • Brighten Up Your Veggie Garden with a Pop of Pepper Color

    veggiegardener
    24 May 2015 | 9:11 pm
    There are a plethora of dishes that can be complimented by the addition of a pepper. Whether it is raw peppers in salad, peppers on a pizza, peppers paired with onions and placed on a bun next to sausage, or stuffed peppers themselves, peppers make for excellent eating. They can also make dishes more aesthetically pleasing and festive by adding a pop of color to your culinary creations. A good pepper dish truly is hard to pass up! Even better than their taste and pleasant appearance is the health benefits they offer. Different types and colors of peppers offer varying benefits, but the pepper…
  • Avoiding Blossom End Rot in the Veggie Garden

    veggiegardener
    17 May 2015 | 6:06 pm
    There is frustration aplenty to be had when you set out into the garden in search of that perfect tomato only to instead find one with blossom end rot. Though it is a common issue with which veggie gardeners are faced, it is no less disheartening when it rears its ugly head. Rather than letting tomatoes and other affected vegetables go to waste as they fall victim to blossom end rot, make changes to your garden to avoid it in the first place. Blossom end rot materializes in the form of a watery area on the fruit that is located away from the stem on the blossom end, hence the name. This spot,…
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    Miss Rumphius' Rules

  • Re-Making an Old Garden for a New Family

    Susan aka Miss. R
    27 Jun 2015 | 12:25 pm
    Often my landscape design clients I ask me to insert some contemporary flavor into an existing landscape. These renovation projects are similar to interior updates in that the new has to dovetail seamlessly with the existing. This family had a very traditional, overgrown and poorly maintained landscape that had no place for three active, young girls to be outside except the driveway, an in need of repair pool, and a too small patio. The house sits on generous lot that is also promontory with a steep slope up to the front door and an even steeper slope back to the rear property line. Most…
  • Garden Design Details: Container Planting

    Susan aka Miss. R
    30 May 2015 | 8:00 am
    For me, it’s the end of container season.  I only plant them for a few clients. Planter design is not a core service of my landscape design practice because I find them to take as much time to prepare for and execute as any other planting design. In reality, that’s what a container is, a planting design executed in a very small, seasonal space. I do have clients who specifically ask me to design their containers and I say yes, but I just don’t overtly offer to do it.   Nobody ever taught me the rules of containers so I approach them in the same way I would any…
  • Contemporary Tiles and the Middle Ages

    Susan aka Miss. R
    19 May 2015 | 4:25 am
    Sometimes my mind connects the dots in unexpected ways.  I visited ICFF (International Contemporary Furniture Fair) in New York over the weekend.  You would think I’d be all mid-mod and forward thinking. But no. I fell for these concrete tiles from Grow House Grow.  They are a new product for the company, frost proof and come a a wide variety of colors. My mind immediately went to the Middle Ages and the floor at Sainte-Chapelle in Paris. Since my images of that were lost in an iPhone debacle, I borrowed this one from Wikimedia to illustrate the point. Now to find a place to use the…
  • Magnolia Lust

    Susan aka Miss. R
    26 Apr 2015 | 6:24 am
    As part of my job as a landscape designer, I regularly walk the growers and nurseries to see what is new and what looks good.  I learn about plants new to me that I may want to trial and try. Like many other designers, I get on a plant jag and have a love affair with a group of plants for a while and then move on to flirt with something else that catches my rather short plant attention span.  Today I have plant lust.  I was at the fabulous NJ wholesale grower, Pleasant Run Nursery yesterday and fell for Magnolia x brooklynensis ‘Black Beauty’ that is just now…
  • Trials and Neglect in my Home Garden

    Susan aka Miss. R
    17 Apr 2015 | 7:53 am
    I’m not a landscape designer who has a wonderfully designed garden that is a terrific advertisement for my craft at my home. I should, I live on a corner, but as I’ve shared here before it’s mostly a neglected mess with good bones and a rotating cast of plants. My home garden is quirky and in a constant state of flux. Since my landscape design practice is design only, I don’t have a crew I can ‘borrow’ for the big tasks, so they wait and are ignored for as long as possible. I’m mostly not very motivated to work in my own garden after spending my…
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    Journal

  • White Persicaria and Red Roses

    Allan
    24 Jun 2015 | 10:28 am
    White Persicaria polymorpha, Rose Emily Carr and on the left foliage from Eupatorium purpureum that will bloom later in the seasonThe above drama occurred serendipitously.  Originally, a flowerbed was planted to be a theatre perormance. Contrasts in colors, textures, heights, and movements supplied by a composition of continuously blooming roses and perennials were created for the pleasure of apartment dwellers when they looked down from their terraces high above a garden in a private park. The tall red roses planted five years ago – Emily Carr, from the Canadian Artists collection…
  • Oriental Poppy Princess Victoria Louise

    Allan
    15 Jun 2015 | 6:15 am
    Perennial gardeners' eternal challenge is finding a local nursery that offers a wide variety of Oriental poppies. Few in my area sell Papaver orientalis , even fewer offer a wide selection and almost none sell the plant in a size that blooms same season. Adding this perennial to the flowerbed is an excruciatingly painful exercise in deferred gratification: - buy it now, watch it wither and hope optimistically to see flowers next year because reawakening is never guaranteed. Online nurseries have been somewhat helpful in addressing the above issues especially when they offer hard-to-find new…
  • A Romantic Pink Perennial: Dictamnus Rubra

    Allan
    8 Jun 2015 | 11:29 am
    Once upon a time, when the number of perennials were fewer than now and gardeners focused on aroma as much as they did on beauty, there bloomed an almost white-flowering plant called Dictamnus alba. It was touted more for its citrus aroma at dusk than for its modest appearance. I tried to include it in my range of late spring perennials but never succeeded. When still in its infancy and not in bloom, it remained camouflaged among the weeds and would be dug up when the beds were cleaned. Never did I feel remorse for this plant butchery. The flower color was weak and invisible from my far…
  • Itoh Peonies Are Not Easy to Find

    Allan
    30 May 2015 | 5:00 am
    Pictured above is Itoh peony Morning Lilac. It remained modest in growth and appearance during the previous four years and only this season has it merited the attribute “spectacular”. For this impatient gardener, four years was a very long time to wait. Itohs are sturdy perennials that are impossible to dig up once planted; consequently, they defy multiplication by root splitting. Industrial growers here in Quebec employ tissue culture propagation to create new plants. Then the seedings are sold to growers who nurture them until they are ready for market. The gestation time from…
  • Penthouse Gardening with Mandevilla and Skyline

    Allan
    25 May 2015 | 9:32 am
    Every spring, I plant flowerpots for a client living on the border of Westmount, Quebec. There is great spiritual excitement working at this site. We garden on the top floor of a twelve-story assisted-living apartment building for seniors that sits at the highest point of Mont Royal, Montreal’s mountain in the middle of a city, modestly landscaped by Fredrick Law Olmstead twenty years after he created New York City’s Central Park. To the south, we see the Saint Lawrence River and the Champlain Bridge that crosses it; to the west, a  horizon boasting the outline of a new…
 
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    Garden Therapy

  • Shooting Star Succulent Planter

    Stephanie
    30 Jun 2015 | 2:45 am
    This festive succulent star centerpiece makes for a beautiful container display and table decoration. Set the planter out on the outdoor table for decoration or hang it on a fence or wall in a sunny spot that you can enjoy all summer long. I made this succulent star to adorn my patio table which is in hot, direct, unrelenting sun ... The post Shooting Star Succulent Planter appeared first on Garden Therapy.
  • The Essential Guide to Growing Happy + Healthy Succulents

    Stephanie
    29 Jun 2015 | 2:31 pm
    Succulents are all the rage and with good reason. They are beautiful, interesting, and in most cases easy to care for. They are often used as decor both indoors and out, yet that doesn’t mean that they ARE decor (ie: meant to be set on a fireplace mantle to collect dust). Succulents are living plants that require some care to ... The post The Essential Guide to Growing Happy + Healthy Succulents appeared first on Garden Therapy.
  • Easy Apricot Butter Recipe

    Guest Blogger
    25 Jun 2015 | 4:03 am
    No matter what time of year it is, apricot butter is a tangy, sweet treat. Served on a soft, mild cheese like brie or ricotta alongside crackers it makes for an upscale addition to the charcuterie while remaining easy to make. Or serve with a fresh loaf of french bread for a simple treat. Camilla Wynne joins us to share this ... The post Easy Apricot Butter Recipe appeared first on Garden Therapy.
  • Moss is New Paint: How to Create Art with Moss

    Guest Blogger
    24 Jun 2015 | 5:19 am
    Everybody loves to have plants around. They bring you tremendous energy, clean up the air and help us relax and feel good. But how about moss? And how about moss as art? Recently, in the world of natural décor, reindeer moss has stepped up as an alternative to plants and flowers. Reindeer moss is actually a type of lichen that ... The post Moss is New Paint: How to Create Art with Moss appeared first on Garden Therapy.
  • Heavenly Coconut Oil Sugar Scrub

    Stephanie
    22 Jun 2015 | 4:01 am
    This coconut oil sugar scrub is like a little slice of heaven for your skin. It smells like the Garden of Eden with a mix of essential oils such as lavender, rose, geranium, carrot seed, and ylang ylang. But the power is not only in the scent because each of these oils have a powerful healing effect on your skin. Lavender essential oil ... The post Heavenly Coconut Oil Sugar Scrub appeared first on Garden Therapy.
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    Urban Organic Gardener

  • How To Grow 168 Plants In A 6 X 10 Space With A DIY A-Frame Hydroponic System

    UOG
    24 Jun 2015 | 4:27 pm
    This source of this post, content, and photos is from goodshomedesign.com The techniques you can use for making gardening far easier than it actually is are not that many and in most cases not that accessible in terms of costs or work put into getting it. In order to succeed, you have to think outside the box! The hydroponic system is that one clever way to grow plants on a small area surface with not that much effort. In the project featured on this webpage you can see how a homemade vertical A-frame hydroponic system can surely help you growing your garden plants. Actually, the hydroponic…
  • Why Are My Plants Turning Yellow? [INFO-GRAPHIC]

    UOG
    17 Jun 2015 | 7:51 am
    How to Read Your Plant’s Yellow LeavesEven the most talented and educated gardeners will have to deal with yellowing leaves at some point or another. And that statement rings truer for those who maintain urban gardens and indoor plants since potted plants have a hard time getting the necessary nutrients they need for sustenance.That’s why Safer Brand put together this infographic that makes it easier than ever to see some reasons your plants might be yellowing, and more importantly, what you can do to make them wholly green again. If some of the leaves on the plants in your urban garden…
  • Benefits of coffee grounds for plants and garden

    UOG
    12 Jun 2015 | 11:14 pm
    This post, content, and images are originally from http://tgcva.org Obviously, coffee beans contain a lot of calcium, sugar, copper, magnesium, carbohydrates, and other vitamins inside. Some studies found the acid levels in the beans are very good for some plants that need acid, such as tomatoes, avocadoes, also various other fruit plants. Even the beautiful roses are also like coffee. Moreover, coffee beans also contain nitrogen, potassium and phosphorus, which is essential for fertilizer. The function of nitrogen is to change sunlight into energy. Phosphorus helps energy entered into the…
  • Mom. Wife. Dreamer of self-sufficiency. Meet Naturally Loriel

    UOG
    3 Jun 2015 | 10:29 pm
    This interview is originally from SeedsNow.com (source: http://www.seedsnow.com/blogs/news/28929665-featured-homesteader-blogger-naturallyloriel-com) How would you quickly describe yourself to others? Mom. Wife. Dreamer of self-sufficiency. Lover of sweets. Knack for storytelling. Chicken & cat lady. =) How did you get started with your blog? I got started with my blog, NaturallyLoriel.com, because I had just found out information on feeding babies that totally contradicted the information I was given by my doctor — my son was 9 months old at the time. From there, it was a domino affect…
  • Sow and Sow Gardens, Building a Backyard Food Forest

    Sariann Irvin
    28 May 2015 | 8:45 am
    At Urban Organic Gardener, we’re all about sharing inspiring stories of how people are growing food in small spaces.  A while back, we found Sow and Sow Gardens on instagram and have been following them ever since. What they’re doing is truly inspiring. How did you get started with your blog/Instagram page? “I got started with my personal Instagram page. I would post all kinds of things about what I was going and what troubles I was having in the garden. Then someone asked me on Instagram if I had blog. At the time, I felt like I was no expert and how could I possibly write…
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    The Garden Plot

  • Which Plants are the Best?

    Garden Media Group
    9 Jun 2015 | 11:16 am
    Originally Posted on Wayfair.com With the weather finally warming up and the arrival of spring, our green thumbs are ready to get started on this year's garden. It's time to think about planting. But with the wide world of gardening open to you, how do you choose what to plant? Whether you're interested in beautiful flowers or a practical vegetable garden, we pulled together data on all kinds of searches to see what plants people are looking for this season.The tropical hibiscus flower towers above the competition. As a recognizable bloom that represents tropical temperatures and bright…
  • 2016 Garden Trends Report: Sneak Peek!

    Garden Media Group
    1 Apr 2015 | 6:05 am
    For the first time in the company’s history, Garden Media is offering a sneak peek into its 2016 trend research. Below are a few of the trends on the company’s radar for 2016.Urine Luck! "Peecycling:" the Next Trend in SustainabilityYou’ve heard of recycling, and even upcycling, but there’s a new cycle in town. "Pee-cycling" is the gateway to truly living a sustainable lifestyle. This sterile human waste can be converted into a valuable fertilizer. And 2016 is the year it will happen in the U.S.The stuff that makes up plant food: nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium, are all secreted…
  • New Vibrant Garden Plants & Products for Spring 2015

    Garden Media Group
    25 Mar 2015 | 9:38 am
    Warm weather and blooming foliage are on the horizon. In anticipation, Garden Media Group has released its much awaited 2015 Garden Superstars for Spring. Making an appearance on this year’s list are breathtaking patio plantings, chemical-free lawn care products and a new spin on a traditional garden flower.Much of the winter is spent wishing for warmth and color. Now, it’s time to grow! These low maintenance and durable plants and products leave a lasting impression with their easy outdoor style and vibrant appeal.Garden Superstars will inspire and influence gardening and…
  • Crown Bees Launches Crowdfunding Campaign to Help Save the Bees

    Garden Media Group
    18 Mar 2015 | 5:30 am
    Social networks aren’t just for people anymore. Today, March 18, Crown Bees is launching its solution-driven Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign to build a network of native Bee Boosterswho support and raise native bees that can later be shared with local farmers.“Since one out of every three bites of food we eat depends on bees, we need more native bees to help take the stress off of honey bees,” says Dave Hunter, CEO of Crown Bees, a supplier of gentle, solitary bees such as mason bees and leafcutter bees as well as American-made bee houses and supplies. “Together, native bees and honey…
  • Crown Bees is building a network of Bee Boosters

    Garden Media Group
    27 Jan 2015 | 11:19 am
    Bees are responsible for one out of three bites of food we eat — and Crown Bees works to safeguard the planet’s future food supply by increasing the population of native bees in North America.   Although the plight of the honey bee has been well publicized, many people are unaware that there are more than 4,000 other species of bees. These native bees can work side-by-side with honey bees to pollinate home gardens as well as major food crops such as cherries and almonds. Crown Bees is on a mission to increase public awareness about native bees and to build a network of “Bee…
 
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    Vegetable Gardening Ideas

  • Double the Food in Half the Time: 23 Reasons to Try Aquaponics

    Blair
    23 Jun 2015 | 8:27 am
    by Jodie Perry Aquaponics is a food growing system that combines a hydroponic vegetable garden with a fish tank, using the two to support one another. There are a lot of great reasons for gardeners to give aquaponics a try: 1. Aquaponic systems use 90% less water than traditional vegetable gardening. Sure, you have to fill up the fish tank with water. But the actual water usage is VERY low, only 10% of what is used in traditional vegetable gardening. You have to replace only what evaporates and what the plants consume, which is a very small amount compared to what is lost when you water the…
  • Spin Bin compost tumbler

    Vegetable7
    29 Jun 2010 | 8:52 am
    If you’ve been a vegetable gardener for very long, you’ve probably discovered the importance of compost for gardening. Compost improves any type of soil, whether it is clay or sandy. The rich organic materials from compost help increase soil fertility, and also give the soil a more sponge-like consistency that soaks up water, and releases it as plants need it. What’s not to like about composting, right? The Spin Bin is a compost tumbler that was introduced for the 2010 season. Tumblers have both advantages and disadvantages. Advantages: Materials are off the ground and…
  • Window Farm? An urban, hydroponic garden in your window!

