Gardening

  • Most Topular Stories

  • Preparing for a Freeze or Frost

    Growing The Home Garden
    15 Apr 2014 | 6:23 am
    Middle Tennessee and much of the south is expected to receive a freeze tonight.  We all know how damaging a freeze could be and we have no to look no further back than 2007 to see the results.  That year many gardeners lost trees like Japanese maples and crape myrtles due to the flow of sap in the trunks freezing overnight which then split the bark.  Unfortunately we can't alter the weather on demand so we have to prepare our gardens for the cold temperatures. Tips to Protect Plants from a Freeze or Frost:Use plastic only if you can make sure the plastic does not touch the…
  • Don't Let Stink Bugs Make You a Fool This April!

    The Garden Plot
    Garden Media Group
    1 Apr 2014 | 7:41 am
     Stink bugs are no joke. When they wake from hibernation this spring they have only one thing on their mind: mating. Once they mate, two stink bugs become hundreds in a matter of weeks.“April 1 is the start of the stink bug mating season,” says Rod Schneidmiller, president of Sterling International and developer of the environmentally responsible insect control line, RESCUE!®. “This is when their numbers begin to multiply exponentially, as a single female stink bug can lay up to 400 eggs over the course of a summer.”Experts recommend trapping emerging stink bugs now when they're…
  • Getting Rid of Standing Water

    Sprinkler Juice
    25 Mar 2014 | 12:57 pm
    Standing water. It can be a problem for many homeowners. “I love my lawn sprinkler system but I have standing water in my yard. How do I get rid of the standard water?” There are ways to get rid of... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • How I Prepare Raised Beds for Early Spring Planting

    You Grow Girl
    Gayla Trail
    15 Apr 2014 | 2:07 pm
    You Grow Girl - Gardening for the People. The weather over the weekend was glorious and full of spring’s promise. As previously mentioned, I took advantage and dove headlong into my early spring to-do list. In a typical spring I charge straight into these chores and make mention of them in passing, but rarely get into the nity-gritty of my process here. This … Read How I Prepare Raised Beds for Early Spring Planting on You Grow Girl.
  • Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day April 2014

    Cold Climate Gardening
    Kathy Purdy
    17 Apr 2014 | 2:39 pm
    My efforts to develop a cabin fever bed are starting to bear fruit. The winter aconites have come and gone, but I have plenty else starting to bloom. New this year I purchased Bulbocodium vernum from Odyssey Bulbs last year. It is colored like a colchicum and used to be called a colchicum, but is […]
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    You Grow Girl

  • How I Prepare Raised Beds for Early Spring Planting

    Gayla Trail
    15 Apr 2014 | 2:07 pm
    You Grow Girl - Gardening for the People. The weather over the weekend was glorious and full of spring’s promise. As previously mentioned, I took advantage and dove headlong into my early spring to-do list. In a typical spring I charge straight into these chores and make mention of them in passing, but rarely get into the nity-gritty of my process here. This … Read How I Prepare Raised Beds for Early Spring Planting on You Grow Girl.
  • Gardener’s Back

    Gayla Trail
    14 Apr 2014 | 3:32 pm
    You Grow Girl - Gardening for the People. Chalkboard illustration by Davin Risk. There’s a double meaning to this title and I suspect that if you’re over 21 you know exactly what I’m talking about. I’ve got aches and pains all over. I took advantage of the great weather this weekend to cross several items off of my April garden to-do list. I … Read Gardener’s Back on You Grow Girl.
  • My 2014 Herb Experiments (+Giveaway)

    Gayla Trail
    10 Apr 2014 | 10:19 am
    You Grow Girl - Gardening for the People. My gluttonous seed-hoarding habits seem to be behind me now, or have at least calmed for a spell. This year I have abstained from impulse buys from swollen turnstile racks and I only placed one mail order this season. Of course, I say this having bought 40 packets of seed in Tucson, Arizona last June. … Read My 2014 Herb Experiments (+Giveaway) on You Grow Girl.
  • Coral Nymph Salvia

    Gayla Trail
    8 Apr 2014 | 2:38 pm
    You Grow Girl - Gardening for the People. I like salvias. I like any and all salvias; from the delicious, culinary sages to the nectar-rich, super smellerific and sticky sweet types that aren’t hardy in my region. I even like the ones that aren’t edible or aromatic. I’m not sure what it is about this genus. Is it their drought tolerance? Their snapdragon-like … Read Coral Nymph Salvia on You Grow Girl.
  • Grow Write Guild #25: Connecting Through the Garden

    Gayla Trail
    7 Apr 2014 | 2:02 pm
    You Grow Girl - Gardening for the People. Over the years, I have met all sorts of people as a result of my personal and professional interest in gardening. Some of these experiences have been thrilling and joyful; others were colorful, frightening, a bit odd, or downright nuts. Some of the strangest conversations took place as I tended my former “Guerilla garden” on … Read Grow Write Guild #25: Connecting Through the Garden on You Grow Girl.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Shawna Coronado

  • Mini Bonsai Tools Are Perfect for Urban Gardening – Product Review

    Shawna
    18 Apr 2014 | 4:30 am
    In the Northern states it’s a tad too early to plant the annuals but we have that edgy feeling in our hearts – IT’S TIME TO GARDEN! Because most of us are resolved to wait for planting until Mother’s Day, the traditional point where we can be safe from frost. Now is the perfect time to work out that edginess by starting a few begonias inside or plant up a mini-fairy garden or  prepare a little bonsai container. I tried out the adorable DeWit Bonsai Tool Set and think it’s great for far more than just bonsai planting. In the city and other urban settings, many…
  • Garden Containers Made of Tree Stumps

