Gardening

  • Most Topular Stories

  • The Garden Clock is Ticking....

    The Hortiholic
    Tony Fulmer
    18 Oct 2014 | 11:50 am
    "The days dwindle down to a precious few" is so true for the October garden. As temperatures drop and you face the reality of rain becoming snow, the urgency to complete fall garden tasks becomes almost manic.You've probably already made the decision whether to cut your perennials now or let them stand as snowy winter sentinels. You've ripped the tired annuals out by their fuzzy little roots. What else could there possibly be to do? Want a few reminders?1) Don't let fall pass without planting bulbs. The soil temps are finally cool enough to put all the spring flowering beauties in. Who said,…
  • Mustard from Seed to Seed: An Epic Journey

    You Grow Girl
    Gayla Trail
    23 Oct 2014 | 9:37 am
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  • Houseplants Part II – Home Air Purification

    Shawna Coronado
    Shawna Coronado
    23 Oct 2014 | 4:41 am
    As a part of my two part series on how to grow houseplants I bring you an indoor garden idea and product review – a houseplant stand that will not leak on your floors and a great list of air purification houseplants that might help you keep your house filled with cleaner air. With our homes filled with computers, electronics, carpet fumes, and all types of chemicals, keeping our indoor air quality clean can be a challenge. Some houseplants make great chemical absorbing tools. There was a two year study done by the Associated Landscape Contractors of America (ALCA) and the National…
  • Smoke On A Rope: Wildflower Wednesday

    Cold Climate Gardening
    Kathy Purdy
    23 Oct 2014 | 2:25 pm
    Driving down country roads on the way to town, I noticed what looked like brown fur in many of the shrubs along the road. I finally realized that the “fur” was actually the seedheads of Virgin’s bower, Clematis virginiana, which Prairie Moon Nursery fittingly calls “prairie smoke on a rope.” Virgin’s bower is a native […]
  • birding by ear, with cornell lab of o’s all about bird song

    A Way To Garden
    margaret
    20 Oct 2014 | 6:44 am
    EVER HEARD the expression “birding by ear”? Despite my years-old collection of CDs (and even older tapes!), I have never [read more…] The post birding by ear, with cornell lab of o’s all about bird song appeared first on A Way To Garden.
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    You Grow Girl

  • Mustard from Seed to Seed: An Epic Journey

    Gayla Trail
    23 Oct 2014 | 9:37 am
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  • RECIPE: Concord Grape Juice

    Gayla Trail
    1 Oct 2014 | 3:07 pm
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  • Chasing the Elusive White Borage

    Gayla Trail
    23 Sep 2014 | 9:34 am
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  • Experiments in Dyeing with Plants

    Gayla Trail
    12 Sep 2014 | 11:59 am
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  • What’cha Growin? Podcast Episode #10 David Leeman

    Gayla Trail
    10 Sep 2014 | 7:09 pm
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    Shawna Coronado

  • Houseplants Part II – Home Air Purification

    Shawna Coronado
    23 Oct 2014 | 4:41 am
    As a part of my two part series on how to grow houseplants I bring you an indoor garden idea and product review – a houseplant stand that will not leak on your floors and a great list of air purification houseplants that might help you keep your house filled with cleaner air. With our homes filled with computers, electronics, carpet fumes, and all types of chemicals, keeping our indoor air quality clean can be a challenge. Some houseplants make great chemical absorbing tools. There was a two year study done by the Associated Landscape Contractors of America (ALCA) and the National…
  • Houseplants Part I – Books and Ideas

    Shawna
    20 Oct 2014 | 4:00 am
    Houseplants terrify me. I am gradually changing my mind about houseplants and see them as a great way to bring some garden love into the house at the end of the garden season. It’s fall, it’s nippy outside, we need some green happiness and inspiration, and face it – there’s only so many martini’s we can drink. Now is the time to venture into the new, the unknown, the houseplant! Two books that have given me a fantastic education on interior gardening are written by experts on houseplants that really know how to guide your planting with smart techniques and tips:…
  • Plant a Siberian Squill Bulb (Scilla siberica)

    Shawna Coronado
    17 Oct 2014 | 9:56 am
    One of the most delightful bulbs found growing in early spring in the Midwestern garden are Siberian Squill or  Scilla siberica. They offer a peek of color when the world is still cold and are a perfect contribution to a bulb garden. Below is a page from my latest book, the Illinois Getting Started Garden Guide, that will give you a fantastic idea on how to get started growing the smart little bulb (photo credit for the Scilla above is from the amazing Kylee Baumle of OurLittleAcre.com). Siberian Squill Botanical Name – Scilla siberica Bloom Period and Seasonal Colors – Blue,…
  • Tips For Growing White Pumpkins

    Shawna
    13 Oct 2014 | 4:03 am
    ‘Tis the season for pumpkins. I loved these displays of blue and white pumpkins at the Morton Arboretum. While it is too late to plant a pumpkin this season, it is not too late to start planning the garden for next season. I’ve fallen madly in love with the white pumpkins. Jung Seed has many varieties, but I think the ‘Full Moon’ variety is easy to find in seed and is an experiment in growing; it can grow to 60 pounds and 3 feet high. Smaller varieties of white pumpkin include Crystal Star and Baby Boo Miniature. All are whimsical and fun. Perfect for painting or…
  • Giant Halloween Spider Decoration

    Shawna
    9 Oct 2014 | 4:55 am
    Green Tip: Reuse whatever you can from home to make crafts for the holiday season instead of spending money – like building a giant halloween spider decoration! (***This post was originally posted in 2010, but I brought it back for a repeat because SPIDERS that’s why! Enjoy!!) Halloween is here and it is time to come up with a creative craft idea for the garden. I reused old materials to build our favorite Halloween spider, Fluffy. That makes Fluffy “green” and me happy because we saved money. We built Fluffy the Spider a few years ago and you can tell he is stored outside in…
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    Cold Climate Gardening

  • Smoke On A Rope: Wildflower Wednesday

    Kathy Purdy
    23 Oct 2014 | 2:25 pm
    Driving down country roads on the way to town, I noticed what looked like brown fur in many of the shrubs along the road. I finally realized that the “fur” was actually the seedheads of Virgin’s bower, Clematis virginiana, which Prairie Moon Nursery fittingly calls “prairie smoke on a rope.” Virgin’s bower is a native […]
  • Frost-Tolerant Flowers: Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day October 2014

    Kathy Purdy
    15 Oct 2014 | 7:38 pm
    Life as we know it doesn’t end with the first frost. Beauty doesn’t stop, either. We have had several light frosts (28.5F/-1.9C was the coldest) but no hard freezes, which means many garden plants are still going strong. (Do you know the difference between a frost and a freeze?) Flowers in the house I was […]
  • Where’s The Best Place to Buy Colchicums?

    Kathy Purdy
    10 Oct 2014 | 6:49 pm
    Where’s the best place to buy colchicums? Two people have asked me that in the past week, and I figure if two readers are actually asking me, there must be quite a few more who are wondering the same thing, but not wondering aloud. When is the best time to buy colchicums? I find I […]
  • How to Fortify Your Roses Against the Cold

    Kathy Purdy
    5 Oct 2014 | 7:22 pm
    Jack Falker is a rose enthusiast who gardens in Minnesota. Minnesota–in case you don’t have the USDA Hardiness Map memorized–is entirely a cold climate state, consisting of Zone 3 and 4. (Okay, there is a teeny bit of Zone 5 in the most recent map, but still.) One can’t grow roses in Minnesota without knowing […]
  • Not White Snakeroot but Late Boneset: Wildflower Wednesday

    Kathy Purdy
    3 Oct 2014 | 7:56 pm
    How many of you have wait-and-see plants in your garden? You know, when you look at a plant in spring and think What the heck is that? Did I plant it, or is it a weed? I guess I’ll just wait and see. Last fall, I planted a bunch of small plants in the Deck […]
 
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    A Way To Garden

  • birding by ear, with cornell lab of o’s all about bird song

    margaret
    20 Oct 2014 | 6:44 am
    EVER HEARD the expression “birding by ear”? Despite my years-old collection of CDs (and even older tapes!), I have never [read more…] The post birding by ear, with cornell lab of o’s all about bird song appeared first on A Way To Garden.
  • nigel slater’s potatoes with spices and spinach (win his new book ‘eat’)

    margaret
    15 Oct 2014 | 8:53 am
    ‘SOMETIMES we just want to eat.” So says Nigel Slater in “Eat: The Little Book of Fast Food,” his latest [read more…] The post nigel slater’s potatoes with spices and spinach (win his new book ‘eat’) appeared first on A Way To Garden.
  • overwintering tender plants, with kathy tracey

    margaret
    13 Oct 2014 | 6:19 am
    ARE YOU JUGGLING the tender plants, playing a game of “Beat the Clock”—or is it “Beat the Mercury”—as temperature increasingly [read more…] The post overwintering tender plants, with kathy tracey appeared first on A Way To Garden.
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    The Occasional Gardener

  • Autumn Leaves, Sort of

    15 Oct 2014 | 12:06 am
    Now that I am living in an endless tropical summer I realize how much an ever changing temperate environment drives you forward into new cycles of activity or states of mind.  The longing for warm summer days, the thrill of fall in New York City when everyone is back from their summer sojourns, the inertia of winter and for gardeners the rush of a new growing season.I have come to the realisation however that the botanical changes that define each season from bud to flower and fruit and then bare branches is something that happens here too - just not in synchronicity. Take the…
  • The Patient Path

    15 Aug 2014 | 8:17 am
    In the last few weeks, the stone path I laid in the dark verandah has finally 'clicked'. It's taken the best part of a couple of years. It's a short path that takes you from the concrete verandah, through the border and an opening in the bamboo fence. I found most of the 'stones' in the orchard where I think many years ago some renovation had occured and these broken pieces ended up being disposed there. They are really chunks of cement and gravel but having been laying around for years in the cooler shade of the orchard, had become mossy.Having transferred and laid them, which took a…
  • Malay Apples

    20 Jun 2014 | 8:11 am
    In the last few years of living in New York City I tried consciously to eat more seasonally which was all well and good in the summer months but as the seasons progressed into the colder months the selection would inevitably thin to root vegetables and apples. I ate a lot of apples. But then I did love going down to the farmers market at Union square and filling up my backpack with them.Here now in the tropics there are no heirloom apples to be found - just the bright red or green homogenous supermarket varieties - Granny Smiths and Red Delicious from Australia and New Zealand. Their…
  • Tropical Chocolate

    29 May 2014 | 8:50 pm
    Its amazing how a few small changes can substantially change the look of a garden. A few new acquisitions for the Dark Verandah have done exactly that. Last saturday on my usual hunt at the farmers market, I found not one but two chocolate colored coleus. Week after week this one vendor would have coleus but always in brighter colors of reds and pinks, then this week he had these two - a ruffled chocolate edge one and one with chocolate splashes.Having had some experience now with the shifting personalites of Coleus I'm going to keep these two in pots and in heavier shade. I've…
  • Riverine Wilderness

    5 May 2014 | 9:50 am
    A while ago, I visited Tanjung Piai, a listed Ramsar site, ie a wetland of international importance. To be honest, it was depressing. Poorly maintained, you could see from the boardwalks, garbage tangled in the mangrove roots. There was a stench that distracted from the beauty of the surrounding flora and as soon as you reached the coast edge, the horizon had a line of tankers en route to nearby Singapore and beyond. The fluctuations in tidal waves they create erode the shrinking coast, their illegal dumping of toxic sludge poison it further. It was hard to connect with this wilderness…
 
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    Plant Whatever Brings You Joy

  • Time for Gingersnaps!

    Kathryn
    20 Oct 2014 | 5:39 pm
    October! A favorite month and one that gets me thinking of spicy sweets with lots of cinnamon and ginger. So it was a lovely synchronicity when my dear friend Maloah mentioned her family’s old recipe for gingersnaps, which I immediately requested. What better treat to hand out out to Trick or Treaters on Halloween? As fate would have it, Maloah’s mother, Buffy Treat, included that particular cookie recipe in a cookbook she lovingly edited back in the 80’s for the Heifer Project International. “Peace begins where the hungry are fed,” says the cover of her book.
  • Love Letter to My Blog on the Occasion of Our 7th Blogiversary!

    Kathryn
    15 Sep 2014 | 6:33 pm
    Congratulations! The Story In the early 90’s I left my home in Mill Valley in Marin Co., and made my way up to the tiny town of Little River, on the coast of Mendocino Co. I simply wanted to “go to the country and get a dog.” So I did. Here I am with Moxie, my first Border Collie, whom I adored, in the woods, on our two acres, in front of our garage and guest cabin and our first little flower plot. Color us happy! And there I planted a garden, the first in a long while, and this simple act became the inception of what was to become my book Plant Whatever Brings You Joy:…
  • Good Old Fashioned Applesauce!

    Kathryn
    3 Sep 2014 | 1:55 pm
    As with all the most delicious concoctions we make in the kitchen the fresher the ingredients, the better the outcome will be. That ladder and tree are in my back garden, so you can well imagine these apples are fresh–and organic! Sure there’s a moth or two in there, but for some blessed reason those moths dig into the center of the apple when they choose to inhabit, which is very handy for a cook with a good paring knife. Yep. A bug here or there may not sound appealing but upon consideration, and the knowledge that commercial apples can be sprayed up to 26 times in a season,…
  • Cherish the Beauty of the Season

    Kathryn
    30 Jul 2014 | 1:17 pm
    I must confess that all summer long I have been hovering over a particular canna lily just outside my front door hoping it would blossom before summer’s end. Last year it did not have time to come to fruition. This year I have not been disappointed and I take great delight in the spectacular persimmon colored lilies that now grace the entrance to my home. Three decades ago I was hovering over my own splendid blossom inside my own round tummy. Inside was a precious being getting ready to emerge who was my own beloved Antonia. Unfettered by any ground outside my front door, I took my round…
  • Flower Games of Children

    Kathryn
    21 Jul 2014 | 2:31 pm
    Summer brings the abundant gift of many kinds of flowers, and, so, it was not unlikely a friend and I would begin reminiscing recently about games we played as children with various blossoms and plants in our childhood gardens. Here are the ones we most readily recalled. Daisy chains “Daisy chain” by User Ecrips on en.wikipedia Who has not spent time sitting in the grass lacing daisies together into a lovely chain, which one could then decide how to use–as a bracelet, a necklace, or, if long enough, as a crown in our hair? What a lovely memory. Wishing on dandelions It…
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    May Dreams Gardens

  • Wildflower Wednesday - Flowers in the Lawn

    Carol
    22 Oct 2014 | 6:57 pm
    Pretty little mystery flower in the lawn I've spent time the last three evenings on my hands and knees and sometimes on my butt planting bulbs for Glory of the Snow,  Chionodoxa gigantia (also known as Chionodoxa lucillia), in my back lawn. I bought 1,000 bulbs of Glory of the Snow, which doesn't take as long as you might think to plant. I timed my first 300 bulbs.  40 minutes.  Not bad.  
  • Every garden is a story

    Carol
    19 Oct 2014 | 6:32 pm
    A garden is more than plants and flowers. A garden is the story of a gardener. Each season is a new chapter. Each plant and flower adds a sentence or two. Some gardens are made up of many stories, when they are tended by gardeners who have come and gone, each adding their chapters to a long tale. Sometimes, the story of a garden is a mystery. What was the gardener thinking? Where did she
  • Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day - October 2014

    Carol
    14 Oct 2014 | 9:05 pm
    Autumn crocus, Crocus speciosus Welcome to Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day for October 2014. Here in my USDA Hardiness Zone 6a garden in central Indiana, I am pleased to introduce a new bloom in my garden for mid-fall. Please give a hearty GBBD welcome to the Autumn Crocus, Crocus speciosus. It's nice to have crocuses blooming in the fall.  Just like in the spring, the first one bloomed and
  • Magical Autumn Crocus - A Story

    Carol
    12 Oct 2014 | 6:28 am
    Once upon a time, in the autumn time, a bouquet of garden fairies were sitting in a garden, resting after a long day spent painting tree leaves in the traditional colors of fall.   The garden fairies were all covered in fall colors - gold, orange, crimson, yellow, burnt umber, brown and all colors in between.  They were tired but satisfied they had done as good a job as they had ever done
  • Ten things your garden wants you to do this fall.

    Carol
    6 Oct 2014 | 7:13 pm
    Your garden wants you to come out do some things this fall. Really. It does. Here are the ten things it wants you to do. Get rid of the dead stuff. While you are at it, get rid of any plant you don't like and compost it. After all, growing the plants you love is one of the secrets to achieving happiness in your garden. Plus you will love your garden if you are at least growing the plants
 
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    Backyard Gardening Blog

  • Growing William Shakespeare’s Garden

    Administrator
    16 Oct 2014 | 6:13 pm
    So there was a guy, you may have heard of him, William Shakespeare, he was sort of a big deal. He was of course an English writer and his works have been popular for almost 500 years, that is some staying power. I actually like his stuff, I’ve read Shakespeare for pleasure, I’m that sort […]
  • How to kill moles

    Administrator
    24 Sep 2014 | 6:17 am
    I hate moles, really I do. I know there are people out there that probably do not condone killing any animal, even moles, I’m not that type of person, but if you are, I can respect that, though this blog post is not for you. Personally I like animals fine, I try to encourage animal […]
  • GMO crops are safe, healthy, and good for the environment.

    Administrator
    15 Sep 2014 | 7:03 am
    Controversy time, as a man a science (ahem, real science) I’ve been perpetually annoyed at all the anti-GMO pseudo BS out there, and I thought “What if there is a nice, accurate, informative, article out there letting people know the facts?” Then I figured, I might as well write the article. This post will be […]
  • Double Coneflowers

    Administrator
    30 Jul 2014 | 6:37 am
    I find myself lately really enjoying double coneflowers (echinacea). Often in gardening we must make choices, do we want big, complex, showy blossoms, or do we want blossoms for a long period of time. Stella de Oro daylily blooms for a long time with relatively small plain yellow blooms, but there are other daylilies with […]
  • The World’s Largest Flowers

    Administrator
    24 Jul 2014 | 8:36 am
    I had a chance to experience two of the worlds biggest flowers recently, only mere weeks apart. The first was the infamous corpse flower, amorphophallus titanum (which means giant misshapen phallus). There is a specimen at MSU near my house that was flowering for the first time in years, and I dragged my kids there […]
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    Digging

  • Autumn amble at New York Botanical Garden

    Pam/Digging
    24 Oct 2014 | 3:50 am
    After touring Wave Hill on October 11, my daughter and I took the train to the New York Botanical Garden. Although both NYBG and Wave Hill are located in the Bronx, mass transit between the two ate up some time, and we had tickets to a Broadway show that evening. We knew we wouldn’t be able to stay long enough to see all 250 acres and 50 gardens. Rather than stress about it, we explored at random, taking paths that wound around enormous boulders fringed by Japanese forest grass and white anemones and into woods tinged yellow and orange. The afternoon was overcast and chilly, but the…
  • Visit to Wave Hill in New York City, Part 2

    Pam/Digging
    22 Oct 2014 | 5:09 pm
    Wave Hill, an estate garden in the Bronx in New York City, which I visited on October 11, was romantically blowsy in the Pergola, Elliptical, and Flower Gardens near the entry. But it got a bit bolder, even Hollywood, in the Aquatic and Monocot Gardens. These two gardens share a large, hedged “room” that visually separates them from the rest of the gardens. I’m nuts about those Dr. Seussian yuccas at the far end, their pincushion heads atop skinny trunks of varying heights. Like golden fireworks exploding against dark-green hedges, you can almost hear them going pow Pow POW!
  • Visit to Wave Hill, a Hudson River estate garden in New York City

    Pam/Digging
    20 Oct 2014 | 12:15 pm
    I traveled to New York City with my daughter on October 10 to see public gardens. On Saturday, our first full day in New York, a chilly rain didn’t keep us from visiting Wave Hill, a 28-acre estate garden in the Bronx with a million-dollar view of the Hudson River and the Palisades, sheer cliffs of exposed, vertically striated stone on the opposite shore. Wave Hill had a succession of owners and a few famous tenants between its construction in 1843 and 1960, when it was deeded to the City of New York. Mark Twain leased the place from 1901 to 1903, and as a boy Theodore Roosevelt…
  • The High Line park in NYC, a skyline promenade, part 2

    Pam/Digging
    19 Oct 2014 | 1:00 pm
    At the end of Part 1 of my post about visiting the High Line in New York City last weekend, we’d just entered Chelsea Market Passage. After the dimness of the passageway, you exit into bright sunlight on the aptly named Sun Deck. Wooden lounge chairs resembling stacked pallets are surely the most popular seats on the High Line. If someone stands up, a passerby darts over to snag a seat. Some of the chairs have wheels that roll along rails, allowing you to cozy up to your neighbor. A water feature across the path puddles water on the paving edge. A bog garden makes use of the overflow.
  • Up on the High Line, a skyline promenade

    Pam/Digging
    19 Oct 2014 | 2:57 am
    Have you ever flown across the country to see one garden? I did last weekend. Rapturous articles and blog posts about the High Line, New York City’s garden-park conversion of an abandoned elevated rail line through the city’s old Meatpacking District, had seduced me for 5 years. One day last June, I suddenly resolved to go see it and invited my teenage daughter to join me on a girls’ garden-visiting, Broadway show-watching, big-city adventure. We flew to NYC last Friday, toured Wave Hill and New York Botanical Garden and saw an evening performance of the hilarious musical A…
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    Blithewold Blogs

  • Not goodbye

    Kristin Green
    24 Oct 2014 | 11:57 am
    I’d prefer to think that the season is in transition rather than ending but when we start throwing some of summer’s best blooms into the bed of Blithewold’s truck, it definitely feels more like a goodbye than a see-you-later. This week, once again, the rain and a woolly nor’easter held off just long enough for […]
  • Celebrating Our Arboretum

    Kelly Sobolewski
    23 Oct 2014 | 9:29 am
    There’s something very new and exciting going on this year in Blithewold’s Visitor’s Center during Christmas at Blithewold. Gail Read, Gardens Manager, Kris Green, Interpretive Horticulturist, and Betsy Ekholm, Horticulturist, have partnered with the garden volunteers to design a display to Celebrate Our Arboretum. Essentially, they are pulling different natural features from throughout the Grounds, preserving […]
  • A rabbit’s eye view with Noel Kingsbury

    Kristin Green
    17 Oct 2014 | 10:31 am
    We are so lucky that yesterday’s rain held off just long enough to take a ground-level tour of Blithewold’s gardens with British garden designer/plantsman/author, Noel Kingsbury. He showed us, plant by plant, exactly what to look for to help predict how different plants will behave in our gardens. He reminded us that plant growth falls along […]
  • Christmas at Blithewold “You Are Invited”

    Kelly Sobolewski
    13 Oct 2014 | 12:03 pm
    Although Blithewold is closing to the public this week, it is anything but quiet around the Mansion. We are now preparing to get the Mansion dressed up for Christmas! It is a bit hard to imagine a snowy winter in the midst of this crisp fall weather, but our decorating volunteers have been prepping and […]
  • Moving into fall

    Kristin Green
    10 Oct 2014 | 11:33 am
    It was chilly this morning. No frost yet (perish the thought — our average first frost date falls in early November) but night temperatures in the forties are definitely giving us a taste of what’s to come along with a chance to acclimatize, and a good reason to pull sweaters out of summer storage. And after […]
 
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    Ellis Hollow

  • Remembering Jade (1997-2014)

    Craig
    22 Oct 2014 | 4:34 pm
    The intensity and smarts of her border collie heritage. The heart of her Lab side. My best friend for 17 years. What more can I say. She loved laying on fresh mulch in the sun on a cool day. Or when it was hot, hanging out under Rosie the Airstream while Elly worked on her remodel. Running through the snow. Chasing the deer back on their side of the 'invisible fence'. Always with a ball or -- more often -- a Norway spruce cone -- in her mouth begging for me to play fetch. She knew pretty well when the bag on the lawn mower would be full and would meet me at that spot to get in a throw before…
  • I’m still here …

    Craig
    3 Aug 2014 | 1:48 pm
    New granddaughter, life, work etc. has kept me away from the blogosphere. (Major triage in garden management this year.) But I did manage to take a few pix this weekend.
  • Signs of spring

    Craig
    16 Mar 2014 | 3:46 pm
    Lows tonight are supposed to be around zero. But despite some stormy weather this last week, there have been signs of spring. Images below are reposted from the Cornell Horticulture blog which has been sucking up a lot of my blogging energy these days. Flower bulb research intern Rose de Wit collects data at Kenneth Post Lab greenhouses. Currently in the banner rotation at the Cornell University homepage. Snowdrops (Galanthus nivalis) bloom in Minns Garden on Tower Road. Students in the course Creating the Urban Eden: Woody Plant Selection, Design, and Landscape Establishment (HORT/LA…
  • RIP Pete Seeger

    Craig
    28 Jan 2014 | 4:54 pm
    94 Reasons Pete Seeger Matters - Gawker tribute.
  • 10 favorite photos (and scans and videos) of 2013

    Craig
    31 Dec 2013 | 9:51 am
    Have I really neglected this blog since Labor Day? Apologies. Life has been hectic. Plus I've been able to scratch my blogging itch some at work through the Cornell Horticulture blog. The little vacation from blogging here has made me start yearning for spring already and getting back to shooting photos and creating scans. Following Les's lead at A Tidewater Garden, I figured I'd pull together a quick collection of favorites from the past year, drawing from both blogs. In most cases, you can click on images for a larger view. New Year's cyclamen With a corm nearly the size of my fist, this…
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    Ledge and Gardens

  • Frost Finale

    Layanee DeMerchant
    23 Oct 2014 | 2:26 am
    Frost signals a seasonal finale. The exuberance of the garden is gone and the gardener is left with subtleties. The small blooms and berries of fall would be overlooked in the abundance of the summer garden but late in the season, after the frost, their significance increases. Who would even notice the tiny purple flowers which develop on the mint plant if they were to appear among the peonies, roses and delphiniums?   Color has shifted from outrageous orange to warm bronze and copper. The bright foliage of the maples is now underfoot. Scuffling through this debris brings the…
  • Bloom Day - October 15, 2014

    Layanee DeMerchant
    15 Oct 2014 | 5:37 am
    The summer really is gone and there is the sweet smell of decay in the air. There has been no frost here yet which is a bit unusual although blackened foliage in the valley a mile away tells a different tale. The star of the fall garden in New England really is foliage but I do have some late blooming annuals and perennials which just hate to give up and they do add some late drama to the landscape. There are few of us who don't have the 'Pink Sheffield' chrysanthemum starting to bloom. Its apricot flowers blend well with the bronze, copper and reds of fall. The hydrangea flowers…
  • On Golden Fronds

    Layanee DeMerchant
    1 Oct 2014 | 12:52 pm
    I take them for granted, these ferns. They seem to be impervious to deer, drought and drenches. They form large colonies and they are a problem if they invade the perennial border. I pull some out each spring but I leave those along the driveway and also those that crop up in crevices which would be seem to defy any robust plant growth. Robust they are though. This fern is Dennstaedtia punctilobula or the hayscented fern. It is deciduous and it is at the end of its growth cycle. It turns yellow and then brown and then it disappears under a heavy snow.  I do take them for granted…
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    the back quarter acre

  • Daffodil inventory

    16 Oct 2014 | 6:00 pm
    Perhaps I shouldn't be surprised that, after several years of blithely shovelling dozens and dozens of daffodil bulbs into every available garden bed, when it came to placing this fall's bulb order, I had less than a total recollection of what had been planted where. I knew that there were lots of different varieties of daffodils and that some have petered out over the years while others are going strong. Great.  A few beds sport a single variety of daffodil--"Mount Hood" skirts the back property line and pheasant's eye…
  • Lobelia: les liaisons dangereuses

    24 Sep 2014 | 10:09 am
    Maybe I didn't know this?  Or I didn't care? Or I thought that I could make it all be different?  Oh, the stories that we tell ourselves!The Great Blue Lobelia Lobelia siphilitica that I tucked several years ago into the crook of the rain garden has adapted marvelously well. The parent plant is healthy and, this time of year, heavy-blooming. All it seems to need is moist soil, a cool corner, and a measure of sun and shade.  For these favors, I have been generously repaid.  Thanks, right? Well, gratitude has not yet tipped to grievance, but I can see…
  • I love living in a blue state . . .