    Vegetable7
    18 Mar 2010 | 11:06 am
    Just read this cool post about Window Farms on This Garden is Illegal. As you can see from the photo (which comes courtesy of Windowfarms on Flickr, by the way), a window farm is a hydroponic window garden made from old plastic water bottles, or other various materials. Here’s an excerpt from the Window Farms site that helps explain what it’s all about. Researchers have argued that to grow some of his own food is the most effective action an individual can take for environment, not only because of the food industry’s heavy carbon footprint but also because participating in…
  • Seed Starting: 5 Tips for Beginner Gardeners

    Vegetable7
    10 Mar 2010 | 1:30 pm
    Gardening can be the most satisfying hobby in the world, resulting in beauty, food, and a keen sense of satisfaction. Plug a seed in some dirt and nature performs a miracle. In the beginning, a gardener can feel overwhelmed by the complexities of gardening manuals, so it’s best to start simply and learn by trial and error. A few simple tips for starting seeds indoors will boost the beginning gardener’s success rate and confidence. 1. Use a Seed Starting Mix. Gardening on a budget might lead you to take some short cuts. So you fill your saved yogurt and margarine plastic containers…
  • Growing Vegetables from Seed

    Vegetable7
    23 Feb 2010 | 1:52 pm
    Whether you start off inside or out, growing your own vegetables from seed is an immensely satisfying process. While you can of course buy established plants and nurture them to full growth, some gardeners believe the only true way to grow vegetables is to start off at the very beginning. This takes a degree of dedication, but the rewards are huge. So where do you to start if you’ve never attempted the process before? Below are some of the more common questions about growing vegetables from seed. Q. Is it easier to grow vegetables if you sow the seeds indoors or outdoors? A. It all depends…
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    Gardener's Journal

  • Peony Lovers: Who Was Sarah Bernhardt?

    gscadmin
    17 Jun 2015 | 7:57 am
    A rain-soaked Sarah Bernhardt blossom gets a new place to shine as a floater in a lily pool. Ever wonder how some plants get their names? The romantically fragrant, pink peony Sarah Bernhardt was named more than 100 years ago and remains a garden favorite. The beloved French actress, known as Madame Sarah (born in Paris 1844-1923), is still considered the most famous actress of the 19th century. The peony that bears her name was introduced in 1906. Among the first actors of her time to take movie acting seriously, Sarah Bernhardt played the role of Queen Elizabeth in her most famous film…
  • Dish it Out. Succulents Can Take the Heat

    gscadmin
    9 Jun 2015 | 11:41 am
    If you’re looking for a simple, easy-care planter that can endure heat and dry spells, consider filling a pot with succulents. I start with an old concrete urn that makes most any plant look good. To ensure good drainage, I add some sand to the potting soil, mounding the soil slightly to show off a mix of low-growing, cold-hardy succulents. In a couple seasons, the plants will fill the allotted space, giving the urn a bejeweled effect. A local nursery offers “variety packs” of succulents — sempervivums and sedums — making it easy to create create varied texture and…
  • Invite Mason Bees into Your Backyard

    gscadmin
    1 Jun 2015 | 4:50 am
    A mason bee makes her way into a bamboo tube to lay an egg. Bees have been in the news lately because of the important role they play in pollinating crops. Even President Obama has gotten involved by launching a new strategy to help honeybees and other pollinators. Although I’d like to do more to help pollinators, I’m not ready to put a hive in my city backyard. Instead, I bought mason bees. These blue-black bees don’t make honey, but they are prolific pollinators that rarely sting. And, like many good things in life, they come in the mail. (To learn more, read About Mason…
  • An Allium You Can Plant Anytime: Summer Beauty

    gscadmin
    26 May 2015 | 5:23 am
    A drift of Summer Beauty alliums harmonizes with a clump of echinacea. Photo by Jill Selinger. Taken from The Know Maintenance Perennial Garden© Copyright 2014 by Roy Diblik. Published by Timber Press, Portland, OR. Used by permission of the publisher. All rights reserved. Upon seeing globe alliums for the first time, many a gardener will say, “Gotta have some of those in my garden.” And then she learns that globe alliums are bulbs — and must be planted in fall. Sadly, it’s too late for this year, but put it on the list for fall: “Buy allium bulbs. Lots of…
  • Succession Planting with Flowers? Sure!

    gscadmin
    20 May 2015 | 12:07 pm
    At the garden center, I noticed some beautiful large-leaf rhododendrons covered in plump buds. They were in small pots — starter shrubs for a woodland-garden-to-be. If I planted them in the landscape, I knew they’d be lost at that size. True, gardening is about patience — and dreaming of what will happen in, say, five years. But gardening is also about instant gratification. To showcase these irresistible rhodies, I made them the “thrillers” of a late-spring/early summer planter. They replaced a set of tulips and hyacinths that had gone by, while complementing the…
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    Annie's Gardening Corner

  • Monday Plant ID

    29 Jun 2015 | 7:51 am
    It's Asclepias syriaca - common Milkweed. The flowers are stunning and fragrant. But beware - its leaves are poisonous.With it being the last Monday in June and so much ahead with this busy 4th of July week, it’s quick and simple – it’s a Monday Plant ID. This wildflower is one to be familiar with, specifically if you love Monarch Butterflies. It’s a summer bloomer and its flowers are stunning and fragrant. This plant, which can often be found on the edge of the road, meadows and old fields, is a habitat for the Monarch Butterflies. It’s also a plant you can forage as an edible but…
  • What Plants Teach Us

    25 Jun 2015 | 8:31 am
    A garden lesson from the Sunflower - be a volunteer. These beauties continue to show up year after year.  Want to be outstanding all the time? This Japanese stewartia - Stewartia pseudocamellia teaches us to use our best features. Its stunning bark works diligently throughout every season.  This specimen tree happens to be one of our favorites. It's not too late to plant a Japanese stewartia and if you look below,there's one more reason. The Japanese stewartia's beautiful blossom; it's an 'add-on' summer feature. Not too flamboyant - just enough to let…
  • Storms & Clouds

    24 Jun 2015 | 6:35 am
    On this beautiful June morning, it's a collage of images from last night's storm clouds. This is my favorite - can you see the dog's face in the clouds? You can get very imaginative with cloud formations. Look closely for the raindrops in the stormy foreground. The metal sun gives a hint of additional sunlight.The clouds appear to be letting go, separating to the north & south, making way for the evening's sunset. Tuesday night's skyline makes way for a beautiful Wednesday - dry air & sunshine.  © All Images – Property of Bilowz Associates Inc.     …
  • No Sleeping in the Garden for this Daylily

    23 Jun 2015 | 6:00 am
    This 'Lullaby Baby' Daylily is an award-winning favorite for Bilowz Associates Inc.'s planting plans Isn’t she a beauty? This ‘Lullaby Baby’ Daylily is an all-time favorite perennial for many of our planting plans. An early bloomer, ‘Lullaby Baby’ showcases one of the smaller, delicate blossoms that send Daylily lovers’ hearts in a swoon. It’s hard to substitute ‘Lullaby Baby.’ It’s a close near white with a soft pink blush - ruffles and all without an 'over the top' splash. It’s easy to mix in with other colors because it’s understated but be-dazzling all in one…
  • Monday Morning Summer Thoughts

    22 Jun 2015 | 8:15 am
    A summer vacation home - another Bilowz Associates Inc. landscape design  Finally, the summer months have arrived, which means many of us may be packing for vacation and leaving our gardens and landscapes behind. So it’s a recycled post from June, 2011 about ‘supplemental loving for your garden.’ The biggest TLC in your absence - to make sure everything is properly watered. Whether you’re off on a well-deserved summer adventure or excursion, you want to arrive back to a landscape that's healthy and alive. It’s easy to think a quenching rain shower might be enough but if it's…
 
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    Serenity in the Garden

  • Sound, an Overlooked Element in Landscape Design

    Jan Johnsen
    29 Jun 2015 | 5:16 am
    glass wind chimes close up    Sound is an overlooked element in landscape design. When we think of sound in a garden we think of birds singing, leaves rustling or bees buzzing.Or we may think of wind chimes...Tim Cline Wind ChimesFor some ideas we can look to ancient Japanese gardens where sound was a key consideration in the overall plan.Stone Path - Japanese Garden at KykuitThis is described beautifully in a text on the Japanese Garden at Rockefeller's Kykuit garden in Pocantico, NY written by Cynthia Bronson Altman:"... The hollow tones of the…
  • Planting in Containers - The Sweetest Aspect

    Jan Johnsen
    28 Jun 2015 | 6:55 am
    Foxtail Ferns in Planter  “Still, as I went about my potting on a glorious afternoon, one small treasure after another, the world of nature that is so terrible and so beautiful appeared only in its sweetest aspect.”- Henry MitchellPlanter for Shady Conditions by Laura McKillopContainer plantings is a gardener's secret - they are easier to maintain and you can enjoy its bounty up close without bending down!  How great is that?White Iceberg Roses in terra cotta plantersThe fun part starts with choosing the pot, then choosing the plants...It is somewhat addictive. I…
  • Garden Photo of the Day - A Serene Water Feature

    Jan Johnsen
    27 Jun 2015 | 12:49 pm
    Margie Grace and Associates, Santa Barbara, CAWater features elevate a garden.. the sound and presence of clean water enhances the atmosphere. Try a recirculating fountain like this.
  • Green - the Master Color

    Jan Johnsen
    26 Jun 2015 | 6:48 am
    photo by J. Johnsen   Green in a garden speaks to us on a visceral level.  The message it sends is one of ultimate calm. Associated with harmony and renewal, green is the 'master color' of Nature, exhibiting more shades in a garden than any other color. This is why a green-only garden can appear to have so many hues...cacophany of greensThe Hindus say the light energy of green governs the heart chakra of our body. They believe that imagining green or surrounding ourselves with green will allow more love, emotional balance and empathy to enter our…
  • 'Electric Blue Gecko' Elephant Ears, Deep Purple-Black

    Jan Johnsen
    24 Jun 2015 | 3:36 am
    Electric Blue Gecko Elephant EarsWant to create a bold statement in your garden this summer? Elephant ears (Colocasia esculenta) sport large, colorful leaves and give your garden an instant tropical effect. They like sun, moist soil and warm weather (zones 8-11. Great in pots - source: LogeesThe Gecko series from breeder Brian Williams of the mail order nursery, Brian’s Botanicals in Louisville, KY is vigorous and change color like a true gecko. 'Electric Blue Gecko' grows 3 ft x 3 ft and has foliage that can look deep purple, black or even…
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    MySecretGarden

  • Arundel Castle Gardens - May 2015

    26 Jun 2015 | 7:53 am
    I can certainly say that these Gardens are among my all-time favorites. I knew nothing about them. They were recommended to us by my husband's colleague when we planned our May trip to Europe.  Hidcote Manor Garden was already on the list, and I needed one more garden to visit while we were in London. Now, thinking back, I believe that an absence of any expectations was one of
  • To the Garden! La Torretta Hotel in Manarola, Cinque Terre, Italy

    13 Jun 2015 | 5:44 am
    Our May trip to Cinque-Terre in Italy, besides all the beauties of the five villages with stunning views, had an unexpected treat. As you may guess, it was a garden! Not a public garden or a botanical garden, and not a garden included into some type of garden tour, but a private, authentic garden located on one of those terraced hills, which we, as tourists, used to admire. I'd never have seen
  • May Garden. End of the Month.