    Shawna
    14 Apr 2014 | 4:06 am
    Last year I published a post on the Oswegoland Park District’s Food Pantry Garden and the awesome WOG’s [Women of the Garden] who run the community garden.  While walking around their garden I spotted an ingenious green and sustainable planting idea — stump planters. Here is how you do it - Find a stump or the remains of a stump form Fill with your favorite soil mix Plant seeds or vegetables directly into stump soil Water and watch it grow By the way, if you want to help out the Pantry Garden by volunteering or with garden supplies, seeds, and more, please contact them.
  • Spring Cleaning With Meliora K. – A Graffiti Experiment Fence Champion

    Shawna
    11 Apr 2014 | 4:00 am
    The Graffiti Experiment  is happy it’s spring! This project is intended to inspire positive community unity and beautiful art instead of hate and gang symbols in our urban neighborhoods. Champions for the project have donated money to help pay the fines my homeowners association charged me in order to help keep the painted fence experiment up longer. I am writing a “Feature of the Month” blog post focused on the champion or the champion’s blog, cause, or company for each champion who is helping me to save the painted fence and support my peaceful protest against gang graffiti.
  • How To Stop Losing Garden Tools

    Shawna
    7 Apr 2014 | 4:42 am
    Do you regularly lose the garden tools because their colors melt into the garden? I do. It’s infuriating. It’s tragic. It drive me nuts. I totally lose my mind over losing the tools. I’ve left garden tools out all winter and found them in spring. My great friend and stand-in Mom, Eileen, came over last year and told me her secret tip for preventing tool loss. How To Stop Losing Garden Tools Buy brightly colored tape Wrap the handles of the tools so they are easier to see Never lose a tool again How to stop losing garden tools is super-easy; just wrap your tool handles in…
  • Blood Orange Screwdriver Cooler Cocktail Recipe – Hello Spring

    Shawna
    4 Apr 2014 | 4:30 am
    Hello Spring! In celebration of spring breaks everywhere – warm beaches, sunny gardens, and delightfully sinful lazy days – I give you the first spring cocktail recipe. ::ding:ding:ding:: I welcome the celebration with the Blood Orange Screwdriver Cooler Cocktail Recipe. It is particularly fantastic with my beloved Tito’s Vodka and is even better if you can use fresh blood orange juice. Watch the video below to see how to make it super quick – filmed in my front lawn cocktail garden. Wahoo! Blood Orange Screwdriver Cooler Cocktail Recipe – Vodka – 1.5 oz.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Cold Climate Gardening

  • Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day April 2014

    Kathy Purdy
    17 Apr 2014 | 2:39 pm
    My efforts to develop a cabin fever bed are starting to bear fruit. The winter aconites have come and gone, but I have plenty else starting to bloom. New this year I purchased Bulbocodium vernum from Odyssey Bulbs last year. It is colored like a colchicum and used to be called a colchicum, but is […]
  • Duluth Trading Gave Me a Kick in the Pants

    Kathy Purdy
    16 Apr 2014 | 7:36 am
    Duluth Trading gave me a kick in the pants–metaphorically speaking. But they did give me the actual pants. About a month ago I got an email with the subject line Duluth Trading Wants to Give You a Kick in the Pants. I subscribe to their company newsletter, and at first glance I thought this was […]
  • Mud Season Mind Games: Dear Friend and Gardener

    Kathy Purdy
    7 Apr 2014 | 12:27 pm
    Dear Friend and Gardener, I have learned through my online friendships with many garden bloggers that spring comes late to my part of the world. Friends around the country (and the world) speak of snowdrops blooming when mine are buried under snow, and show off their daffodils while I am waiting for my first crocuses […]
  • What Treasures Have Been Stolen by this Winter?

    Brian Bixley
    31 Mar 2014 | 11:37 am
    Sunshine is delicious, rain is refreshing, wind braces us up, snow is exhilarating; there is really no such thing as bad weather, only different kinds of good weather. ~John Ruskin, quoted in Adam Gopnik, Winter. It is a truth almost universally acknowledged that this has been a bear of a winter, battering to the body […]
  • Make That Lingering Snow Earn Its Keep

    Kathy Purdy
    21 Mar 2014 | 7:10 pm
    The snow is melting, but not fast enough to suit me. I’ve already taken pictures of where the snow melts first, so I know where to plant my spring-flowering bulbs this fall. In the spirit of making lemonade out of lemons, I realized this lingering snow was the perfect opportunity to outline a new garden […]
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    A Way To Garden

  • an intimate look at feathers, from cornell lab

    margaret
    16 Apr 2014 | 9:54 am
    AS THE ONLY LIVING ANIMAL TO HAVE THEM, birds corner the market on feathers.  Now one of my favorite places [read more…] The post an intimate look at feathers, from cornell lab appeared first on A Way To Garden.
  • inspired by nature’s layers, but not hung up on natives-only

    margaret
    14 Apr 2014 | 10:12 am
    LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT THOMAS RAINER doesn’t ask a plant for its passport before making space for it in a garden, but [read more…] The post inspired by nature’s layers, but not hung up on natives-only appeared first on A Way To Garden.
  • how to grow the best-tasting tomato

    margaret
    12 Apr 2014 | 9:20 am
    IS IT NATURE (as in genetics) or nurture (as in where and how you raise it) that makes for a [read more…] The post how to grow the best-tasting tomato appeared first on A Way To Garden.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    About.com Gardening

  • It's National Garden Month!