    2 Sep 2014 | 2:04 pm
    . . . and I'm not limiting myself to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. No, I mean the blue--or almost blue--tones of late summer flowers. Sadly, I've got the blues this year from some of my favorites' failure to thrive: the larkspur has been effectively eliminated by rabbit predation and the blue flag iris sent up only a single flower.  But other cultivars have fared fair better.   Salvia farinacea "Victoria Blue"Spiky clumps of annual blue salvia flourish just about anywhere they are planted.  They look great--even when menaced by storm clouds--at the front of…
  • Sweet end of summer

    25 Aug 2014 | 7:27 pm
    Cool temperatures this past week have stirred up conversations about an early fall.  The plant world, too, seems to be pushing the seasons forward.The end of summer is sweetened by the sight and scent of the appropriately named Summer Sweet Clethra alnifolia "September Beauty." Because these natives flourish in damp, acidic soils, several are sited adjacent to the rain garden and another next to a down spout. This time of year, they are over-loaded with intoxicating pure white racemes. Bees and butterflies flit, land, and sip like reeling, happy drunks. No complaints from that…
  • Geraniums: celebrating the commonplace

    8 Aug 2014 | 10:41 am
    Until a couple of years ago, I had always lumped geraniums into that group of trailer trash flowers--carnations, impatiens, petunias--that Big Box stores and uninspired landscapers inflict upon horticulturally sensitive souls. With such diversity of plant life available, why bother with geraniums? They are boring and clichéd. And they smell funny.But then I went to France.  Specifically, I went to Alsace, the eastern region of France that borders the river Rhine.  This is the country of geraniums, half-timbered buildings, and Riesling wine. Geraniums…
 
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    A Leafy Indulgence

  • Vacation In Quirky Cedar Key

    Swimray
    12 Oct 2014 | 7:26 pm
    A few days before the convention were spent on the gulf coast of Florida in the small, quaint, walkable, low-key town of Cedar Key. There are no stop lights, no chain restaurants, and no chain hotels in the town that is known as 'old Florida' (before the mouse arrived.)I will spare the 'where is this place' theme from last year's trip because I doubt anyone but local residents would know the answer. As this is a gardening blog, I will try keeping to that subject with some photos I found interesting around town.Tuesday was Burger Day at AdaBlue Cafe on the outskirts of town. The gardener's…
  • My Three Garden Tips

    Swimray
    27 Sep 2014 | 7:06 pm
    We all pick up secrets along our garden journey. I have a few that I will call tips since I picked them up from somewhere in the past, but they are no longer secrets since being published here. I wish I could take credit for thinking of them, but will take credit for passing them on.Tame Your BuddleiaEverywhere I look, I see Buddleia growing wild and free, out of control. I wanted to keep my buddleia tamed. First, I cut it down to within a foot (30 cm) of the ground for the winter. When it begins its spring growth, I will pinch every shoot after two pairs of leaves. Two shoots will develop…
  • Long Day At Longwood

    Swimray
    23 Aug 2014 | 7:45 am
    This gardener of over a decade has never been to Longwood Gardens in Pennsylvania, or to the other nearby gardener ports of call. Longwood Gardens was on the list of staycation day trips assigned to any weekend with nothing else planned.The battle plan was to attack on Saturday in August. The weather was to be glorious. The route was arranged, camera batteries charged, and walking clothes readied. Then it rained Friday evening and the meteorologists changed their tune to Saturday showers. Dark overcast skies ready to burst open greeted Saturday morning so the trip was off.After plans were…
  • August 2014 Bloom Day

    Swimray
    15 Aug 2014 | 6:06 am
    Garden Bloggers' Bloom DayWhat's blooming in the garden on the 15th of the month Rather than the same ol' same ol' let's present some of the newer items rearing their heads this year. I will throw in a few items that have not been here a while, too. I even put the photos on the X-Large setting for this posting. Today it's about the pictures -- not the story.The Irish Eyes are smiling. This rudbeckia "Irish Eyes" with the green centers was planted from seed twice in the past two years, but this was the first year anything survived and bloomed. They are growing but blooming sparsely. Let's see…
  • Thomas Jefferson's Chinese Ixia

    Swimray
    6 Aug 2014 | 8:10 pm
    Belacamda Lily was Belamcanda chinensis until about a year ago. Then botanists started playing with the names of some plants due to newfound genetic knowledge, and presto. The name changed to Iris domestica. Could its leaves actually resemble the irs family?The seeds hopped into my goodie bag at the annual Seed Swap in February 2012. Here we go again with another free plant from the seed swap or from a neighbor. During the first year, they were sown indoors and transplanted, producing one flower stalk that summer. The next year, (last summer) the plant came back half-heartedly, but did not…
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    A Leafy Indulgence

  • Vacation In Quirky Cedar Key

    Swimray
    12 Oct 2014 | 7:26 pm
    A few days before the convention were spent on the gulf coast of Florida in the small, quaint, walkable, low-key town of Cedar Key. There are no stop lights, no chain restaurants, and no chain hotels in the town that is known as 'old Florida' (before the mouse arrived.)I will spare the 'where is this place' theme from last year's trip because I doubt anyone but local residents would know the answer. As this is a gardening blog, I will try keeping to that subject with some photos I found interesting around town.Tuesday was Burger Day at AdaBlue Cafe on the outskirts of town. The gardener's…
  • My Three Garden Tips

    Swimray
    27 Sep 2014 | 7:06 pm
    We all pick up secrets along our garden journey. I have a few that I will call tips since I picked them up from somewhere in the past, but they are no longer secrets since being published here. I wish I could take credit for thinking of them, but will take credit for passing them on.Tame Your BuddleiaEverywhere I look, I see Buddleia growing wild and free, out of control. I wanted to keep my buddleia tamed. First, I cut it down to within a foot (30 cm) of the ground for the winter. When it begins its spring growth, I will pinch every shoot after two pairs of leaves. Two shoots will develop…
  • Long Day At Longwood

    Swimray
    23 Aug 2014 | 7:45 am
    This gardener of over a decade has never been to Longwood Gardens in Pennsylvania, or to the other nearby gardener ports of call. Longwood Gardens was on the list of staycation day trips assigned to any weekend with nothing else planned.The battle plan was to attack on Saturday in August. The weather was to be glorious. The route was arranged, camera batteries charged, and walking clothes readied. Then it rained Friday evening and the meteorologists changed their tune to Saturday showers. Dark overcast skies ready to burst open greeted Saturday morning so the trip was off.After plans were…
  • August 2014 Bloom Day

    Swimray
    15 Aug 2014 | 6:06 am
    Garden Bloggers' Bloom DayWhat's blooming in the garden on the 15th of the month Rather than the same ol' same ol' let's present some of the newer items rearing their heads this year. I will throw in a few items that have not been here a while, too. I even put the photos on the X-Large setting for this posting. Today it's about the pictures -- not the story.The Irish Eyes are smiling. This rudbeckia "Irish Eyes" with the green centers was planted from seed twice in the past two years, but this was the first year anything survived and bloomed. They are growing but blooming sparsely. Let's see…
  • Thomas Jefferson's Chinese Ixia

    Swimray
    6 Aug 2014 | 8:10 pm
    Belacamda Lily was Belamcanda chinensis until about a year ago. Then botanists started playing with the names of some plants due to newfound genetic knowledge, and presto. The name changed to Iris domestica. Could its leaves actually resemble the irs family?The seeds hopped into my goodie bag at the annual Seed Swap in February 2012. Here we go again with another free plant from the seed swap or from a neighbor. During the first year, they were sown indoors and transplanted, producing one flower stalk that summer. The next year, (last summer) the plant came back half-heartedly, but did not…
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    Bumblebee Blog

  • Announcing My Big New Plan to Make a Whole Lot of Money

    Robin Ripley
    15 Oct 2014 | 10:58 am
    Thank you for subscribing and visiting http://bumblebeeblog.com Now that I have put the pack back on, so to speak, and am blogging again after my year-long blog vacation, I decided I better check in on those clever blog gurus. You know who they are. They’re the professional bloggers who tell us amateur-hour bloggers all the things we need to do to become […] The post Announcing My Big New Plan to Make a Whole Lot of Money appeared first on Bumblebee Blog.
  • What I Did on My Vacation from Blogging

    Robin Ripley
    25 Sep 2014 | 8:08 am
    Thank you for subscribing and visiting http://bumblebeeblog.com Well, hello there! Did you notice I was gone? Did you miss me? I missed you. Truly, I didn’t set out to take nearly a full year off from blogging here at Bumblebee. Sometimes, life just gets in the way. Sometimes you have to make a choice between living life or writing about it. Not […] The post What I Did on My Vacation from Blogging appeared first on Bumblebee Blog.
  • A Pause in the Run/Walk Through Life

    Robin Ripley
    27 Oct 2013 | 2:46 pm
    Thank you for subscribing and visiting http://bumblebeeblog.com I went out this morning for my daily run/walk. I say “run/walk.” I used to say “run.” Now I say “run/walk.” It’s really “walk.” I am still in denial about the whole knee pain situation. Anyway, I digress. I went out this morning for my daily run/walk. Most days I listen to books via Audible […] The post A Pause in the Run/Walk Through Life appeared first on Bumblebee Blog.
  • Panera Bread and My Garden Video Debut

    Robin Ripley
    29 Aug 2013 | 2:36 pm
    Thank you for subscribing and visiting http://bumblebeeblog.com I am in the movies! Okay, not the big screen. More like the little screen—say, the size of your computer monitor. I and my garden are the subjects of a  video and Q&A story for Panera Bread’s new website and to promote their new “Live Consciously” campaign. (Update: The story and video have moved temporarily […] The post Panera Bread and My Garden Video Debut appeared first on Bumblebee Blog.
  • Pretty and Pink Pickled Red Onions

    Robin Ripley
    20 Aug 2013 | 6:18 am
    Thank you for subscribing and visiting http://bumblebeeblog.com Solo lunches can be such delicious affairs. You can eat leftovers. (One of my all-time favorite foods.) You can eat standing at the frig. (Not recommended.) Or you can build a gourmet sandwich from fixins’ and condiments you have on-hand, such as these pretty and pink pickled red onions. The fact is, some of my […] The post Pretty and Pink Pickled Red Onions appeared first on Bumblebee Blog.
 
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    Garden Rant

  • Confessions of a Garden Conservancy Open Day Volunteer by Susan Harris

    Susan Harris
    24 Oct 2014 | 6:09 am
    Before I get to the confessions, a short tour of the four fabulous DC-area gardens open to the public through the Garden Conservancy’s Open Gardens Program.  (And thanks to local APLD VP Carolyn Mullet for making it happen.) The home and garden above and in the next three photos are modern in the best ways – doing smart things with solar power and stormwater.  Design by Sandra Youssef Clinton. Photo taken from the roof, where there’s veg-growing and Sedums. I was pleased to my favorite-yet-underused native groundcover – Golden Groundsel - and lots of other smart…
  • Ellen DeGeneres ISO Gardener by Susan Harris

    Susan Harris
    23 Oct 2014 | 4:33 am
    Anyone following Nick the Gardener on the Ellen Show knows that she helped him  land a part in a sequel to the Magic Mike movie. So now she’s looking for a new gardener – click here to apply.  Must be “hot, strong, and have that extra somethin’ somethin’.” I’m not a regular Ellen-watcher but have heard she does garden herself, or at least talks like she does. Ellen DeGeneres ISO Gardener originally appeared on Garden Rant on October 23, 2014.
  • Trashing Out with Kudzu and ‘Sherman’s Ghost’ by Allen Bush

    Allen Bush
    22 Oct 2014 | 3:15 am
    Kudzu is the poster child for invasive plants. The vine that gobbled up more than seven million acres in the south became the unintended consequence of the USDA’s plan to stop erosion. When African-Americans, in 1910, began their migration from the rural south to northern cities, the vine would eventually go wild. Kudzu the wrong way near Pineville, Kentucky. Marco Polo wrote about kudzu (he called it ko), but it was centuries before someone compared the flower fragrance to grape Nehi soda. Jesuits in Siam, in the 1660s, were hyping its potential textile use. Kudzu gathered steam. The…
  • Amsonia, Aster and Capital Columns at the National Arboretum by Susan Harris

    Susan Harris
    21 Oct 2014 | 11:56 am
    I’ve been waiting eagerly for these plants to reach their peak of fall color and yesterday they dee-livered!  After posting this on Facebook I learned that the designer is well-known plantswoman Angela Treadwell-Palmer.  Great example of the kind of native-plant design being promoted by Thomas Rainer, who just turned in his book on the subject Timber Press.  So, we wait ’til 2015. But back to this photo – it’s straight form the iPhone.  No alterations.  And FYI, the columns once held up the U.S. Capitol Building, before new wings were added. They make for a great…
  • From Lawn to Portrait in Sand to Soccer Field by Susan Harris

    Susan Harris
    16 Oct 2014 | 5:32 pm
    Dept of Interior photo by Tami Heilemann For just this month a 6-acre strip of lawn on the National Mall has been turned into a portrait in sand and dirt by Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada called “Out of Many, One.” Commissioned by the National Portrait Gallery, it’s a composite of many ethnic groups, a generic face of Americans. About 2,300 tons of sand and 800 tons of soil were used, and the video below shows some of the action. This spot is on a busy flight path, so will be seen by lots of travelers while it’s there this month, and looks awesome in satellite photos. (Scroll…
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    Transatlantic Gardener

  • Hostas for late season leaf color

    Graham Rice
    23 Oct 2014 | 5:14 am
    This is not the time of year when we usually think of hostas turning on the color but look at this ‘Paul’s Glory’ outside my window here in Pennsylvania. All summer the golden leaves with their narrow blue-green edges have made an impressive clump but now, as the edges turn yellow and the centers fade to white (as they tend to do in shade), ‘Paul’s Glory’ takes on a whole new look. And it’s not the only one.Years ago in my garden in Northamptonshire I grew that old favorite ‘Halcyon’ in a terracotta pot (below right, click to enlarge). And every year it turned this lovely…
  • Two ways to grow chrysanthemums

    Graham Rice
    20 Oct 2014 | 1:00 am
    I spotted these “mums” on the left (above, click to enlarge), growing outside the hospital where I’ve been going for my cardiac rehab. They’re replacements for petunias grown in exactly the same way and look like nothing more than a display of footstools outside a furniture store. Although they’re perfectly hardy, they’re treated as seasonal bedding plants and will be replaced when they’re over.This is one two main ways we see chrysanths here in the US, the familiar alternative is to grow similar varieties as individual specimens in pots, on the front steps perhaps. These, too,…
  • Burning bush: fall foliage for cutting

    Graham Rice
    14 Oct 2014 | 1:00 am
    Had a jolly time at my niece’s wedding on Saturday up in Woodstock, New York (where the festival famously wasn’t) and, as ever, spotted something of horticultural interest. The bold floral displays at the ceremony featured gladioli in autumnal orange with purple amaranthus and all backed by – burning bush, Euonymus alatus. Click the image to enlarge it and see the foliage more clearly.It’s not often that we see Euonymus alatus used as cut foliage. It makes a spectacular feature in the landscape with its brilliant fall color and is also being mentioned as a worrying invasive. But not…
  • Bee-friendly Himalayan balsam

    Graham Rice
    2 Oct 2014 | 1:00 am
    Himalayan balsam, Impatiens glandulifera, is a common plant of British riversides, pond margins and other wet places and is always said to be too invasive for us to be allowed to grow. It looks as if it’s smothering everything else where it grows, so it’s banned. It can be a lovely plant, so not being allowed to grow it is unfortunate.On my recent short visit back to England I saw it along the River Nene in Northamptonshire (along with the American native Imaptiens capensis), by the Wey Navigation Canal and River Wey in Surrey and in other waterside places. Some stands of it looked dense…
  • Transatlantic touch-me-not

    Graham Rice
    25 Sep 2014 | 6:31 am
    It’s always intriguing to find a plant that’s native near our American home in Pennsylvania growing near our English base in Northamptonshire (and vice versa) and the other day a stroll by the River Nene not far from our Northamptonshire house provided an enjoyable surprise. Spotted touch-me-not or jewelweed, Impatiens capensis, was growing on the bank (below, click to enlarge).There were only a few patches, all grouped near each other, and I wondered for a moment if I myself had inadvertently introduced it on my shoes as perhaps I did in Pennsylvania when it suddenly it turned up in our…
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    WashingtonGardener

  • Fenton Friday: Full Plot and New Markers

    WashingtonGardener
    24 Oct 2014 | 3:15 pm
     Yay! We got new plot markers this week at the Fenton Community Garden, which is great as the old wooden stakes were rotting and mine no longer could stand up. I find my new marker in the middle of my neighbor's plot and quickly moved it lest he think I was staking a claim on his Swiss Chard!My plot is busting out of bounds, but I still have lots of tomatoes ripening and annual flowers blooming so I will keep stuffing cool season crops in around them as best I can. The photo above is an overview of the whole plot. Going clockwise from the top-left corner are: tomatoes on top pf potatoes,…
  • Video Wednesday: Create a New Garden Bed Without Digging

    WashingtonGardener
    22 Oct 2014 | 2:06 pm
    Here is another video from our "classics" vault:In this video, Kathy Jentz, Editor/Publisher of Washington Gardener Magazine, demonstrates how to winterize a vegetable garden including how to create a new garden bed without digging.See more videos at: http://www.monkeysee.com/WashingtonGardener
  • Saffron Crocus (Crocus sativus): Grow Your Own Spice Cabinet

    WashingtonGardener
    20 Oct 2014 | 3:54 pm
    Sponsored blog post by: DutchGrown.comSaffron Crocus (Crocus sativus) is the source of saffron that makes Indian curry and Spanish paella so special. You understand why this spice is so expensive when you see how tiny the red-orange stigma (female organs) of the flower are and that it takes dozens of these little threads to make enough to be used for one dish.This bulb is reliably hardy here in the Mid-Atlantic region (USDA Zone 6-8) and just needs good, well-draining soil and a full sun location. It is best to plant them in a bed that is not irrigated so they do not rot over the summer when…
  • Fenton Friday: Sweet Potato Plot

    WashingtonGardener
    17 Oct 2014 | 1:43 pm
    This week at my plot in the Fenton Community Garden, we had another round of torrential rains (almost 3 inches dumped at once) along with tornado warnings and fierce winds. I did not get much time out in the garden, but did manage to dig up the one sweet potato I planted. It was almost 3 pounds worth from one tiny slip so I'm happy with that. It is now curing in my sunroom.I did notice that my brussel sprouts are taking off rapidly and I have high hopes of being able to harvest some for Thanksgiving!How is your edible garden growing?
  • Washington Gardener Magazine October 2014 ~ Winterthur: Last of the Wild Gardens

    WashingtonGardener
    16 Oct 2014 | 2:53 pm
    Washington Gardener is the magazine for gardening enthusiasts in the Mid-Atlantic region.   The October 2014 issue is now published and being sent as a PDF attachment to all current subscribers.This issue includes:~ Winterthur: Last of the Wild Gardens~ Ramps: Wild Leeks of Appalachia~ October Garden Tasks~ Local Events List~ 5 Flower Bulbs You Should Grow~ Meet Michael McConkey of Edible Landscaping~ Don’t Move Firewood Warning ~ Before-After of a Garden for an Orange House~ New Elderberry Introduction~ Rhododendrons Disturb Soil Nitrogren Cycle and much…
 
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    A Tidewater Gardener

  • Bloom Day - A Foot in the Door

    Les
    15 Oct 2014 | 1:00 am
         The first signs of fall are starting to appear in the local landscape, but peak foliage does not usually happen for us until early November. I am OK with that, as fall makes me somewhat melancholy, mainly because I know what's to follow. We have had a remarkable spate of weather in the past 6 weeks with mild temperatures, and plenty of rain, even though much of that has fallen in strong
  • Another Year Older in Salida

    Les
    12 Oct 2014 | 8:05 am
         Part of our trip this summer was spent in Salida, Colorado, a quirky town on the Arkansas river in the state's "banana belt". Once a railroad town, Salida now relies on tourism from outdoor enthusiasts, and is a mecca for cyclists, skiers, hikers, kayakers and rafters. My birthday happened to fall while we were there, and as a gift, Sherpa Girl B took me and my son whitewater rafting through
  • Among the Ancients

    Les
    27 Sep 2014 | 8:14 am
         On our trip to Colorado this summer, one of the places I really wanted to visit again was the Mt. Goliath Natural Area. We briefly stopped here on our first trip west, but I was alone in wanting to spend more time here and felt rushed, plus I did not own a decent camera then. This summer there was no rush, and Sherpa Girl K and I were able to wander leisurely among the bristlecone pines (
  • Hurricane Hugo 1989

    Les
    21 Sep 2014 | 3:00 am
         Once upon a time, a young man was supposed to meet some friends for a long weekend at a beach house in North Carolina. However, he was given the wrong address, and in those days there were no such things as cell phones, and he had no way to find his friends. So what was the young man to do? He certainly didn't want go back to gray Richmond, rather he headed further south to Charleston, a
  • Bloom Day - River Flowers

    Les
    15 Sep 2014 | 5:52 pm
         With few exceptions, my September blooms look a lot like my August blooms, so feeling pressed for time, and wanting to do something different, this month's Bloom Day will feature some of the plants I saw yesterday while kayaking along the James River in Charles City County, Virginia. This part of the river is about halfway between Williamsburg and Richmond, and is far enough from the coast
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    clay and limestone

  • Wildflower Wednesday: The Charming Indian Physic

    Gail
    21 Oct 2014 | 11:00 pm
    Has fabulous fall color.That's what initially caught my eye, but, then I noticed it had the most delightful foliage and wiry stems with little seed pods left over from the summer flowers. I decided then and there that it had to be in my garden.It wasn't until the following May that I got to see the charming flowers. Prairie Moon Nursery says that the  flowers of Porteranthus stipulatus have a subtle beauty that is a nice break from the bigger blooms of most wildflowers. I think the little star shaped flowers are beautiful and somewhat reminiscent of apple blossoms. They look good planted…
  • Fall is the best time to bee in the garden!