    31 May 2015 | 8:08 am
    May garden is always a delight. Everything is healthy and fresh, colors are not washed out, but saturated and bright. The terrace garden, as always, is a bit chaotic, very casual and full of plants grown from last year seeds. I never mulch this place, and let the plants self-seed. The view of the back yard from the terrace garden Peony Coral Charm (above) and Green Lotus
  • Hidcote Manor Garden: May 2015

    20 May 2015 | 7:50 am
    After visiting Lawrence Johnston's Jardin Serre de la Madone outside Menton, France (post is HERE), I knew that I must see his other garden, Hidcote Manor Garden in England. I did it recently, on May 12th 2015. As it became usual for my blog, there are more pictures than words in my posts, and you know the reason - life is bigger than blogging, especially now, in May, when your own garden calls,
  • My May Garden Before and After Vacation

    16 May 2015 | 7:39 am
    Just several hours after we left for our European trip, I was sent this picture.  It's taken from the window of our breakfast room. A deer in my garden is not anything extraordinary, but there were four of them and they weren't at the perimeter of the garden, as usual, but in the very middle of it!  The plants in this part of the garden are never sprayed with 'Liquid Fence', and the fact that
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    Veg Plotting

  • GBMD: There is a Garden

    VP
    1 Jul 2015 | 12:30 am
    Stonework, tile and planting detail from the Turkish Paradise Garden I also featured yesterday. I was trying to recall Thomas Campion's poem when I saw the garden. Thank goodness for the power of Google when I got home, so I could feature it on this month's Muse Day :)If you're not reading this on vegplotting.blogspot.com, Blotanical or your own web reader such as Bloglovin' or Feedly, then the website you're using is a blogpost feed scraper. Why not go straight to the source instead? That's vegplotting.blogspot.com
  • Beat the Heat at RHS Hampton Court

    VP
    30 Jun 2015 | 12:30 am
    Nilufa Danis's opulent Turkish Garden of Paradise felt right at home in yesterday's heat Phew what a scorcher! Temperatures were in the high 20s at RHS Hampton Court yesterday and are set to soar into the 30s today. Here are my tips to help you enjoy the show, instead of getting a bit grumpy in the heat like I did.Go early and/or stay late - it means you can enjoy the show at the cooler times It was noticeably cooler under the arbour in Nilufa's garden at 1pm yesterday. There are a lot of trees at Hampton court, some with seats around them, so you can have a long sit down -…
  • Things in Unusual Places #15: Turtles

    VP
    29 Jun 2015 | 12:30 am
    Pity the poor gardener who kindly guided us around the wonderful iris collection in the Laking Garden at The Royal Botanical Gardens (RBG) near Toronto. The star attraction at the time was a turtle laying her eggs in the garden's soft fertile earth, so he didn't stand a chance while a gaggle of garden bloggers tried to catch the moment when another egg plopped into the hole.Apparently this is a regular occurrence in June, which merits a warning on the garden's page on the RBG website. Luckily the turtle was unfazed with her new found stardom and quietly carried on with her business.A…
  • Postcard From Canada

    VP
    24 Jun 2015 | 12:30 am
    I've just got back from a fab holiday in Canada, where Victoria and I joined 70 other bloggers from the USA and Canada for several days of varied garden visits and fun during the Garden Bloggers Fling in Toronto. As well as catching up with lots of friends I met in Seattle and Portland, it was great to meet Amanda and Susan at last.NAH came over with me and as you can see he whisked me up the CN Tower for a sunset visit, plus the opportunity to conquer my fear of heights by walking me across the glass floor in that big bulgy bit you can see in the picture. A further opportunity presented…
  • Unusual Front Gardens #22: Cambridge Gate

    VP
    19 Jun 2015 | 12:30 am
    Most building work is usually screened by an ordinary hoarding. However, when it's right opposite Regent's Park, something a little more in keeping with the neighbourhood is required. Cambridge Gate itself has an interesting entry in London Gardens Online.If you're not reading this on vegplotting.blogspot.com, Blotanical or your own web reader such as Bloglovin' or Feedly, then the website you're using is a blogpost feed scraper. Why not go straight to the source instead? That's vegplotting.blogspot.com
 
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    The Enduring Gardener

  • Highlights from Hampton

    The Enduring Gardener
    30 Jun 2015 | 11:02 pm
    This is just a brief whizz through some of the gardens at Hampton Court that caught my eye. It is far from comprehensive because, due to a 5.45am start, I forgot to take my camera with me and failed to fully charge my iPhone. Anyway, excuses out of the way, I did really like the reincarnation of the World Vision garden which used some of the same elements as they did in their Chelsea garden – in particular the yellow Perspex rods and the squares of sunken planting. The Conceptual Gardens were generally of a high standard this year. The Malawi Garden from African Vision featured examples of…
  • Things are looking pretty Rosy right now

    The Enduring Gardener
    30 Jun 2015 | 12:26 am
    This has to be the best year I can remember for roses with the cool nights keeping them in peak condition for much longer than usual, as well as pleasingly pest and disease free.  I don’t think of my garden as majoring on roses, but with them all out at once there are far more than I realised. This is a selection of them. If there is a garden near you that is known for its roses, this is the year to get out there and admire them – and smell the roses of course. Cardinal Richelieu Gloire de Dijon Hybrid Tea Rosa de Rescht Darcy Bussell Gertrude Jekyll Hyde Hall Self seeded Cooper…
  • 10 tips for using metals in the garden

    The Enduring Gardener
    27 Jun 2015 | 11:03 pm
    Shiny, lustrous, rusty or painted, metals can be used both structurally and decoratively in your garden. Here are some ideas on how to use and care for steel, aluminium, zinc and copper. Aluminium slat raised garden bed 1. Metal mix When two different metals touch and there is a liquid like water present, a slight current flows between the metals. Some, such as zinc, aluminium and carbon steel are ‘active’, becoming easily corroded when in contact with ‘noble’, or passive metals like titanium, nickel and copper. This hierarchy, called the Galvanic Series, means you…
  • The Holz Hausen – a stylish way to store your logs

    The Enduring Gardener
    24 Jun 2015 | 12:54 am
    Visiting friends in Monmouthshire, we thought Andy Goldsworthy had been at work when we saw these wonderful wood stacks.  It turns out that they are Holz Hausen – a German method of stacking wood that is both good to look at and practical.  If you’ve got the wood, this is a good time to start one of your own – and here you can watch an American enthusiast explaining exactly how it’s done.
  • 5 Alternative Fruit Trees To Grow

    The Enduring Gardener
    20 Jun 2015 | 3:22 am
    There are lots of alternative fruit trees worth considering for the garden. Most have slipped out of fashion, perhaps because they haven’t been developed and hybridised like so many of our favourite fruits. However, if you don’t want to actually eat their fruit you may think about growing them for their good looks alone. Here’s five fruit trees and shrubs worthy of attention : Quince There are two types of quince. There’s the shrubby Chaenomeles japonica often grown as an ornamental bush with pink, white or red flowers and then there’s the common quince Cydonia oblonga. The…
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    Urban Gardens

  • Spiral Staircase for Trees

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    30 Jun 2015 | 11:22 am
    Tapping into nostalgic childhood memories of treehouses and summer days exploring, climbing, and trespassing, 2015 Royal College of Art graduates Thor ter Kulve and Robert McIntyre conceived of CanopyStair, a staircase which wraps around a tree trunk to offer an … Read More... The post Spiral Staircase for Trees appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Aeris and Altrove: Planter and Air Purifier

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    29 Jun 2015 | 12:00 pm
    Milan design studio Lab Fabrici describes their work as a synergistic mix of science, nature, and design. With their Aeris + Altrove planter and air purification duo, they got that right. Aeris Aeris boosts the air purifying properties of the … Read More... The post Aeris and Altrove: Planter and Air Purifier appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Designer Farrah Sit’s Hanging Gardens

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    28 Jun 2015 | 11:48 am
    Remember those Isosceles and Scalene triangles you learned about in school? Brooklyn designer Farrah Sit would make Euclid proud. She creates objects, like her Tetra, Graphite, and Ballast planters using these geometric shapes.  Ballast collection of matte stoneware planters. Sit … Read More... The post Designer Farrah Sit’s Hanging Gardens appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • A Living Staircase as Floating Indoor Garden

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    26 Jun 2015 | 4:54 pm
    Rising 41 feet up and four floors high, designer Paul Cocksedge’s Living Staircase floats within the space like a soaring indoor garden. The steel and American white oak spiral staircase forms the internal nucleus of London’s Ampersand building in the … Read More... The post A Living Staircase as Floating Indoor Garden appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Azuma Makoto’s Frozen Botanical Sculptures

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    26 Jun 2015 | 7:00 am
    For his installation, Iced Flowers, botanical artist Makota Azuma encapsulated flowers within large blocks of ice, as if they were frozen in time. When the ice melted, the preserved flowers in a way bloomed again, a nod to nature’s life … Read More... The post Azuma Makoto’s Frozen Botanical Sculptures appeared first on Urban Gardens.
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    Lead up the Garden Path

  • Makeover finished – for now.

    Pauline
    29 Jun 2015 | 11:35 pm
    A couple of weeks ago, the last of the new permanent planting was done in the Sunset Border. Planting all done for now. Leaf mould pile. Time now for a mulch of lovely leafmould which has been maturing in the corner of the woodland, this pile is 2 years old. This isn’t a very good photograph, but the pile is about 3ft high and about 10ft long. Assorted seeds. I managed to find some old seed packets that I thought would come in useful for sprinkling into the spaces between the plants. Mulch in place, looking left. Looking right and seed now sown in the spaces. All done, I will now just…
  • Another mixed bag.

    Pauline
    25 Jun 2015 | 11:23 pm
    Having a few photos that couldn’t be made into a post by themselves, I’ve put them together to make a mixed bag for June. Each morning, at exactly the same time, I get a wake up call.  Not from the clock radio, which starts with gentle classical music to ease me into wakefulness, no it is this fellow (why am I assuming it’s male?) a large baby bird which was sitting on the back lawn the other day. Crow, rook or jackdaw? He is a big baby, obviously just out of his/her nest and crying loudly for it’s parents to come and feed it. It has lovely blue eyes but I do wish it…
  • Foliage for June GBFD.

    Pauline
    22 Jun 2015 | 12:28 am
    The garden is now, in this month of June, filled with flowers of all description, but if we stop for a while, we can see that foliage still has a large part to play in the garden, even if it is in a supporting role. Rogersia My Rogersia in the bog garden, has now turned green from the beautiful bronze colour that it was a month ago, which I think is a shame. Even so, the large leaves contrast with the divided leaves of the ferns and astilbes planted around it. I’m going to have to move the Japanese painted fern from behind it as it is too small  and can’t be seen properly.
  • An amazing afternoon.

    Pauline
    17 Jun 2015 | 11:37 pm
    Last Saturday we had the most amazing afternoon visiting a garden in Devon, or actually one garden was in Devon and the other, next door, was in Somerset! I found it in the Yellow Book for the  National Garden Scheme. Not only was it two gardens, but there were sculptures and originally there was a railway line with the station buildings, that have now been converted into houses, somebody was a happy bunny and I don’t mean just me! Entrance to Venn Cross gardens. As soon as we stepped into the garden, we could tell that we were in for a good afternoon, the planting looked wonderful.
  • Blooming marvellous!

    Pauline
    14 Jun 2015 | 11:51 pm
    The weather this month has been very variable. Lots of very cold winds, coming from the east, a bit of sunshine which became very hot and humid a couple of days ago, coming up from Africa. Then it all went downhill with rain, thunder and lightning! In spite of all that, the flowers weren’t put off, they said it was June, so they were going to flower, no matter what the weather was doing, some of them are a bit battered, but they are still flowering. Mdme Alfred Carrierre The pergola is bursting into life with Rosa Mdme Alfred Carriere doing her bit. She has lots of flowers at the…
 
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    Garden Walk Garden Talk

  • Gaura – Everybody Wants Butterflies, but What About Moths?

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    30 Jun 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Do you want a plant of loose texture and spidery form that is perfect for a relaxed, carefree border? A plant that lasts all summer and can take a bit of drought to still bloom?  Maybe a plant that even … Continue reading →
  • What Happens if You Don’t Cut or Water Your Lawn?

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    28 Jun 2015 | 4:00 am
    You can always grow beautiful flowers instead. Tour my garden in late June, where the front garden is almost anything but grass. Is this story real? Last year, a couple in Southern CA decided to forgo watering the lawn to … Continue reading →
  • A Beautiful Woodland Garden Tour- Lewiston Gardens

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    26 Jun 2015 | 4:00 am
    Let’s start as I did and walk through the dappled morning light. The property is located in a woodland setting and feels very natural as you stroll the property listening to the chorus of birds. Even a woodpecker was sounding … Continue reading →
  • Do Bloggers Want to be Popular?

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    23 Jun 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Let’s look closer…We had a wonderful talk by a “popular” blogger at the Garden Bloggers’ Fling in Toronto. I share much with this blogger. We both have eclectic blogs; we both write what we feel and don’t take on sponsorship; … Continue reading →
  • Cutting Gardens When You Have Little Space

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    21 Jun 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Having a dedicated cutting garden is the best of all worlds. You have your show garden and one for taking all that you want for displays. Smaller urban properties like mine have limited space for a cutting garden and having … Continue reading →
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    Gardenerd

  • Ask Gardenerd: Mildew on Grapes

    Christy
    1 Jul 2015 | 6:19 am
    This week we explore powdery mildew on grapes: “Every year we have a good crop of grapes, but they are covered by mold. What should we do? We sprayed our grapes with milk & water (equal parts) to no avail. … Continue reading → The post Ask Gardenerd: Mildew on Grapes appeared first on Gardenerd.
  • Soil Food Web Intensive – Part 2

    Christy
    30 Jun 2015 | 12:00 pm
    In our last episode, we shared the wonders of Dr. Elaine Ingham’s Soil Food Web Intensive course. Today, we’ll continue with more tidbits and tricks that will help you build better compost (and compost tea) for a healthier garden. In … Continue reading → The post Soil Food Web Intensive – Part 2 appeared first on Gardenerd.
  • Ask Gardenerd: Growing Chicken Feed

    Christy
    24 Jun 2015 | 6:04 am
    Heads-up homesteaders, this Ask Gardenerd question is for you: “I want to start having my chickens eat things from the earth, than from the store. They are were born in April. I saw your video on YouTube about making that … Continue reading → The post Ask Gardenerd: Growing Chicken Feed appeared first on Gardenerd.
  • Soil Food Web Intensive – Part 1

    Christy
    23 Jun 2015 | 11:07 am
    I’ve just returned from spending 5 glorious days with Dr. Elaine Ingham, the soil microbiologist who coined the term “Soil Food Web.” It was, indeed, intense. Even though I’d been circling this information since 2009 when I saw Jeff Lowenfels … Continue reading → The post Soil Food Web Intensive – Part 1 appeared first on Gardenerd.
  • Growing Turban Squash

    Christy
    10 Jun 2015 | 6:21 am
    Turban squash, also known as Turk’s Cap, is a winter squash that is so alluring it steals focus from pumpkins any day. We pilfered one from the Heirloom Expo last year, saved the seeds, and grew them out this spring. … Continue reading → The post Growing Turban Squash appeared first on Gardenerd.
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    Veggie Gardening Tips

  • How to Simplify Growing Mushrooms

    Kenny Point
    19 Jun 2015 | 5:37 am
    Most people get it backwards! They love mushrooms, and think Chanterelles are wonderful, so they look for Chanterelle spawn. If they manage to find it, they are disappointed to learn that Chanterelles require conditions which are not present in their own back yard or home. They sigh, and give up, because they are just too hard to grow! If you start with the mushroom, growing mushrooms can be very difficult. You are required to produce conditions which the mushroom you want to grow, actually thrives in. This can be problematic for many kinds of mushrooms. To make it simpler, start with the…
  • At Home with FLEX, Troy-Bilt’s New Yard Care System

    Kenny Point
    3 Jun 2015 | 5:25 am
    I shared previously about my participation in Troy-Bilt’s Saturday6 Program and that I would be writing and conducting product reviews for the company. Well the next step was making the tough decision of selecting one product from their line up for my first review. I went back and forth before finally choosing the brand new FLEX to trial in my own yard! In case you haven’t heard about Troy-Bilt’s new FLEX, it is an innovative set of power equipment created to help manage a range of outdoor tasks including mowing, leaf blowing, power washing, and even clearing snow. The FLEX…
  • Growing Edible Perennials in the Backyard Vegetable Garden

    Kenny Point
    27 May 2015 | 7:29 pm
    There is nothing like raising edible perennials to get a big jump on the growing season and to help reduce your planting chores in early spring. I incorporate traditional perennial vegetables as well as those that are more common in permaculture gardening circles. It’s great to enjoy a lush, green garden and early harvests without putting much effort into producing it. Just like with ornamental perennials, once planted those perennial edibles will return year after year with a fraction of the effort required to raise an annual crop. Long Lasting Benefits of Raising Perennial Vegetables In…
  • Introducing the Troy-Bilt Saturday 6