    18 Apr 2014 | 2:46 am
    April is National Garden Month. I hope you've been able to get out in your garden despite the crazy weather, because April is also the start of our Spring Flowers photo challenge. While you are out there working hard, it is so easy to forget to take photos of your spring garden. Put your camera in your garden tote and take some time to enjoy spring's surprises - and then share them with us....Read Full Post
  • And the Winner Is...

    16 Apr 2014 | 2:30 am
    Congratulations, Anne (goannerun), your "Winter Garden" photo was the favorite! Winter decided to pay (hopefully) one more visit to many of us this week, but voting for our Winter Color ...Read Full Post
  • Last Chance to Vote for Winter Color

    15 Apr 2014 | 5:00 am
    Unfortunately winter won't quite let go, but at least we know we're on the upswing. Here's one more look at the winter that over-stayed its welcome. Look through the photo ...Read Full Post
  • Guaranteeing Healthy Plants

    14 Apr 2014 | 2:32 am
    It's been a long, long, long winter. Plants are arriving in the garden centers and I just want to hug them. Every year, I try to make a list of what I want to buy, before I venture into temptation. I can't always stick to my resolve, but I can at least be discerning about which impulse buys are robust enough to be worth giving in to....Read Full Post
  • Seeds or Seedlings?

    13 Apr 2014 | 3:05 am
    Every year someone asks me if they have to start from seed, to grow vegetables. Good question. Actually, not every vegetable will do well, if direct sown in the garden. Some simply won't have enough time to mature and others need a bit more pampering than they are likely to get outdoors. Those racks of seeds are very tempting in the bleakness of winter, but now the tables are filling up with even more tempting seedlings. There is something to be said for either approach, so check out my tips and then fill up your garden....Read Full Post
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Plant Whatever Brings You Joy

  • Getting Ready for the Garden

    Kathryn
    11 Apr 2014 | 3:10 pm
    Ha! I know what you were thinking when you read Getting Ready for the Garden. You thought new gloves, cleaning up handtools, preparing the Earth, raking, bringing out the lawn mower and all the requisite steps we each are required to do for a successful season. But actually, I was talking about getting YOU ready for the garden. Really. Because having certain things in place, ready for the wear and tear of gardening, happens to be a very good idea. So I’m going to depart from my usual practice of rarely mentioning products, etc. and actually share with you some of the products I’ve…
  • The Beauty of Spring at Dusk

    Kathryn
    24 Mar 2014 | 9:12 am
    quince at dusk A funny thing happened on the way to writing this post. I was intending to write about gathering together resources to help ensure our body’s best spring into spring, and I will, in fact, be writing that soon. However, thinking I’d include a few spring blossoms in my post, I took my camera out into the garden, even though “it was late” and, lo, this post took a turn towards sharing, for now, the beauty found in day’s lingering light upon the spring blossoms that abound this end of March in Northern California. It is my gift and joy to share with…
  • Bark

    Kathryn
    24 Feb 2014 | 5:53 pm
    Perhaps it is inevitable that my attention in winter would be drawn to the barren trees, devoid of distracting leaves and even branches, the trunks of trees quite bare, revealing, simply, bark. I decided to bear witness to those that share the spaces I occupy in my daily life. Here they are, their varied beauty, a story recorded, yet untold, in each, logged and duly admired. I hope you enjoyed this lovely journey. Love and end of winter blessings, Kathryn xoxo Book News: Interested readers will find an excerpt from Plant Whatever Brings You Joy: Blessed Wisdom from the Garden in the spring…
  • Rain and violets…

    Kathryn
    11 Feb 2014 | 3:34 pm
    Dearest readers, well, a week or so ago I was lamenting that the annual wild violets that I’ve come to take for granted were offering me a hard lesson: they may not be taken for granted. Not at all. Particularly midst the worst drought California has experienced in a long time. And in my many decades living here I’d never experienced the likes of months without rain, with only a faint whisper of hope that it might change. I’m certain I was not alone in praying to the Rain Gods that Be, asking for a miracle of a wet winter, even though February had arrived. And then the…
  • The Good Things Jar and Gratitude

    Kathryn
    19 Jan 2014 | 7:38 pm
    “We can only be said to be alive in those moments when our hearts are conscious of our treasures.” – Thornton Wilder Rare it is for me to revisit a topic covered on this dear blog, but revisit I will the Good Things Jar and with good purpose. Last January it was an idea. This January I speak from experience! I want to share with you what it ultimately meant to me, and thus perhaps inspire those of you who have not explored this simple practice, or maybe hear from those of you who did try and had a lovely result! “For each new morning with its light, For rest and…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    May Dreams Gardens

  • Dear Friend and Gardener: Snow in Spring

    Carol
    16 Apr 2014 | 7:15 pm
    Snow on the garden on April 15th Dear Dee and Mary Ann, It's been a few weeks since my last update for Dear Friend and Gardener, but in those few weeks there wasn't much to report. However, the occasion of snow on April 15th seems like a reason to write and provide an update on my veg garden and share a few pictures.  Whenever it snows when it shouldn't snow, I'm reminded of the passage
  • Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day - April 2014

    Carol
    14 Apr 2014 | 9:05 pm
    Violets grown from seed, blooming on the 13th Welcome to Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day for April 2014.  Here in my USDA Hardiness Zone 6a garden in central Indiana, I think spring is running just a little bit behind previous years. Not only is spring running a bit behind, but she's putting on a pretty good impression of winter this week. Yes, indeed. After providing us with a few days in the
  • Pretty Hyacinths, and not all in a row.