    Gail
    20 Oct 2014 | 10:37 am
    Sunday was the best day so far this fall for the gardener, the bees and the little asters to play and dance together. It was a wonderful October day with sunshine and a warm breeze. The soil was still damp from the deluge the week before and the shrubs and trees were just beginning to wear their fall colors.The little asters were dancing in the breeze while Bumblebees flew from flower to flower.  I snapped hundreds of photos but, only a few were in focus. They refused to pose for me, they were caught up in their mad dash to collect pollen and nectar to supply their nests before the cold…
  • I appreciate the honeybees that visit my garden

    Gail
    3 Oct 2014 | 5:00 am
    Isn't she beautiful! All the honeybees we see foraging for nectar and pollen are female and unless we keep hives we'll probably never see a male bee. The worker honeybees' jobs include: caring for larvae (baby bees), making wax, building honeycomb, cleaning up the hive, storing pollen, cooling the hive, making honey, guarding the hive and collecting pollen and nectar. They are busy little creatures and I feel fortunate that they stayed still long enough for me to snap a few photos! I appreciate that they pollinate flowers as they forage for pollen and nectar. I also have a fine appreciation…
  • Wildflower Wednesday: Some Plants Like to Challenge the Boundaries!

    Gail
    23 Sep 2014 | 11:00 pm
    At Clay and Limestone we call several of them good friends.Physostegia virginiana, aka, False dragonhead is a good friend of my garden. It's one of the rough and tumble wildflowers that makes gardening on my shallow, often dry garden soil worth the effort! It's an enthusiastic grower, but, I decided years ago that a lovely lilac river of spiky flowers that attracts bumbles, small bees, skippers and hummers was worth having to pull out a few errant plants. (go here for more on this plant)This mint can get a root hold in your moist, rich garden soil Successful colonizers like False dragonhead…
  • A Choice Later Blooming Susan

    Gail
    10 Sep 2014 | 8:09 am
    I am a here and now person and Rudbeckia fulgida var fulgida is my blooming here and now favorite! I wish that you could see it's charms in person,  it's not just another orange coneflower!If you've chanced upon it in a local native nursery and passed it by as just another Susan, let me disabuse you of that notion! Trust me when I say that this Susan is choice, with smaller flowers on tall straight stems, shiny green foliage and a longer bloom than Rudbeckia 'Goldsturm'.Plant this Susan with meadow and prairie plants like the ex-asters, Amsonia hubrichtii, and native grasses for a lovely…
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    Dirt Therapy

  • Waiting for the fall color

    Phillip Oliver
    10 Oct 2014 | 7:24 am
    Despite us having a drought-free summer, I am afraid that we have been paying the price for it this fall. It has been extremely dry for over a month now. There has been rain around us, especially in Colbert County, but every time a mass of rain heads this way, it tends to break up when it gets to the Tennessee River. Last weekend the weather forecasters screwed up big time when they predicted a 70% percent change of rain and we ended up getting nothing! They are saying the same thing for this coming Monday but I am refusing to listen to them.Yesterday, I turned the sprinklers on in areas that…
  • The last of the photos from the Ohio trip

    Phillip Oliver
    2 Oct 2014 | 3:52 pm
    Here are a few odds and ends from our brief trip to Ohio a few weeks ago.Marion, Ohio is about 20 miles north of Marysville. It is probably best known as the birth place of Warren G. Harding, the 29th President of the United States. This was his residence from 1891 - 1921.   A few miles away is the tomb and memorial of Harding and his wife Florence. The memorial resembles a Greek temple and is made of white marble. It was begun in 1926 and completed the following year.The old Post Office in Marion is now a Historical Museum (and also the location of the Popcorn…
  • The covered bridges of Union County, Ohio

    Phillip Oliver
    30 Sep 2014 | 10:26 am
    Here are a few photos of the covered bridges of Union County, Ohio. We had a day to ourselves and decided to tour the countryside after finding a brochure at our motel on these covered bridges in a nearby county. It took us a while to get our bearings and we quickly learned that a GPS is not very helpful for locating bridges. We stopped at a service station to ask for directions and I could not help but notice that they had a fantastic deli with great looking sandwiches and pizza. We got directions from a very helpful lady, got some sandwiches and headed toward the first bridge, which was…
  • More from Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens

    Phillip Oliver
    21 Sep 2014 | 3:42 pm
    The Franklin Conservatory and Botanical Gardens in Columbus, Ohio was well worth the drive from Marysville (about 30 minutes). It was an overcast day with mild temperatures - perfect for a garden visit. Although the conservatories were awesome (see my previous post), the outdoor gardens were lovely as well. I saw workers everywhere tending to stunning displays. The above photo shows a raised bed near the front entrance which contained a striking agave ("Whale's Tongue"??), ornamental grasses and coneflower.Ornamental grasses and lantana - There was a lot of coleus used throughout the gardens.
  • Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens - Chihuly Exhibit

    Phillip Oliver
    19 Sep 2014 | 2:12 pm
    We visited Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens in Columbus, Ohio on an overcast and cool day, absolutely perfect weather for visiting a botanical garden. The conservatories were outstanding and really more spectacular than the gardens themselves. A Chihuly exhibit was taking place and the pieces were breathtaking. Some of the pieces pictured here may not be Chihuly and if that is the case, I apologize. I have more photos of the gardens that I will share in my next post. Text and photos by Phillip Oliver, Dirt Therapy
 
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    Natural Gardening

  • Biltmore walled garden

    Lisa
    21 Oct 2014 | 5:11 pm
    view from terraceLast Sunday's visit to Biltmore included a visit to the walled garden, as well as a walk up to see the far vista from the terrace.the creativity with grasses, mums, and Mexican bush sage were nice, and way beyond the usualthe mums were the stars, but the interesting twists with grasses were clever
  • Fall light

    Lisa
    20 Oct 2014 | 10:00 am
    This is the first full week of clear, crisp sky we've had so far this fall.  The characteristically soft, hazy light of spring and summer blew away, leaving behind dramatically blue skies.We don't see this kind of blue very often in the southeastern U.S.  Today's walk felt different, almost like I was in an unfamiliar place, even though it was one of my usual routes.Bass Pond, Biltmore EstateYesterday's walk around Bass Pond found the sky reflected in the pond;  I was amazed to see that the camera managed to capture the reflection so clearly.
  • An amazing mushroom

    Lisa
    19 Oct 2014 | 5:47 pm
    I've never seen a mushroom that looked like this before (nor had my gardening companion).Its markings echo long-ago learnings about selective pressure around moths, and industrial Britain. (They became darker as coal ash polluted the air over a century ago).Nevertheless, this was an extraordinary-looking mushroom, seen on a outing this morning to Biltmore  -- in the Winter Garden.mushroom near Japanese maple
  • Tapping into the creative side of gardening

    Lisa
    12 Oct 2014 | 5:34 pm
    I've been thinking about this topic for a while:  this post a couple of years ago reflected on some of my thoughts then.I totally rediscovered my creative side through gardening and thinking about designing with plants, in general.Writing about my nature and gardening observations has been a wonderful creative outlet, I've realized, too, for the past seven years.  And through many posts. Teaching classes about gardening, too, has focused my attention back to creativity as well.What do YOU really want in your garden?  It's all individual.  We all have different tastes,…
  • Still more monarchs

    Lisa
    10 Oct 2014 | 12:21 pm
    one of many monarchs nectaring on the large BuddleiaThe flow of monarchs continues;  the abundant Buddleia flowers are actively being visited, with the nectar resources shared with Painted Ladies, skippers and other butterflies, and bees of all sorts!
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    Outside Clyde

  • Chasing Autumn

    Christopher C. NC
    24 Oct 2014 | 7:00 pm
    It has been hard to get the colors in a distant view to show up this year. The lighting never seems to be just right. In my travels I see all kinds of views. One day it is lit up majestic. The next time it is as dull as paste. We are at peak now. Those distant hills are covered in a golden orange. Trust me. It is far easier to
  • Until The Frigid End

    Christopher C. NC
    23 Oct 2014 | 5:37 pm
    Red poles and yellow maples. Mr. Button in a tree. The Yellie Mum in the autumn glow. The Pink Mum is still going. Next year the patch will be four times this size. A hint of the under garden with a last ditch bloom. Blue sky and colorful trees as the
  • Good Enough

    Christopher C. NC
    22 Oct 2014 | 6:45 pm
    Up close and personal autumn is doing fine. I think it is the drive home that is the cause of my disappointment. Most days it has been very sunny and the distant mountains are bleached of color. The ongoing wind gives a dusty cast from the upturned leaves and it all just looks bland. The drive this morning under partly cloudy skies was a different story. The mountains were glowing.
  • Wending Through Fall

    Christopher C. NC
    21 Oct 2014 | 7:12 pm
    When the light is right there are small pockets of intense color. When the light isn't great, I have a photo editor to bump things up a notch. This is the autumn we are having, not the best, but not terrible. The fading ferns are looking awesome. The myriad colors on a leaf
  • More Muted Fall

    Christopher C. NC
    20 Oct 2014 | 7:48 pm
    There is still time for things to go vibrant. An odd amount of green still lingers out there for so late in October. By now we coulda had snow. We shoulda had some hard frosts. Neither has happened. Maybe that's what's messing with the fall color.
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    Growing The Home Garden

  • How Long Does It Take Roundup to Dissipate from the Soil?

    20 Oct 2014 | 11:48 am
    There are lot of home and garden products that a gardener can choose to use in the garden. Not all of them are good to use frequently and should only be used sparingly or not all all. Roundup is one of those types of chemicals. It accomplishes its goal very well but will leave residue in the soil. Here is a question I was asked this weekend about Roundup:Q. I am a renter, 2-1/4 years at present location. Landlord sprayed roundup before I moved in, so I've done container gardening from day one (and got him to quit spraying). What is your opinion/guess on how long, if any, to let the…
  • How to Save Okra Seeds

    16 Oct 2014 | 5:30 am
    It's time to put up the summer harvests and begin preparing for winter and next spring. One way to prepare for spring is to save seeds from plants you grew this year that you enjoyed so that you can grow it again next year. Okra is a southern garden favorite that is very easy to collect and save seeds from. There are only a couple steps to saving seeds from okra.First A Little About OkraOkra is botanically known as Hibiscus esculentus or Abelmoschus esculentus but we'll just keep it easy and call it okra. In it's most common culinary form here in the south okra is fried, but it can also be…
  • What You Shouldn't Do With Your Fall Leaves

    15 Oct 2014 | 6:09 am
    Fall is well underway and we all know that with fall comes mountains of leaves! The beautiful color changes can quickly transition into a thick carpet of smothering leaves on the ground. Many homeowners are smart and use this natural resource in the garden but others do one thing that drives this gardener crazy. What is it that you shouldn't do with fall leaves? Burn them.Why is burning leaves a bad thing? Two reasons: it releases pollutants into the air and it is extremely wasteful. Smoke and particulates get released into the air and decrease the air quality. Last year a neighbor burned his…
  • Light Up the Night with a Backyard Fire Pit and Solar Lights!

    10 Oct 2014 | 6:45 am
    In the fall there are several iconic thoughts that spring to mind of most people. Cool crisp days evoke good feelings and memories created around fall festivals, apple cider, holidays, and other fall activities. One way to share the fall experience with your family is to add a backyard fire pit. What could be better than a cool crisp evening around the campfire with friends and family while roasting marshmallows and making smores? A simple backyard fire pit is an easy project that you can put together to add another special memory making activity to your fall events! (All materials for…
  • Organic Removal of Bermuda Grass

    3 Oct 2014 | 6:35 am
    Last weekend I pulled out the tomato plants (all but three) and did the yearly Bermuda grass removal. Bermuda grass is one of the two most frustrating parts of my vegetable garden, the other being the deer. Bermuda grass (Cynodon dactylon) grows and spreads through rhizomes (under the soil) and stolons (above the soil). Any piece of the roots or stolons left behind will regrow which makes removing Bermuda grass very difficult.To remove the Bermuda grass I use a trimmer and cut back all the grass to the ground. Then I till up the soil multiple times. After each run with the tiller I rake up…
 
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    Sharing Nature's Garden

  • Another beautiful San Antonio garden to share...

    Diana
    24 Oct 2014 | 9:02 pm
    The second stop on our recent visit to San Antonio was Heather's garden from Xeric style.  Her style is certainly xeric, yet with many soft grasses, draping perennials and ground cover, it has a delicate feel. You can see my post about the first garden here. Purple fountain grass frames a collection of other grasses and yuccas.The sun was blazing hot that day, so taking photos was a real  challenge.  These yuccas were enveloped in a blanket of pretty purple trailing lantana, but it's hard to see that here.In this his view of the front of the house you can see that her…
  • A little garden trip down the road...

    Diana
    23 Oct 2014 | 5:58 am
    Last week I went on a jaunt to visit some of our blogging friends in San Antonio. They've come to Austin periodically, so it was time to venture south to see them. Our first stop was Melody's beautiful and spacious garden. After a treat of delicious mini muffins and ginger cookies baked by her lovely daughter, we stepped into her sanctuary. The first view is a wonderful pool, surrounded by pots and plants that gave it a rustic, more natural look. To deal with foraging deer, this fence guards Melody's vegetables, herbs and some perennial favorites.Garden art like this gazing ball catches your…
  • Bloom Day showcases late summer blooms in the garden...

    Diana
    15 Sep 2014 | 3:11 pm
    Even though the thermometer hit 97 today, summer is beginning to wane here in Central Texas for Garden Bloggers Bloom Day.  Carol of May Dreams Gardens invites us to share what's blooming in our gardens on the 15th of each month, so here's a stroll through my landscape.Some of the heat-loving perennials are on their second set of blooms this summer.  Plants like lantana, salvia, sage, are putting on a dog days show while the sun is still high in the sky.I recently made a return trip to the Arbor Gate Nursery in Tomball to collect some of their wonderful garden art.  I came home…
  • Cistus nursery delights gardeners at Portland Fling...

    Diana
    15 Sep 2014 | 6:56 am
    Our third stop on the first day of the Portland Garden Bloggers Fling was Cistus Nursery.  Coming from the Lan Su Chinese Garden, which was serene and peaceful, Cistus provided a bold contrast -- it was chock full of plants - a sensory explosion for plant lovers.There were many familiar plants at the nursery, like these Yucca rostrata, which grow happily at home in Austin, Texas. I did say chock full, didn't I? But some of the Cistus family were uninterested in visiting bloggers."Yeah, I see you, but it's hot and it feels good here on these cold bricks, so I hope  you…
  • Seed-sowing season starts soon!

    Diana
    12 Sep 2014 | 10:18 am
    On my fabulous trip to Paris to visit my cousin this summer, I didn't get to Giverny, Monet's inspirational garden.  While in Paris I enjoyed the impressionist exhibit at the D'Orsay museum, which included many Monets, Manets, Pissaros, and Sisleys, among others.  The amazing ability of these painters to bring the canvas to life leaves me awestruck. I feel as though I already know Monet's  garden. (Don't tell, but I actually have 5 Monet/impressionist coffee table books - my most recent chronicling the D'Orsay exhibit.)So, when one of my bff's went to Paris a few weeks ago, she…
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    The Transplantable Rose

  • Passalongs and Reseeders Say Happy Autumn

    Annie in Austin
    30 Sep 2014 | 8:34 pm
    This post, Passalongs and Reseeders Say Happy Autumn, was written by Annie in Austin for her Transplantable Rose blog. After August 2014 tied the tile for Second Driest August on Record in Austin, many of us gardeners were not looking forward to September! But then the temperature dropped a few degrees and in mid-September several inches of rain fell. That's all it took to divert September 2014 from the hot, dry path it had been following to a gentler trail - the path to a flowery September. Many of the current flowers descend from plants bought years ago. The original plants are long gone,…
  • Clerodendrum incisa - the Musical Notes Plant

    Annie in Austin
    24 Sep 2014 | 11:44 pm
    If you live in Central Texas you probably know one of the most interesting nurseries in Austin- Barton Springs Nursery on Bee Caves Road It's a fine place to buy full-size plants, shrubs, trees, native plants and roses. For experimentally minded gardeners, it's a great place to find odd little inexpensive rooted cuttings to play around with. The thermometer stood at 100F one afternoon in June 2013 but my friend Carole and I felt like poking around a nursery so we headed to Barton Springs. I was familiar with some of the small plants I brought home  -Salvia discolor/Andean Silver Sage;…
  • Still Posting After All These Years

    Annie in Austin
    18 Jun 2014 | 4:13 pm
    This post, Still Posting After All These Years, was written by Annie in Austin for her Transplantable Rose blogThe Transplantable Rose turned eight years old last week. Eight years is long enough for two presidential terms. Eight years covers all the grades in an old-fashioned grammar school, and is also long enough to change a 13-year-old child into a fully-fledged, 21-year-old adult. Did my blog change in eight years? The format changed as Blogger evolved but that’s about all.  But blogging did change something in this blogger’s mind and habits.Before the Transplantable Rose ever…
  • Absolutely April

    Annie in Austin
    26 Apr 2014 | 10:31 pm
    This post about my garden in Austin, Texas was written by Annie in Austin for her Transplantable Rose blog. Three weeks can make a big difference in the garden! Since that last post the garden plant spreadsheet shows fewer plants with question marks next to their names. The Barbados Cherries appear to be alive. They also appear to be about 6" tall now. But you don't want to see that photo and I don't want to take it. Averted eyes is the way to carry on while the boxwoods decide exactly where they'll regrow - don't want to take that photo either. This photo of the ice-and-freeze damaged…
  • In like a Lion and Out like a Shorn Lamb

    Annie in Austin
    1 Apr 2014 | 11:00 pm
    This post about my garden in Austin, Texas was written by Annie in Austin for her Transplantable Rose blog. Did my February post listing all the trees in the garden put a hex on them? This part of the privacy screen looked pretty good six weeks ago. By the first of March tiny leaves and buds had appeared on Spiraea, Redbud, roses, Arizona Ash, Fig and dwarf Pomegranate, and flower buds swelled on the native Texas Mountain Laurel But then came the March 3rd-4th Thundersleet that bent the Loropetalum to the groundWhile the iced Oleander leaned over to block the steps to the drivewayThe trees…
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    Kiss my Aster!

  • The KMA Method of Bulb Planting

    Kiss My Aster!
    6 Oct 2014 | 10:20 am
    To begin with, I've always thought people that plant their bulbs in September to be goody-goodies and people I would probably not like very much (or would like me!). Perhaps these are people that do not live life by the seat of their yoga pants? I have a sound method for planting large masses of bulbs in my garden that relies on hardcore laziness/practicality that I feel the need to pass on to you. I also urgently want you to know that you DESERVE bulbs, lots of them. If I hadn't had a few hundred in my garden this incredibly fashionably-late spring, I would have gone totally off the…
  • Check Out My Crust (Not a foodie)

    Kiss My Aster!
    14 Sep 2014 | 9:31 am
    I'm not gonna GOOP you. I'm all about short cuts or lazing out entirely and getting a take-out most nights. But this time of year, when the tomatoes are rolling in the door VOLUNTARILY, I make a lot of pizza. Yeah, from scratch (except the sauce. And I don't make the cheese, either. Just the crust, I guess...)The secret to good home-made pizza is a pizza stone and about $3 worth of sauce and cheese. It's easy, sort of fast and makes a lot of food. This set-up I'll be talking about makes a 2 pizza-stone sized pizzas and one tiny one for Hazel. Pizza stones are at Target for about $20 and you…
  • One for the road

    Kiss My Aster!
    25 Aug 2014 | 5:09 pm
  • Working Towards the Wedding

    Kiss My Aster!
    25 Aug 2014 | 9:36 am
    For the first time in weeks, it's quiet around here. The kid is in school and it's too hot to dig, build, mulch, power wash, prune, burn or chop anything down. As my Dad says, "we're polishing a turd over here", but I think it's a lovely and worthy turd.My sister is getting married in THIS TURD!So here I am at my desk, dealing with months' old speaking contracts and changing all my Visa card numbers on all my subscriptions and Amazon because I lost my card someplace in the yard and I don't even have time to look for it.So, about 3 days a week I've been hurling myself at wedding prep,…
  • When the @#$% Hits the Fan: Gardening, Condensed

    Kiss My Aster!
    30 Jul 2014 | 8:15 am
    We have only lived in this house for a little over 2 years. As ambitious as I am about the landscaping, I understand that living someplace for 2 years with a 3 year old, mathematically, is like living here for less than 1 year.I just can't get things done the way I used to, I could crank it out before baby. When we moved in here, I made a 5 year plan and I've been sticking to it. It's a large and wily property. I don't seek to remove all it's wildness, but it was a little neglected for a few years and I seek to reclaim a little order.Well, the 5 year plan has just gone down the…
 
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    Our Little Acre

  • Let's Drink to Apples!

    Kylee Baumle
    21 Oct 2014 | 6:24 pm
    My husband and I have taken many, many evening walks down our road over the years. As far as country roads go in these parts, this one provides some interesting scenery. There are the neighbors that have an assortment of animals, a cemetery that has many familiar names, and we cross two creeks lined with wildflowers.Many years ago, we also noticed a mature apple tree growing in the deeper ditch on the west side of the road about three-quarters of a mile south of our house. I've always been curious as to how it got there, knowing that there are random apple trees planted by Johnny Appleseed in…
  • Wordless Wednesday: You Might Be a Gardener If ...

    Kylee Baumle
    15 Oct 2014 | 4:12 pm
    ...this happens.
  • Foraging For Fungus

    Kylee Baumle
    14 Oct 2014 | 8:54 pm
    If ever there was a good year for mushroom hunting, this is it. We've had plenty of rain all summer long into fall, and I've never seen so much fungus growing here, there, and everywhere as I have this year. Fairy rings abound.I've always been overly cautious about wild mushrooms because I have a great fear of eating the wrong kind. I just don't know enough about them to say for certain what's edible and what isn't. But I *think* we've got plenty of the good kind just a few yards from our back door.First, it was the puffballs (Calvatia sp.)... A couple of weeks ago, we were cleaning up the…
  • Wordless Wednesday: Lunar Eclipse - 8 October 2014

    Kylee Baumle
    8 Oct 2014 | 5:50 am
    Photographed from a second floor bedroom window in Northwest Ohio at 6:09, 6:17, and 6:42 AM, EDT.
  • American Meadows $50 Gift Certificate Giveaway

    Kylee Baumle
    5 Oct 2014 | 8:55 pm
    Just when we got a winner to my last $50 gift certificate giveaway, here's another! This time it's to American Meadows, a company I've done business with in the past, and I just placed another order with them. They're located in Vermont and they've been around since 1981.Here's what I ordered:Red Spider Lily (Lycoris radiata) - 5 bulbsI've always loved these but never thought we could grow them up north here in Ohio. Not so, I recently found out! So when I saw that American Meadows had them, I decided to give them a try this fall. They're a late summer bloomer and they're RED! You know how I…
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    The Gardens of Petersonville

  • A Success Story

    Sheila
    12 Oct 2014 | 10:45 am
    Although there are some pretty pathetic looking scenarios this fall in the garden, there are also some happy ones. This is my little lemon tree that I wrote about last spring. It was suffering from a long list of bugs and diseases and looked very sad. I think I only got one lemon from this tree since last April. But after cutting back the damaged foliage, I fertilized it with an organic fertilizer, gave it long, deep soaks all summer and hosed it down every once in a while and now it is rewarding me with tons of sweet, sweet blooms that fill the air with their lovely fragrance, on top of an…
  • Weather Woes

    Sheila
    7 Oct 2014 | 11:52 am
     Our weather continues to be unusually hot and humid. Days where the temperatures hit the 90's are not unusual for October for us, but they are usually accompanied by dry Santa Ana winds, not high clouds and humidity and they don't go on for weeks at a time. We are becoming addicted to air conditioning  and rarely head out to the yards because there are no enticing breezes at all to lure us to visit. I must admit I've been feeling terrible about how the fall months are slipping by, usually the best months to get things done in the gardens, without much being accomplished, until…
  • Moving Towards Fall

    Sheila
    12 Sep 2014 | 7:59 am
    This week and last we had the trees trimmed in SJC. We try to put it off for as long as possible, but the palm trees start to open their seed pods and drop the pollen and eventually the seeds and it is a terrible mess. It takes four whole days of about five men to do the job. The end-of-summer gardens are really a mess. I am frustrated  because it is just a disappointment to walk around and see so many ailing plants due to a long dry summer. Not only that, the temperatures have been so hot that just keeping everything alive is a chore. Most of my attention has been on a number of house…
  • My Asian Pears

    Sheila
    2 Sep 2014 | 9:05 am
    I love surprises in the garden and this was a pleasant one! This pear tree was here when we moved in and there were many years I could have sworn it was dead. Few leaves, even fewer blooms led me to believe it was very unhappy as were many of the other fruit trees that were planted here by the previous owners. I fed it and watered it along with the others and it continued to sulk, but not quite give up entirely. Occasionally it would produce a couple of these rather round Asian pears, usually going unnoticed until they fell to the ground before I had a chance to taste them. But this year I…
  • Wrapping Up Summer

    Sheila
    30 Aug 2014 | 12:01 pm
     If you read my blog for inspiring pictures, you had better stop now and wait for another post! After a busy summer with grandkids and a few weeks on vacation I've returned ready to take inventory and start thinking about what needs to be done in the SJC garden this fall. The list is long as usual. You can see by this picture that the cheap obelisks I had picked up at a big box store years ago have been falling apart for some time now and my garden helper has patiently been trying to save them for the clematis to cling to as best he can. I have already ordered metal ones and they should…
 
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    Am I Bugging You Yet?