    Kenny Point
    30 Mar 2015 | 6:52 pm
    My recent getaway to Charleston, SC wasn’t simply an escape from the long and cold winter, but the result of an invitation to participate in Troy-Bilt’s Saturday 6 program. I have had very positive experiences with the Troy-Bilt brand so it didn’t take long for me to accept the invitation, join the new Saturday 6 team, and head to South Carolina. Before I share the details about the program I’d like to introduce the other members of the group: Rochelle Greayer is the founder of Pith + Vigor and author of “Cultivating Garden Style.” She gardens in Massachusetts, is a…
  • A Look Back at the Fall Vegetable Garden

    Kenny Point
    9 Mar 2015 | 5:47 pm
    This winter has seen nothing but one wave after another of cold, ice, and snow, to the point that I haven’t been able to actually see the garden at all over the past couple months. That’s not entirely bad as the consistent snow cover provided insulation and will help protect over wintering plants from the bitter cold and biting winds. The coming week’s weather forecasts and rising temperatures provide hope for the reappearance of both Spring and the garden. In the meantime I thought I’d post some pics from the fall season and the last time that I could actually enjoy…
 
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    Perennial Meadows

  • Early Summer Theme Plants – Roses and Hardy Geraniums

    Michael
    22 Jun 2015 | 11:55 am
    In a small garden you need to carefully choose a number of theme plants that you can use in sufficient quantities to have a bold impact and which, each in their turn, play a role in a sequence stretching from spring through summer, autumn and on into winter. I have been exploring my ideas for theme plants in my perennial meadow garden in a series of earlier posts and will continue to point out the star performers as this year progresses. It is June and roses have to be considered. Over the years I have tried many, but steadily the bushes have tended to disappear from my borders while the…
  • Theme Plants

    Michael
    17 May 2015 | 2:16 am
    Snowdrops, hellebores, daffodils and lots of tulips: these are the plants that flower in sequence to bring my gardens to life each spring. But now that Tulipa sprengeri is coming into flower the end of spring has been signalled and I must look forward to the next group of theme plants to take the show forward into summer. Theme plants in my perennial meadows are the key plants that dominate the schemes in their season and carry the banner forward. Together they grow happily together to create a coherent block of vegetation that functions as one of the design elements in the garden’s…
  • Tulips from Amsterdam

    Michael
    15 May 2015 | 2:49 am
    Plants in their season can bring spectacle to the garden when used boldly. I search for such players in my gardens and use them repeatedly, at numerous intervals throughout the planting  – I call them the theme plants in my perennial meadows. In my recent posts I suggested mid-season daffodils as the leading theme plants for late spring to be followed by tulips before the arrival of summer. The city of Amsterdam has in recent years started to celebrate the tulip by placing pots filled with them throughout the main tourist areas. At one level this pleases me as the flower is…
  • Looking at Garden Planting Design Mistakes

    Michael
    30 Apr 2015 | 12:31 am
    As a keen gardener I am always making mistakes and learning from them, but invariably gardening books only tell us the correct way to do things and only show perfectly composed photographs of gardens to which we must aspire. Looking at your own gardens is different than looking at those of others. When I see my low-growing, open garden in spring I see it in the context of how it will be in high summer when the air will be filled with arching grasses and billowing clumps of head-high perennials. Others might view my garden now as lacking in structure and variations in height; I see the…
  • The Vernal Garden

    Michael
    5 Apr 2015 | 9:04 am
    Seasonal Highlights in the Perennial Meadow Garden For more than three weeks the weather has been cold, wet and very windy here in the Netherlands, but now it is Easter and it feels like the gardening season has begun. The nights are still cold, but the days are calm and sunny and daffodils dominate the garden; finally it is the place to be. In every season I take the time to note which plants really make their mark and then try to build upon these highlights to improve the garden’s appearance in future years. Hellebores have been flowering in my garden for almost two months, but it is…
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    Beautiful Wildlife Garden

  • Did that Cocoon Just Walk Away?

    Loret T. Setters
    19 Jun 2015 | 11:07 am
    I love when something in my garden is being chewed on.  It means I am providing habitat and food for some species.  Needless to say, I got quite excited when I was down by the gate recently and I spotted a particular Sawtooth Blackberry (Rubus pensilvanicus) plant that looked all lacy. I have hundreds of […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • The Box Turtle In The Garden

    Brenda Clements Jones
    16 Jun 2015 | 6:12 pm
    There is a precious, little animal inside that shell, his head sticking out of the house on his back, like an old man. They come out during wet weather. If it is raining, I can pretty well count on finding one trying to cross the road, no matter where my travels take me. I’ve made […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Finding butterflies in my wildlife garden

    Judy Burris
    15 Jun 2015 | 8:50 pm
    The month of June is already shaping up to be a productive time for the butterflies that are supported by my beautiful wildlife garden.  As I was weeding and watering my veggie garden, a lovely Clouded Sulphur butterfly gracefully glided onto a patch of clover at my feet and deposited a single egg.  I bring […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Pollinator Week: More than Bees and Butterflies

    Loret T. Setters
    12 Jun 2015 | 10:27 am
    Next week, June 15-22, 2015 is National Pollinator Week.  As we all know “butterfly gardens” are the rage. Of course everyone will set out to create a garden haven adding nectar and larval host plants to encourage the fluttering beauty of butterflies.  When bees join in the gardeners are thrilled as well, and often they […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Hop to it in the Garden

    Loret T. Setters
    5 Jun 2015 | 10:03 am
    As springtime turns toward summer things are really starting to hop around here. Literally! Seems that this week I cannot walk a single path in my beautiful wildlife garden without tripping over one of our amphibian friends. Southern Leopard Frogs (Lithobates sphenocephalus) of all shapes and sizes startle me as I peruse the native plant […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
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    Vegetable Gardener - All featured posts

  • 9 Tips for Growing Vegetables in Window Boxes

    30 Jun 2015 | 7:43 pm
    Posted by ChrisMcLaughlin I've been very happy with these pint-sized veggie gardens as long as I remember that they can require a little special attention on occasion.
  • Peat Moss Alternatives

    30 Jun 2015 | 1:21 pm
    Posted by ChrisMcLaughlin The fact that gardeners have enjoyed a long love affair with peat moss is completely understandable. Here's the problem.
  • Beat the Heat--Cool Down with Mint!

    25 Jun 2015 | 2:53 pm
    Posted by cookinwithherbs As temperatures soar outside, we need relief from the heat. Mint is a naturally cooling and refreshing herb that most of us have right in our own backyards (usually in abundance due to its rampant spreading habit). Here are a few ideas and recipes for cooling down with mint.
  • How to Plant a Milk Crate

    23 Jun 2015 | 12:48 pm
    Posted by WesternGardener Would you like to grow a “crate to plate” garden? It turns out that milk crates are the perfect size for growing vegetables and herbs in a container garden.
  • Celebrate Summer! Easy Cucumber Recipes

    21 Jun 2015 | 2:00 pm
    Posted by cookinwithherbs Today is officially the first day of summer--we celebrate the solstice and Father's Day both! The garden is revving up as is the summer heat--the salad greens are bolting--however I've picked my first two cucumbers and last night I pitted 4 quarts of sour cherries for the freezer. What's happening in you garden? Try one of these cooling cucumber recipes to welcome the season!
 
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    Miss Rumphius' Rules

  • Re-Making an Old Garden for a New Family

    Susan aka Miss. R
    27 Jun 2015 | 12:25 pm
    Often my landscape design clients I ask me to insert some contemporary flavor into an existing landscape. These renovation projects are similar to interior updates in that the new has to dovetail seamlessly with the existing. This family had a very traditional, overgrown and poorly maintained landscape that had no place for three active, young girls to be outside except the driveway, an in need of repair pool, and a too small patio. The house sits on generous lot that is also promontory with a steep slope up to the front door and an even steeper slope back to the rear property line. Most…
  • Garden Design Details: Container Planting

    Susan aka Miss. R
    30 May 2015 | 8:00 am
    For me, it’s the end of container season.  I only plant them for a few clients. Planter design is not a core service of my landscape design practice because I find them to take as much time to prepare for and execute as any other planting design. In reality, that’s what a container is, a planting design executed in a very small, seasonal space. I do have clients who specifically ask me to design their containers and I say yes, but I just don’t overtly offer to do it.   Nobody ever taught me the rules of containers so I approach them in the same way I would any…
  • Contemporary Tiles and the Middle Ages

    Susan aka Miss. R
    19 May 2015 | 4:25 am
    Sometimes my mind connects the dots in unexpected ways.  I visited ICFF (International Contemporary Furniture Fair) in New York over the weekend.  You would think I’d be all mid-mod and forward thinking. But no. I fell for these concrete tiles from Grow House Grow.  They are a new product for the company, frost proof and come a a wide variety of colors. My mind immediately went to the Middle Ages and the floor at Sainte-Chapelle in Paris. Since my images of that were lost in an iPhone debacle, I borrowed this one from Wikimedia to illustrate the point. Now to find a place to use the…
  • Magnolia Lust

    Susan aka Miss. R
    26 Apr 2015 | 6:24 am
    As part of my job as a landscape designer, I regularly walk the growers and nurseries to see what is new and what looks good.  I learn about plants new to me that I may want to trial and try. Like many other designers, I get on a plant jag and have a love affair with a group of plants for a while and then move on to flirt with something else that catches my rather short plant attention span.  Today I have plant lust.  I was at the fabulous NJ wholesale grower, Pleasant Run Nursery yesterday and fell for Magnolia x brooklynensis ‘Black Beauty’ that is just now…
  • Trials and Neglect in my Home Garden

    Susan aka Miss. R
    17 Apr 2015 | 7:53 am
    I’m not a landscape designer who has a wonderfully designed garden that is a terrific advertisement for my craft at my home. I should, I live on a corner, but as I’ve shared here before it’s mostly a neglected mess with good bones and a rotating cast of plants. My home garden is quirky and in a constant state of flux. Since my landscape design practice is design only, I don’t have a crew I can ‘borrow’ for the big tasks, so they wait and are ignored for as long as possible. I’m mostly not very motivated to work in my own garden after spending my…
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    The Gardening Blog

  • Gutter Garden

    Barbara
    22 Jun 2015 | 12:18 pm
    I have heard the saying, “Weeds are flowers that don’t know that they have to grow in a row”. Well, I have found a new respect for this common plant – my new name for a weed. The Dictionary defines a weed: weed |wiːd|noun: “a wild plant growing where it is not wanted and in competition with cultivated plants.” Well, that is not always true. I have a place for “weeds” in my garden and they are very [...]
  • Essence of my Winter Garden

    Barbara
    11 Jun 2015 | 2:45 pm
    I love the softness and the coolness of a winter garden. After a harsh summer, it is a pleasure to see so much green. The mist envelopes the mornings and everything looks magical – the spiders webs look like jewellery. I hope you enjoy the walk through my June garden…….. Lets see whats happening in the front garden My beautiful Leopard Tree! Lets see whats growing in the winter veggie garden Another [...]
  • My Greywater System

    Barbara
    31 May 2015 | 10:34 am
    We have been planning this simple Grey Water System for quite sometime. It needed to be simple and cheap to do! So today was the day!! I will take you through the process with the photo DIY. We decided to use a collection box to trap the grey water and direct it to the veggie patch through a system of pipes. These pipes are the average plumbing pipes you get at any hardware [...]
  • A Bokmakierie in my Garden

    Barbara
    31 May 2015 | 8:41 am
    I have never see this bird before!! What a surprise when I saw him in my garden!! I quickly looked up in my Bird Book (Sasol Southern African Birds – a photographic guide: Ian Sinclair/Ian Davidson) This beautiful bird, the bokmakierie, kept us entertained while he played with his reflection in the car window! This bird is not common in gardens, so what a pleasure that he graced ours and that my [...]
  • Harvest Day

    Barbara
    29 Jan 2015 | 3:00 pm
    This is the best day of the week! The day I go out with my basket and harvest all the ripe and ready vegetables!! Yum!! Happy Days! The photos tell the story……. Love all the veggies and such great variety!! Will cook some and juice the rest!   Happy Gardening xxx
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    Native Plants and Wildlife Gardens

  • Please Send Rain

    Mark Turner
    1 Jul 2015 | 5:00 am
    It feels like mid-August in Bellingham, not the first of July. The sky has been a clear blue most of the last 30 days and temperatures have been in the 70s and 80s. The last time we got more than a few sprinkles of precipitation was a quarter-inch of rain on May 5 and a […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • How To Start a Native Plant Garden

    Suzanne Dingwell
    22 Jun 2015 | 9:03 pm
    How do I start? Many people wrestle with this question after deciding they want to transform their yard into a native plant garden. When Susan and Jim Graham first made that decision, they described their existing yard as “ mostly turf grass with an azalea mustache;” a look typical of many landscapes routinely installed in […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Front Porch Prothonotaries

    Pat Sutton
    18 Jun 2015 | 5:56 pm
    Just one of the many reasons why we garden for wildlife: Prothonotary Warblers breeding on our front porch! Imagine our excitement on May 17th when we heard the distinctive and emphatic song of a Prothonotary Warbler: “Sweet! Sweet! Sweet!” We each grabbed binoculars and headed out to see where it was and found it singing […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Slither Here, Slither There

    Loret T. Setters
    13 Jun 2015 | 10:15 am
    The other day I was doing my daily lap around the pond (on foot, I didn’t swim it ) when I nearly stepped on one of my slithering friends. A demure Peninsula Ribbon Snake (Thamnophis sauritus sackenii) was scouting through the littoral zone of the pond in search of something good to eat. This native […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • A Bestiary: Part Forty-one ~ Songbirds: Scarlet Tanager

    Carol Duke
    11 Jun 2015 | 7:19 am
    Continuing on with the Cardinalidae family as life is bursting open here on our southeast facing New England hillside habitat. The rich red of the Scarlet Tanager (Piranga olivacea) complements the fresh greens of spring when he returns via his flight across the Gulf of Mexico from South American wintering sites. Complementary colors of red and green are […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
 
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    Big Blog Of Gardening

  • How To Grow Dahlias

    Guest Author
    6 Jun 2015 | 8:43 am
    Big Blog Of Gardening Tips on growing dahlias from Dr. Leonard Perry, University of Vermont. Continue reading → How To Grow Dahlias
  • EWG’s Dirty Dozen Fruits & Vegetables: How many can you grow in your garden?