    Carol
    13 Apr 2014 | 3:21 pm
    I think hyacinths are a bit difficult to place in the spring garden.  Their upright racemes just beg you me to plant them like little soldiers all in a row.  Indeed, I do have a row of hyacinths in the garden, along the edge of the border on the side of the house. Don't mock the row. Those hyacinths have returned reliably for probably ten years, if not longer. Many tulips don't come back
  • You can't stop me!

    Carol
    9 Apr 2014 | 8:11 pm
    Magnolia stellata It occurred to me this week.  When the star magnolia (Magnolia stellata) blooms, it is generally time to mow the lawn. Now that I know this, I won't have to actually look at the lawn to decide when I should mow it for the first time. I'll just mow whenever the magnolia blooms. I'm kidding. I will look at the lawn to decide if it is ready for the first mowing.  But I won't
  • Little bits of sky

    Carol
    6 Apr 2014 | 7:09 pm
    Chionodoxa sp. Little bits of sky fell down to my garden and turned into flowers. I love the blue of these small spring blooms which carry the common name of glory-of-the-snow and the genus name of Chionodoxa.  For years, I've driven by a house surrounded by a lawn filled with these blooms. The house is old and has seen better days, as has the lawn and garden.  But without fail, the
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Backyard Gardening Blog

  • First Flower of Spring 2014

    Administrator
    31 Mar 2014 | 3:08 pm
    Today it was 61 degrees out, woohoo, finally, after such a cold cold Winter & Spring. Of course, tommorow it starts getting cold again, but today was nice, and I spied my first flower. I was out in the garden doing what you should do this time of year, which is prune trees if they need to be pruned, and clean up old spent perennials from last year, getting the garden ready for new growth. You prune trees now because they store all their energy in their roots while dormant, so by cutting off dormant limbs you’re not cutting out any of the tree’s stored energy – but then…
  • Optimism in the Garden

    Administrator
    11 Mar 2014 | 8:06 am
    Spring is a time of optimism, of renewal, of growth, well, normally. Unless you live in Michigan under the specter of the polar vortex. This winter has been horrible, absolutely horrible. I normally am not one to get worn down spiritually by the winter, but I have this time. I hate it here, I absolutely hate it. It hasn’t even been a fun winter, where you can go out sledding, or skiing, or building a snow man. It has been too cold even for any of that. We’ve had more days below 0 than above freezing. I’m sure some plants will have perished by the time Spring rolls around,…
  • Aftermath of an Ice Storm in the Garden

    Administrator
    23 Feb 2014 | 12:20 pm
    In December, right before Christmas we were hit by a major ice storm, the worst in decades. People at the power company said it was the worst they could remember. We didn’t lose power, luckily, but people all over our town did, some for as long as 10 days (into January). Major commercial areas lost power, more traffic lights were off than were working, downed power lines were everywhere, some left for days or weeks, because they didn’t have the man power to fix them all. This isn’t Georgia either, this is Michigan, we have tons of crews and plows and salt and people trained…
  • Book Review: A Garden of Marvels

    Administrator
    15 Feb 2014 | 12:27 pm
    I’m a big science geek and so when I was offered a free copy of A Garden of Marvels: How We Discovered that Flowers Have Sex, Leaves Eat Air, and Other Secrets of Plants by Ruth Kassinger I quickly accepted, and I’m glad I did. My first job was bagging groceries, however my second job was working in a research lab at Michigan State University studying the genetics of arabidopsis thaliana trying to identify phenotypes that produce increased seed oil. So I’ve always been interested in some of the science behind plants, though I’ve never taken a botany or horticulture…
  • Landscaping for Home Security

    Administrator
    8 Feb 2014 | 7:47 am
    Your landscape can be beautiful, your landscape can feed you, but your landscape can also protect you. Much like a well trained dog can be both a friend and a security system, your yard and garden can serve double duty too. First Do No Harm The first step to deterring burglars and other miscreants with your landscaping is to make sure you’re not doing anything to encourage them. Large shrubs or bushes that hide your windows or doors, allowing a burglar to work on them out of view, are a big no-no. You should also keep a well maintained yard, believe it or not, a well maintained yard is…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Bloomingwriter: Gardening in Nova Scotia

  • Exciting breakthroughs in blue flower varieties

    Jodi DeLong
    1 Apr 2014 | 8:26 am
    Blue is the rarest of colours in the flower world, which is probably why true-blue flowers like gentians cause people like me to gasp and lose my mind, and collect them wherever I can find them. The spring gentian, Gentiana acaulis, shows off each May with breathtaking, gentian-blue flowers, and will cause me to stop what I'm doing, sit down, stare and the flowers and just smile. I don't grow a lot of morning glories, but I always, always have to have the perfectly named 'Heavenly Blue', with its huge blue flowers. I especially love the brilliant yellow eye and the hint of lavender in…
  • Nursery Open Dates in Nova Scotia, & other events

    Jodi DeLong
    22 Mar 2014 | 5:57 am
    With spring slowly starting to makes its tentative arrival in Atlantic Canada, there are signs of life at many local nurseries. So what I'm going to do here is post the opening dates for as many as I can, and will add others once I have them. These are all nurseries I love and support, and you should too. Baldwin Nurseries: We posted Rob's catalogue last week on bloominganswers (under downloads) and on his blog; it's not yet up on his website, but you can find out about a lot of great new plants on his Facebook site.Although his open hours begin in early April, call or email early in the…
  • Windowbox Contest at Saltscapes Expo!