  • Cotinis mutabilis

    vanessa cardui
    5 Oct 2014 | 3:08 pm
    These big shiny green beetles are well known as fruit eaters.  When we had the fig tree in the nursery, they lived up to their common name 'Fig eater beetles' by attacking and eating the ripe figs enmasse.  Actually, that's one reason we got rid of that fig tree.  The other being, don't particularly like figs or stepping in the fallen ones while doing chores.But I've also seen these beetles spending a lot of time on flowers, like this one on the bulbine frutescens.  Since Cotinis mutabilis is attracted to sweets (fruit, fruit juice) they could be eating nectar and maybe,…
  • Days of a Porch Post Spider's Life

    vanessa cardui
    2 Oct 2014 | 10:05 pm
    My old front porch has some posts featuring 4x4 uprights and crossing decorative connecting pieces of wood that make nice spots for spiders to hang out.  It doesn't hurt that I also don't brush the webs away very often.On a recent hot morning I was hose watering some plants (yes, Officer Waterwatch, I do have a positive shut off valve on that hose!) and kind of absent-mindedly squirted some water onto the post where a labyrinth spider has been living.  The water scattered her recently hatched spiderlings out of the retreat and into the small yet disorganized web structure shining in…
  • Syrphid Snapshots

    vanessa cardui
    30 Mar 2014 | 11:26 am
    The Aloe plicatalis is blooming again and I caught this syrphid fly snacking at one of the flowers on a sunny recent day.The fly adjourned to another flower to clean itself off:First the rearThen the face.Cute as they are, syphids are still flies after all.  Not sure of the species on this one; my lack of a dorsal view makes it hard to use the distinctive bee-like coloration and pattern for help in identification.
  • Notes on Transition through Spring

    vanessa cardui
    20 Mar 2014 | 8:36 pm
    Hello again.Found this dead moth in the planter 'neath the mailbox.  It's a white lined sphinx moth, Hyles lineata.    The larval food includes elm; could this moth have grown as a caterpillar way up in the elm canopy over the mailbox and planter of its ultimate resting place?  Or did it feed on the portulaca growing in someone else's yard. Either way, it's spent adult body is now food for ants.  My last post on this species was almost exactly one year ago; I guess that means something.Dried tulips from a funeral bouquet rest atop my rust-colored metal mesh…
  • 2013 Winter Solstice Bug Hunt and Count

    vanessa cardui
    29 Dec 2013 | 5:20 pm
    Whew!  It's a lot of working trying to find buggies in the scorching winter weather we're having here in SoCal.  Didn't quite get to the count on the 21st . . . sorry traditionalists (which btw includes myself)!  Yesterday and today have been in the 80s with a dry Santa Ana wind blowing.  Typically I get some out of the ordinary bug sightings in any season with a strong wind.  I guess when you weigh that little you get blown around a bit. Not this time, really, as the count is full of the usual suspects:SPIDERS:Lots of funnel web spider webs in evidence, and I saw…
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    Skippy's Vegetable Garden

  • October flowers in my vegetable garden

    kathy
    19 Oct 2014 | 10:50 am
  • parsley pesto

    kathy
    16 Oct 2014 | 4:11 am
    I think I'll make Parsley Pesto today while it rains outside. I had a nice patch of basil, but it got the new basil downy mildew and never amounted to anything I could use for pesto. I don't know what I'll do next year for basil. Has anyone seen resistant seeds yet? Anyway, I have way too much parsley in the garden, so Parsley Pesto it is! This recipe looks good: Parsley Pesto at Food and Wine.com. I'll just process the parsley, garlic, olive oil and salt then freeze it. Nuts and cheese can be added when we use it. I scaled the recipe up. 10-12 cups lightly packed parsley leaves (a large…
  • today's harvest

    kathy
    15 Oct 2014 | 8:41 pm
  • today's garden work

    kathy
    15 Oct 2014 | 7:37 pm
    It's 80*F a couple days after our average first frost date! And warm weather is still ahead of us. It's great to be still picking peppers and green beans, though the rest of my summer crops have faded with the fading light. i am ready to put up a winter low tunnel over greens, but no need for it yet. the hoops are standing bare and waiting. Work today in my home garden:- pull carrots- pick green and red chile peppers- start bagging late blight infected tomato debris for disposal in the trash (I should have done this earlier, but there is so much that I piled it and let it rot down for a…
  • October backyard

    kathy
    15 Oct 2014 | 5:17 pm
    Not too bad for a cell phone photo! I forgot my camera at my parents' house last week. I'll have to make the hour trip back up there to get it soon. I set this photo as my desktop background. This afternoon the dogs and I took the row boat across the pond to conservation land under those tall pines you can see. We walked on the trails for an hour. Lots of other dogs and people were out walking on this beautiful day. Sad that it took me so long to row across a little pond. I have to learn how to manage a couple of oars. It's a lot harder than a kayak paddle. At least the dogs didn't complain.
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    Ilona's Garden Journal

  • Word To The Wise

    Ilona Erwin
    6 Oct 2014 | 6:51 am
    Do you wait around for the last minute to put your gardens to bed for the winter? That may not be the best thing to do this year. Winter seems to be fast approaching in many areas, and Ohio might get cold quickly. In 2013, the deep cold came with the Thanksgiving holiday, and in 2014 many gardeners are complaining that the temperatures are dropping earlier than usual.What sort of delays did I rue in the past?I especially regret leaving out a large pot all winter a couple years ago. It filled with water and froze. Made of resin, I was lulled into believing it would be immune to frost cracking.
  • The Growing Season Review

    Ilona Erwin
    20 Sep 2014 | 11:09 am
    July looked bestYou know how people like to summarize their year during December and especially at the turn of the year? Well, this is that time for Gardeners.Premature you say? For me, I will yet again be absent from my garden and al that remains for me to do this year is planting and preparing for the next spring. The vegetable gardening will consist mainly of cleanup, and for some reason I am anticipating an early frost and onset of cold.Every year for the past 7 or 8, I have been saying, promising, vowing to stay with my garden during the growing season. To be there when it most needs me,…
  • The Down And Dirty Weeding Tool List

    Ilona Erwin
    9 Aug 2014 | 9:45 am
    The Bare Essentials Some essentials when brand newI've done a lot of tweeting and writing about weeding this season. There are a couple of reasons for that including the unusually wonderful weather (from my perspective, anyway), and my desire to have my yard look like I actually garden, despite many trips to visit the children and grandchildren.The weather: It has been a cool summer with plenty of rain. That means everything stayed in growth mode and I was able to continue working outside. When heat and humidity skyrocket I hide in my airconditioned room ( we have 1) and write. The…
  • Winding Up July

    Ilona Erwin
    31 Jul 2014 | 7:11 pm
    I didn't say "Hot enough for you?" once this month. Not that I am given to using that phrase, anyway, but the weather in Ohio could not have been more beautiful. We had "Polar vortex" in July. Normally I write off this month in terms of garden work. Only mad dogs and Midwesterners work in the heat and humidity, but the so-called "fall temperatures" (the weatherman's terms, not mine) allowed for plenty of garden grooming this year. I called it a bonus of the "rare days of June": with blues skies white puffy clouds, summer zephyrs, jade green grass, and blissful 70's temperatures.Of…
  • What I'm Weeding Out

    Ilona Erwin
    1 Jul 2014 | 8:50 am
    Catching Up With SummerWorking Away At the FrontlineI swore to myself I wouldn't do this, but I miscalculated how much I wanted to spend time with grandkids (even though it meant numerous 9 hr. trips). I am now playing catch up with the garden weeds, long grass, and a veritable jungle out there.So in the spirit of "making lemonade", I thought I would let you know the status of the weeds around here. Maybe you have some of them, too. I'm pretty sure you do.I make piles to gather up after weeding session is done.What are the main weeds of July in my Ohio garden? It will take a list.Poison…
 
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    Bananas.org

  • banana hands

    Sammie
    24 Oct 2014 | 3:45 pm
    How many hands are on your banana bunch? So far I only have 5 on my Sweetheart and 5 on Dwarf Brazilian.
  • weird banana leaf. HELP!

    kelvin0909
    24 Oct 2014 | 1:03 am
    i'd been trying to grow musa acuminata as a hobby farmer. the banana plant had been planted for 10 months now. fertiliser had been given every month. it was growing until recently i get weird leaves coming out. Anyone here can help me to diagnose the problem? Thanks in advance. :nanadrink:
  • Harvested too early, or are these seeds viable?

    siege2050
    23 Oct 2014 | 5:19 pm
    Sorry for the blurry pic, I picked this fruit from my Musa Velutina/Dasycarpa to see how the ripening is coming along. The fruit had no sweetness yet, but the seeds are very dark, do you think they are viable, and developed enough for germination? :2738:
  • New bananas, Thousand Finger?

    wolfyhound
    23 Oct 2014 | 4:46 pm
    My five new bananas! Any opinions? I did pick the ones that looked like sword pups. Of course, the original guy apparently told the woman I got them from a lot of odd stuff.
  • Over Fertilization?

    ifnull
    23 Oct 2014 | 1:51 pm
    In the last 2 days i have seen significant growth on this plant. The problem is that the leaves seem underdeveloped. They are extremely thin, tearing easily and burning. I didn't get a picture yesterday but the newest leaf was tearing open the prior leaf which was still completely unopened. Today 5 Days ago
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    North Coast Gardening

  • Organic Fertilizer Recipes: How to MacGyver Up a Custom Blend

    Genevieve
    5 Oct 2014 | 8:25 pm
    Developing a healthy soil is the goal of every gardener, but sometimes plants need an extra boost. Perhaps you are growing high-yield fruits and vegetables, plants with big blooms like roses, rhododendrons and camellias, or just feel that your soil isn’t performing well and your plants need a little help while you work to balance it with compost and other approaches. In any case, creating your own organic fertilizer blend from single ingredient fertilizers is a great way of saving money and keeping control over what exactly goes into your garden. I would think that in using single…
  • DIY Organic Fertilizer: Demystifying Single-Ingredient Fertilizers

    Genevieve
    1 Oct 2014 | 12:01 am
    Single-ingredient organic fertilizers have long been a mystery to me, and since I haven’t wanted to screw things up, I’ve been using the already-blended mixes from brands like Gardner and Bloome, which have formulations that work well for the different labeled uses (acid-loving plants, flowering plants, etc). Yet using single-ingredient fertilizers, and blending them yourself, gives you a greater degree of control in tailoring your fertilizer to the plants you have and the needs of your own soil. Making your own fertilizer from bulk ingredients can also save you money over buying…
  • Association of Professional Landscape Designers 2014 Design Awards

    Genevieve
    29 Sep 2014 | 12:01 am
    Every year, I look forward to reading about the Association of Professional Landscape Designers’ award-winning landscapes, because there is usually such a diverse array of winners. So I was honored to be asked by Susan Morrison, editor of APLD’s The Designer magazine, to write up descriptions of each of the award-winning landscapes for the fall issue of the magazine, taking information from the photos, landscaping plans, and design briefs each designer submitted. With a variety of styles, budgets, climates, and client needs, I learned something new from each landscape, and while some…
  • Garden Travel: Choosing the Best Garden Tour

    Genevieve
    1 Sep 2014 | 10:28 am
    Two years ago, I had the experience of going on two amazing garden tours of the San Francisco Bay Area, one that I structured myself, and one that was arranged by Sterling Tours, where they bussed the whole group from garden to garden for four days and took care of everything, so all I had to do was enjoy the experience. What did I learn? Well, I was surprised to find just how much I enjoyed going on an actual, structured garden travel experience. I generally prefer to travel alone so that I can take things at my own pace, and not get stuck going to a bunch of lame touristy stuff. But the…
  • Tired of Spraying? You Might Just Need a Dose of CTFD

    Genevieve
    26 Jun 2014 | 2:43 pm
    New gardeners, like new parents, tend to be a bit overprotective of their charges. It doesn’t matter whether we’re talking a fancy new shrub from the garden store, or our firstborn little darling – too much hovering can lead to, well, not-so-great results. There’s a new parenting trend floating around the internet called “Calm the F*** Down“, which is exactly as it sounds. The idea being that a playful spirit and another martini might just lead to better kids then a stressed-out ‘tude and a stack of the latest parenting books. As a new mom, I can’t…
 
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    Ewa in the Garden

  • Book Review: Sissinghurst. Vita Sackville-West and the Creation of a Garden

    24 Oct 2014 | 11:11 pm
    If enchantment by English gardens was ever part of your inspiration this book is definitely for you.  Vita Sackville-West, the British poet, together with her husband Harold, created the beauty of iconic British garden – Sissinghurst. Harold created the structure, Vita filled it with plantings. It doesn’t happen often that the garden outlives its creators, but today still Sissinghurst is one
  • 3 Orchids that Look Like an Animal

    22 Oct 2014 | 8:26 am
    Orchids produce some of the most beautiful and unique flowers in the world.  Recently, they have become one of the most common house plants you can buy and are available everywhere.  What most people don’t realize is just how many different Orchid species there are and how amazing they can be. With over 20,000 Orchid species recognized today, you can’t even imagine some of the flowers they
  • Ewa in the Garden on the list of top 50 gardening blogs at Garden Bloggers Conference, Atlanta, 2014

    19 Oct 2014 | 4:27 am
    I would like to say big thank you to all my regular and occasional viewers that come here to see and and view what life bringh to my garden path. Without you I wouldn't be on the list of top 50 gardening blogs published by Garden Bloggers Conference 2014 in Atlanta. Really appreciate! Hope to see you returning :) If you are a blogger and would like to improve your blogging, I would like to
  • Pinheiros Altos

    18 Oct 2014 | 4:15 am
    Visiting a friend living in Pinheiros Altos (Algarve, Portugal). Some weeks ago. Utmost simplicity and elegance.  As vertical structure featuring stone pines (Pinus pinea). Its dynamic shapes contrasted with rounded shapes of pruned shrubs. Harmonious and balanced. See the shape of the pool? If you need to pay for something  make sure you make it right. The Grown-Up's Guide to Running
  • Vegetable Market at the Ocean in Olhao, Algarve, Portugal

    17 Oct 2014 | 10:15 pm
    Prices are in euro. I love those diiferent varieties of hot pepper and plants that flower in the winter time.  Fresh seedlings for the next coming crop. The vegetable market in Olhao has something special to offer. Beside delicious fruits, vegetables and other stuff, it offers direct view to the ocean. The salty breeze and unique scent of ocean are embracing the produce of the
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    Your Small Kitchen Garden

  • Wordless Wednesday Sunset, 2014

    Daniel Gasteiger
    22 Oct 2014 | 9:08 pm
     
  • Gloom and Bloom Day Autumn, 2014

    Daniel Gasteiger
    16 Oct 2014 | 1:25 am
    Why are there cosmos in my kitchen garden? Someone once told me that cosmos growing with sweet corn keep away corn ear worms. I still don’t know whether it works, but I’ve yet to find ear worms in my corn. This year, the corn didn’t do well, but the cosmos plants are about ten feet tall and bursting with blossoms. There had been a power outage by the time I woke up this morning. It was raining. For a few minutes during the day, the rain stopped, but when I had a chance to get out to the garden and make photos, I got wet. Lighting was horrible… my super-sophisticated camera struggles…
  • Blond Zucchini?

    Daniel Gasteiger
    8 Oct 2014 | 11:22 am
    As long as I’ve known zucchini, it has been a dark green squash like the young one in this photo. To some kitchen gardeners, the existence of blond zucchini is no surprise (though calling it “blond” is probably not normal). In my experience, whether store-bought or homegrown, zucchini is a dark-green squash. It never occurred to me there might be other shades of zuke, and I really didn’t care. Until this summer. You see, on one of five zucchini plants growing from commercially-package seeds, a squash developed that is very light, creamy green rather than zuke green. Of course,…
  • Horseradish!

    Daniel Gasteiger
    5 Oct 2014 | 1:40 am
    After 17 months in my refrigerator, the horseradish roots my brother gave me looked pretty happy. Those are some seriously healthy-looking green leaves… despite that they’ve seen almost no light for more than a year. How about a little horseradish with your steak? Once a year at Christmas, we have beef fondue with a collection of homemade steak sauces. At least two of those sauces include horseradish… horseradish from a jar. But that’s going to change. In March of 2013, my brother gave me to horseradish roots dug from his garden. I was busy and so I left the roots wrapped in plastic…
  • Autumn in Lewisburg’s Community Garden

    Daniel Gasteiger
    2 Oct 2014 | 5:11 pm
    Cabbages provide some drama at the Lewisburg Community Garden. If this is on a private allotment, some Lewisburg family is going to be sick of cabbage-based side dishes. I stopped in recently at Lewisburg’s community garden and saw some impressive sights. Most impressive of all: tomato plants that had late blight lesions over a month ago had somehow survived, put out new growth, and produced even more tomatoes! I guess cool days and an amazing lack of humidity made the blight fungus uncomfortable and kept it from reproducing. The community garden seems in peak season. It’s producing…
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    Dirt Du Jour Daily Blog

  • Feed me Seymour!

    cindymcnatt@gmail.com
    22 Oct 2014 | 6:58 am
    If you’re thinking you might as well take the winter off where you live, get one thing done before you take your break. Planting a cover crop in your vegetable garden feeds the soil, loosens the structure and provides organic materials when you dig it under in spring. You’ll be ready to plant in a super-duper enriched environment. It’s as easy as sprinkling seed. Mother Earth News has the long-form how-to. whatever TwinCities.com—Public smackdown for gardener sprucing vacant lot
  • Because the birds don’t hunker down

    cindymcnatt@gmail.com
    21 Oct 2014 | 9:16 am
    Fall might look a little dull to a hummingbird. What, with the blossoms gone and nectar sources scarce. Kennedy Glass Studios has been making these beautiful nectar feeders for four years. whatever Wall Street Journal —Big problem in English garden community: Spiking snails over the fence.
  • Fall color for warm climates

    cindymcnatt@gmail.com
    16 Oct 2014 | 10:14 am
    A lot of us mistakenly believe that fall color has something to do with climate. But that is only partially true. Deciduous plants change leaf color in preparation for cold weather, but only because the days are growing shorter. Short days are what trigger the change. You got to plant it, to get it. Here are eight plants that color up nicely in warm climates: Pistashe Liquidambar Barberry Persimmon Crape Myrtle Ginkgo Japanese Birch Honey Locust whatever Local8Now —Tennessee women gets the slammer for sloppy yard
  • Christopher Columbus’s plant discoveries

    cindymcnatt@gmail.com
    13 Oct 2014 | 5:56 am
    Yeah there were the new worlds and all that to be explored, but then there were the plants. The Columbian Exchange is named for the first mass exchange of materials from continent to continent. The old world shared horses, chickens and smallpox with the Americas. The Americas gave up the good stuff: vanilla, chocolate and strawberries. whatever LATimes: Stealing plants and lawn statues for a cause: frat parties
  • Five fun pumpkin facts

    cindymcnatt@gmail.com
    8 Oct 2014 | 7:44 am
    1. Most pumpkins are not true pumpkins, but kinds of squash 2. In fact, pumpkin pie filling is typically squash mixes that include Butternut, Hubbard or Boston Marrow 3. Pumpkins have been grown in North America for five thousand years 4. The Jack O’ Lantern originated in Ireland in the form of turnips 5. Not all pumpkins work for pumpkin recipes. For cooking try Baby Bear, Cinderella, Fairytale and Sugar Pie whatever Central Florida Future: Your Starbuck’s Pumpkin Spice Latte? No pumpkin in the ingredient list. 
 
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    Veggie Gardener: Organic Vegetable Gardening Tips

  • Seven Delicious Fall Vegetables, Besides Pumpkins (with Recipes)

    Lauren M
    8 Oct 2014 | 1:47 pm
    I love fall and the variety of vegetables that are now readily at my disposable. Unlike the light and airy offerings of summer, fall veggies tend to be savory comfort foods that help take your mind off the cold setting in outside, and the gardens that will soon be freezing over. Unfortunately, with our culture’s […]
  • Tips for Fall Garden Preparation

    Chris
    2 Oct 2014 | 6:34 am
    As the summer season comes to a close, it’s time take stock of the condition of your garden. If you have decided to plant a second season harvest, there is a good chance you have already removed the debris from your summer plants. But, if you have yet to plant your fall crops or are […]
  • Zucchini Three Ways

    Lauren M
    25 Sep 2014 | 7:22 am
    Garden tomatoes get a lot of attention, and even though their plants tend to produce in abundance, the other vegetable that is taking up a considerable amount of room in my kitchen is zucchini. Zucchini is one of the most versatile vegetables you can grow. Because of its mild taste, chefs have been known to […]
  • Unconventional Planters

    Lauren M
    22 Sep 2014 | 8:47 am
    The great thing about gardens is that most of them can fit anywhere. This is why you may be able to repurpose junk from your garage into a unique garden—you just need to get a bit creative. Planters are also ideal for indoors when the weather doesn’t allow for outdoor growing. Though there are a […]
  • Tips for the Lazy Gardener

    Lauren M
    18 Aug 2014 | 6:18 am
    I’m ashamed to admit that sometimes I play the role of the lazy gardener. When I first started gardening, I pictured myself spending evenings and weekends tending to my garden, creating pristine and perfect plots. But the longer I actually gardened, the more I realized that not only is a perfect garden nearly unattainable, but […]
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    Miss Rumphius' Rules

  • Garden Design Details: Stone at Skylands

    Susan aka Miss. R
    22 Oct 2014 | 4:18 am
    I hadn’t visited Skylands for about ten years, and never in the fall.  I went hoping to see the last of the fall foliage and instead found stonework that was interesting in its scope and full of ideas. Formerly an estate developed in the 1920s, it is now the New Jersey Botanical Garden and its stone American Tudor mansion  is better known than the gardens as a popular site for weddings. The stonework at Skylands is incredible and impressive…even if much of it is in need of repair.  There is both formal and rustic stonework and sometimes dressed stone is juxtaposed with…
  • Garden Design Details: Fall Beyond Foliage

    Susan aka Miss. R
    14 Oct 2014 | 5:08 am
    I had some rare time in between landscape design projects and clients last week and as I’ve been meaning to take my new camera lens out for a spin, I stopped by Frelinghuysen Arboretum in Morristown to search out some of the details of the season.  The focus of this public park is plants…not necessarily design although it has its designer-y moments.  I go here when I need a plant fix.  I send my landscape design students here to photograph and learn about plants just as I did years ago when I was learning. Grasses, asters, Japanese anemones and Monkshood were at their peak…
  • Garden Design Inspiration: Architectural Details in Chicago

    Susan aka Miss. R
    7 Oct 2014 | 4:37 am
    When I was in Chicago in August, speaking at IGC about landscape designers and their potential relationships with garden centers  I took a day before and a day after to explore the city and meet up with friends.  I’ve been to Chicago regularly over the past five years and have seen and written about its wonderful gardens and street plantings, but this time I went in search of something else.  Architecture. Chicago reinvented itself after the great fire in 1871, and many of architecture’s greatest design minds have lived or worked in the city. Three who formed the basis of the…
  • Garden Visits: Princeton

    Susan aka Miss. R
    13 Aug 2014 | 6:35 am
    I visited gardens yesterday in Princeton, New Jersey. The tour was arranged by the New Jersey Landscape and Nursery Association (NJNLA) and featured four very different gardens by designer Bill Kucas. What struck me about these outdoor spaces was that their details is what really made them interesting. In each space the features beyond plants were detailed beautifully, but when I asked about what made the spaces personal, that had been left up to the clients. In each space, with the exception of the one still being built, the choice of furniture and accessories beyond what the landscape…
  • Riding in the Backseat around a Curve

    Susan aka Miss. R
    31 Jul 2014 | 8:55 am
    Miss R has been in the backseat all summer. Pretend you are on a roadtrip and listening to a story on the radio…the pictures will come after we reach our destination. In a twist of weather related events and wonder, my landscape design business and my commitment to being the national President of APLD has taken all of my time, leaving little extra for regular blog posts.  Although I feel a nagging sense of ‘it’s been too long’, I’m happy to have my priorities straight and to be able to see my garden and landscape design work come alive. I always feel that the…
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    Garden Therapy

  • Halloween Miniature Garden

    Stephanie
    24 Oct 2014 | 11:11 am
    What better time than Halloween is there to be creative in the garden? I decided to take a stab at my very first miniature garden design to celebrate the spookiest eve with skeletons, tombstones, and (of course) a miniature pumpkin patch! I’ve been wanting to take a stab at mini gardening ever since I read Janit Calvo’s amazing book, Gardening in Miniature. I am lucky enough to call Janit a friend, so after she wrote this fantastic tutorial on how to make a miniature garden patio for Garden Therapy, she also sent me a Halloween mini garden kit containing skeletons, pumpkins,…
  • Hooty the Owl Pumpkin

    Stephanie
    20 Oct 2014 | 2:26 pm
    This owl pumpkin is an easy way to add a unique spin to your Halloween or fall decor. This year I was playing a bit more with different designs for Jack-o-Planterns and I’m happy with how this one turned out. The white pumpkin seemed to beg to become something elegant, a owl no less! The white owl pumpkin planter was inspired by my favorite visitors, snowy owls. I went to visit them a while back (you can see my photos here) and I now go each year hoping to catch a glimpse of these majestic creatures. They are simply stunning, with large, graceful wingspans and downy, white feathers.
  • Garlicky Spinach and Kale Butter

    Stephanie
    16 Oct 2014 | 6:01 am
    Warning, this garlic bread made with spinach and kale is dangerously tasty! Gluten-haters don’t be afraid, you can easily make this gluten-free by swapping out the bread with your preferred brand. No matter what bread you choose, you can pack in the greens and makes a new favorite side for dinner, especially when entertaining!  This recipe isn’t just to get a healthy dose of greens and garlic into your system (or the bellies of little ones) but once you taste it there is no doubt that you will be clamoring for kale, chard, green onions, spinach, and herbs from the garden to…
  • Protect Your Garden from Vampires: How to Grow Garlic

    Stephanie
    14 Oct 2014 | 11:45 am
    As we get ready for Halloween, it’s the perfect time to think about how you can naturally vampire-proof your garden. Planting garlic around the perimeter will protect your veggie beds from getting tramped in the night while they vant to suck your bloooood. In all seriousness, it’s a good reminder to plant garlic when you start thinking about Halloween, at least that’s the case in Vancouver.  If you live elsewhere, a rule of thumb is that garlic should be planted between 3 and 6 weeks before the ground freezes, to ensure there is enough time for the roots to develop. The…
  • How to Make Planted Pumpkins Last!