    Todd Heft
    27 Apr 2015 | 7:09 am
    Big Blog Of Gardening Looking at the Dirty Dozen fruits and vegetables list, I counted 7 which I grow in my garden and rarely consume from any other source. Continue reading → EWG’s Dirty Dozen Fruits & Vegetables: How many can you grow in your garden?
  • How To Grow Bigger, Better Carrots: Soil Prep, Planting & Harvesting

    Todd Heft
    16 Mar 2015 | 7:09 am
    Big Blog Of Gardening The key to growing carrots succesfully in your garden is in the soil preparation, especially if you live in areas with rocky or clay soil. Continue reading → How To Grow Bigger, Better Carrots: Soil Prep, Planting & Harvesting
  • 10 Of The World’s Weirdest Flowers

    Guest Author
    9 Mar 2015 | 10:33 am
    Big Blog Of Gardening From the Monkey Face Orchid to the Corpse Lily, here are ten of the weirdest flowers in the world. Continue reading → 10 Of The World’s Weirdest Flowers
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    The Pond Blog

  • Fire and Water: The New Fire Fountain from Aquascape

    Bill Dubert
    11 Jun 2015 | 1:51 pm
      Fire and water. There are few things in the world quite like combining two traditional opposites for making a stunning statement. For my part, our new Fire Fountain is one of the most exciting new products to come through in a long time. This product would be really cool if it were just a bowl of stones and water with a fire pot in the middle, but it’s so much more than that. It features a pump system that moves water steadily from the outside of the bowl surface, falling over the edge of the inner ring like an infinity pool, an endless cycle of water moving toward fire. Place…
  • Dealing with Duckweed in Your Pond

    Bill Dubert
    21 May 2015 | 7:28 pm
    I have a confession to make. I really like duckweed. I think that it’s pretty, and can be really interesting to look at. The way that it propagates so rapidly is really impressive, and the free-floating roots are neat. Watermeal, a type of duckweed, doesn’t even have roots, it just absorbs nutrients and water directly through the bottom of it’s frond. Watermeal is also worth noting for being the smallest known flowering plant. Duckweed, though, can be a huge problem in a pond. In good conditions, a duckweed plant can bud and divide once per day, meaning a daily doubling of…
  • Save up to $100 off of Aquascape products today at Loch Ness Water Gardens!

    Bill Dubert
    26 Mar 2015 | 2:56 pm
    Need a new pump? A new pond vacuum? Stocking up on water treatment supplies? Now’s the time with one of the best deals you’ll see all year. From now until May 31, 2015, Aquascape is offering a fantastic mail-in rebate worth up to $50 off of their products. Now, that’s a great deal, but it gets better: Combine it with our Spring Savings coupon deal, also worth up to $50 off exclusively at Loch Ness Water Gardens, and you can save up to $100 off of a purchase of any combination of Aquascape products! Here are the details: From March 15th – May 31, 2015, Aquascape is…
  • Tips for your Spring Pond To-Do List

    Bill Dubert
    20 Mar 2015 | 1:41 pm
    Well, Spring is officially here after what has been, for much of the US, a particularly nasty winter. That means that it’s time to pull off the cover net, clean up around the pond, squirt various liquids into your water, etc. You know the drill. Here are a few quick tips to make things go more smoothly this year. Make an actual to-do list This is one of those tips that took me a long time to figure out, but has since been absolutely invaluable. Sitting down with a pen and pad to make out a physical list that you can check off is incredibly useful for a few reasons. First of all,…
  • 5 Things You Need to be Ready for Spring

    Bill Dubert
    24 Feb 2015 | 8:28 pm
    Spring is coming at us fast, and I can’t wait for it to get here (and not only because my kayak paddle is in the corner, mocking me). One thing that I’m NOT looking forward to, though, is the inevitable scramble to get those last-minute items that I forgot to have ready ahead of time, before the pond warms up. Since I was already making a list for myself, I figured that I’d point out a few items for my readers that will be necessary sooner than you think, all of which I’ve forgotten at some point in the past. 1. Pond Vacuum I’ve talked before about the importance…
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    Nigel Gnome grows a vegetable

  • Shortest day!

    Nigel Gnome
    20 Jun 2015 | 10:41 pm
    Nine hours of daylight, not a lot of time but enough to do a few tasks in the garden.I planted some heritage purple broccoli we bought from a great organics store in Napier last weekend. They bring our broccoli plantings to 25, should keep us happy I'd say.Lemons looking goodThe parsnips, carrots and beetroot are all doing well, though the shadow line needs to retreat now and give the iceberg lettuces some sun. That should happen quite quickly now we have reached winter solstice.A cute fantail with only one tail feather was flitting about this afternoon
  • Carrots are up!

    Nigel Gnome
    27 Apr 2015 | 11:06 pm
    My lovely prepared soil must work, the carrot seedlings are just peeping out, the recent rain hasn't harmed them at all even though it has been quite heavy at times.A lovely gift from friend, a handsome grey pupkin, the best. :)Lovely grey pumpkin detailThe forest pansy tree has been dropping it's leaves very quickly in the last few days, they look lovely on the lawnAutumn is definetely here.Forest pansy whirlI have been sent a link to an interesting website to encourage people to let their gardens go wild, well sort of. :)It's an American site but the ideas would aply anywhere.Garden Gone…
  • Beanless but there is hope of carrot

    Nigel Gnome
    20 Apr 2015 | 12:57 am
    Poor old beans met their fate this weekend, they were looking like they were suffering. It was surprising to find how many pods they were still hiding deep under the leaves. These palnts have produced so many beans, many bags full. At times the yellow ones would be flourishing, then the greens ones seem to respond and grow a whole new crop, then the yellows would do it back. They were planed 6th January I cut the stems leaving the roots in the ground enabling them to add nitrogen to the soil over winter.last beans and more chilliesI wanted to plant some more carrots and have another go at the…
  • Mad March

    Nigel Gnome
    15 Mar 2015 | 10:28 pm
    Cyclone Pam is supposed to be thrashing us at the moment, but luckily so far there has only been a bit of rain and some huge swell at the Heads. Hopefully that will be it. I did take down the back yard shade sails in case they were going to be blown away. Pruned all the young inward growing plum branches to keep the tree open. New zucchini seedlings are growing well and all the seeds planted recently have come up. The limes look good.Lovely limesPulled the last of the carrots to make way for winter plantings, not a bad lotHup Holland Took a panorama from the roof as I was up there getting the…
  • Garden reconfigure

    Nigel Gnome
    8 Mar 2015 | 10:32 pm
    March is upon us and the changes in the light direction and the shortening of days is becoming apparent. The sun is nice to sit in at the end of the day as it slants through the back garden. Quite different this year as the large titoki tree that graced the font garden has now gone, it blocked a lot of the late evening light. Lots of seed planting for the coming season, beetroot, tender stems broccoli, parsley, a couple more zucchini, more rocket and fennel, and lots of corianderThe vege garden path as been rethought, made wider and also made more potential growing space, a win all…
 
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    Flowerona

  • RHS Hampton Court Palace Flower Show 2015 – Flowers from the Farm

    Rona
    30 Jun 2015 | 4:01 pm
    In place of my Wedding Wednesday blog post series, today I’m continuing my coverage of the RHS Hampton Court Palace Flower Show. Flowers from the Farm, a nationwide network of cut flower growers, have a wonderful stand at this year’s show! Designed by Green and Gorgeous, it showcases stunning British blooms grown by members of the Flowers from the Farm network. On the one side of the stand is this chalkboard design… And on the other side is this fireplace, against a lovely floral-inspired wallpapered backdrop. The rose varieties included in the punch bowl on the mantelpiece…
  • RHS Hampton Court Palace Flower Show 2015 – Floristry College of the Year

    Rona
    29 Jun 2015 | 4:01 pm
    Many congratulations to City of Bath College for winning Floristry College of the Year at this year’s RHS Hampton Court Palace Flower Show! The theme for the competition was ‘Musicals through Time’ and their incredible exhibit was inspired by ‘My Fair Lady’. The flowers the students had used included orchids, roses, spray roses, peonies and eryngiums. And you can take a closer look with the following photos… Isn’t the attention-to-detail astonishing?! I’m really thrilled for the college. You may remember that I featured their award winning…
  • Book Review of The Flower Appreciation Society : An A to Z of All Things Floral

    Rona
    28 Jun 2015 | 4:01 pm
    I hope you had a lovely weekend. Today, I’ll be at the Press Day for the RHS Hampton Court Palace Flower Show. Join me on Instagram for behind the scenes photos from my time there. Now on to today’s blog post and I’m delighted to feature my book review of The Flower Appreciation Society’s very first book – An A to Z of All Things Floral. Written by the fabulous Ellie and Anna who are pictured below, it’s a book like no other floristry book that I’ve ever read! From A to Z, it takes you through the world of floristry and it’s brimming full of…
  • Flowerona Links : With peonies, roses & a flower house…

    Rona
    27 Jun 2015 | 4:01 pm
    I hope you’re having a lovely weekend…and if you’re in the UK, have been enjoying the beautiful summery weather. Here’s this week’s round-up of floral inspiration from around the globe! General Sinclair & Moore‘s first workshop A growing trend for artisanal blooms… The Farmer and the Florist Interview – Flower House – via Floret A garden of roses via The Garden Gate Flower Company Peony Passion via photographer Georgianna Lane Weddings Wild & whimsical wedding inspiration Elegant & timeless Roman wedding Gorgeous pink bridal…
  • Flowerona Reflects Video : 27/06/15

    Rona
    26 Jun 2015 | 4:01 pm
    This week’s Flowerona Reflects video features hydrangeas, delphiniums, Wild at Heart at Liberty and The Hoxton Holborn. I hope you enjoy watching the video and don’t forget, if you’d like to subscribe to my YouTube channel, please click here and then click on Subscribe.
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    Your Easy Garden

  • Homemade All-Natural Bug Spray

    Kristen Blaker
    17 Jun 2015 | 11:12 am
    Working out in the garden is so rewarding and lovely until you look down at your leg and see…a tick! What nasty, little creatures! Or have you ever gotten swarmed by mosquitoes while trimming back your raspberries? I have. Mosquito bites are annoying, but tick bites can be deadly. They carry a host of diseases, including Lyme disease, Colorado tick fever, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, African tick bite fever, Tick paralysis, tick-borne meningoencephalitis. Yuck! This essential oil blended spray tells those bugs to “buzz off!” For the past six weeks, I’ve been outside teaching…
  • Public Gardens – The Forgotten Green Asset

    Phillip Townshend
    31 May 2015 | 7:33 am
      Elizabeth Park Conservancy, the oldest public rose garden in the US. Photo by Susan Cole Kelly photography. I recently visited the Elizabeth Park Conservancy in Hartford, Connecticut, which is home to the oldest public rose garden in the US.  This year they’re celebrating their 118th year (and we too are celebrating a birthday, with it being 20 years since Flower Carpet was launched in the USA). The reason for the visit was that we donated some Flower Carpet® roses to the park because the Park was looking for some disease-resistant, low-maintenance roses. The reason that the park…
  • Natural Ways to Repel Insects in Your Garden

    Guest Bloggers
    29 May 2015 | 1:04 pm
    Natural pesticides can easily be made with common kitchen products From homemade sprays to natural enemies, there’s always a way to protect your plants without causing damage to beneficial insects, the environment or your family. Biological Control Ladybugs are a perfect example of biological control. Almost every creature has natural predators, and garden pests are no exception to the laws of nature. Ladybugs are a great way to naturally fight the insects in your garden. Ladybug larvae have a voracious appetite for soft-bodied pests – especially aphids. The larvae and adults alike will…
  • Beating the Drought with Gardening Tips from the Pros

    Judie Brower
    18 May 2015 | 8:49 am
    Flower Carpet Yellow after days of 100° temperatures With a widespread drought now affecting Texas, California and other parts of the US, many homeowners are about to give up on their gardens.   Don’t despair – there are ways to beat the drought and continue gardening.Here are a few tips from the pros (many of whom live in Australia where they just came out of a 13-year drought!). Choose the right plants Start by looking at your neighbors’ yards and gardens to see what’s working for them. Don’t assume that just because a plant has loads of blooms it’s a high-water use…
  • Lettuce Heads – A Fun Gardening Project for Kids

    Kristen Blaker
    14 May 2015 | 4:55 pm
    Face Plants are funny and fun for kids to create! I’m always looking for new ways to make gardening fun for my classes with the local elementary school at Hiland Hall Gardens. Whenever I can integrate humor into my lessons, I find it’s always well received. Who doesn’t love to laugh, right? The kids dubbed my latest garden lesson “Face Plants”, which is basically a new take on the chia head phenomenon. We created small pots out of clay, but if you don’t have access to a kiln, you could use air-dry clay or even create a simplified version by drawing a face on the side of a paper…
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    The Mini Garden Guru - Your Miniature Garden Source

  • Miniature Gardening is Growing Roots Worldwide

    Janit Calvo
    26 Jun 2015 | 2:47 pm
    Miniature Gardening is Growing Roots Worldwide I do believe the appropriate terms is, “AWESOME SAUCE!!” Lol! Yeah, a surprise from my publisher arrived earlier this week: the Turkish version of Gardening in Miniature! Thank you, Timber Press! It was just a couple of weeks ago that we learned of a Korean version in the works. […]
  • How YOU Can Help Save Our Environment and Our World

    Janit Calvo
    18 Jun 2015 | 12:24 pm
    How YOU Can Help The Pope Save Our Environment and Our World The world needs your help! In case you missed it, an important protest is going on online and here in the PNW to stop Shell from drilling in the pristine arctic. THIS IS NOT ABOUT OIL. It’s about putting corporate responsibility over greed. […]
  • Declutter Your Fairy Garden with the New Bestselling Ebook!

    Janit Calvo
    13 Jun 2015 | 12:21 pm
      Thinking like a fairy can help you declutter your fairy garden, save money and make a prettier display. Our new eBook will help you do that. Declutter Your Fairy Garden with the New Bestselling Ebook! Decluttering is all the rage now with the new book that is making us tear apart our closets and cupboards. In the […]
 
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    Organic Gardening Tips - Smiling Gardener

  • How To Grow MORE Food In LESS Space With Biointensive

    20 Jun 2015 | 9:00 pm
    If you want to grow a lot of food, in a small space, using not too many resources... And are willing to put in some work in order to accomplish that... Biointensive gardening may be for you.
  • Going Beyond The 80-20 Rule In The Garden

    7 Jun 2015 | 9:00 pm
    If you can give your soil the right amount of air, water and food, you can grow healthy plants. But what makes gardening a challenge is that it can be difficult to get all of those factors right. The single best ‘ingredient’ to bring into the garden that helps moderate air, water and food is organic matter in the form of mulch and compost ( part 1 ), and cover crops and perhaps biochar ( part 2 ). Yet sometimes you’re starting with rather poor soil that’s been:
  • 2 Less-Known Methods To Improve Soil Fertility

    5 Jun 2015 | 9:00 pm
    In part 1, I talked about how organic matter is the most important ingredient for many gardens, and how mulch and compost are two of my favorite ways of using it. But there are two other ways of using organic matter. The first is in some ways the most powerful of all, and the second may play an important role in reversing climate change. Let’s get into them...
  • If I Could Do Only One Task In My Garden...