    Jodi DeLong
    14 Mar 2014 | 7:38 am
     One of the many hats I wear (and my favourite one) is being part of the Saltscapes magazine family. Saltscapes is all about life in Atlantic Canada, and every year for the past 10 years, we have put on an amazing weekend show, Saltscapes Expo, at Exhibition Park in Halifax. I like to tell people it's as if the magazine comes to life; there's entertainment, seminars and demonstrations, food to sample, great unique shopping opportunities from some of the finest of artisans and producers in Atlantic Canada, and much more! It is always a busy, busy time, but a fun time.Because this is our…
  • Rediscovering (& reimagining) the joy of houseplants

    Jodi DeLong
    25 Feb 2014 | 8:02 am
    Back when I was a student at the Nova Scotia Agricultural College, my room in residence resembled a miniature jungle. At one point, I had over 100 plants in that room, ranging from tiny lithops (living stones) to sprawling English ivy and philodendrons, to colourful African violets. Although I don't have quite so many indoor plants these days, I still have quite a few. There has never been a time since I was in my mid-teens that I haven't had houseplants, and I can't imagine ever NOT having them. They are like cats in that respect--they are part of who I am. Often when people…
  • Snow-themed plants for the beginning of FARCH...

    Jodi DeLong
    3 Feb 2014 | 10:40 am
     Depending on where you live in North America, yesterday's Groundhog Day prognosticator either saw his shadow or didn't (yeah, I know what I just wrote). I like what one person said, we can either focus on six more weeks of winter, or only six more weeks til spring. No matter how the groundhog called it, we have just entered that everlasting period of winter that I call FARCH, which begins on February 1 and winds up on 31 March, hopefully with some signs of spring unfurling.To give us all a lift in winter (or to cool off our friends in the Southern Hemisphere, in midsummer as they…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Zanthan Gardens

  • Week 15: 4/9 – 4/15

    M Sinclair Stevens in Austin, Texas
    13 Apr 2014 | 7:24 pm
    2014-04-13. Almost no larkspur this year. The meadow is given over to cilantro. Some yellow iris surprised me.
  • Week 40: 10/1-10/07

    M Sinclair Stevens in Austin, Texas
    4 Oct 2013 | 5:10 am
    2013-10-03. The rain garden with the pigeonberrry in full flower.
  • GBBD 201302: February 2013

    M Sinclair Stevens in Austin, Texas
    16 Feb 2013 | 5:48 pm
    Kalanchoe daigremontiana, Mother of Thousands.
  • Meadow: Dry Year vs Wet Year

    M Sinclair Stevens in Austin, Texas
    17 Feb 2012 | 11:37 am
    2008-02-04. A dry winter.
  • GBBD 201202: February 2012

    M Sinclair Stevens in Austin, Texas
    15 Feb 2012 | 7:27 pm
    2012-02-15. Rose 'Mermaid. Close up.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Digging

  • Fixing a floppy Will Fleming yaupon for Foliage Follow-Up

    Pam/Digging
    15 Apr 2014 | 10:05 pm
    ‘Will Fleming’ yaupon (Ilex vomitoria ‘Will Fleming’), a fastigiate cultivar of our native yaupon holly, is one of my go-to vertical accent plants. It’s a green punctuation mark, ideal for adding height to a flat bed or using in multiples as a narrow hedge to screen an ugly view. In sun or shade it’ll grow to 10 or 15 feet (I like to give mine flat-top haircuts at about 6 feet tall) but only 1 to 2 feet wide. Sometimes, however, the outer branches go a bit floppy, ruining the vertical shape. Like this — not the look I was going for. You might think…
  • Wildflowers and more in bloom at the Wildflower Center

    Pam/Digging
    14 Apr 2014 | 10:02 pm
    For Garden Bloggers Bloom Day let’s go to the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center here in Austin. I visited on Sunday with family who were in town, hoping to see some bluebonnets. We saw a lot more than that, including these beautiful pink flowers that resembled apple blossoms. Does anyone know what native Texas shrub or tree this might be? Update: It’s a Texas crabapple, also known as Blanco crabapple (Malus ioensis var. texana). Thanks for the ID, Linda/Patchwork Garden and James Smith! Texas bluebonnets spilled through grassy meadows like spring-fed streams. They also popped up…
  • Great horned owls on the nest at the Wildflower Center

    Pam/Digging
    14 Apr 2014 | 11:45 am
    With family in town last weekend, smack in the middle of wildflower season, we made a visit to one of my favorite places in Austin: the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center. Sure, I wanted to see bluebonnets and other spring flowers, but I also knew a secret that not everyone who visits knows. A great horned owl nests each year in a planter niche on the stone walls of the entry garden (officially known as the South Texas Mission Garden), by the Wetland Pond. She’s there right now. Do you see her? How about now? A telephoto lens or a pair of binoculars will give you a better peek.
  • Nursery visit: The Arbor Gate near Houston

    Pam/Digging
    13 Apr 2014 | 9:49 pm
    My sister, who lives in Houston, expressed amazement at how many gardens I managed to squeeze into my visit to her city a couple of weekends ago. It’s true. I’ve shown you four Open Days tour gardens, plus four drive-by gardens that were pretty fabulous, plus a nursery visit to Thompson+Hanson, plus wildflowers in Brenham along the way. Whew! But I have one more nursery visit to share with you, The Arbor Gate in far northwest Houston (Tomball, to be exact), a lively, customer-oriented, garden-art-packed destination nursery for Houston-area gardeners. I was touring with my friend…
  • Wildflower season in Texas, a magic carpet of color