    Stephanie
    9 Oct 2014 | 4:48 am
    Pumpkins make festive fall containers for autumn flowers with stunning arrangements set off by vibrant colours. Colours like green and grey and black. What? You thought I would write “orange”? Of course, pumpkins start off orange, but once you carve them into planters they will start to mold and morph into my previously mentioned colour palette. What can you do to make them last? I make pumpkin planters every year (like these ones) and they last for at least a month for me. Today I’ll reveal my secrets! First, (and this seems to be a pretty good rule of thumb for making…
 
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    Urban Organic Gardener

  • Too Poor to Be Healthy?

    UOG
    22 Oct 2014 | 5:47 am
    “An obese mother-of-two who lives on benefits says she needs more of taxpayers’ money to overhaul her unhealthy lifestyle.  Christina Briggs, 26, says she hates being 160 kilos but she can’t do anything about it because she can only afford junk food. Meanwhile, exercise is out of the question because she doesn’t have the funds to join a gym.” Unemployed Christina gets £20,000 in benefits a year and lives in a council house with her two children by different fathers, Helena, 10, and Robert, two. She left school as a teenager after falling pregnant with her…
  • Why, How & What to Compost

    UOG
    10 Oct 2014 | 6:02 am
    From AvantGardens “Compost is a mixture that consists largely of decayed organic matter and is used for fertilizing and conditioning land. Home composting reduces the need for water, fertilizers, and pesticides and encourages a higher yield in crops. Consisting of nutrient-rich brown and green material, compost creation is low-maintenance and can be done on both small and large scales.” Creating your own compost will save you money and is easy to do! With compost starters like Ringer® Compost Plus available to help organically speed up the process, you can start reaping the…
  • How to Select the Best Grow Light for Indoor Growing

    UOG
    25 Sep 2014 | 7:31 am
    Not all light is the same by Michelle Moore Plants respond differently to different colors of light. Light on either end of the spectrum, blue light or red light, have the greatest impact on photosynthesis. Kind of Lights Blue light, referred to as cool light, encourages compact bushy growth. Red light, on the opposite end of the spectrum, triggers a hormone response which creates blooms. Orange and reddish light typically produce substantial heat, however, some lights are able to produce full spectrum light without the heat. Grow lights come in all shapes, sizes and price ranges. As a…
  • Fresh produce on a city bus. Delivering fresh, local, organic fruits and vegetables to food deserts.

    UOG
    12 Sep 2014 | 6:24 am
    A bus in Chicago helps bring fresh produce to residents of “food deserts.” Sandra Endo reports.
  • The film the food industry doesn’t want you to see. #FedUp — NOW PLAYING.

    UOG
    9 Sep 2014 | 11:38 am
    This is the movie the food industry doesn’t want you to see. FED UP blows the lid off everything we thought we knew about food and weight loss, revealing a 30-year campaign by the food industry, aided by the U.S. government, to mislead and confuse the American public, resulting in one of the largest health epidemics in history. From Katie Couric, Laurie David (Oscar winning producer of AN INCONVENIENT TRUTH) and director Stephanie Soechtig, FED UP will change the way you eat forever. See the film and then join the filmmakers in taking THE FED UP CHALLENGE. Join us in our cause and go…
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    The Garden Plot

  • Celebrate a Special Mother-in-Law this October

    Garden Media Group
    8 Oct 2014 | 9:53 am
    Sunday, Oct. 26 marks Mother-in-Law Day, a special day to honor the woman who gave birth to your spouse and the grandmother of your children. This unofficial holiday offers a chance to get to know “mom” and show her the appreciation she deserves. “Whether you’ve known her for years or you’re new to the family, every mother-in-law deserves recognition and thanks,” says Katie Dubow of Garden Media Group, a public relations firm specializing in the gardening and outdoor lifestyle industry. Before choosing a gift, think about her interests and hobbies. Everyone loves a present that…
  • Protect BrazelBerries® From Old Man Winter With These Easy Steps

    Garden Media Group
    6 Oct 2014 | 6:43 am
    The new line of BrazelBerries® blueberries and raspberries shrubs that grow easily in containers or gardens are a snap to care for over the winter with some simple steps. Most varieties within the BrazelBerries® collection can take cooler temperatures and actually need a certain amount of chill to set fruit the next year. The blueberry varieties Jelly Bean™ and Blueberry Glaze™ and the thornless Raspberry Shortcake™ raspberry all are specifically bred to survive during cold months either inside in a protected spot or out in the garden or landscape. Peach Sorbet™ is a hybrid that may…
  • New Infographic from Longfield Gardens Illustrates How to Enjoy up to 60 Days of Spring Flowers

    Garden Media Group
    25 Sep 2014 | 6:00 am
    As fall approaches, gardeners are making plans to plant flower bulbs for brighter spring gardens, landscapes and bouquets. With a little understanding and forethought, gardeners can extend their flowering season by choosing the right bulbs that bloom one right after another, filling spring with flowers for months.“Bulb gardening is very easy by nature. Just dig up some dirt, put in some bulbs and wait,” said Marlene Thompson, creative director for Longfield Gardens.“Our new infographic further simplifies the bulb gardening process by helping gardeners understand spring’s four…
  • Celebrate National Indoor Plant Week with Costa Farms

    Garden Media Group
    15 Sep 2014 | 1:27 pm
    To help spread the word on the benefits of indoor houseplants, Costa Farms is once again backing National Indoor Plant Week, September 15 – 19, 2014. Since beginning in NYC in 2008, Costa Farms’ "O2 for You: Houseplants with a Purpose" campaign has continued to raise awareness on the benefits of houseplants. These green beings help to purify the chemical pollutants (volatile organic compounds) emitted from products and materials found in our homes and offices. Event founder Mark Martin, from Interior Tropical Gardens, says, “We like to say that the ‘oxygen arrives when the plants…
  • Trumpet Daffodil Commands the 2014 Spotlight

    Garden Media Group
    12 Sep 2014 | 5:51 am
    Searching for a fresh, bold burst of spring color? Look no further than Trumpet daffodils. Crowned 2014 flower bulb of the year, the Trumpet steps into the spotlight this fall. Trumpet daffodils are beloved for their classic shape and style: huge, bright canary flowers with a prominent, extra-long cup. Plus, this daffodil is a dependable "repeater," returning year after year with more blooms.The Trumpet daffodil has proven to be a classic display of color that offers beautiful blooms each year.Like all spring-blooming flower bulbs, the time to plant the Trumpet daffodil is in fall. To create…
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    Gardener's Journal » Gardener's Journal

  • Colossal Carrot Harvest

    Gardener's Supply
    22 Oct 2014 | 8:02 am
    We’re getting more great entries in our 2014 Harvest Photo Contest. This one is from Annmarie Mones in Trumbull, CT. Here in CT I used the square-foot gardening method. I had several different patches and varieties of carrots, beets, and some parsnips planted this year. Unfortunately, voles moved into my garden, and I lost all my beets and some of the carrots and parsnips. I decided to pull almost all the root vegetables to see what I could salvage. I am happy to say I have carrots to last me awhile! This pile of carrots are all keepers and waiting for me to clean them, along with a few…
  • A Great Gift that Gives Back

    Gardener's Supply
    10 Oct 2014 | 6:45 am
    Heritage Honey and Beestick Set  “Who Needs Gift Wrap?” writes “Jessie the Gardener” from Philadelphia. In her review of the Heritage Honey and Beestick Set. “I purchased this to gift to a friend who loves tea, and I thought the honey and dipper might go well with a box of her favorite tea. It turned out to be such a beautiful product, both the honey and the hardwood honey dipper, that I decided not to wrap it up. She loved the beauty and thoughtful nature of this gift. She even upcycled the jar, filled it with button flowers, and gave it back to me! LOVE!
  • Turn Cherry Tomatoes into Something Special

    Gardener's Supply
    6 Oct 2014 | 10:22 am
    Thanks to everyone who entered our Tomato Recipe Contest on Facebook. Here’s the winning recipe, from Megan Miller of Carver, MA. Megan Miller, with her autumn garden in the background THIS summer — unlike many of my fellow local gardeners — I had a wildly successful crop of tomatoes. My heirlooms colored up and my cherries were extraordinarily prolific. In fact, I’m still harvesting yellow pear and black cherry tomatoes. My wife and I had tomatoes at almost every meal and I still had enough to share with my granny and mom, who live across the street. The garden wasn’t…
  • Good Ideas Grow in the Pumpkin Patch

    Gardener's Supply
    23 Sep 2014 | 9:53 am
    Just-harvested pumpkins Our exceptionally productive plant grew 29 pumpkins. Sometimes the most successful fund-raisers are spontaneous. A recent effort here at Gardener’s Supply started with a single pumpkin plant, which grew to massive proportions, sending its vines throughout our test gardens. By the end of last week, we had harvested 29 sugar pumpkins, tended by Deborah Miuccio, our test gardener. We never expected such a large harvest, but we suspect that it was because Deborah fertilized the plant with Worm Power and used Pumpkin Pedestals to support each fruit. “What do…
  • Use LED Candles to Create Safe, Beautiful Centerpiece

    Gardener's Supply
    15 Sep 2014 | 5:54 am
    Feeling creative? Check out the Learn + Share area for several great DIY projects. Our step-by-step slideshows will inspire you to create. One of the projects is an Adirondack-themed wedding centerpiece, below, which features items gathered from the woods—pine cones and birch bark—in combination with Ivory Pillar LED Candles, twine and a large wooden bowl. Created by Lisa Gribnau, Gardener’s Supply The post Use LED Candles to Create Safe, Beautiful Centerpiece appeared first on Gardener's Journal - From America's Gardening Resource
 
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    Annie's Gardening Corner

  • Friday Flash

    24 Oct 2014 | 7:54 am
    Another Coastal Design Project in Progress by Bilowz Associates Inc. It’s a quick look at one of Bilowz Associates Inc.’s coastal design projects in progress plus a recap from this past Wednesday’s post, ‘Mastering the Plan.’ It’s just a Friday flash reminder that the latter part of fall and winter serve as the perfect time for your design and approval process with coastal, riverfront or wetland properties. Keep an eye on our Houzz profile where more images and descriptions of this coastal project should be posted soon. As Gerard Way states, “One day your life will flash before…
  • Mastering the Plan

    22 Oct 2014 | 7:04 am
    Mastering the Plan - Bilowz Associates Inc. Master Plan /South Shore Riverfront property  On this rainy New England Wednesday, put a slot in your calendar - 'Mastering the Landscape Plan'. These cooler months signal the perfect time to work on the design phase of your landscape project. If you missed this post back in August, Cool Days = Perfect for Planting Again, a riverfront property designed by Bilowz Associates Inc. was shown in its spring planting phase. Above is our rendered master plan.  For garden folks just searching for useful fall planting tips, a click on this past link…
  • October Moments

    20 Oct 2014 | 7:57 am
    One of the beautiful October moments is discovering the country back roads.And here’s an amazing find on one of those New England back roads- June’s Bakeshop.  Stumbling upon this off-the-beaten path bake shop, it wasn’t what one might expect. Imagine cookies that can only be described as a work of art; so creative you don’t dare eat them. But it’s simply a must. Discovering country back roads can often bring you to places you might otherwise never find. This seasonally decorated cookies and cake shop is something worth checking out, especially if you're in the market for…
  • Friday's Flower #Inspiration

    17 Oct 2014 | 7:53 am
    It's #Imagery and #Inspiration - a simple story within this beautiful Rose. Mary Oliver, take it away."Instructions for living a life." And if you missed out on this week's earlier post regarding Rose tips in the fall garden, it's a click and a link away. Click here.  Until Monday, enjoy your gardens and the last hurrah of the New England foliage. © Rose Image by Ann BilowzIf you like this blog, check in for your daily share's worth of garden inspiration, landscape architecture and design tips; always original, not cookie cutter and copied. Just like our design work, we strive for…
  • Water is Life

    16 Oct 2014 | 7:49 am
    Water is LifeIt’s one of those rainy, soggy New England days and one can only hope that in #PatriotsNation, despite all the team’s injuries, that we get another win this evening. But onto the point of today’s post, which if any parents and teachers happen to be reading, it’s a Thursday contest you don’t want to miss. Just in from the Landscape Architecture newsletter, it’s worth the click on this link about a National Art Contest that focuses on Smart Water Use. This ‘Water is Life’ Classroom art and mural contest is meant to engage students from grades K-12 while bringing…
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    Serenity in the Garden

  • American Burnet - One of the last native flowers to bloom

    Jan Johnsen
    23 Oct 2014 | 5:06 am
    Sanguisorba candensis - photo by Jan JohnsenDo you have a slightly wet piece of ground? American Burnet (Sanguisorba canadensis) is an under-appreciated native perennial plant that might work for you! It is a fall bloomer that is still sporting its spikes of white fuzzy flowers in mid-October. American Burnet by Stefan Bloodworth Also called Canadian Burnet, it is common in the Eastern US and it is a large, graceful plant that is native to swamps and bogs but has a high degree of drought tolerance. It begins to bloom in August and continues through…
  • Designing in the Prairie Spirit: Darrel Morrison

    Jan Johnsen
    20 Oct 2014 | 7:55 am
    I had the pleasure of teaching along with Darrel Morrison at Columbia University for these last few years. Darrell is an outstanding landscape designer, thinker and teacher. And you should know about him.source: APLD OH While he was teaching he also worked on several wonderful landscape projects including the NY Botanical Garden's new Native Plant Center.NYBG Native Plant Center - photo - Jan JohnsenHere is a lovely video that I think anyone would thoroughly enjoy! His words are so heart felt and eloquent.Bravo, Daryl! I hope you spread your magic around the world.
  • Garden Photo of the Day - The Incomparable Japanese Maple in Fall

    Jan Johnsen
    20 Oct 2014 | 6:11 am
    "The fact that time is moving faster means that it is getting more and more difficult for people to take control of time, or even just to take time off and relax. And it is precisely this dilemma which led to the demand for gardens today to be sanctuaries of contemplation, where one feels embraced by nature.In essence, gardens which provide people with peace of mind, a sense of stability and a feeling of contentment. It’s no longer enough to merely provide a green zone here, or an occasional floral embellishment to a skyscraper there. What we need today are gardens that can reach…
  • TEXTURE in the Garden - a Guest Post by Yuliya Bellinger

    Jan Johnsen
    16 Oct 2014 | 6:07 am
    Lamb's Ear One of my assignments to my graduate students in the landscape design program at Columbia University is to take a paragraph from the book, 'The Hidden Dimension' by Edward T. Hall and share a personal experience related to the topic of the selected excerpt. 'The Hidden Dimension' is a time honored classic on the role of spatial understanding in cultureThe following is an essay that the talented designer, Yuliya Bellinger, wrote. I think it is so lovely and wanted to share it with you. Simple is beautiful.  TEXTURE in the Garden By Yuliya…
  • My Annual Reminder- Plant Drumstick Allium now

    Jan Johnsen
    13 Oct 2014 | 4:00 am
    I must admit I first discovered Drumstick Allium when I could not find any other allium bulb to buy...It was late fall and I had waited too long to buy the popular Globemaster Alliums...What to DO? I bought the Drumstick bulbs and was thrilled at the result.These purplish - red blooms are small - 1" -and oval shaped.  They bloom in my part of the world in June- July  atop wiry 24" - 30" tall stems and wave in the breeze...They make a superb cut flower (which you can dry to be an 'everlasting').    THEY ARE DEER RESISTANT. Drumstick Allium…
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    MySecretGarden

  • Lakewold Gardens' Fall and Showcase Tables Through My Eyes ans Lens

    24 Oct 2014 | 7:04 am
    I hope you can make it this year.  Lakewold Gardens 16th Annual Beautiful Tables Showcase:  October 23-26, 2014 from 10a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • Autumn Colors In Yang's Nursery: Japanese Maples and Others

    23 Oct 2014 | 7:16 am
    This is the time of year when even driving on a highway or in a residential area provides an opportunity to marvel at the colorful foliage palette. But,  while driving we can't enjoy it to its fullest extent, right? To absorb all the beauty which the fall offers us we need to step on the ground and better yet - on the ground where the beauty is concentrated, isolated from the distractions of the
  • Green October Hydrangea Bouquets

    12 Oct 2014 | 7:58 am
    It's time to cut hydrangea bouquets.  Some of them will stay in the house, and some will decorate my garden working table through the winter. Almost all the blue flowers turned green in August. The majority of the flowers for the bouquets shown below came from the bushes of Nicco Blue which grows in a shady northern border against a wall and in a more sunny back hedge:
  • Emerald Autumn in My Garden

    1 Oct 2014 | 10:22 am
    Autumn is slowly creeping into my garden The shady corner doesn't feel it yet. The morning sun is pushing its way through the tangles of the Magnolia Vine. A huge leaf of the Tetrapanax is happily bathing in its light.  Summery Euphorbia in the
  • Pinkish Side Of My September Garden. Wordless Wednesday

    24 Sep 2014 | 8:34 am
    ***Copyright 2014 TatyanaS
 
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    Veg Plotting

  • Salad Days: An Autumnal Experiment

    VP
    24 Oct 2014 | 12:30 am
    This year I'm trying an experiment with my late sown lettuces. I usually grow them in pots and some old sinks in my cold frames. Everything is fine initially, but the height of the front of frame is too low for the pots placed there and things get a little mushy.This year I'm trying seed trays instead. These will give the leaves more headroom, but I'm not sure if there's sufficient growing media to sustain them for the whole of the winter. However, that can be remedied easily if my fears prove well founded.I made a relatively late sowing in early September of 2 rows of lettuce seed per tray -…
  • Wordless Wednesday: Autumn at Westonbirt Arboretum

    VP
    22 Oct 2014 | 12:30 am
    If you're not reading this on vegplotting.blogspot.com, Blotanical or your own web reader such as Bloglovin' or Feedly, then the website you're using is a blogpost feed scraper. Why not go straight to the source instead? That's vegplotting.blogspot.com
  • Daffy Dahlia

    VP
    20 Oct 2014 | 12:30 am
    My daffy dahlia - posing for its photo in the large terrace bed Whilst I was out in the garden last week, I noticed something slightly different in one of my bright yellow "dinner plate" dahlias. This plant is in its third season here and it's the first time I've seen a streak of red on any of the petals.Just one flower is affected, so what's going on?Four possible reasons spring to mind: environmental impact, genetic mutation, reversion, or a reaction to a virus.Environmental impactI wrote about how environmental factors affected My Crazy Petunias last year. I found the…
  • VP's VIPs: Our Flower Patch

    VP
    17 Oct 2014 | 12:30 am
    Sara (left) and Cally of  Our Flower PatchPicture credit: Clare Green andWestern Daily PressIt gives me great pleasure to feature my latest VIPs -from Our Flower Patch, a joint venture between Cally Smart and Sara Wilman. I've known Cally for ages as she's one of my Local Vocal bloggers and I met Sara last year when she, Cally and I went on our Gardeners' Question Time adventure.Cally and Sara are keen supporters of the British Flowers movement and earlier this year launched Our Flower Patch. They're so excited and passionate about what they're doing, I've decided to divide our…
  • GBBD: Aster novi-belgii 'Waterperry'

    VP
    15 Oct 2014 | 12:30 am
    Asters are the final plant to come to my garden and my terrace bed revamp this year. I was put off them as a child because the Michaelmas daisies we had (as they were often called then) were those sorry, leggy and mildew ridden specimens so often seen in 1960s gardens.My picture shows a very different aster called A. 'Waterperry'. I bought it as a souvenir of a wonderful visit to the garden last September, where this particular cultivar was discovered. The garden's famous long border contained many asters, all very healthy with not one jot of mildew to be seen. They made me revise my thinking…
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    Restoring The Landscape With Native Plants

  • Beneficial Insect Profile - Lacewings

    24 Oct 2014 | 8:29 am
    Brown lacewing larvaAs the last remaining leaves fall from the trees, I start to think about all the beneficial insects that are seeking shelter under the leaf litter or attached to plant stems for the winter. With leaf blowers dominating the suburban landscape, many gardeners are perhaps not aware that they are eliminating next season's predators and parasitoids when they clean-up their garden in the fall. Eggs, larvae, pupae and adults of beneficial insects are blown or raked up, bagged with the leaves and set out at the curb.In perennial gardens we don't need to be this fastidious. Leaves,…
  • Ground-Nesting Bee Profile ~ Unequal Cellophane Bee, Colletes inaequalis

    22 May 2014 | 9:16 am
    The Unequal Cellophane Bee is typically the earliest Colletes species to emerge in the spring in our area. This spring, I found several aggregations of nests on south-facing slopes at a local park.Females began excavating nests as early as the third week of April (unseasonably cool spring). Other nests not on the exposed slopes were easy to find due to the prairie burn performed the previous fall. Ant nests clustered around the clumps of little bluestem grass, Schizachyrium scoparium in this prairie were dug/sought out by northern flickers in early April. The flickers did not show any…
  • Native Bee Spotlight: Cuckoo Bees ~ Coelioxys spp.

    3 Feb 2014 | 1:35 pm
    Cuckoo Bees ~ Coelioxys spp.A female cuckoo bee, Coelioxys sp. nectars onhairy false goldenaster, Heterotheca villosa in late fallThere are many types of cuckoo bees in North America. In the Coelioxys genus, there are approximately 46 speces. The common name "cuckoo bee" is typically used for any bee species that lays its eggs in the nests of other bees. These bees are known as cleptoparasites, where the cuckoo bee larvae kill the host larvae and feed on the provisions (pollen and nectar) provided by the host bee.Coelioxys cuckoo bees are common in the summer months; in central Minnesota I…
  • Book Release: Pollinators of Native Plants

    10 Jan 2014 | 6:54 am
    Available March 2014Book Website: www.pollinatorsnativeplants.comAttract and Support Pollinators with Native Plants•  Over 65 perennial native plants of the Midwest, Great Lakes region, Northeast and southern Canada profiled•  Pollinators, beneficial insects and flower visitors featured that the native plants attract•  1600+ photos of native plants, pollinators and beneficial insects•  Attract, observe and identify pollinators on native plants•  Informational chapters on pollination, types of pollinators and beneficial insects, pollinator habitat and…
  • Predator Profile ~ Grass Carrying Wasps, Isodontia spp.