    3 Jun 2015 | 9:00 pm
    There are dozens of strategies you can implement to have a more successful garden. And what your garden needs may be very different from what my garden needs. But there is one ingredient that, when used properly, is often going to have a tremendous impact on most gardens around the world.
  • The 3 Most Important Ingredients For Most Gardens

    1 Jun 2015 | 9:00 pm
    I’m a big fan of spraying organic seaweed fertilizer at least once a month in my garden. I do this primarily to help my plants deal with heat, cold, wind, drought and disease. But that’s not the most important ingredient my garden needs.
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    Sow and So

  • Salvia Flowers – Wordless Wednesday

    Laila Noort
    1 Jul 2015 | 1:24 am
    The post Salvia Flowers – Wordless Wednesday appeared first on Sow and So.
  • Our Sunflower Competition is a Tradition

    Laila Noort
    30 Jun 2015 | 4:51 am
    Although we haven’t mentioned it so far, our Sunflower competition is more or less a given. The traditional “Who can grow the tallest sunflower” is an annual challenge. At the end of the season you can send us a photo of you with a tape measure measuring your largest sunflower. Who can beat Michael Dahl this year??? The post Our Sunflower Competition is a Tradition appeared first on Sow and So.
  • I for Indeterminate – Word Up!

    Bridget Elahcene
    27 Jun 2015 | 1:20 am
    Indeterminate \ˌɪndɪˈtəːmɪnət\ When describing an inflorescence, this term means that the flower stems are not terminated by a single flower at the tip but have flowers all the way up the stem, the lower flowers usually opening first – for example the foxglove. With plants in general, it can mean that the stem will carry on growing indefinitely, as in the case of cordon grown tomatoes. The post I for Indeterminate – Word Up! appeared first on Sow and So.
  • Foxy Foxglove – Wordless Wednesday

    Laila Noort
    23 Jun 2015 | 10:08 pm
    The post Foxy Foxglove – Wordless Wednesday appeared first on Sow and So.
  • Gooseberry and Elderflower jam

    Laila Noort
    22 Jun 2015 | 5:44 am
    It’s no coincidence that the respective seasons for gooseberries and elderflowers are one of the same.  The tart taste of the gooseberry goes so well with the sweet vanilla-esque taste of the elderflower. A match made in heaven. Fruit patch Luckily we have a few well established gooseberry bushes in the fruit patch and the elders we planted last year are teaming with large flower heads which are now coming into bloom. The sweet heady fragrance is almost too much when you walk past. Last year the pups were extremely interested in the unripe gooseberries and they picked them carefully…
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    The Hortiholic

  • Plant Life-Saving 101

    Tony Fulmer
    25 Jun 2015 | 8:52 pm
    Soggy soil and rotting rootsIt's an understatement to say that spring rainfall has been more than adequate. This year even the River birches and willows are looking longingly toward higher, drier soil. While you can't stop Mother Nature there are actions to take to save plants after the recent downpours:1) It seems obvious, but do override the in-ground sprinkler system. When air spaces in soil are full of water rather than oxygen, roots become stressed, roots may die. Even lawns, with their comparatively shallow root systems, have had enough for the time being. Save the water, save the…
  • Dahlia Do's and Don'ts

    Tony Fulmer
    2 May 2015 | 6:56 pm
    Flowers, like celebrities, can have cyclical popularity. Based on the volume of customer questions, dahlias are the smokin' hot plant right now. Never grown them? Check them out at your local garden center and prepare to be dazzled.   A wealth of choicesHybridizers have expanded the range of flower and plant sizes, colors and flower forms so there's a dahlia for every taste. It's pretty darned cool to watch a quarter-sized bud open into an 8" (or larger) flower later in the summer! Yep, I'm in awe of big ole' dinnerplate dahlias.Here are a few tips for success from my experience growing…
  • Timely Tips for Spring Garden Cleanup

    Tony Fulmer
    24 Mar 2015 | 2:43 pm
    Are you itching to get out and start playing in your garden? Me too. It's time to: prune, mulch, stake and most important - plant! Here are a few things to consider as you head out in Slogger-shod feet and West County Rose gloved-hands armed with Felco pruners. Snow Mold1. Lawns - Check turf for this winter's gift - snow mold! You can't miss it (see picture). Symptoms look worse than their long term effect. Snow mold will disappear with fertilization and light raking once the ground warms and dries a bit more. Don't rake in deep shade where shallow-rooted fescues reside. You may pull them up…
  • Off to the Amaryllis Races

    Tony Fulmer
    23 Dec 2014 | 1:03 pm
    'Elvas'It's really easy to understand why amaryllis are so wildly popular. They grow quickly once awakened from dormancy, have flowers that are the epitome of spectacular, are practically maintenance-free (can be grown in water or soil) and are just plain fun to watch! I heard people are even having amaryllis races - they all pot them the same day, then keep track of whose grows fastest, tallest, or has the most flowers. But they're so-oo-o-o easy even a tot could grow them.Big bulbs!My first memory of amaryllis was shopping with Mom at the florist for an azalea. I saw a box on the counter…
  • A Year in the Life of a Fraser Fir

    Tony Fulmer
    25 Nov 2014 | 5:43 pm
    I was fortunate recently to have the opportunity to chat with a new friend, Fletcher, the Fraser fir. We talked long distance. He shared highlights of life on the Christmas tree farm before coming to Chalet. There's a lot happening down on the farm!Where I grew up in VirginiaWhere do you come from, Fletcher?Thanks for asking, Tony. My great-grandparents originally came from Mt. Rogers, the highest point in Virginia. I've kinda lost track, but I'm at least the 8th generation of Fraser fir coming from those cool mountains. I started out as a tiny seed from the cone of my parent tree. Did you…
 
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    Primrose Blog

  • 30 Gardening Hacks For Green Fingers

    Primrose
    16 Jun 2015 | 12:53 am
    Even if you love tending to your garden as much as we do here at Primrose, we bet you’d probably jump at the chance to spend less time on your knees pulling up weeds and a bit more time relaxing with friends and family. To help you do just that and make the most of what will hopefully be a sun-filled summer, we’ve unearthed some of the best time-saving gardening hacks. As well as hacks to help you get your garden chores completed a little sooner, you’ll find advice for repelling pests, attracting butterflies and finding out whether your soil is acidic or alkaline. And while…
  • Prehistoric Pest Control – Dinos Destroying Your Garden?

    Primrose
    12 Jun 2015 | 9:13 am
    Tyrannosaurus on the terrace? Velociraptors on the veranda? Bactrosaurus in the bushes? What if we really were Walking with Dinosaurs? Dinosaurs have been notoriously tricky to keep in the enclosures created for them in the movies, but how good would your garden be at keeping them out? We’ve investigated a few of our pest control products to see which would be best to keep the dinos from trampling your tulips. Here’s what we found out… 1. PestBye™ Advanced Cat Scarer Bad luck, although the hearing of mammals like cats extends to ultrasonic frequencies, making a sonic…
  • Primrose – The Nation’s New Favourite Flower

    Primrose
    11 Jun 2015 | 4:07 am
    Image by Stanze on Flickr The primrose overwhelmingly took out the title for favourite flower not only in one region of Britain but in three.  Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales all agreed that the humble primrose deserved the top spot; these results come after nearly three months of voting. England diverged from the pack and voted for bluebell to slide into first, but primrose lovers should not be disheartened by this information as the primrose managed to secure a reasonable position in second place. The question of favourite flower was put to the public as part of Plantlife’s 25th…
  • Smartedge’s Easy Lawn Edging – New Colours!

    Primrose
    29 May 2015 | 7:20 am
    Creating the perfect crisp, neat lawn edge is a dream for keen gardeners all over the country, and with summer fast approaching it is the perfect time to get outside and make that dream a reality. Unveiling two exclusive new colours of Smartedge’s Easy Lawn Edging, we are making the range even more versatile than before. In addition to the classic black already stocked, the edging will now be available in green and brown – natural tones to suit a variety of garden projects. Many are put off working on their lawn edges, however, by experiences with edging made of flimsy materials…
  • 5 Flowers That Can Handle The Summer Heat

    Primrose
    29 May 2015 | 6:55 am
    It’s nearly June, and spring flowers are coming to the end of their time. This is the month where all your hard work in the early spring could come undone, but do not fret for we are here to help. Here is our list of the top 5 summer blooms that aren’t fussy, can handle the weather and will keep your garden looking spectacular until well into autumn. Aster Aster flowers, in their many variations love full to partial sun exposure. This makes them excellent flowers to add to your summer garden. These stunning perennials were named by the Geeks for their star like bloom. They can be planted…
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    Balcony in Berlin

  • rose absolute

    sophos
    30 Jun 2015 | 11:29 am
  • guerilla gardening

    sophos
    24 Jun 2015 | 12:30 pm
    During a somnambulist Saturday morning supermarket sweep, I came across a consignment of little pelargonium plants at 1€ a pop. Since it was time to fill the balcony boxes, and the garden centre is a long way away, I impulse-bought a bunch of them in various colourways. When I got home I realised I didn’t want that kind of two-tone mix after all, and the plants were left for weeks in a cardboard box getting dry and manky, dropping all the flowerbuds. Just as things were starting to look dire, I noticed two flower pots outside the Späti on the corner below, containing only a sorry…
  • balcony roses

    sophos
    13 Jun 2015 | 9:01 am
    My rose experiment is starting to show results! The cubana is producing little cream puff roses, 6-7cm in diameter, blushing in apricot and pink. The climber, I’ve unceremoniously trained towards an old curtain pole in the corner of the balcony, without consulting the internet about how and when, I’m afraid. I’m sure it’s sturdy enough though. And there are a few rosebuds appearing now, too:
  • flower follow-up

    sophos
    26 May 2015 | 10:38 am
    The brilliant pink of this cheap zonal pelargonium is the reason I keep it over winter, and it now has pride of place in the glazed pot. The roses have grown quite a bit since I planted them a month ago, but so far no buds on the climber: The clematis is having a good year, as reported. An early flush of little lotus flowers in a water colour wash.
  • pigeon problem

    sophos
    17 May 2015 | 10:29 am
    Regular readers may recall that the hellebores are spending summer on the kitchen window ledge. No? Well, they are. I thought they might be happier in the cooler courtyard, where the sun is filtered through the leaves of the tree. That’s until two wood pigeons decided to try them out for nesting size. The couple returned a few times but after careful consideration opted for somewhere else. Probably because of their prospective neighbour.
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    Urban Gardens

  • Spiral Staircase for Trees

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    30 Jun 2015 | 11:22 am
    Tapping into nostalgic childhood memories of treehouses and summer days exploring, climbing, and trespassing, 2015 Royal College of Art graduates Thor ter Kulve and Robert McIntyre conceived of CanopyStair, a staircase which wraps around a tree trunk to offer an … Read More... The post Spiral Staircase for Trees appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Aeris and Altrove: Planter and Air Purifier

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    29 Jun 2015 | 12:00 pm
    Milan design studio Lab Fabrici describes their work as a synergistic mix of science, nature, and design. With their Aeris + Altrove planter and air purification duo, they got that right. Aeris Aeris boosts the air purifying properties of the … Read More... The post Aeris and Altrove: Planter and Air Purifier appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Designer Farrah Sit’s Hanging Gardens

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    28 Jun 2015 | 11:48 am
    Remember those Isosceles and Scalene triangles you learned about in school? Brooklyn designer Farrah Sit would make Euclid proud. She creates objects, like her Tetra, Graphite, and Ballast planters using these geometric shapes.  Ballast collection of matte stoneware planters. Sit … Read More... The post Designer Farrah Sit’s Hanging Gardens appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • A Living Staircase as Floating Indoor Garden

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    26 Jun 2015 | 4:54 pm
    Rising 41 feet up and four floors high, designer Paul Cocksedge’s Living Staircase floats within the space like a soaring indoor garden. The steel and American white oak spiral staircase forms the internal nucleus of London’s Ampersand building in the … Read More... The post A Living Staircase as Floating Indoor Garden appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Azuma Makoto’s Frozen Botanical Sculptures

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    26 Jun 2015 | 7:00 am
    For his installation, Iced Flowers, botanical artist Makota Azuma encapsulated flowers within large blocks of ice, as if they were frozen in time. When the ice melted, the preserved flowers in a way bloomed again, a nod to nature’s life … Read More... The post Azuma Makoto’s Frozen Botanical Sculptures appeared first on Urban Gardens.
 
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    Grow Our Way

  • How to Get Rid of Crabgrass the Easy Way

    Safer® Brand
    26 Jun 2015 | 5:03 am
    Throughout North America, homeowners confront an annual scourge that can turn a lush, smooth emerald carpet into a weedy mess: crabgrass. Specifically, large crabgrass (Digitaria sanguinalis) — which also goes by the name hairy crabgrass — and smooth crabgrass (Digitaria ischaemum) can invade lawns, flower beds and vegetable gardens, rapidly becoming a nuisance. When one plant can produce an estimated 150,000 new crabgrass seeds from each plant, you know it’s trying to take over your yard! What is Crabgrass and Why Not Just Let it Grow? Crabgrass and other unwanted weeds steal valuable…
  • How to Get Rid of Black Spot on Roses

    Safer® Brand
    23 Jun 2015 | 5:53 am
    It starts gradually — a few yellowed leaves dropped to the ground, a few dark brown or black spots on the leaves you can easily attribute to just natural aging. Then suddenly, your rose bush looks terrible! Leaves are falling off at a rapid clip. Before tumbling to the ground, the leaves are dotted with black spots or splotches that fade into the leaf itself. As the days progress, nearly all the leaves yellow and fall from your prized roses, leaving a thorny skeleton behind. What happened? Was it an insect that attacked over night or something else? Black Spot on Roses If this scenario…
  • When to Fertilize Your Lawn

    Safer® Brand
    12 May 2015 | 12:11 pm
    What do you think of when you hear the word lawn? A rolling green carpet forming a picture-perfect frame for your home? A place for your children to safely play in peace? Whatever image the word lawn conjures in your mind, you’re not alone. Americans love lawns. According to NASA – yes, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration – satellite data reveals that Americans grow more lawn space than corn and wheat. Between residential and commercial lawns, golf courses and other recreational facilities, lawns cover 128,000 square kilometers in America. That’s a lot of lawn! Use Safe…
  • Why Are My Plants Turning Yellow?

    Safer® Brand
    28 Apr 2015 | 7:51 am
    It happens to all gardeners. One day you wake up and realize your tomato plant’s leaves are yellow and you have no idea why. Don’t panic! We are here to help you answer that daunting question of “why are my plant’s leaves turning yellow?” Use the infographic below to understand what your plant might be trying to tell you through different types of yellow leaves. After the graphic, we’ll explore a little more in depth of why leaves turn yellow and brown, and how to give your plants the nutrients they need to stay green. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons…
  • How to Get Rid of Eastern Tent Caterpillars

    Safer® Brand
    23 Apr 2015 | 5:50 am
    If you notice web-like structures between branches of your trees, including your ornamental and fruit trees, then you may be dealing with a common pest found all over North America: the tent caterpillar. These pests are actually the larvae of several types of moths that make their home in your trees and feed on plant leaves.  Tent caterpillars are aptly named for the conspicuous, silk tents they build in the branches of host trees. With severe infestations, they can defoliate your trees. By learning how to get rid of tent caterpillars and finding safe control methods, you’ll help save your…
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    The Horticult

  • Monday Motivation: June Gloom Goes Turquoise, Garnishing With Pride, and a Grow-Light Herb Garden (From Paris, Y’all!)