    Pam/Digging
    11 Apr 2014 | 5:12 am
    A red, white, and blue patriotic spring is in full swing in the fields of east-central Texas. Guessing that the early wildflowers were in full bloom east of Austin, I made a wildflower run right after school dropoff yesterday — a little late for the golden hour of sunrise, but what the heck. You grab a moment when you can find it. And boy am I glad I did. I headed out Highway 71 to FM 535, southwest of Bastrop near Rockne — about an hour’s drive from central Austin — and found Texas bluebonnet and Indian paintbrush mixing it up in a magic carpet of color. Not…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Blithewold Blogs

  • One step back…

    Kristin Green
    17 Apr 2014 | 5:48 am
    …two ahead. By now there should be a spring in our dance step – and there is. I can tell because it squishes. This week another 2″ of rain fell. But on top of that, a frosting of sleet. A lot of wind blew in the latest storm, making a few open daffodils kiss the ground, […]
  • Not all is a washout

    Dan Christina
    14 Apr 2014 | 6:49 pm
    (Originally this post should have ran last week, but was never loaded. Oops!) As you most likely saw in Kris’ post last week, Washout, things around the grounds have been quite a mess.  We have been able to get almost every path back to walkable standards, and keep moving forward with clean up, but the one […]
  • Spring forward

    Kristin Green
    11 Apr 2014 | 7:23 am
    Even though the forsythia hasn’t bloomed yet, we declared it time to prune the roses. We can tell that the roses are ready because their buds have swelled and the Ballerinas in the North Garden have even begun to break — to leaf out. The only danger with early pruning is that the new growth […]
  • An Evening at the Opera

    Margaret Whitehead
    4 Apr 2014 | 12:25 pm
    An Evening at the Opera, 1912 Bessie and William McKee spent their winters in Boston at their large, elegant townhouse on Commonwealth Avenue.  Among their favorite entertainments was the Opera.  They were members of the Boston Opera Company which performed at the Opera House, and they attended every week during the season – often twice a […]
  • Washout

    Kristin Green
    2 Apr 2014 | 11:40 am
    We were about to open for the season. Even though the daffodils in the Bosquet aren’t quite in bloom yet, the grounds and gardens looked spiffed and ready for a spring hurrah. And then over this past weekend, a lot of rain fell. Upwards of 5″ came down like a hammer and chisel and caused more damage than […]
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Ledge and Gardens

  • Bloom Day - April 15, 2014

    Layanee DeMerchant
    15 Apr 2014 | 2:40 pm
    April Bloom Day has arrived with April showers which is just as it should be. It is time to reap the rewards of past fall bulb plantings along with celebrating the earliest bloomers. The snowdrops have lost their pretty white flowers but there is much of interest to take their place in the gardens which are still being uncovered. Most of you know of Iris 'Katherine Hodgkin'. She is tiny and her color is pale but satisfying. These clumps are a testimony to her happiness and mine. What is spring without some smiling pansies? I have planted the containers by the back door with this…
  • Fire and Ice

    Layanee DeMerchant
    8 Apr 2014 | 8:13 am
      l-r. Sister Sue, Layanee, Cousin Mary Lou I have been on vacation.  That is one excuse for not posting for three weeks. The other is the flu. Good reasons right? Well, vacation is over and the flu is gone and while there is still a bit of chunky ice here and there along the drive, spring cleanup has begun. I started with a bit of pruning. The Hydrangea paniculatas get a heavy haircut this time of year. This keeps them looking a bit neater while controlling the size as well as forcing some new and vigorous growth. They flower profusely when pruned in early spring. The borders…
  • Vernal Equinox - 2014

    Layanee DeMerchant
    19 Mar 2014 | 11:18 pm
      My garden is a mirror of the vernal equinox. There are equal parts of light and dark in the garden. The snow line is visible in many areas. The southern exposures in the garden are dark and void of growing vegetation, for the most part. The northerly sites have up to six inches of snow still on them.  My hellebores are still buried and this mornings garden walk entailed skirting the snow line. The earth was hard and unyielding underfoot but there was bird song in the air and a definite feeling of spring. I missed Bloom Day this weekend but the blooms have started. The snowdrops…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    A Leafy Indulgence

  • Hyacinths Sliced And Diced

    Swimray
    9 Apr 2014 | 8:00 am
    The hyacinths (Hyacinth orientalis) are in bloom, even ones that were hacked to pieces last year. I was digging in the dirt to make room for some pepper plants in the front cottage garden. A few good-looking vegetables are now planted in this garden, and last year bell pepper plants were being set down. The trowel blasted into a few white hyacinth bulbs below the surface that forgot to tell me where they were hiding.The pieces were cleaned off and planted with hope they would multiply like a starfish, each piece growing anew. It worked! This year, all pieces grew, and they all had blooms,…
  • The Undead Zombie Plants

    Swimray
    31 Mar 2014 | 7:13 pm
    A quick walk through the gardens last week showed the extent of winter's damage. Zombie plants are everywhere. They appear dead, but may be undead -- ready to spring up from the earth to grow among the living again.At a gardening lecture attended Saturday, everyone was wailing in anguish at the slow arrival of spring and the exceptionally harsh winter. One gardener complained that the temperatures dropped below the minimum temperatures of the USDA Hardiness Zone Map, not realizing its numbers are average low temperatures, not lowest. And then it snowed yesterday.Zombies inhabit the side…
  • Winter Walk Off