    12 Dec 2013 | 8:15 am
    Grass-Carrying Wasps ~ Isodontia spp. There are a number of ways to attract beneficial insects to your landscape. Planting a diversity of native plants is an easy, win-win solution. Not only do the plants attract many types of beneficial insects including solitary wasps, but they help support a functioning, complex ecosystem.One of the most interesting solitary wasps in my landscape is the grass carrying wasp. Several years ago I purchased a bell-shaped wire frame. I filled the openings with hollow stems from native perennials in my yard to see what types of solitary bees would use…
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    GrowBlog

  • Four Fantastic Early-Blooming Bulbs for Permaculture Gardens

    23 Oct 2014 | 1:06 pm
    It happens every year. As soon as the last are tucked into the ground, I start thinking about how one can never have enough spring-blooming bulbs, so why not plant a few more? As with all decisions about pretty flowers, I keep in mind the notion that plants should serve multiple purposes. Ring the bells and call the people, because very early bloomers like crocus and scilla provide pollen and nectar for bees on mild late winter days, when little else is in bloom. Easy to grow in a range of climates, early-blooming bulbs help get the first honey bee brood of spring off to a nutritious start,…
  • Growing New Fruit In Your Garden: Loganberries and Jostaberries

    16 Oct 2014 | 11:24 am
    Autumn, or fall to my North American cousins, is the season of mellow fruitfulness. The sun sits lower in the sky, mists spill out over the landscape and fruiting plants give one last burst of glory before it's shutters down for winter.
  • Preserving - How to Ferment Garden Vegetables

    9 Oct 2014 | 11:38 am
    Earlier this year, I had a front row seat at a lecture given by , author of two authoritative books on , which is salt-fermenting vegetables using the microbes nature provides on plant tissues. For an hour, Katz shared tips and massaged sea salt into a big bowl of chopped cabbage and radishes, crunching the mixture with his hands. Though I have been fermenting vegetables for several years, this hand-crunching was a new technique for me. Now I use it all the time.
  • How to Create a Natural Winter Wildlife Garden

    2 Oct 2014 | 11:15 am
    During the summer months, wildlife is ever-present in my garden – bees buzzing, birds chattering, the odd frog hopping away as I move a pile of plant pots – but come autumn and winter, most of them just sort of...disappear. Right?
  • How To Be Happy: Grow a Vegetable Garden

    26 Sep 2014 | 4:16 pm
    There are many formulas for how to be happy, and the latest versions make pretty good sense. Exercise, healthy eating, ample sleep and doing things that help others are favorites on various how to be happy lists, which brings us to the humble vegetable garden. Dismissed by some as a dirty waste of time, vegetable gardening is emerging as a treasure trove of happiness.
 
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    The Enduring Gardener

  • How to Make a Succulent Wall Planter

    The Enduring Gardener
    23 Oct 2014 | 5:18 am
    by Daniel Carruthers In the same way that you might put a picture on the wall in your home with the good fortune of a wall in the garden you can do the same with a succulent wall planter. A frame of plants to admire that will grow as the season extends providing you with months of interest as each succulent comes into flower. There’s a few tutorials around the web on how to construct the framework although we’ll give you a brief look at how you might go about it. The size of the frame was dictated by the materials to hand. Here’s what you’ll need for the framework.
  • Melbourne Botanic Garden

    The Enduring Gardener
    19 Oct 2014 | 11:26 pm
    As a bit of a snake-phobic, my introduction to the part of the Melbourne Botanic Garden which is sited outside the city and specialises in native Australian flora was somewhat unsettling. The numerous signs about snakes had me walking down the middle of the path at all times despite the curator’s assurances that they had only two things on their mind – a. food: I was too large and b. sex: they wouldn’t fancy me. This is a garden that is beginning to mature and I found it both fascinating and informative. I particularly liked the part that showed the transformative effect of…
  • Sago Palms set the Gold Standard

    The Enduring Gardener
    18 Oct 2014 | 11:14 pm
    Apparently the seeds of the sago palm are of such  uniform size and weight that they were used by the gold merchants as a unit of weight in the early days of the trade.
  • The Perilous Life of a Young Monitor Lizard

    The Enduring Gardener
    17 Oct 2014 | 11:05 pm
    As we pootled around the Botanic Garden in Nigel Taylor’s buggy admiring our surroundings we spotted a young monitor lizard on the trunk of a palm tree.  The reason that it was up there turns out to be that if they stay on the ground their parents will eat them!
  • The Street Trees & Shrubs of Singapore

    The Enduring Gardener
    17 Oct 2014 | 5:04 am
    Given the crowded nature of Singapore it is wonderfully green with ribbons of trees and shrubs weaving through the streets.  They provide welcome shade and soften the hard edges of the contemporary buildings.
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    Busch Gardens in Virginia Blog

  • There’s More Than One Way to Get “Cursed” at Busch Gardens Williamsburg

    Emily Bea
    24 Oct 2014 | 6:40 am
     Howl-O-Scream is almost over and thousands of guests have survived "the Curse", but what many people don’t realize is that another curse came to life as a ride in 2005 with the opening of Curse of DarKastle.  The outside theming is a replica of the castle of King Ludwig II of Bavaria, Neuschwanstein, that also includes a garden maze leading to the entrance.  Inside, guests may also notice similarities between the original castle and the Busch Gardens replica. The storyline starts in a “pre-show” area where guests get a two minute introduction hinting at the…
  • Owl Bet You Didn’t Know…

    Emily Bea
    22 Oct 2014 | 8:48 am
    It’s that time of year again: time to find Halloween costumes and unpack the spooky décor.  Have you ever noticed how many fall and Halloween decorations feature owls?  As it turns out, owls have long been associated with some dark myths. Did you know that in Europe during the Middle Ages owls were linked to darkness, witches and the occult due to their nocturnal lifestyle? In Roman culture it was believed that hearing an owl’s hoot was a sign that your demise was near.  Whoooooo knew? The park is home to several of these aerial hunters and the truth is…
  • Howl-O-Scream 2014 In Motion

    Emily Bea
    15 Oct 2014 | 7:42 am
    Every year, I’m amazed by how quickly the park transforms into Howl-O-Scream. Whenever I hear the details about the number of people working on the project and the sheer volume of decorations installed, I’m impressed by how much work gets done in such a short amount of time. If you’ve visited recently, then you’ve seen the theming for yourself. But if you haven’t, it’s our job in the marketing department to show you how cool it all is. But sometimes a picture just doesn’t do it justice, especially when we are trying to show off the world’s…
  • Busting Halloween Wolf Myths at Busch Gardens®

    Emily Bea
    8 Oct 2014 | 2:09 pm
    Today the full moon rises, setting the perfect scene for Howl-O-Scream at Busch Gardens. The only thing missing from this spooky tableau is the silhouette of a howling wolf against the backdrop of a full moon. Busch Gardens is home to three gray wolf packs. Guests often hear them howling during the day as they stroll through Jack Hanna’s Wild Reserve. Their howl can travel for miles, but it has nothing to do with the moon. Yet that is what many people believe. Many wolf behaviors are misinterpreted and embellished by people whose fascination for the animal is based more on myth…
  • Busch Gardens® Coasters Featured on Series Premier of All-American Amusement Parks

    Emily Bea
    30 Sep 2014 | 9:29 am
    Go behind the scenes at the World’s Most Beautiful Theme Park as Busch Gardens Williamsburg is featured on All-American Amusement Parks, a new series premiering on Great American Country (GAC) on Thursday, Oct. 2. Check your local listings for channel number. The “Extreme Coasters” episode highlights America’s best amusement parks, and host J.D Scott gives viewers an inside look at all the thrills and chills Busch Gardens offers.  Join us for the series premiere, featuring Busch Gardens Williamsburg, on Thursday, October 2 when we will be live-tweeting the premier…
 
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    Lead up the Garden Path

  • Colours of Autumn GBFD.

    Pauline
    22 Oct 2014 | 3:17 am
    Gradually the colour green is draining away from some of the leaves in the garden. Underlying colours are starting to emerge as the garden prepares to have it’s final fling of the year. Usually we can rely on fantastic colours for about a month before they all blow away in a puff of wind, but for the last couple of days it has been a lot more than just a puff!  I’ll start in the front garden where the front border is now looking very colourful with the red leaves of Cornus alba sibirica Westonbirt , the gold of the silver birch Betula ermanii and the orange of the Prunus by the…
  • Still flowering. GBBD October.

    Pauline
    15 Oct 2014 | 1:58 am
    I managed to have a few minutes just walking round the garden the other day, so made the most of it and took some photos for GBBD. The garden is managing quite well without attention from me, the only problem is that the grass is getting so long without it’s normal haircut from the undergardener! Still flowering is Aster frickartii Monch, now in its third month and shows no sign of stopping. I must buy more for further down the border by the field. Fuchsia magellanica Alba with an unknown pale pink little aster. All the hardy fuchsias have been flowering since July, they certainly give…
  • Leave of absence.

    Pauline
    3 Oct 2014 | 10:52 am
      I’m afraid I will be missing for a while as the undergardener is now in hospital, so the garden and my blog will have to take a backseat. After visiting the doctor on Monday I had to take him straight to the hospital  in Exeter and he was operated on first thing on Tuesday morning.  There will be a couple more operations to come in the future but hopefully I will have him home again  in a weeks time when he should have recovered from this op.. In the meantime I hope they sort out a different anaesthetic for him as he had an allergic reaction to the one he was given and his…
  • Changing foliage in September GBFD.

    Pauline
    22 Sep 2014 | 8:24 am
    The present sunny spell is lasting quite a long time. We had torrential rain last Friday which perked all the plants up, and now we are back to sunny days once more. September so far has been a very warm, sunny month.  I’m not complaining,  but we do need more rain to keep the garden happy. When looking round the garden for foliage to photograph this morning, nothing was jumping out at me, it is too soon for the autumn tints where we live, only one or two plants have started to change, most will be photographed for next month. The red stemmed Cornus along the driveway in the front…
  • Berry Delicious.

    Pauline
    18 Sep 2014 | 6:36 am
    At this time of year,  berries are are covering some of the shrubs and trees in the garden and becoming more and more obvious as they change colour. If only the birds would leave them until the cold weather of winter kills off the insects, then they would have plenty of food to see them through a cold spell. Unfortunately they are like children in a sweetie shop, hopping from one bush to another, trying them all. Lots of sloes on the blackthorn at the top of the garden,  sloe gin anyone ? I have never bought an Hypericum, but the birds are obviously dropping seeds in the garden as I’m…
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    Garden Walk Garden Talk

  • Town Life in Prague

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    20 Oct 2014 | 12:44 pm
    What I found most charming about Prague was the city life. People were everywhere, conversing on street corners, enjoying coffee at the café, and doing their daily shopping. It is a very pedestrian friendly town, with many narrow streets leading … Continue reading →
  • Prague Castle Gardens

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    18 Oct 2014 | 10:36 pm
    The gardens at Prague Castle are terraced up a steep hill. They step down to the City of Prague, the castle sitting protectively over the city. Prague has many churches of a variety of denominations. Cathedrals are very ornate and I was … Continue reading →
  • Charles Bridge, Prague

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    17 Oct 2014 | 1:46 am
    Although I am in Budapest, Hungary, I will show you some beautiful images of and from the famous Charles Bridge in Prague. I am working on an iPad which I am not fond of for creating posts. On my trip I … Continue reading →
  • Colorful Prague in Red

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    15 Oct 2014 | 1:32 pm
    I have so much to show you that is amazing architecture, and it will be coming up shortly. The bridges, churches and cafes are such wonderful places in Prague. I am now in Hungary on our river boat and have … Continue reading →
  • Where’s Donna?

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    12 Oct 2014 | 12:39 pm
    Not as catchy as “Where’s Waldo”, but anyway, I am traveling around Central and Eastern Europe. When you get this post, I have landed in Prague, Czech Republic. I almost did not make the trip fighting off a respiratory illness … Continue reading →
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    Gardenerd

  • New Restaurant Garden in Downtown LA

    Christy
    23 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    Artisan House, a combination market and restaurant/bar on the corner of 6th and Main Street, serves delicious, fresh food all day long, offering organic produce, artisanal wines and small-farm dairy products. The restaurant menu sports all the eye-catching entrees, sandwiches, … Continue reading →The post New Restaurant Garden in Downtown LA appeared first on Gardenerd.
  • Ask Gardenerd: Root Knot Nematodes

    Christy
    15 Oct 2014 | 7:56 am
    A great question came into Ask Gardenerd this week: “Do you have any tips on getting rid of root rot nematodes? Thanks! – Max“ There are natural ways to rid or drastically reduce your soil of pesky nematodes, Max. But … Continue reading →The post Ask Gardenerd: Root Knot Nematodes appeared first on Gardenerd.
  • Fall: Time to Plant Perennials

    Christy
    14 Oct 2014 | 7:59 am
    Fall is the time of year to plant perennials. Why? Isn’t the season winding down? It is, but it’s the perfect time to put winter-hardy perennials in the ground because they will use winter to develop strong roots. When spring … Continue reading →The post Fall: Time to Plant Perennials appeared first on Gardenerd.
  • Nailed It!: Zucchini Flan Fail

    Christy
    8 Oct 2014 | 7:21 am
    This one is especially for anyone out there who thinks we’re perfect here at Gardenerd. Hang on to your hats, it’s gonna be great. Years ago, when traveling to Italy, we picked up this great cookbook from a vegetarian farm … Continue reading →The post Nailed It!: Zucchini Flan Fail appeared first on Gardenerd.
  • Gardenerd on Root Simple Podcast

    Christy
    7 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    Meet Erik Knutzen and Kelly Coyne, the Root Simple Team. They have spent years designing a homesteading lifestyle for themselves that is enviable among gardenerds. In the heart of Los Angeles, they keep chickens, grow food, preserve the harvest, make … Continue reading →The post Gardenerd on Root Simple Podcast appeared first on Gardenerd.
 
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    Veggie Gardening Tips

  • More Ideas for Cultivating Mushrooms in the Home and Garden

    Kenny Point
    9 Oct 2014 | 9:24 am
    The fall season is a perfect time to explore the fascinating world of backyard mushroom cultivation. I’ll start by sharing some of the delicious edible fungi that is currently springing up right outside in and around my garden. Then I’ll share some info on mushrooms picked up at the recent Mother Earth News Fair, and close with ideas for easily growing shrooms right inside your home. My oyster and shiitake logs are stacked up and have been fruiting for weeks even if their production does seem to be rather limited compared to recent years. Maybe that’s due to the dry weather and…
  • The Mother Earth News Fair Returns to Pennsylvania

    Kenny Point
    1 Oct 2014 | 7:26 am
    The 2014 Mother Earth News Fair that took place in Seven Springs, PA a couple weekends ago was a great event and I walked away with many new ideas and techniques to try out in the garden and to share with you here on the Veggie Gardening Tips website! Normally the downside of a fall gardening event is that you’re inspired to grow and enthused about gardening at precisely the time that nature is telling you that it’s time to shut things down for the winter. This Mother Earth News Fair was different because I walked away with so many things that I am excited about and can apply right…
  • A Weekend at the Herb and Garden Faire

    Kenny Point
    13 May 2014 | 5:02 am
    The 27th Annual Herb & Garden Faire took place over the weekend at the Landis Valley Village and Farm Museum in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. The two day event included plant sales, gardening lectures, arts and crafts, music, delicious foods, and garden themed displays. What started out as a small plant has grown over the years into what may be the largest event of this type in the northeast. There’s always an impressive lineup of nurseries, herb growers, and plant lovers offering an array of rare, heirloom, and unusual, plants for sale. From vegetables to fruits, and herbs to flowers,…
  • Taking Stock of the Garden’s Winter Losses

    Kenny Point
    9 May 2014 | 3:21 pm
    This past winter was harsher than what we’ve grown accustomed to, with colder temps, more snowfall, and longer periods of sustained freezes. Even after spring arrived we have continued to receive colder than normal lows and lingering threats of potential frost. I’m still assessing the damage left behind by winter, but so far it has not been pretty with some unexpected losses in areas that have easily survived past winters. My guess is that it wasn’t the low temperatures that created the havoc, but rather the long stretches where temps fell below freezing and then remained there for…
  • Preserving the Harvest with a Food Dehydrator

    Kenny Point
    20 Mar 2014 | 4:56 am
    Despite spring’s arrival today according to the calendar, it feels like the new growing season is a ways off, and the first hints of fresh produce are just now beginning to sprout up from the earth. But there is plenty of last season’s harvest preserved and ready for use thanks to the fresh veggies that were dried, stored, or even fermented before winter cut short the last garden’s production. A variety of kitchen appliances helped me to stretch and preserve the garden’s bounty; from a juicer that is great for juicing winter greens and root crops, to the food processor…
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    Perennial Meadows

  • Autumnal Textures over Perennial Colour

    Michael
    14 Oct 2014 | 1:01 am
    My trial gardens in Amsterdam have teetered on the edge of chaos this year as a result of moving house. Weeds are under control and wayward growth ruthlessly chopped down, but I long for a clean sweep and the fresh growing season in 2015.   Although colour is everywhere in the garden this autumn from bright yellows, hard reds, glowing oranges and rich browns, it is the textures of the plants that really stands out and dominates.   The sense of being overwhelmed by burgeoning vegetation has been emphasised by the tangle that encroaches upon every path and impedes perambulation;…
  • Managing Soils

    Michael
    7 Sep 2014 | 12:31 am
    Healthy soil is the foundation of any perennial meadow planting I have already written about my decision to mulch newly planted perennial meadows following initial planting in order to suppress weeds. Time and again I am amazed just how much work it saves and the fact that we don’t have to walk in amongst the plants to weed means that the soil does not get trampled and compacted; in every way, that initial mulch is a good investment. Surprisingly though most contractors and designers in Europe don’t include mulches in their plans. I suspect the main reason is cost as clients are…
  • Managing Garden Soils

    Michael
    3 Sep 2014 | 12:35 am
    Soil Management for Perennial Meadow Planting Schemes Americans mulch and Europeans don’t and arguments rage between those that do and those that don’t. Like many generalisations there are more exceptions than truths, but apparently an over reliance on bark mulches in American landscaping has triggered a knee jerk reaction against them. In a recent book I have just read on perennial meadow gardening, the very first full page photograph shows how desolate a typical American municipal planting scheme appears where mulches fill the wide spaces between the perennial plants. There is…
  • Perennials Prevent Weeds

    Michael
    30 Aug 2014 | 9:50 am
    Late Summer Sensations In the Perennial Meadow Garden Although I have had to neglect my trial gardens on the edge of Amsterdam this year following a decision to move house and all that involved, it is surprising just how well they have grown and how little work it has been to keep them looking good. The key to successful perennial planting is not only choosing the right plants but planting enough of them. My borders were planted densely in the first instance as these gardens are where I trial the plants I write about and design with, but as the borders mature the planting densities become…
  • Maintaining Perennial Meadow Plantings

    Michael
    28 Aug 2014 | 12:39 am
    My trial gardens on the edge of the city of Amsterdam have taken a back seat in my life this year following the decision to move house. After months of viewing properties, packing and unpacking boxes of possessions and endless trips to furniture showrooms it is finally time to return to gardening and assess how well, or not, things have faired. Gardening this summer has taken on more the form of a series of kamikaze raids than the leisurely pursuit that the hobby magazines would have us believe in. Visits to the gardens have involved a dash around with the watering can followed by frenzied…
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    Beautiful Wildlife Garden

  • Native Plant Garden of Gold

    Loret T. Setters
    24 Oct 2014 | 8:24 am
    We’ve cooled down some in Central Florida, although by Northeast or Midwest standards it still is steamy and hot.  Still, it is Florida Autumn and the garden is reflecting the standard fall colors everyone is so accustomed to. As the golden flowers unfold, the birds wait with anticipation for some of the flowers to go […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • The Power of One

    Ellen Honeycutt
    23 Oct 2014 | 5:00 am
    I believe in the power of using native plants in whatever landscape that man designs and creates. I believe in the power of using locally native plants to restore some small ecological balance back to a landscape that man has ripped apart. I believe that choosing to do so has an impact that, magnified by […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Seed collecting for school gardens

    Stacey Evers
    20 Oct 2014 | 5:28 am
    If you’re already thinking about next year’s school garden, this is the time to pick up your seeds: they are cheaper now than at pretty much any other time of the year. When I say “pick up” seeds, I mean it literally. Go out to your fading garden and get them. Collecting seeds takes only a […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Inviting Dragonflies to Lunch in the Garden

    Loret T. Setters
    17 Oct 2014 | 4:15 pm
    I noticed someone enjoying a bit of lunch in the garden recently.  It was an Eastern Pondhawk Dragonfly (Erythemis simplicicollis) and based on the coloration, a male. Males become pruinose blue with white claspers and a green face.” More often than not when I come across an Eastern Pondhawk in the garden it is one […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Desert Ants are Dynamic

    Jacqueline Soule
    11 Oct 2014 | 9:30 am
    June was National Pollinator month, and many folks decided to help insect pollinators by planting flowers. Now for some not so popular insects that are also highly beneficial for the garden, but few people welcome them – ants. Indeed, some people are of the belief that the only good ant is a dead ant. While […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
 
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    Vegetable Gardener - All featured posts

  • I Have a Pair of Honey Badger Garden Gloves

    23 Oct 2014 | 6:56 pm
    Posted by ChrisMcLaughlin Garden gloves have never been this useful.
  • How to Make Tomato Sauce

    20 Oct 2014 | 12:38 pm
    Posted by WesternGardener If you have too many tomatoes, why not make tomato sauce? Here’s a simple process for turning a bumper crop of homegrown tomatoes into an unbelievably tasty tomato sauce.
  • Autumn Herbs in the Ozarks

    16 Oct 2014 | 12:29 pm
    Posted by cookinwithherbs On the road in the Ozarks... here are some photos of the Heritage Herb Gardens at the Ozark Folk Center, as well as some roadside natives, in Mountain View, Arkansas. Do you know these herbs?
  • Giant Pumpkins Weigh-Off at Topsfield Fair

    14 Oct 2014 | 5:00 am
    Posted by yourownvictorygarden The New England Giant Pumpkin Weigh-Off at the Topsfield Fair was held earlier this month, with a massive 1,900 pound pumpkin taking the first place prize.
  • Plant a Beautiful Vegetable Garden

    13 Oct 2014 | 10:48 am
    Posted by WesternGardener Now’s the time to start dreaming about the vegetable garden you want to grow next season. One demonstration garden in Palmer, Alaska, is blooming with possibilities to help get you started.
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    Miss Rumphius' Rules

  • Garden Design Details: Stone at Skylands

    Susan aka Miss. R
    22 Oct 2014 | 4:18 am
    I hadn’t visited Skylands for about ten years, and never in the fall.  I went hoping to see the last of the fall foliage and instead found stonework that was interesting in its scope and full of ideas. Formerly an estate developed in the 1920s, it is now the New Jersey Botanical Garden and its stone American Tudor mansion  is better known than the gardens as a popular site for weddings. The stonework at Skylands is incredible and impressive…even if much of it is in need of repair.  There is both formal and rustic stonework and sometimes dressed stone is juxtaposed with…
  • Garden Design Details: Fall Beyond Foliage

    Susan aka Miss. R
    14 Oct 2014 | 5:08 am
    I had some rare time in between landscape design projects and clients last week and as I’ve been meaning to take my new camera lens out for a spin, I stopped by Frelinghuysen Arboretum in Morristown to search out some of the details of the season.  The focus of this public park is plants…not necessarily design although it has its designer-y moments.  I go here when I need a plant fix.  I send my landscape design students here to photograph and learn about plants just as I did years ago when I was learning. Grasses, asters, Japanese anemones and Monkshood were at their peak…
  • Garden Design Inspiration: Architectural Details in Chicago

    Susan aka Miss. R
    7 Oct 2014 | 4:37 am
    When I was in Chicago in August, speaking at IGC about landscape designers and their potential relationships with garden centers  I took a day before and a day after to explore the city and meet up with friends.  I’ve been to Chicago regularly over the past five years and have seen and written about its wonderful gardens and street plantings, but this time I went in search of something else.  Architecture. Chicago reinvented itself after the great fire in 1871, and many of architecture’s greatest design minds have lived or worked in the city. Three who formed the basis of the…
  • Garden Visits: Princeton

    Susan aka Miss. R
    13 Aug 2014 | 6:35 am
    I visited gardens yesterday in Princeton, New Jersey. The tour was arranged by the New Jersey Landscape and Nursery Association (NJNLA) and featured four very different gardens by designer Bill Kucas. What struck me about these outdoor spaces was that their details is what really made them interesting. In each space the features beyond plants were detailed beautifully, but when I asked about what made the spaces personal, that had been left up to the clients. In each space, with the exception of the one still being built, the choice of furniture and accessories beyond what the landscape…
  • Riding in the Backseat around a Curve

    Susan aka Miss. R
    31 Jul 2014 | 8:55 am
    Miss R has been in the backseat all summer. Pretend you are on a roadtrip and listening to a story on the radio…the pictures will come after we reach our destination. In a twist of weather related events and wonder, my landscape design business and my commitment to being the national President of APLD has taken all of my time, leaving little extra for regular blog posts.  Although I feel a nagging sense of ‘it’s been too long’, I’m happy to have my priorities straight and to be able to see my garden and landscape design work come alive. I always feel that the…
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    Native Plants and Wildlife Gardens

  • Revise, Revitalize, Rejoice: Urban ReForestation Works!