    Chantal Aida Gordon
    29 Jun 2015 | 3:00 am
    With vacation in the air (insert multi-star emoji), the food is sweeter, the bubbly is bubblier, and Monday feels less Mondayish.… ► The post Monday Motivation: June Gloom Goes Turquoise, Garnishing With Pride, and a Grow-Light Herb Garden (From Paris, Y’all!) appeared first on The Horticult.
  • Check Out Our ‘Gardening Tips for Renters’ Guide on Better Homes & Gardens

    Chantal Aida Gordon
    25 Jun 2015 | 7:12 am
    We get this question a lot. “Great garden, but why would you invest all this time/money/energy into a place you’re just renting?” Fair question!… ► The post Check Out Our ‘Gardening Tips for Renters’ Guide on Better Homes & Gardens appeared first on The Horticult.
  • Sun Seekers: Our Passiflora Vines are Flowering and Fruiting

    Chantal Aida Gordon
    23 Jun 2015 | 3:00 am
    Happy summer, everyone! We spent the solstice hanging out with the peacocks and torch lilies at the LA Arboretum — tour to come.… ► The post Sun Seekers: Our Passiflora Vines are Flowering and Fruiting appeared first on The Horticult.
  • Prickly Treat: We Shop (and Shop) at the LACSS Drought-Tolerant Plant Festival

    Chantal Aida Gordon
    18 Jun 2015 | 8:46 pm
    California’s severe drought should be a wakeup call for every babe and babette in our state to take immediate steps to reduce water usage.… ► The post Prickly Treat: We Shop (and Shop) at the LACSS Drought-Tolerant Plant Festival appeared first on The Horticult.
  • Esprit de Courtyard: La Jolla Secret Garden Tour, Part Two

    Chantal Aida Gordon
    10 Jun 2015 | 3:00 am
    Behold — our favorite garden on the tour. How did this home spread its vines in our hearts? We love this place — one of six stops on the La Jolla Secret Garden Tour; read Part One here — because it’s a living example of how you can add green to a compact space in a way that thrills and surprises at every turn.… ► The post Esprit de Courtyard: La Jolla Secret Garden Tour, Part Two appeared first on The Horticult.
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    Grow Up Hydrogarden

  • DIY Home Remedies Grown In Your Hydrogarden

    Amanda Kuhn
    30 Jun 2015 | 9:27 am
    Nowadays, women are all about the “do it yourself” movement. If you can do it why can’t we? This is a question that women in particular have been asking for years. Daily beauty remedies have reached a peak in pricing in todays society now more than ever. But thanks to outlets such as Pinterest, Women’s Day and Instagram, women have now been blessed with theRead More
  • Take a Trip With Your Hydrogarden

    Amanda Kuhn
    2 Jun 2015 | 10:40 am
    With summer right around the corner its easy to get distracted by all the fun activities going on around you. I find that I am much more prone to forgetting or thinking about what to plant in my hydrogarden. If you’re feeling adventurous, why not embrace a culture change and plant culturally specific produce that compliments particular ethnic cuisines? You can try an Italian gardenRead More
  • Growing Hydroponic Lettuce

    Erika Raia
    25 May 2015 | 1:38 pm
      We received this email this morning from Neil (one of our favorite master hydrogardeners) about growing and harvesting lettuce in the Grow Up Hydrogarden and wanted to share it with you! It is amazing how resilent lettuce and other plants are. And, Neil’s story speaks to that strength so just when you think you can’t grow a veggie, think again, plants want to thrive andRead More
  • Q&A Help! Roots Are Taking Over My Garden

    Erika Raia
    21 May 2015 | 8:37 am
    Do you have roots that are taking over your garden? Are your pots overflowing because the roots are clogging the drainage holes? One of our favorite hydrogardeners, Neil from South Carolina wrote us this morning about that very issue that he is having with overgrown roots clogging the drainage holes in his Grow Up unit. One of the solutions we offered was to switch hisRead More
  • Why Not Earth Day Everyday?

    Amanda Kuhn
    22 Apr 2015 | 3:24 pm
    April 22nd, 2015 marks the birthdate to one of the biggest environmental movements of all time.  Earth Day is a now a global holiday, celebrated by vast amounts of people of all different cultures. Global awareness became present in 1970, during the peak of student activists protesting and holding anti war social unions. The idea came to Earth Day founder Gaylord Nelson, then a U.S.Read More
 
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    A Garden for All

  • Orange Crush

    Kathy
    1 Jul 2015 | 6:00 am
    Eastern Tiger Swallowtail inside a Lily (photo by: Kathy Diemer) A day without orange . . . is like a day without sunshine. Indeed. The color orange simply radiates warmth and happiness by combining two dynamic hues: vibrant red and cheery yellow. Orange is an optimistic shade that can uplift and rejuvenate our spirits. Words like motivation, spontaneity and enthusiasm for life are associated with the color orange, as well as adventurous, inspirational, and confident.  Orange is extroverted and uninhibited, quite the show off in fact, always helping us to focus on the bright side of life.
  • Innisfree

    Kathy
    24 Jun 2015 | 6:00 am
    Water features abound at Innisfree (photo: Kathy Diemer) Imagine a garden designed to delight us visually and sensually, as well as addressing the often neglected sense of sound.  Using a story high fountain, rambling brooks tumbling over carefully placed stones and a gorgeous forty acre lake; the sound of water soothes visitors, while the reflective surfaces incorporate the sky and surrounding hillside into this breathtaking atmosphere.  Ivy covered steps lead to a panoramic view (photo: Kathy Diemer) Innisfree’s creation started with the vision of an artist, Walter Beck,…
  • Can’t Miss With Lychnis

    Kathy
    18 Jun 2015 | 6:00 am
    Closeup of hot pink Rose Campion (photo: Kathy Diemer) Derived from the Greek word meaning lamp, I can think of no better description than to say the flower of lychnis will indeed “light up” your garden.  A few of the most commonly recognized lychnis are really quite different individuals.  One is Lychnis chalcedonica, also known as Maltese Cross, which is a long lived perennial for sunny zones 3-8. Familiar for its vibrant red blossoms that can reach up to 3′, there are now white and salmon colored options as well.  The other commonly known lychnis is Rose Campion, or…
  • Bold and Beautiful Blossoms

    Kathy
    2 Jun 2015 | 6:00 am
    Vibrant Orange Poppies Sizzle in the Garden (photo: Kathy Diemer) Just as summer’s sun sets the sky ablaze, so too will bold blossoms sprinkled throughout your gardens.  As if you’re turning on a switch of colors; one touch creates a burst of sizzling orange, another ignites with flashes of fiery red, or brilliant amber petals illuminate an otherwise lackluster location. Now imagine kicking it up a notch . . . or two . . . and doubling or tripling the flower’s dimension to create a true explosion of color.  If this intensity boost sounds like something you’d want to plug into, read…
  • A Horse of A Different Color

    Kathy
    26 May 2015 | 6:00 am
    Aesculus hippocastanum Flower (photo: www.comanster.edu) Aesculus hippocastanum, or common horse chestnut, is a popular choice for park settings and a perfect tree for a large lawn.  Not to be confused with our nearly extinct American Chestnut, Castanea dentata, horse chestnut is native to Southeastern Europe, hardy in zones 4-7, with an expansive architecture reaching over 80′ tall and 40′ wide (at a growth rate of 2-3′ annually).  Horse chestnut prefers full sun with moist soil, has palmate, five fingered foliage that may bronze in fall, and a lifespan over 150…
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    Tree Service Portland - Northwest Arbor-Culture » Blog

  • 6 of the World’s Most Tranquil Trees

    Jon Nash
    25 Jun 2015 | 2:01 pm
      Hurried cities, fast trains, responsibilities that never end. It’s no surprise many of us are stressed. What might surprise you is that something as simple as spending time in a forest can reduce stress, lower your blood pressure, and even help you sleep. Even just a five-minute walk through the trees can make a difference. I wish I could bring the forest to you, but sadly I can’t. So I’ll give you the next best thing: a virtual tour through six of the most tranquil and soothing trees in the world. Before we get started, here’s some calming music to listen to as you read.
  • 10 Crazy Tree Photos from Around the World

    Jon Nash
    15 May 2015 | 1:36 pm
    Trees are beautiful and purify the air we breathe, but they can also be breathtaking, funny, and just plain weird. Get ready to see infrared trees and trees with faces, 1,000-year-old trees and trees from the future. Let’s take a trip around the world to look at 10 crazy tree photos from four different continents! 1. Great Banyan Tree – India This looks like a forest, but believe it or not, it’s just one tree. In 1925 the central trunk had to be removed due to rot, but the rest of the tree is still alive and well. It lives in a botanical garden near Kolkata, India. Photo: McKay…
  • How to Build a Treehouse

    Jon Nash
    11 Mar 2015 | 1:18 pm
    Building a treehouse is a fun and time-consuming process—especially if you’ve never built one before. They come in all shapes and sizes, from small tree forts to giant luxury hideaways. In this post, I’ll show you how to build one type of simple backyard treehouse, but I’ll offer plenty of resources along the way for those of you with more ambitious plans. Source: M S No matter what kind of treehouse you want, safety is your first priority. If you’re not confident with your building skills or you want an elaborate design, consult a professional treehouse builder, such as Nelson…
  • 5 Tree Pruning Tools You Need

    Jon Nash
    16 Feb 2015 | 2:18 pm
    Are branches blocking your windows or walkways? Are you tired of that overgrown tree dropping twigs all over the yard? Or is an old tree simply growing out of control? Residents of the Pacific Northwest are no strangers to tree woes. With the right tools, you can solve many small tree problems with a little DIY pruning. (Save major tree issues for us professionals.) Trimming can keep trees healthy, add value to your property, and make you the envy of your neighbors. But which tree pruning tools should you use? The best tree pruning tool for any job depends on how thick and high up the…
  • What Is Arboriculture?

    Jon Nash
    26 Jan 2015 | 3:26 pm
    The simplest definition of arboriculture is tree care. This post will answer “What is arboriculture?” in more detail, explain how it’s different from forestry and landscaping, and explain what certified arborists do. People like Chris and I who plant and prune trees are arborists. But not all arborists trim trees. And definitely not all tree services use certified arborists. More on that below too. Arboriculture Definition Arboriculture means growing, tending, studying, or removing individual trees and shrubs. (It also encompasses woody plants and vines.) Here are a few different…
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    Mill Race Garden Centre Blog

  • 8 Things That Will Keep Pests Out of Your Garden

    19 Jun 2015 | 9:21 am
    Are you fed up with bad bugs blighting your garden? We know the feeling. After you’ve spent so much time, effort and cash on making your garden the best it can possibly be, the last thing you want is for your plants to be eaten by insects. Or worse – for the insects to eat you! We’ve gathered together a few helpful tips to keep bad bugs at bay, so hopefully this summer you won’t have to suffer your plants being turned into lace by caterpillars, or mosquitoes feasting on your bare skin when you’re trying to enjoy your lovely garden. Let the battle commence! 1. Plant garlic Garlic…
  • 18 Beautiful, Easy to Maintain Flowers & Plants for Lazy Gardeners (PLUS: Tips for a Low Maintenance Garden!)

    3 Jun 2015 | 2:23 am
    If watching Ground Force as a child led you to believe that gardening is a terribly difficult pastime that involves lots of heavy lifting and a flagrant disregard for underwear, chances are you've been put off the pursuit for life (and also regularly have nightmares about water features). However, it needn't be as tricky as you might think. There are lots of low maintenance plants that will look gorgeous with little to no effort required. Plus, believe it or not, the world of gardening advice is filled with myths that make it appear harder than it really is. For instance, water droplets will…
  • 21 Signs You’re at a Quintessentially British BBQ

    22 May 2015 | 4:33 am
    Come rain or shine, nobody does a BBQ quite like us Brits. And while we can't always rely on good weather, the UK has its own list of well-established BBQ traditions that we can all relate to. To celebrate the 19th National BBQ Week and the Bank Holiday weekend, we have compiled a list of 21 signs you might be in attendance at a quintessentially British BBQ. And if you've never been to one before, you're in for a treat! 1. Someone cut the lawn for the first time all year Image credit: F_A This is always a sign that somebody is about to cook something outdoors. 2. It’s a bank holiday Image…
  • The 3 Best Apps for UK Gardeners

    28 Apr 2015 | 10:24 am
    No hobby has bypassed the digital age, gardening included.  You can find dozens of apps within the Apple Store ripe for the picking.  But how do you sort the wheat from the chaff? Luckily, we have rounded up some of our favourite apps for green-fingered tech lovers.  Here are three of our favourites: 1)  intoGardens About:  intoGardens is an app for iPad and Android tablet users.  (In the Google Play store, the app is simply called “Gardens.”) This app is basically a gorgeous glossy magazine packed full of ideas and inspiration.  There’s plenty of content for both beginners and…
  • 7 Secrets to a ‘No Work’ Garden: A Guide for Lazy Gardeners

    16 Apr 2015 | 6:00 am
    Who wouldn’t like a ‘no work’ garden? Even if you enjoy gardening regularly, let’s face it, there are always times you wish it could just take care of itself! If your previous attempts at gardening have been unsuccessful, or your busy schedule doesn’t allow enough time to maintain a viable garden, today’s post will help. With a little planning and preparation, you may be surprised at what you can achieve without sacrificing much time or effort at all! So without further ado, here are our seven secrets to a ‘no work’ garden. 1. Choose companion plants One great way to reduce…
 