    Swimray
    20 Mar 2014 | 10:07 am
    Although a little late with this post, it was eventually completed (past the official deadline.) My winter walk-off was started on Monday, but then we were gifted a March snow storm for the record books. I started after the storm, but did not finish the walk or photos until sunny yesterday.My walk was around Old Town Alexandria. This year, I photographed things that were interesting to me.When temperatures warm, freeze, warm, and when there is no rain gutter, you get icicle lights.This is storefront to an interior decorator and furnishings store on the main commercial drag. Although…
  • Time To Wake Up

    Swimray
    9 Mar 2014 | 12:49 pm
    For the past three years or so, I have saved a few plants from the annual winter kill in order to replant in the spring. This is done either by keeping the plants going, or putting them into hibernation. I try out a new technique or two each year in the hope of having a better preservation success rate. The new tricks I am testing this year follow.CannaHere's how they roll. About three Pretoria canna tubers are planted in the garden in the spring. They easily grow and multiply during the summer, (not large enough to bloom until July) loving the hot humid weather we are noted for. The three…
  • Paper-Yellows

    Swimray
    8 Feb 2014 | 5:51 am
    Surprise the customers. I bought paperwhite narcissus at a local nursery last year after searching throughout town for the least expensive. I was buying for the master gardeners. I am VP of Training, and it was graduation time, when the rookie newbies were graduating from the training program to CERTIFIED master gardener status.It was a custom to hand out a small goodie bag to the graduates as they walked across the stage (front of the room) to receive their diplomas (certificates) and shake hands. I put together the best goodie bag ever with the extremely limited funds available. Included…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    A Leafy Indulgence

  • Hyacinths Sliced And Diced

    Swimray
    9 Apr 2014 | 8:00 am
    The hyacinths (Hyacinth orientalis) are in bloom, even ones that were hacked to pieces last year. I was digging in the dirt to make room for some pepper plants in the front cottage garden. A few good-looking vegetables are now planted in this garden, and last year bell pepper plants were being set down. The trowel blasted into a few white hyacinth bulbs below the surface that forgot to tell me where they were hiding.The pieces were cleaned off and planted with hope they would multiply like a starfish, each piece growing anew. It worked! This year, all pieces grew, and they all had blooms,…
  • The Undead Zombie Plants

    Swimray
    31 Mar 2014 | 7:13 pm
    A quick walk through the gardens last week showed the extent of winter's damage. Zombie plants are everywhere. They appear dead, but may be undead -- ready to spring up from the earth to grow among the living again.At a gardening lecture attended Saturday, everyone was wailing in anguish at the slow arrival of spring and the exceptionally harsh winter. One gardener complained that the temperatures dropped below the minimum temperatures of the USDA Hardiness Zone Map, not realizing its numbers are average low temperatures, not lowest. And then it snowed yesterday.Zombies inhabit the side…
  • Winter Walk Off

    Swimray
    20 Mar 2014 | 10:07 am
    Although a little late with this post, it was eventually completed (past the official deadline.) My winter walk-off was started on Monday, but then we were gifted a March snow storm for the record books. I started after the storm, but did not finish the walk or photos until sunny yesterday.My walk was around Old Town Alexandria. This year, I photographed things that were interesting to me.When temperatures warm, freeze, warm, and when there is no rain gutter, you get icicle lights.This is storefront to an interior decorator and furnishings store on the main commercial drag. Although…
  • Time To Wake Up

    Swimray
    9 Mar 2014 | 12:49 pm
    For the past three years or so, I have saved a few plants from the annual winter kill in order to replant in the spring. This is done either by keeping the plants going, or putting them into hibernation. I try out a new technique or two each year in the hope of having a better preservation success rate. The new tricks I am testing this year follow.CannaHere's how they roll. About three Pretoria canna tubers are planted in the garden in the spring. They easily grow and multiply during the summer, (not large enough to bloom until July) loving the hot humid weather we are noted for. The three…
  • Paper-Yellows

    Swimray
    8 Feb 2014 | 5:51 am
    Surprise the customers. I bought paperwhite narcissus at a local nursery last year after searching throughout town for the least expensive. I was buying for the master gardeners. I am VP of Training, and it was graduation time, when the rookie newbies were graduating from the training program to CERTIFIED master gardener status.It was a custom to hand out a small goodie bag to the graduates as they walked across the stage (front of the room) to receive their diplomas (certificates) and shake hands. I put together the best goodie bag ever with the extremely limited funds available. Included…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Garden Rant

  • Behind the Scenes: Making a Video Trailer for a Gardening Book by Evelyn Hadden

    Evelyn Hadden
    16 Apr 2014 | 12:53 am
    Recording the soundtrack in my front room with Boise Blues Society Directors.  Thanks, guys!!Left to right: Randy Reese, ‘Mojo’ Mike Witmer, James ‘JT’ Tyler, and Bobby Peters. Though it’s no longer a new idea, it seems odd to me that a gardening book would have a video trailer. How can a video—a very different medium—give a taste of what readers might experience? On the other hand, videos lend drama to their subjects, and though I’d hope a book would have more than enough personality to entice readers, we humans are wired to notice moving…
  • Wild within bounds by Elizabeth Licata

    Elizabeth Licata
    14 Apr 2014 | 5:23 am
    Believe it or not: After initially pouring some compost into the globular bottle, Latimer used a wire to carefully lower in a spiderwort seeding, and then added a pint of water to the mix. The bottle was sealed and placed in a sunny corner. Apparently, the bottle planting, started in 1960, has been thriving ever since, with the last watering in 1972. Whether this actually happened or not, there are so many reasons I love this story. I suppose it’s possible— I do have a four-year-old terrarium that I completely ignore with no ill effects that I can see—but that’s not the point. What is…
  • DCGardens.com and a Call for Photos and Videos by Susan Harris