    Suzanne Dingwell
    22 Oct 2014 | 8:20 pm
    What do people say when you ask them what things they associate with a park? Mary Jo Aagerstoun demanded. Answering her own question before pausing for a reply, she says, They think about picnics, soccer, and tennis. All of which are humancentric. Our parks need to be so much more, they can BE so much […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • A Recipe for an Autumn Habitat Garden

    Debbie Roberts
    20 Oct 2014 | 4:00 am
    Creating your own habitat garden filled with native plants is easier than you think.  Here’s a simple recipe for an autumn habitat garden filled with goodies for local wildlife that calls your garden home. 1) Start with some autumn blooming flowers, like goldenrod (Solidago) and false aster (Boltonia  asteroides) 2)  Mix in some seed heads […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • A Small Dose of Rewilding

    Jennifer Baker
    16 Oct 2014 | 3:00 am
    I’m working on a few woodland restoration projects this fall that could benefit from a bit of rewilding. I’ve been labeling some of my projects as such, in my head at least, because I think it sounds much more romantic than restoration, especially on the heels of rewilding campaigner George Monbiot’s eloquent TED talk and 2013 book, Feral. […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • And in This Corner…Active Arachnids

    Loret T. Setters
    13 Oct 2014 | 11:30 am
    It is Green Lynx Spider (Peucetia viridans) season at my place.  Every year at this time they set up shop…often you’ll find them hovering and protecting their egg sac for weeks.  Momma does tend to the little ones. While technically spiders are not insects as they have 8 legs (they are Arachnids), most of us […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • A Bestiary: Part Thirty-four ~ Songbirds: Eastern Bluebird

    Carol Duke
    11 Oct 2014 | 5:42 am
    Of all the many birds I have known here at Flower Hill Farm it is the Eastern Bluebirds Sialia sialis, who have connected and communicated with me the most. I love their sweet murmurs and seeing their beautiful cerulean wings and upper bodies. Their warm brown-orange breast and white underbelly complement the bright blue of their wings […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
 
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    Nigel Gnome grows a vegetable

  • Green for Go!

    Nigel Gnome
    13 Oct 2014 | 12:28 am
    Wonderful time of year and time of garden, the whole place is sprouting things.  A tub of mesclun lettuce sproutings, boysenberry growths, citrus trees all flowerings and sprouting forth. Plums fattening and there is already a tomato or two!Roma tomato babyFortune plum babies fattening upFrom under the plum treeNew/old cape cod chairPlanted 2 roma acid free grafted tomatoes and two different hot chilli plants. Went to the garden centre on Thursday to get first pick of the new delivery, rather than the last few stragglers on Sunday afternoon. There are a number of green houses now. Paving…
  • Asking for it!

    Nigel Gnome
    21 Sep 2014 | 11:01 pm
    Against all better judgement and advice I still insisted on buying a tomato plant, a drafted cherry. It looked great, had flowers on it and was raring to go. There was no more danger of frost or anything I said. Duly planted yesterday and looking happy. Today we have just had a small hail fall.However I had made it a light bag so the effect should not be too bad. This is made from the large plastic bags I have from my mat boards, any picture framer will have them. Four sticks and it's all good.Instant greenhouse with a mat board bagI cut a few slits in the bag to allow some airflow. I'll keep…
  • Very Spring

    Nigel Gnome
    13 Sep 2014 | 10:13 pm
    After several days of steady rain a sunny Sunday was a pleasant relief, there are buds popping on everything, the snowball tree has shown a leaf or two as has the prunus now the blossoms are coming to an end. I have seen growth on the new orange tree with even the hint of a flower budthe peas are well up and will need some framework very soonprovencal pea seedlingspicked a few beetroot and a couple of nice long white leeksbeetroot leeks lemons mint spring onion coriander broccoli stemsAdd captionSpotted a few white butterflies already, damn their eyes, I swatted two with one flap of my hankie…
  • Gently getting warmer

    Nigel Gnome
    7 Sep 2014 | 10:49 pm
    The mornings are kinder, 7-8 C lately, makes everything a little nicer, the sun is up in the morning and there is a bit of light left after work. Daylight saving starts in 3 weeks, that will really make things feel summery. The peas I sowed a couple of weeks ago are now 2" tall and will need a frame soon. Sowed a couple of short rows of spring onions and a long mixed row of white and red radishes. We had a day and night of rain, the first decent lot for about 2 weeks, everything will get a big boost from that. The plum is blossoming well now, looks like we should get a good crop this year.A…
  • Change is underway

    Nigel Gnome
    18 Aug 2014 | 1:25 am
    There is a nice gentle confirmation of the coming summer in the garden now. Small buds are forming on the fortune plum tree, the sulking lettuces have come to life as have all the onions and leeks. Still picking lots of tender stem broccoli and the normal broccoli is ready for picking as well.Broccoli headsThe vege beds have all had some more lime applied as well as lots of compost and a good sprinkling of sheep pellets. Stand clear!Garden overviewFortune plum flower budsWe have a dwarf nectarine tree to grace the front part of the flower/vegetable garden, hopefully it lives up to it's name…
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    Flowerona

  • Flowerona Reflects…featuring Blue Sky Flowers & Mary Jane Vaughan

    Rona
    24 Oct 2014 | 4:01 pm
    This week’s Flowerona Reflects video shows footage of a Flower Crown Workshop at Blue Sky Flowers and a Festive Open House at Mary Jane Vaughan on a very flowery Wednesday this week! P.S. Don’t forget, if you receive this blog post via email and would like to view the video, simply go to www.flowerona.com. Tweet
  • Flowerona Tips: My favourite blogging book…Blog Inc.

    admin
    24 Oct 2014 | 11:26 am
    I often get asked by florists who are either thinking of starting a blog or are unsure how to grow their readership…”Can you recommend a book?” Well, I’ve read quite a few books about blogging and my favourite has to be this one by Joy Cho, who writes the blog Oh Joy. Called ‘Blog Inc’, it really is a must-read! Tweet
  • Florist Friday: Interview with Katja Bergdorf of Bergdorf’s Flowers of Copenhagen

    Rona
    23 Oct 2014 | 4:01 pm
    It’s Florist Friday and today I’m so thrilled to feature an interview with Katja Bergdorf of Bergdorf’s Flowers of Copenhagen, together with breath-taking photographs of her floral designs by Maria de Faci! Could you tell us what prompted you to become a florist? I became a florist after I’d been running a catering business with 75 staff for other people and mixing it with my 3 years at business college. I stopped working and followed my dream as I wanted to be a florist and own my own business.  So, I started sweeping the floors at a very famous florist in…
  • Book now for our next Flowerona ‘Social Media for Florists’ workshop – February 24th, 2015

    Rona
    22 Oct 2014 | 4:01 pm
    We’re so thrilled to be running our next Social Media for Florists workshop on February 24th 2015 at Brixton East in London! If you’re a florist and would like to find your focus, build your floral following and grow your business through social media, then please do join us. I’ve mentioned this new date briefly on Flowerona earlier this month and already almost 40% of the places have been sold! Here are all the details: Background Join us for a fun and inspirational class away from the demands of your shop or studio and together let’s spend a productive day working on…
  • Jamie Aston at Brides The Show – October 2014

    Rona
    21 Oct 2014 | 4:01 pm
    In this week’s Wedding Wednesday blog post, I’m delighted to feature florist Jamie Aston’s stand at Brides The Show in London earlier this month. Taking centre stage and appearing to almost float above the table was a spectacular long floral design with an abundance of eye-popping colours and different textures.  Phalaenopsis orchids, roses, hydrangeas, astilbe, dendrobium orchids, spray roses, amaranthus and gloriosa lily could all be found in the arrangement. This tall design was also complemented by a low design, which went down the length of the table. Jamie said:…
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    Sprinkler Juice

  • Using a Sprinkler Timer to Save Money

    22 Oct 2014 | 7:02 am
    Everyone wants to save money on their water bill. It’s highly unlikely you’ll run into someone who says “Gee, I am just not spending enough money on water. I really want my water bill to be... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Setting the Time for Fall Watering

    14 Oct 2014 | 10:23 am
    Properly caring for your lawn in the fall means you may need to adjust your timer on your lawn sprinkler system. This is because now that the air is cooler and the days are shorter, your lawn needs a... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Avoiding Sprinkler Runoff

    7 Oct 2014 | 8:34 am
    Having a lawn sprinkler system is supposed to save you time and money while assuring your lawn it will get the proper amount of needed water. These positives can be negated if there is significant... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Fall Gardening Tips

    30 Sep 2014 | 6:39 am
    Fall can be a great time to garden. The weather is cooler and the nights are longer. There are many things you can do to get the most out of your fall gardening season: It may be fall, but start... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Managing a Lawn during a Drought

    24 Sep 2014 | 7:20 am
    Some areas of the country have been dealing with drought conditions for several months now. Such conditions usually mean water rationing and water restrictions. This can make things tough for... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
 
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    Your Easy Garden

  • Favorite Garden and Nature Quotes

    judieyeg
    23 Oct 2014 | 1:14 pm
    Here are a few more quotes that our readers have shared with us . . . Every flower is a soul blossoming in nature.   A morning glory at my window . . .   Colors are smiles of nature   I think I shall never see a poem as lovely as a tree.   Do you have a favorite gardening or nature -related quote?  Please send it along and we’ll add it to our collection to share with all!  Simply Leave a Reply below with your quote. Until next time, Garden on good people!      
  • Fun Things to Do in the Garden

    Elizabeth DeFriest
    20 Oct 2014 | 10:00 am
    Often when I go outside, I’m not looking for a Big Garden Job – spreading trailer loads of mulch, laying paving, getting up in a tree to take out the dead-wood. Most of the time I drift about in a happy daze doing a bit of this, and a bit of that. And if I think about what I’ve done later that day, none of it seems remotely impressive. I mean, only another gardener would appreciate that I’d taken 45 minutes to wash and rearrange the pebble mulch on my succulent pots. But that doesn’t bother me because I suspect I’m not alone in what I get up to. I think there are many of us who…
  • Using Garden Phlox to Add Color to the Garden

    judieyeg
    17 Oct 2014 | 12:27 pm
    Garden phlox come in a variety of colors and are ideal for adding color in most gardens.  They range from white and pale shades of pink and purple to bright reds, pinks and purples.  Volcano phlox are among the most mildew-tolerant and are more compact than some of the older varieties of phlox.  As a result, they don’t need to be staked and can be used in a variety of settings.  Daylilies are another garden workhorse, adding color for long periods of time, with minimal care and maintenance. Stella-type daylilies are rebloomers and are a option for non-stop color.   Using…
  • 3 Basic Steps for Creating Garden Rooms

    judieyeg
    14 Oct 2014 | 11:37 am
    Are you tired of simply thinking of your garden as an open space or something to view from a distance?  Do you want your guests to feel as comfortable in your garden as they do in your home? Would you like to create an outdoor small space for a few moments of solitude and privacy? If so, read on . . .   This welcoming backyard area is filled with little garden rooms scattered throughout. You can create a quiet place in which to read or watch the birds simply by good placement of furniture. Garden rooms do not need to be expensive.  Sure, you can create an amazing area with stone…
  • 5 Simple Garden Container Ideas

    judieyeg
    6 Oct 2014 | 7:21 am
    Although many people simply use filled garden containers on their deck or patio to add impact, they can be used as problem-solvers! Let’s look at five examples below… Tropicanna is a great thriller, with geraniums and angelonia as fillers and fragrant French marigolds as the spiller. To start with, regardless of where and how you’re using them, for maximum impact, garden containers should include a “Thriller” (usually a tall plant), a “Filler” (something bushy to fill empty spaces) and a “Spiller” (something that gracefully spills over the pot). However, some plants…
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    The Mini Garden Guru - Your Miniature Garden Source

  • Halloween DIY: How to Make Miniature Zombies

    Janit Calvo
    24 Oct 2014 | 7:25 am
    Halloween DIY: How to Make Miniature Zombies I normally don’t care for gore and blood. Dress up like a zombie for Halloween? No thanks, I’d rather be anything else. I used to like the old fashioned horror movies that left much to my own imagination and that was, and still is, puh-lenty for me. Do […]
  • Miniature Halloween Gardening with Plow & Hearth

    Janit Calvo
    17 Oct 2014 | 3:41 pm
    Miniature Halloween Gardening with Plow & Hearth Have a “little” fun in the miniature garden by mixing and matching Plow & Hearth’s fairy items and houses with their holiday accessories. In this blog today, we’ve used their houses in a couple of different gardens so you can get a better idea of what they look like. I’ve […]
  • Decorating Fun in the Miniature Halloween Garden

    Janit Calvo
    11 Oct 2014 | 6:15 am
    Decorating Fun the Miniature Halloween Garden I saw a friend’s post on Facebook this morning showing her full Halloween display all a-glow and ready for The Day. So, I collected a bunch of my own miniature Halloween items and raided both of our online stores to see if I could do the same. It kinda […]
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    Sow and So

  • D is for Dew Point – Word up!

    Bridget Elahcene
    23 Oct 2014 | 10:54 pm
    Dew Point \ˈdjuː pɔɪnt \ The air temperature at which water can no longer be held in gaseous form and will condense onto a surface.
  • Colourful Chillis – Wordless Wednesday

    Laila Noort
    21 Oct 2014 | 9:27 pm
  • C is for Cauliflorous – Word up!

    Bridget Elahcene
    16 Oct 2014 | 9:31 pm
    Cauliflorous \ˈkɔːlɪˌflɔːrəs\ Bearing flowers directly from the trunk or branches of the plant, often without stems or leaves, for example Forsythia.
  • Time for Topiary at the Villas…

    Bridget Elahcene
    13 Oct 2014 | 9:45 pm
    After much consideration, research and nerve mustering, at last I have taken the  bull by the horns – or should I say, the shears by the handles – and  topiarised our handsome two metre tall (and rapidly growing) Cupressus tree! A gift The tree was a birthday gift four and a half years ago when it was about ten centimetres high and part of an arrangement in a basket. In fact it is the sole survivor of said arrangement. We wanted a tree in the garden and had the perfect place for it, so I proceeded to plant it out and it has established itself well. In fact it has grown…
  • B is for Basal Plate – Word up!

    Bridget Elahcene
    9 Oct 2014 | 9:43 pm
    Basal Plate \ˈbeɪs(ə)l pleɪt\ Compressed portion of stem forming the base of a bulb from which the roots, leaves and stems grow. Bulbils also arise from this plate of tissue. The basal plate of any bulb needs to be in good condition is to remain healthy and grow. Any damage to the basal plate may result in fungal infection, causing the bulb to rot.
 
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    The Hortiholic

  • The Garden Clock is Ticking....

    Tony Fulmer
    18 Oct 2014 | 11:50 am
    "The days dwindle down to a precious few" is so true for the October garden. As temperatures drop and you face the reality of rain becoming snow, the urgency to complete fall garden tasks becomes almost manic.You've probably already made the decision whether to cut your perennials now or let them stand as snowy winter sentinels. You've ripped the tired annuals out by their fuzzy little roots. What else could there possibly be to do? Want a few reminders?1) Don't let fall pass without planting bulbs. The soil temps are finally cool enough to put all the spring flowering beauties in. Who said,…
  • Conifers are the Cure

    Tony Fulmer
    30 Sep 2014 | 2:25 pm
    Does our Zone 5 plant palette ever seem limiting to you? Do you yearn for just one specimen plant that no one else in northern Illinois has? Do you ever look at your garden and think, "If I could just get a plant with year 'round interest for that spot I'd be so much happier with my garden?" I know I'm always thinking what would be hot in this or that spot. Do we need a support group for those of us looking for plants off the beaten path?If it existed I would suggest "Conifers are the Cure". For those that haven't been smitten or bitten yet, but want more landscape interest the world of…
  • "High" on 'Drangeas

    Tony Fulmer
    29 Aug 2014 | 9:21 pm
    Hydrangea macrophylla 'Endless Summer'If plant popularity is directly proportional to the number of new varieties debuting annually, Hydrangeas are HOT, HOT, HOT. Exciting new varieties are popping up like mushrooms after a summer rain.Why all the Hydrangea excitement?Something-for-everyone range of flower forms including mophead (softball), panicle (cone-shaped) and lacecap (flat-topped donut with a lacy, open center). Flowers not only last a long time, but many develop interesting seed heads for winter interest.Sun or partial shade tolerance. If you're putting them in sun in hot summer…
  • Garden Training for Excess Raining

    Tony Fulmer
    17 Jul 2014 | 10:42 am
    I thought I had a handle on just how wet the summer has been. My rain gauge (that measures 100ths of an inch, I'm proud to say) recorded 9.30" for June. I just spoke with a fellow horticulturist who was telling me that she was pruning and found gangs of slugs hiding in yew branches four feet off the ground. We've revealed a new definition of saturation point: So wet that even slugs seek higher ground!Short of dragging water-soaked containers under overhangs or setting up umbrellas over drought-tolerant perennials, there's only so much a person can do to stem the flood waters. Here are a…
  • Japanese (Maple) Spoken Here

    Tony Fulmer
    8 May 2014 | 5:33 am
    'Koto-No-Ito'. 'Osakazuki'. 'Asahi zuru'. 'Beni maiko'. 'Shishigashira'. 'Oridono nishiki'. 'Seiryu'. 'Inaba shidare'. These Japanese maple (Acer palmatum) names are, of course, beautiful in their own right. The beauty of the trees exceeds even the elegance of their names.Feel the thickness of a Japanese maple leaf, especially a cutleaf (dissectum) type, and it doesn't take much imagination to understand how they might sunburn or get wind-tattered if planted in the wrong place. For that reason I'm especially happy when someone says they want a Japanese maple and have an east-facing exposure.
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    guzmansgreenhouse.com Blog

  • How to start seeds indoors

    Paul Guzman
    20 Oct 2014 | 9:18 am
    Article by: by By Diane Linsley Check out Diane’s outstanding website at: Dianeseeds.com- Diane’s Flower Seeds Heirloom flowers, rare perennials, daylilies and Starting Indoor Seeds This is a lot easier than it sounds. Even inexperienced gardeners can start seeds with … Continue reading →
  • Is fall a good to plant trees, shrubs and other plants

    Gary Guzman
    29 Sep 2014 | 3:02 pm
    Photo by danperry.com Is fall a good to plant trees, shrubs and other plants? Of course it is.  The recent rains in and around the southwest have made this an even more optimistic time to plant. The cooler nights, the windless days, the … Continue reading →
  • Yuccas Agave and Bear Grass for Southwest Landscaping

    Gary Guzman
    24 Aug 2014 | 6:41 am
    Yuccas, Agave, and Bear Grass: Southwest Landscaping Here are a few drought tolerant plants that can be used just about anywhere the sun shines. They can be used as mass plantings, single specimen, and some in containers. First we start … Continue reading →
  • Ornamental Grasses for the Southwest

    Paul Guzman
    30 Jul 2014 | 5:16 am
    Photo by PublicDomainPictures Depending on where you live many ornamental grasses for the southwest will go dormant during the winter (Herbaceous). You can cut them down low to the ground, and they will vigorously grow back during spring. These grasses are … Continue reading →
  • The Mexican Bird of Paradise Plant

    Paul Guzman
    12 Jul 2014 | 12:19 pm
      Photo by wallygrom  The Mexican Bird of Paradise Plant (Caesalpinia Mexicana).  Has a yellow flower and is considered a large shrub.  Its actually pretty easy to make it grow as a small tree.  So it would be perfect for a … Continue reading →
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    Chicken Waterer

  • Salmonella Linked To Hatchery Chicks

    ChickenWaterer
    27 Sep 2014 | 8:02 am
    The Center for Disease Control is reporting 344 cases of Salmonella so far this year that can be traced to handling live chicks.  The illnesses are reported in 42 states with the highest concentration of reported cases in New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, North Carolina, and Virginia.The cases have been traced back to chicks purchased from Mt. Healthy Hatchery of Ohio. The same hatchery has experienced similar problems in 2012 and 2013.  Symptoms of Salmonella infection include the following:Most persons infected with Salmonella bacteria develop diarrhea, fever, and abdominal…
  • Crowing Rooster Smartphone Alerts

    ChickenWaterer
    7 Sep 2014 | 12:20 pm
    iPhone and Android phones let customize the sounds that are associated with various alerts such as calendar appointments, new email and text messages, etc.We've created an audio file of a rooster crowing that you can place on your smartphone. Instead of a default alarm tone you can have our rooster let you know that you have an upcoming appointment or a new text message.You can find the files and instructions on how to download at our web site:Chicken SmartPhone Alerts BriteTap chicken waterer. Clean water made simple! Visit us at ChickenWaterer.com.
  • A Chicken's Labor Day

    ChickenWaterer
    31 Aug 2014 | 7:50 am
    BriteTap chicken waterer. Clean water made simple! Visit us at ChickenWaterer.com.
  • Make the Perfect Perch For Your Chickens

    ChickenWaterer
    31 Aug 2014 | 6:23 am
    Sitting PrettyPerches provide a secure place for your chickens to rest at night and they have the added benefit of keeping chickens off the floor where they can be soiled by droppings.Mabel, my feet are killing me!Most books on coop design tell poultry owners to provide at least 10 inches of perch space for each bird in the flock. However, books generally don't specify the diameter or the shape of the perch. This isn't too surprising because there hasn't been any research done on the subject until very recently.  In 2011, a group of poultry researchers in Germany conducted a series of…
  • Rhode Island Red Chicken History & Breed Profile

    ChickenWaterer
    24 Aug 2014 | 8:37 am
    "Practical, Prolific, Profitable" that's how the Rhode Island Red (RIR) was described in the 1890's by Isaac Champlin Wilbour, an important early promoter of the breed. Wilbour's description of the breed is as true today as it was back then; RIR's are wonderful dual purpose chickens that lays 200-300 large brown eggs per year.History of the Rhode Island RedThe chicken that we are familiar with today resulted from a series of breeding experiments begun by William Tripp in 1854. Tripp was a sea captain and made routine visits to the coastal town of New Bedford, Rhode Island. Captain…
 
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    The Foodie Gardener™

  • Easy Hydroponic Planter: Grow Lettuce in Repurposed Coffee Container!

    Shirley Bovshow
    16 Oct 2014 | 2:08 am
    If you consider yourself more of a “foodie” and less of a “gardener” because you  don’t like the idea of getting your nails dirty, read on! You can grow lettuce, greens, and herbs year-round in a hydroponic planter made from a repurposed coffee container.   Before you start questioning how difficult it must be to make a hydroponic planter, stop! I want to share with you instructions for creating a specific, low-tech hydroponic planter that uses no electrical pumps or air stones to circulate the water. I’m referring to the Kratky Method of…
  • Recycled Wood Tree Box As Raised Vegetable Planter

    Shirley Bovshow
    12 Aug 2014 | 10:18 am
    Here’s a clever idea using recycled wood landscape tree boxes as raised vegetable planters. I was on a garden tour in Mar Vista California  when I stumbled across designer, Mary Lee Kuhlman’s practical idea.   Keep an eye open for landscaping projects in your neighborhood where tree boxes are found in abundance.   Some landscape companies will give them to you for free or at a nominal price if you ask. Chances are, the landscape company  has to haul the boxes back to the garden center for a small credit or to their office, where they are piling up.   Great For…
  • Grow Hot Peppers: Spiciness Rated by Scoville Heat Chart

    Shirley Bovshow
    7 Aug 2014 | 1:05 pm
    I’m growing peppers at the Home & Family show vegetable garden now that warm temperatures during the day and cooler nights are trending in Los Angeles. Peppers, both sweet and hot ones  can put up a fuss and drop fruit, or not set fruit at all, if the climate is not right. They are temperamental like that. If peppers weren’t so delicious, I wouldn’t put up with their fussiness!       I introduced co-hosts, Mark Steines and Cristine Ferrare  to the Scoville Pepper Heat Chart that rates  spiciness or “hotness” in peppers. As heads of the…
  • Video: How To Grow Vegetables on Your Patio

    Shirley Bovshow
    1 Aug 2014 | 2:06 pm
    Watch my garden segment from Home & Family show on how to grow food in any small space. You can grow lots of food in your patio, balcony or porch!   Visit FoodieGardener.com to learn how to grow food with style!
  • Foodie Gardener Design Tip: Strawberry Planters

    Shirley Bovshow
    6 Jul 2014 | 10:41 am
    Do you crave clean, modern design as much as you crave sweet, mouth-watering strawberries in the summer?     Plant your June-bearing strawberries in a  creamy white container that’s at least 18″inches in diameter. Place the strawberries around the perimeter of your white container and plant flowers or some basil in the middle! Beautiful, edible design.   Want more ideas? See my “vertical strawberry post!”  
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    Epic Gardening

  • Deep Water Culture: What Is It And How To Get Started

    Kevin
    22 Oct 2014 | 7:39 pm
    The post Deep Water Culture: What Is It And How To Get Started is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog. If you're new to growing plants hydroponically, words like "Deep Water Culture" can sound like they're straight out of a science-fiction movie.  Compared to soil gardening, hydroponics looks more complex - but it's really not!The different ways of hydroponic gardening (nutrient film technique, deep water culture, ebb and flow) might sound confusing, but once you […] The post Deep Water Culture:…
  • Easy DIY Aquaponics Review

    Kevin
    10 Oct 2014 | 1:46 am
    The post Easy DIY Aquaponics Review is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog. Review Of: Easy DIY Aquaponics Author: Kevin Editorial Quality Effectiveness Price Ease of Instructions I Liked 24/7 customer support is awesome Loved the 3D renderings of the systemMaterials list costs less than Aquaponics 4 You systemYou can download everythingMaintenance log included! I Didn't Like Some of the freebies I didn't care about Would like to […] The post Easy DIY Aquaponics Review is by Kevin and appeared first…
  • A Quick List of Perennial Vegetables To Add To Your Garden

    Kevin
    9 Oct 2014 | 5:22 pm
    The post A Quick List of Perennial Vegetables To Add To Your Garden is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog. This post is a continuation of our '8 Vegetables You Can Grow Over and Over Again' series we did earlier this year on the blog.  Check it out! Jump To A Plant 1. Asparagus 2. Sunchokes 3. Groundnut 6. Horseradish7. Raddichio8. Bunching Onions9. Sorrel ​Most of us gardeners, whether beginners or veterans favor annual veggies […] The post A Quick List of Perennial Vegetables To Add To Your…
  • Aquaponics 4 You Review: Is It Legit?