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    Organic Lesson

  • 6 Wonderful Health Benefits of Gardening

    gardenhero
    21 Jun 2015 | 11:42 am
    It’s been over six months since I started my gardening journey and what a ride it has been. Because I live in a small apartment, my gardening endeavor started off really small with just two pots of herbs. Now, I have expanded that to eight! Along the way, I noticed how there has been so much that I have gained from gardening. Even with spending less than 30 minutes a day taking care of my gardening activities, I have noticed a difference to my overall well-being. For those who are reading this, I hope you are also interested in building or already maintaining or your own garden. To give…
  • Artificial Synthetic Grass: Benefits & Costs Infographic

    gardenhero
    7 Jun 2015 | 8:34 pm
    In recent years, the popularity of artificial grass has grown significantly for a number of reasons. Not only are homeowners looking for a permanent solution to having a beautiful backyard, a lot of homeowners, especially in California, are also facing a water crisis that prevents them from maintaining a natural grass lawn. Although the upfront cost of installing high-quality artificial grass is expensive, the cost of having a synthetic lawn makes sense over the long-term. In this infographic, we take a look at the main benefits of maintaining a synthetic lawn. Maintenance benefits The life…
  • Drought Tolerant Grass Alternatives for California Lawns

    gardenhero
    27 May 2015 | 8:49 pm
    It has been bad times for California homeowners as the drought continues its endless streak. With more and more restrictions being set on residential water usage, owning lush green lawns seem to have become a distant dream for homeowners. Well, that isn’t necessarily the case. There is still a bit of hope for lawn owners as there are many great drought tolerant grasses out there that would help maintain a nice textured lawn. In the infographic below, we present four drought tolerant alternatives that are known for requiring minimal water consumption. Please keep in mind that although…
  • Vegan Diet: 3 Spring Vegetables to Add to Your Recipes

    gardenhero
    22 Mar 2015 | 1:22 pm
    Spring is finally here! These days, we have the convenience of having access to all types of seasonal fruits and vegetables regardless of the time of year. However, it can be said that these fruits and vegetables taste best during the season when they are naturally harvested. In this infographic, we showcase three great spring vegetables you can add to your vegan diet. We also provide three great recipe suggestions for each of the vegetables. Rhubarb lemonade? Fava bean hummus? I can’t wait to get started on cooking up a great feast. These vegetables may not always be available in your…
  • Day 78: Growing Herbs Indoors – Cilantro, Chives, Basil

    gardenhero
    18 Mar 2015 | 5:54 pm
    Hey everyone. Apologies for the lack of update but frankly there hasn’t been too many stuff to post about since my last Shoebox Gardening post. Now we are at around day 78 of growing cilantro, chives, and basil leaves indoors. If you remember what happened in the last update then you would know that I had quite a few sprouts appearing for each herb. Unfortunately, many of them have died due to a lack of watering. Here is the progress of my garlic chive plant. It hasn’t grown all that much but it is definitely looking a lot healthier than last time. Apparently, garlic chives are…
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    Great Garden Supply: New Products

  • All-In-One Rose & Flower Care

    25 Jun 2015 | 6:16 am
    Bayer All-One-One Rose & Flower Care is Three Systemic Products in One: Fertilizer Insect control
  • FELCO PRUNER 4

    25 Jun 2015 | 5:18 am
    A more basic bypass pruner without the refinements but still with the famous Felco pruner quality and cutting performance. The Felco 4 pruner is the hardened cousin to the model 2, stripped down and built to last under the most grueling conditions.
  • Weber Performer Deluxe Charcoal Grill

    17 Jun 2015 | 5:44 am
    The Weber Performer Deluxe grill features an exclusive Touch-N-Go gas ignition system that ignites charcoal briquettes with the push of a button. Especially handy is an LCD countdown cook timer with a large readout . The timer attaches to the gri..Price: $399.00
  • Nelson Sled-Base Pulsating Sprinker (50285)

    12 Jun 2015 | 6:39 am
    The large heavy-duty metal head pulsating sprinkler allows for flexible area coverage up to 90 foot diameter and variable pattern control. The innovative metal head design provides easier to adjust and more ergonomic features. The touch points are larger and easier to grasp for better control. Dis..Price: $24.99
  • Nelson Dual-Spike Base Pulsating Sprinkler (50280) 

    12 Jun 2015 | 6:39 am
    The large heavy-duty metal head pulsating sprinkler allows for flexible area coverage up to 90 foot diameter and variable pattern control. The innovative metal head design provides easier to adjust and more ergonomic features. The touch points are larger and easier to grasp for better control. Dis..Price: $23.99
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    Back To My Garden

  • This Week In Gardening – How To Grow Gargantuan Vegetables

    gardentips
    1 Jul 2015 | 12:42 am
    Home-grown vegetables taste better than store bought. Your friends and family are secretly envious of your garden. I’m just curious….what’s the biggest, most outrageous thing you’ve ever grown in your garden? When I was a wee lad I went the to the Austin Thresherman’s Reunion.  It was a end of summer festival in the village […]
  • Gardening in the UK with Jane Perrone

    gardentips
    28 Jun 2015 | 11:14 pm
    Jane Perrone loves being outside, experiencing first hand the infinite intricacies and fascinations.  She loves growing her own delicious, fresh food.  She blogs about gardening at www.Perone.blogs.com  Jane is a journalist and gardening editor at The Guardian, one of the biggest newspapers in England.     In This Episode You’ll Discover … Water conservation in […]
  • Starting Your Own Vegetable Garden with Kirsten Lints

    gardentips
    25 Jun 2015 | 10:52 pm
    Kirsten Lints loves growing veggies, starting seeds, and cooking with fresh, delicious ingredients from her garden.  She is a talented designer and loves the connection between her satisfied clients and their new landscapes.  Kirsten is a certified Professional Horticulturist and a Master Gardener.  www.GardensAliveDesign.com     In This Episode You’ll Discover … Starting seeds indoors […]
  • This Week In Gardening – 10 Garden Bloggers You Need To Read

    gardentips
    24 Jun 2015 | 4:48 am
    Most gardeners today are extremely busy, wouldn’t you agree? I promise you that in each edition of This Week In Gardening you’ll discover at least 3 time-saving short cuts that you can use almost immediately in your garden. It’s a round-up of all the stuff I’ve been writing the past week as well as a […]
  • A Garden of Marvels with Ruth Kassinger

    gardentips
    21 Jun 2015 | 11:10 pm
    Ruth Kassinger loves the way her conservatory garden lifts her spirits during the cold winter months.  She is a celebrated author of ten books for both kids and grownups on science, history and gardening.  Ruth’s brand new book is called A Garden of Marvels and explores the untold history of the first botanists and extraordinary […]
 
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    Grow Our Way

  • How to Get Rid of Crabgrass the Easy Way

    Safer® Brand
    26 Jun 2015 | 5:03 am
    Throughout North America, homeowners confront an annual scourge that can turn a lush, smooth emerald carpet into a weedy mess: crabgrass. Specifically, large crabgrass (Digitaria sanguinalis) — which also goes by the name hairy crabgrass — and smooth crabgrass (Digitaria ischaemum) can invade lawns, flower beds and vegetable gardens, rapidly becoming a nuisance. When one plant can produce an estimated 150,000 new crabgrass seeds from each plant, you know it’s trying to take over your yard! What is Crabgrass and Why Not Just Let it Grow? Crabgrass and other unwanted weeds steal valuable…
  • How to Get Rid of Black Spot on Roses

    Safer® Brand
    23 Jun 2015 | 5:53 am
    It starts gradually — a few yellowed leaves dropped to the ground, a few dark brown or black spots on the leaves you can easily attribute to just natural aging. Then suddenly, your rose bush looks terrible! Leaves are falling off at a rapid clip. Before tumbling to the ground, the leaves are dotted with black spots or splotches that fade into the leaf itself. As the days progress, nearly all the leaves yellow and fall from your prized roses, leaving a thorny skeleton behind. What happened? Was it an insect that attacked over night or something else? Black Spot on Roses If this scenario…
  • When to Fertilize Your Lawn

    Safer® Brand
    12 May 2015 | 12:11 pm
    What do you think of when you hear the word lawn? A rolling green carpet forming a picture-perfect frame for your home? A place for your children to safely play in peace? Whatever image the word lawn conjures in your mind, you’re not alone. Americans love lawns. According to NASA – yes, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration – satellite data reveals that Americans grow more lawn space than corn and wheat. Between residential and commercial lawns, golf courses and other recreational facilities, lawns cover 128,000 square kilometers in America. That’s a lot of lawn! Use Safe…
  • Why Are My Plants Turning Yellow?

    Safer® Brand
    28 Apr 2015 | 7:51 am
    It happens to all gardeners. One day you wake up and realize your tomato plant’s leaves are yellow and you have no idea why. Don’t panic! We are here to help you answer that daunting question of “why are my plant’s leaves turning yellow?” Use the infographic below to understand what your plant might be trying to tell you through different types of yellow leaves. After the graphic, we’ll explore a little more in depth of why leaves turn yellow and brown, and how to give your plants the nutrients they need to stay green. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons…
  • How to Get Rid of Eastern Tent Caterpillars

    Safer® Brand
    23 Apr 2015 | 5:50 am
    If you notice web-like structures between branches of your trees, including your ornamental and fruit trees, then you may be dealing with a common pest found all over North America: the tent caterpillar. These pests are actually the larvae of several types of moths that make their home in your trees and feed on plant leaves.  Tent caterpillars are aptly named for the conspicuous, silk tents they build in the branches of host trees. With severe infestations, they can defoliate your trees. By learning how to get rid of tent caterpillars and finding safe control methods, you’ll help save your…
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    In the Garden...with Mariani Landscape

  • Setting Your Outdoor Dining Table

    Gina Iliopoulos
    1 Jul 2015 | 4:00 am
    Last time we had you over for dinner, today we help you set your own outdoor table.  The season is finally upon is, outdoor events, gatherings, and parties call for special set-up and we have some unique, and quite special … Continue reading →
  • Outdoor Dining with Mariani Landscape

    Gina Iliopoulos
    29 Jun 2015 | 4:00 am
    Well everyone was so enamored with Frank Mariani’s Italian edible garden we thought you might enjoy seeing how the harvest is shared.  Today we show you the outdoor kitchen and dining room.  Below is a view from the garden we … Continue reading →
  • Mariani’s Edible Garden

    Gina Iliopoulos
    26 Jun 2015 | 4:00 am
    We promised you more on the Italian edible garden and we have an amazing tour for you of our own Frank Mariani’s garden.  This garden is more than just edibles, it was created to support the traditional family dinner, with … Continue reading →
  • Italian Edible Garden

    Gina Iliopoulos
    23 Jun 2015 | 4:00 am
    Last time we talked about Italian terra cotta and today we thought you would like to know what was in all those wonderful containers.  By carrying the theme from pots to plants you can create an Italian edible garden.  In … Continue reading →
  • Considering Terra Cotta

    Gina Iliopoulos
    22 Jun 2015 | 4:00 am
    You’ve probably heard many suggestions on creating the perfect display container like “thrill, fill, and spill”.  There are a variety of different ways to describe how to build a striking container garden.  But have you thought about the actual pots … Continue reading →
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    Harmony Gardens Landscaping

  • The Organic Way to Fertilize your Garden

    HGadmin
    30 Jun 2015 | 8:22 am
    Is there any Organic Way to Fertilize your Garden? Building a healthy soil is the basis of healthy plants whether they are flowers, vegetables or herbs. All plants need nutrients and they get their nutrients from the soil they are planted in. Nutrients in the soil thus need to be replenished. This replenishment is called fertilizing. Organic fertilizers for your garden Manures: provides nitrogen content, trace elements and organic matter to build a healthy soil ecosystem. Fresh animal manure can burn plants and so should always be composted. Composted manures are weed seed free also.
  • Attracting Wildlife to your Garden

    HGadmin
    30 Jun 2015 | 8:14 am
    It is nearing the end of winter—what are your plans for your garden this spring? This spring why don’t you figure your wild neighbours into your outdoor plans and create a wildlife garden? Eight tips to make your gardens more wildlife-friendly: 1) Plant lots of colourful and scented flowers to attract butterflies and hummingbirds 2) Ensure to include areas of shrubbery and low bushes to make homes for birds and small animals. Some varieties will provide berries attracting songbirds like cardinals and finches. 3) Install a pond or water feature to attract animals and birds […]…
  • Mulching

    HGadmin
    27 May 2015 | 6:54 am
    Mulching is applying a ground cover to planted areas as part of ongoing maintenance and conservation management. Mulch is a gardener’s best friend. There is no other gardening task that provides as much payback as mulching. Objectives of Mulching are: 1) Insulate soil from extreme temperature (hot and cold) changes thus maintaining uniform soil temperatures 2) To protect the soil from structural damage that results from winter freezing 3) Conserving soil moisture by reducing losses thru evaporation 4) Keeps soil moist therefore making nutrients more available to plants 5) Reduces soil…
  • Lawn Fertilization

    HGadmin
    19 May 2015 | 6:43 am
    Fertilization is the addition of necessary nutritional elements to keep your lawn’s soil healthy. The soil itself needs to replenish its nutrients so it can continue to keep your lawn healthy. All fertilizers provide three main nutrients for the grass which are listed by percentage weight on fertilizer packages. These are nitrogen(N) which is necessary for grass stem and leaf growth; phosphorous(P) which promotes grass root, fruit and flower growth; and potassium(K) which assists other nutrients to function well within the plant. The ratio of nutrients are always listed in the order of N…
  • Why is turf (lawns and sod) so important in the landscape?

    HGadmin
    14 May 2015 | 6:20 pm
    Why is turf (lawns and sod) so important in the landscape?  With recent problems of grub infestations in the Ottawa area many have chosen to get rid of their turf. But turf is very important within the landscape as there are many benefits of turf. Turf grass is North America’s largest agricultural crop. Turf grass is an integral part of our serene and beautiful outdoor living space. Benefits of turf grass (lawns and sod): 1) Business and Economic Improvement: lawns increase the value of our property by 15 to 20 per cent. They improve curb […] The post Why is turf (lawns and sod) so…
 
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    Tipsplants.com

  • Kopper King Hibiscus – Major Features and Care Tips

    admin
    23 Jun 2015 | 7:14 am
    HibiscusKopper king hibiscus is one of the modern day hybrids created by crossbreeding the hardy hibiscuses. Just like all the hybrids you will not be able to grow it from the seeds as the child plants might look different from the original. If you look after it and cultivate it the right way this deciduous shrub will keep you happy with its big beautiful flowers for quite a few years. The main distinctive feature is the copper or burgundy colored dark foliage. The dark leaf plays up the hand sized white to pink flowers. The Distinctive Breed Features:
  • Hibiscus Bouquet: For the Unforgettable Tropical Themed Wedding

    admin
    23 Jun 2015 | 6:45 am
    HibiscusHibiscuses are known as garden flowers with all kinds of hibiscus seeds and plants for sale. There are numerous gardeners and fans that love the variety that hibiscuses can offer combined with their affordability and ease of cultivating.
  • Hibiscus Mutabilis – A Symbol of South

    admin
    23 Jun 2015 | 5:51 am
    HibiscusThis type of plant is the ancestor of the native hibiscuses that grow in Southern and Gulf States hence the second name Confederate rose as this plant is very popular among the local gardeners with its huge flowers and simple care. It belongs to the hardy perennials and feels good in mild climates surviving mild winters well. Another representative of the breed is Rubrum hibiscus mutabilis or single confederate rose. It has five distinctive petals common for all hibiscuses but does not have the distinctive skirt.
  • Double Hibiscus: The Most Unusual Exotic Variety 7 Major Planting Rules

    admin
    23 Jun 2015 | 5:37 am
    HibiscusA double hibiscus is a member of the broad hibiscus family that has been cultivated and broadened by the nurseries all over the world. The flowers are really beautiful with the same five base blooms but they have ruffle skirts and the blossoms are double making them look even bigger.
  • Seven Major Rose Mallow Hibiscus Care Tips

    admin
    18 Jun 2015 | 6:07 am
    HibiscusThe rose mallow hibiscus is native to the wet swamp areas and creek edges of the southwest USA. They are easy to grow in the garden following out major care tips and tricks. Since it is a natural breed the plant will be easy to look after and cultivate. Just like all the other hardy hibiscuses rose mallow can handle droughts and survive mild winters.
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