    Kevin
    9 Oct 2014 | 12:14 am
    The post Aquaponics 4 You Review: Is It Legit? is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog. Review Of: Aquaponics 4 You Author: Kevin Editorial Quality Effectiveness Price Ease of Instructions I Liked Video instructions make the entire build easy Simple and straightforwardGood info on what fish to use and what plants work bestExtremely low-cost for a guide of this depth I Didn't Like No tracking log included Videos watched online or […] The post Aquaponics 4 You Review: Is It Legit? is by Kevin and…
  • 9 Awesome First Harvest Pictures To Inspire You For Fall

    Kevin
    8 Oct 2014 | 2:03 am
    The post 9 Awesome First Harvest Pictures To Inspire You For Fall is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog. As we’re getting into fall (even here in San Diego), it’s about time to start thinking about fall gardens.  I was looking up some gardening inspiration to get back in the gardening mindset as I haven’t grown anything for a month or two and came across some amazing photos from first-time gardeners that blew my […] The post 9 Awesome First Harvest Pictures To Inspire You For Fall…
 
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    Grow Our Way

  • How to Grow the Perfect Tomato

    Safer® Brand
    21 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    Have you ever marveled at the plump, juicy delicious tomatoes that your friends or neighbors seem to be able to grow so effortlessly? Do you wonder why your own tomato growing efforts don’t seem to deliver the same results? Growing perfect tomatoes isn’t always easy. A little luck and a lot of tender loving care are required. It also helps if you know how to overcome the obstacles that can prevent you from achieving the tomato growing success you desire. Poor soil quality – First things first, make sure that your soil pH is ideal for tomatoes. You can easily find a pH soil testing kit…
  • Fresh Fads

    Safer® Brand
    16 Oct 2014 | 3:00 pm
    These days, the concept of gardening encompasses much more than raising a few flowers and vegetables in the yard. While traditional backyard gardening is still a favorite pastime in the United States and around the world, the art of gardening continues to change and evolve. Let’s take a closer look at some of the “fresh fads” that are currently taking over today’s gardening world. Organic Gardening The focus on protecting the environment and consuming foods that are free of man-made preservatives and pesticides has continued to intensify in recent years. As a result, the popularity of…
  • Gardening For Beginners: The Garden Game Plan

    Safer® Brand
    14 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    If you’ve made the decision to start your very first organic vegetable garden, congratulations are in order! Organic gardening has much to offer. You’ll have lots of delicious and nutritious fresh produce on hand for your family that you can share with your friends and neighbors. By growing your own vegetables instead of buying them at the store, you can lower your monthly food bills. Gardening is also great exercise, and you’ll have the satisfaction of watching something grow from the ground up. As with any new venture, proper planning is the key to producing a thriving, bountiful…
  • Watering: How Much Is Too Much?

    Safer® Brand
    11 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    Whether you’re a soil gardener or a hydroponic gardener, a key challenge you’re likely to face is keeping your plants properly hydrated. You need to ensure your plants are receiving the appropriate amount of water without overwatering — and you need to be watering at just the right time. Use the following watering tips to help maximize your organic gardening efforts throughout the growing season. Watering an Organic Soil Garden Use your finger – When it comes to determining if it’s time to water your organic garden, your own finger can be an extremely valuable asset. Place your…
  • How to Grow Your Own Herbs

    Safer® Brand
    9 Oct 2014 | 8:52 am
    Who says growing has to be limited to the outdoors? Growing herbs indoors can be a great way to put your green thumb to good use throughout the year, in even the harshest winter climates. With an indoor herb garden, you’ll have plenty of fresh herbs on hand for cooking or adding a little extra flavor to your favorite dishes — without having to spend a fortune at the grocery store. Adding herbs to your foods can provide an additional source of vital nutrients for you and your family. Growing herbs can also be fun and a great way to relieve stress. Creating the Ideal Herb Growing Conditions…
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    Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden

  • Our Butterflies Arrived Safely in Tucson!

    Jonah Holland
    24 Oct 2014 | 4:05 am
    by Jonah Holland, PR & Marketing Coordinator, Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Last week we told you about our butterfly round-up.  At the close of Butterflies LIVE we sent 194 butterflies from the exhibit to Tucson Botanical Gardens. Tucson just sent this note with these pictures, “There were three families in the exhibit when the package arrived so those children (and moms) were able to participate by holding some of the butterflies until the butterflies flew off. Usually we have a no touch policy but in this case we made an exception — and it was a hit with the…
  • Gardening: Ornamental Grass to the Rescue

    Jonah Holland
    23 Oct 2014 | 4:18 am
    by Lynn Kirk, Public Relations Writer,  Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden, reprinted with permission from the Richmond Times-Dispatch Traditional turf is a good choice for high-activity areas, but ornamental grass is a sustainable alternative elsewhere in the landscape. And it also changes throughout the year. Pictured is the seasonal change of eulalia grass. Photo by Don Williamson The foreground shows purple fountain grass and in the distance you can see the Conservatory. The Conservatory lawn was recently planted with ornamental grasses: prairie dropseed, purple muhly grass and switchgrass.
  • Knockout Blooms: Azalea Beauty Break

    Jonah Holland
    22 Oct 2014 | 4:42 am
    Photo by Jonah Holland, PR & Marketing Coordinator, Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Fall blooming azalea with raindrops.
  • Knockout Blooms: Japanese Windflower

    Jonah Holland
    21 Oct 2014 | 8:28 am
    by Jonah Holland, PR & Marketing Coordinator, Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Did you know that the Japanese windflower is part of the same family as the common buttercup? If you look at the form of the flower and the leaves you can see the similarities! The family is Ranunculaceae and also includes ranunculus a bloom often found in bridal bouquets. Ranuculas and anemone are some of my favorite flowers. Which reminds me of this quote: But a weed is simply a plant that wants to grow where people want something else. In blaming nature, people mistake the culprit. Weeds are people’s…
  • Fall-Blooming Camellias Burst onto the Scene

    Jonah Holland
    21 Oct 2014 | 4:17 am
    by Jonah Holland, PR & Marketing Coordinator, Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden We’ve had many fall blooms popping up like crazy in the past few weeks, but these are a few of my favorites! Enjoy. Camellia sasanqua ‘Polar Ice’ Camellia sasanqua ‘Setsugekka’
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    The Horticult

  • Gold Medal Petals! Our Visit to the International Rose Test Garden

    Chantal Aida Gordon
    24 Oct 2014 | 3:00 am
    No matter how much we fawn over our intergalactic passion flowers and the slick party dresses of our fuchsias, our hearts will always somersault at the sight of a romantically formed garden rose.… ►
  • Block Party: How to Make Quick and Easy Raised Beds for Your Garden

    Ryan Benoit
    22 Oct 2014 | 3:00 am
    Earlier this month we decided to redo our flower beds/“stadium garden,” where we normally rotate blooming annuals and perennials. After storing the tuber of our Impatiens flanaganae, which enjoyed a powerful summer bloom, and saying goodbye to our last dahlias, we realized our garden bed could use a good lift — literally and figuratively — for the new fall season.… ►
  • Coleus Collection: A Colorful Fall Fix For Our Garden

    Chantal Aida Gordon
    14 Oct 2014 | 3:00 am
    What colors do you associate most with fall? Here in our subtropical climate, we don’t get the level of fluorescent foliage we did growing up in the Northeast and Midatlantic — like the neon New England landscapes I saw last week while visiting friends in Boston.… ►
  • Store Tour: In East Hollywood, Shopping for Gifts, Gems and Stems at Twig & Twine

    Chantal Aida Gordon
    8 Oct 2014 | 3:04 am
    Something to love about living in/near a busy city: Those moments when you find — amid the concrete hustle and bustle, the glaring hither and thither — a pocket of inspired, fertile serenity.… ►
  • 56 Hours in Portland: Coffee, Beer and Botany in the City of Roses

    Chantal Aida Gordon
    29 Sep 2014 | 8:11 am
    We’re very much into the whole “buy experiences rather than things” thing. So when Ryan suggested we celebrate my birthday by going to Portland, I said, “Put a bird on it!” and by “bird” I mean me, and by “it” I mean the City of Roses.… ►
 
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    The Diligent Gardener

  • Are You Replacing Garden Tools Unnecessarily?

    Gaz
    21 Oct 2014 | 6:44 am
     Do you recognise this scenario? You’ve done a heavy but satisfying day in the garden of weeding, pruning and digging. The hot bath and the drink with your name on it are calling to you. You know you really should clean your tools before putting them away, but surely that’ll wait until tomorrow? Carrying out simple maintenance directly after using your tools should make them last, but if you do need to replace, never buy ‘cheap and cheerful’. Investing in top quality hand tools that will last, is the smart option. Ditch That DirtMake sure you wash the dirt off thoroughly. Use a…
  • How to Create an Exotic Garden Pond

    Gaz
    10 Oct 2014 | 7:53 am
    Garden ponds add a great point of interest to your garden and they can also help to improve the environment by creating a safe and diverse habitat for many different species. From frogs and newts to harmless leeches and freshwater mussels, a variety of different fish to the Great Pond Snail, a pond can be a great home and resting place for a whole host of wildlife. Garden ponds also provide fresh drinking water for birds and mammals, and it also gives them a safe area to cool off in the hot summer season. So keeping your pond thriving all year round is very important and beneficial to the…
  • The Best Ways to Decorate your Garden

    Gaz
    6 Oct 2014 | 3:27 am
    Even the most attentive gardeners can still occasionally be guilty of letting their little piece of land become a bit ordinary and dull. Yes, you may keep the lawn nice and tidy, but it might be that you’re at a bit of a loss as to what you can do to decorate your garden, and turn into something paradisiacal that you are proud to show off, or content to simply sit in and relax.Whatever your horticultural prowess, you’ll be pleased to know there are things you can adorn your garden with, both natural and man-made, that can bring your personal plot to life. Here is a selection of these…
  • Winter Storage: Caring for your Garden Tools

    Gaz
    6 Oct 2014 | 3:19 am
    Those glorious (well mostly, glorious) summer months are coming to a close for another year and unfortunately that means goodbye sunshine and BBQs and hello autumn. It’s getting pretty chilly around here and all too quickly for my liking, and all of this cold weather has got me thinking about starting to plan for those long winter months.As you can no doubt tell, we adore our garden and everything that goes in it, from our beloved Koi to our countless tropical of plants, but don’t be fooled, it’s not just your plants that require round the calendar maintenance. Before those rainy months…
  • Organising Your Garden in Time for Winter

    Gaz
    6 Oct 2014 | 3:17 am
    Sadly, after a long and at times boiling hot summer, the winter months are coming and that means that the nights are drawing in, the days are becoming shorter, and that we’re more susceptible to rain. All in all, this means that the time we spend out in the garden is becoming incredibly limited. The bad (even worse news) is that once the autumn is over, we’re really struggling for time, and that’s why you have to ensure that you get your garden ready for the winter months now. Here’s how you can do just that:   Tidy the Borders: Autumn is the best time of year to dig up and…
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    Grow Up Hydrogarden

  • Health Benefits of Gardening

    Erika Raia
    22 Oct 2014 | 1:00 am
    Gardening and connecting with nature is rewarding for everyone, at any age, and it is good for your mind and body.  Breathe in the fresh air, quiet the world around you and get moving in the garden to increase blood flow and invigorate your senses. Growing your own garden isn’t just a great source of healthy, wholesome veggies, fruits and herbs; it is nourishment forRead More
  • Hydroponics in Schools

    Erika Raia
    15 Oct 2014 | 1:00 am
    Hydroponics is the process of growing plants in a nutrient-rich, water infused, growing medium instead of soil like a traditional garden. The word “Hydroponic” comes from the Greek words hydro, meaning water, and ponos, meaning labor. For thousands of years, people have used hydroponics because of the higher yields and benefits it offers over traditional gardening. A hydrogarden is a garden that is grown using hydroponic gardeningRead More
  • Growing Flowers in your Hydrogarden

    Erika Raia
    7 Oct 2014 | 12:34 pm
    Have you ever wished you could grow flowers without  having to deal with the mess of soil and weeds? Hydroponic gardening makes growing flowers, easier and faster than traditional gardening. Grow Up Hydrogarden is self-watering system that uses hydroponic technology to grow flowers, veggies, herbs and fruits in a growing medium (Growstone GS-1 and Mix This or Perlite). It uses 90% less water than a traditional gardenRead More
  • Growing Indoors

    Erika Raia
    30 Sep 2014 | 2:30 am
    Many of us live in an area where gardening outdoors during Fall or Winter is not possible and are faced with either packing the garden up for the winter or moving it indoors. Indoor gardening is growing in popularity especially amongst individuals that have come to rely on the fresh, wholesome veggies and herbs that they grow from home. Grow Up Hydrogarden is designed forRead More
  • 5 Ways that Hydroponic Gardening Benefits the Environment

    Erika Raia
    24 Sep 2014 | 1:09 pm
    Soil free gardening benefits the environment in many different ways and is growing in popularity, not just in commercial farming, but in home gardening. Grow Up Hydrogarden makes growing your own vegetables, fruits, herbs and flowers, year-round, easy. The crops taste better, have higher nutritional value, do not require a green thumb and help reduce your carbon footprint. 5 ways that Hydroponic Gardening promotes sustainableRead More
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    No Soil Solutions

  • Growing Hydroponic Vegetables

    admin
    18 Oct 2014 | 5:44 pm
    There’s something special about growing hydroponic vegetables. Everybody has seen a typical backyard garden. It’s no surprise walking out into a backyard garden to find some wonderful vegetables, but what if you seen some of those same vegetables growing on their back porch? What if you seen some of those same vegetables being grown in The post Growing Hydroponic Vegetables appeared first on No Soil Solutions.
  • How To Mix A Three Part Nutrient Solution

    admin
    11 Oct 2014 | 6:04 pm
      For my hydroponic systems I use a three part nutrient solution from General Hydroponics Flora series. The three parts are sold together in a park and also sold individually. Since your plants need more of some nutrients than others, you won’t need to buy all three parts together every time after your initial purchase. The post How To Mix A Three Part Nutrient Solution appeared first on No Soil Solutions.
  • Aquaponics

    admin
    29 Sep 2014 | 10:02 pm
    The first hydroponic plant I grew was a tomato plants in a 5 gallon bucket. I had used an old paint bucket, a left over air pump and an old air stone I had used in my aquarium. Like many starting out hydroculture gardening, after my first plant success I wanted to grow more. I The post Aquaponics appeared first on No Soil Solutions.
  • Aeroponics

    admin
    19 Sep 2014 | 11:50 am
    Aeroponics is considered more of an advanced hydroponic method of gardening. Some do not consider aeroponics to be a true hydroponics method as the plant roots are not submerged in water. Instead with aeroponics, plants are often placed in small holes or slits to stabilize the plant while the roots are suspended in the air. The post Aeroponics appeared first on No Soil Solutions.
  • Nutrient Film Technique- NFT Hydroponics

    admin
    7 Sep 2014 | 9:42 pm
    Nutrient film technique, or NFT for short, is very simple hydroponic method and has a pretty basic design, making it popular for hydroponic gardening at home or on a commercial scale. While NFT hydroponics could be set up to just grow one plant, usually multiple plants are grow in one system. NFT hydroponics is a The post Nutrient Film Technique- NFT Hydroponics appeared first on No Soil Solutions.
 
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    A Garden for All

  • Bonny Verbena

    Kathy
    24 Oct 2014 | 2:00 am
    Verbena with Hummingbird Moth (photo: Kathy Diemer) I’m not much of an annual lover.  Don’t get me wrong, I always make up a few containers and window boxes every year (even though I find the daily watering and fertilizing quite tedious).  Annuals are also great for filling in those open spots that mysteriously appear (after what I suspect were major vole fests).  And I have the utmost respect for those dedicated folks that plant dahlias and cannas annually, carefully digging them up and storing them through the winter.  But that’s just not me.  I want a…
  • Wethersfield Garden

    Kathy
    21 Oct 2014 | 2:00 am
    Picture yourself sitting here! (photo by: Kathy Diemer) I’ve visited some wonderful gardens this year; a few with magnificent ocean or river views, others with incredible landscapes flush with foliage and flowers.  And just when I thought the season was winding down, I found one more on my “must see” list, whose last open day (other than special events) was September 28.  As karma would have it, I happened to look up Wethersfield Garden that very morning, and was able to squeeze in by the skin of my teeth!  Lady Luck continued to have my back, providing crystal clear…
  • Iron Maiden

    Kathy
    17 Oct 2014 | 2:00 am
    Ironweed & company (photo credit: Kathy Diemer) Our native ironweed, Vernonia noveboracensis, is an extraordinary beauty with massive deep violet blooms atop stems that can reach over 5 feet tall; standing as proudly in your garden as she does in the local meadow.  Like Lady Liberty, vernonia carries her purple torches high to illuminate late summer gardens filled with golden rudbeckia and mauve eupatorium.  A member of the aster family, this gypsy roams the east coast from Massachusetts to Florida, spreading happiness to the local bees and butterflies along the way.  Because she can…
  • Mighty Metasequoia

    Kathy
    14 Oct 2014 | 2:00 am
    Dawn Redwood’s stunning bark and curious branching habit (photo by: Kathy Diemer) For a tree with majesty and presence, I can think of nothing grander than the Dawn Redwood, Metasequoia glyptostroboides.  This king among trees is worth considering if you have a moist area and the room to accommodate a large tree.  And I mean large.  Under the right conditions, Metasequoia is a fast growing tree; growing several feet annually and capable of reaching over 100’ tall by 20’ wide in zones 5-8.  Considered a living fossil, Dawn Redwood was once one of the most widespread tree species…
  • Shades of Grey

    Kathy
    10 Oct 2014 | 2:00 am
    Silvery combination (photo credit: Kathy Diemer) As summer winds down and fall colors blaze, a few soothers can help balance the display.  And that’s where grey foliage serves as a welcome moderator.  Surprisingly, grey plants can add more drama than some of the boldest flowers and foliage.  By simply mixing some different silver leaved forms and textures, you can create a visual wonderland that is both calming and tranquil.  And don’t we all need a peaceful escape every now and again? Helen von Stein’s frosty foliage (photo by: Kathy Diemer) For a short form of…
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    Drought Gardening

  • Watering Low Water Plants (6 Things You Should Be Doing, But You’re Not)

    Austin Fernald
    18 Oct 2014 | 10:42 am
    Watering is an important part of growing a healthy garden (Duh!). Even low water plants need water sometimes. No plant can truly survive on zero water. If you think watering a drought tolerant garden is as simple as setting the timer for your sprinkler system to come on everyday, or just going out into your […] The post Watering Low Water Plants (6 Things You Should Be Doing, But You’re Not) appeared first on Drought Gardening.
  • 9 Drought Tolerant Vegetables for Any Size Garden + Growing Guide

    Austin Fernald
    11 Oct 2014 | 7:39 am
    Many people think that when they make the change from a water intensive garden to a drought tolerant one, they have to give up growing vegetables altogether. But that’s not true at all! Yes, certain vegetables need gallons of water a day to survive, but many vegetables can grow and prosper in drought conditions too. […] The post 9 Drought Tolerant Vegetables for Any Size Garden + Growing Guide appeared first on Drought Gardening.
  • The Down and Dirty Guide to Soil (For the Average Gardener)

    Austin Fernald
    5 Oct 2014 | 1:34 pm
    Contents of This Article: What is Soil Types of Soil The Soil Horizon Soil pH Soil Nutrients Ideal Soil Traits by Garden Type Improving Soil Introduction Plants need soil to grow healthy and big. Soil for plants is like fruits and vegetables for kids (Sorry for the bad analogy). Plants absorb the nutrients they need […] The post The Down and Dirty Guide to Soil (For the Average Gardener) appeared first on Drought Gardening.
  • Garden Tool Review: Flexrake Hula-Ho

    Austin Fernald
    28 Sep 2014 | 8:16 am
    For reference: this tool is featured on my resources page. What the heck is a Hula-Ho? If you have never heard of a Hula-Ho, then right now you might be wondering, what the heck is a Hula-Ho? For those of you who do know what a Hula-Ho is, then I hope this review does it […] The post Garden Tool Review: Flexrake Hula-Ho appeared first on Drought Gardening.
  • How to Know if a Plant is Drought Tolerant (Just by Looking at it)

    Austin Fernald
    26 Sep 2014 | 12:43 pm
    There thousands of different types of plants, all across the world, that grow in all different types of climates. But what makes it so that some plants can grow exceptionally in hot, dry, drought susceptible areas? The simple answer is, biology. Drought tolerant, what’s that? The definition of drought tolerant is as simple as the […] The post How to Know if a Plant is Drought Tolerant (Just by Looking at it) appeared first on Drought Gardening.
 
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    Tree Service Portland - Northwest Arbor-Culture » Blog

  • How To Capture Rainwater

    Jon Nash
    30 Sep 2014 | 3:49 pm
      Why Capture Rainwater? Not only does capturing rainwater help the environment by conserving resources, it also saves money. Depending on how much it rains where you live and the size of your house, you can accumulate a significant amount of water with a simple arrangement. During the summer, a rain barrel can save homeowners about 1,300 gallons of water. This extra water you save can really make a notable difference in your water bill. Source: Amanda Slater Rainwater collected from rain barrels picks up very little contamination because it is gathered from the roofs of houses. Having…
  • When Is the Best Time to Prune Shrubs and Trees?

    Jon Nash
    12 Sep 2014 | 12:20 pm
    Tree pruning is healthy. Think of it as a haircut — you’re not hurting the plant, just keeping things in the best shape and paving the way for future growth. But you don’t want to disfigure your shrubs. Misguided hacks can prevent your tree from blossoming that year. Consider this your quick guide to the best time of year for tree pruning and shrub trimming. First, an important note: Dead branches, those in the way of pedestrians, and those that could damage your property can be removed anytime. Don’t wait with a dangerous situation. If you have a tree emergency, you can call us…
  • How To Plant a Tree

    Jon Nash
    22 Aug 2014 | 10:00 am
    Planting trees is a fun and easy activity to do with your friends and family. When you plant trees on your property, you can add a lot of beauty and value to your landscape. While planting a tree can seem like a very simple task, there are many rules that you need to follow to ensure that your tree and landscape thrives. Read this post to learn how to properly plant a tree so that it can grow and stay healthy for years to come. Research and Placement Always research the type of tree that you would like to plant before planting. Different species can grow to unwanted sizes, send out roots that…
  • Protecting Your Home From Wildfire

    Jon Nash
    7 Aug 2014 | 10:00 am
    Every year, with more drought and rising temperatures, we are experiencing more wildfires. Wildfire can spread unexpectedly to tens of thousands of acres in a matter of hours, leaving homeowners with little time to prepare their property for the oncoming disaster. Yet there are several simple steps that you can take to prepare your home and property to withstand raging wildfires. Careful planning and yearly maintenance could mean the difference between a singed yard and a completely destroyed home and property. This post will teach you how to create a fire resistant landscape around your…
  • How To Spot Tree Hazards and What To Do About Them

    Jon Nash
    28 Jul 2014 | 10:00 am
    Trees are a very fascinating and strong organisms in many respects. They can withstand hurricane force winds, freezing temperatures, and even prolonged drought. Yet a tree can be greatly affected by even the slightest change. You can read our previous post, Why Is My Tree Dying?, to learn about how overwatering, improper transplanting, and even slight changes in the soil can injure and even kill a tree. When a tree is affected by certain ailments and is in close proximity to cars, property, and people, it can become a serious hazard. Keep reading to learn some of the most common tree hazards…
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