    Susan Harris
    11 Apr 2014 | 5:13 am
    Thanks, Rant commenters, for your great suggestions for improving videos of gardens, like the videos I showed you last week of the National Arboretum in April.  I heard you that the photos were whizzing by too fast, and that most of you prefer the techno music over Vivaldi.  Pixelation and other technical points were mentioned, and then came a volunteer garden-video coach who lives near me!  She created this charming video of a garden tour in my town.  And a blogging pal across the country is joining in the public-garden-video craze (I can hope!). Photos and Videos Sought It’s time…
  • Through the Hand Lens: Pat Haragan’s Steady View by Allen Bush

    Allen Bush
    8 Apr 2014 | 2:06 pm
    Pat Haragan’s book signing and lecture at Whitehall House and Gardens on March 26th. I have dozens of floras sitting on cluttered bookshelves: from China to the Caucasus and from Kansas to Kentucky. Yet even more mileage is guaranteed from a new botanic investigation that covers territory closer to home—my neighborhood. I predict the pages of Pat Haragan’s “The Olmsted Parks of Louisville: A Botanical Field Guide” will soon become dog-eared. But why, you wonder, would such a narrow focus on local flora—nearly 1990 acres in five principal Louisville Olmsted Parks (Cherokee,…
  • Can a Video Attract Garden Visitors? by Susan Harris

    Susan Harris
    4 Apr 2014 | 6:06 am
    I’ve long had the notion that somehow short, viral-going videos showing the fabulousness of a garden that’s open to the public might increase visitorship – and thereby support for the garden.  And here in the D.C. area the poster child for a fabulous garden that could use some support is the National  Arboretum, which was hit hard by the last sequester (when WAS that?  And what the hell IS a sequester, anyway?).  Since then it’s been open just 4 days a week, and Arboretum-lovers would dearly love to get that situation corrected and back to normal – open seven…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Future House Farm

  • First Pruning

    6 Apr 2014 | 1:07 pm
    Two years ago we planted a plum tree out back. We have very little experience pruning, but we figured—What the hell, let's go for it. There is no established cone or goblet shape, I just didn't see how to do it. What we did do was eliminate any crossing branches and tall vertical spikes. Oh, and we made sure not to cut more than a third of the branches. In short, we shot from the hip and we're hoping for the best. I think it looks pretty damn good.
  • Mostly Tomatoes

    30 Mar 2014 | 11:26 am
    Our seedlings are doing great. I believe the number of tomato starts is somewhere between 100-125. A majority of these are determinate paste tomatoes for the community garden's market garden area. In a third tray we have a slew of greens and some flowers. 2014 is off to a solid start.
  • Planting Peas

    22 Mar 2014 | 3:05 pm
    The 2014 season has begun.
  • Applesauce

    23 Nov 2013 | 7:39 pm
    Today $20.00 in seconds became four gallons of applesauce. What's even cooler is that Jude and I got to spend some time together in the kitchen. His knife skills (for a kid who doesn't turn three for another month) are impressive.
  • Winterizing

    21 Nov 2013 | 5:38 am
    I'm not sure if this shot is pretty or perverse. Either way, our community garden water storage is ready for the freeze.  
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Lois de Vries' Garden Views

  • The Eagles Have Landed

    Lois J. de Vries
    29 Mar 2014 | 5:01 am
    The Duke Farms eagles, that is. By 7:17 this morning when the screenshot was taken, one chick had hatched and another was pipping. The third chick is not due until Sunday but, since the first two were late in arriving, it's likely the third one will be, as well. You can watch live at: http://www.dukefarms.org/en/Stewardship/WildlifeCams/eagle-cam/   The eagles' tree was downed by Hurricane
  • Orchids in Bloom

    Lois J. de Vries
    6 Mar 2014 | 1:13 pm
    Miltoniopsis Whether you like your orchid shows big or small, ‘tis the season. Stony Hill Farms’ 26th Annual Orchid Open House starts today and continues through Sunday, March 9th. It includes free lectures, and wine and cheese tasting stations hosted by vendors from Sussex County. Stony Hill’s orchid house is located along Route 24/513 West in Chester, NJ. Go slow along the driveway; it’s
  • Share The Love - give me a piece of your mind

    Lois J. de Vries
    7 Feb 2014 | 12:13 pm
    <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 <![endif]--> Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net Here’s your chance to play a part in shaping the future of Cultivating The Inner Gardener. Please take a few moments to weigh in and tell me a little about yourself, share your thoughts about how you prefer to receive information,
  • 2013: The Year in Review

    Lois J. de Vries
    8 Jan 2014 | 10:10 am
    <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 <![endif]-->           <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 <![endif]--> Where I’ve Been and Where I’m GoingLooking back. 2013 was a year of ups and downs and all-arounds during which I eventually returned to the place where my journey had begun. My connection with the natural world has always been a profoundly spiritual one and that is where
  • Cicada Van Winkle's Garden

    Lois J. de Vries
    4 Jun 2013 | 5:00 am
    Photo credit: cicadamania.com It’s National Garden Week and I thought it would be fun to follow on the heels of last week’s Brian Lehrer Show open phone segment by imagining what Cicada Van Winkle would think if he woke up in your garden today, after having been asleep for 17 years. <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 <![endif]-->So I’m calling on all garden bloggers and gardeners to
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Transatlantic Gardener

  • Was in hospital, now back home

    Graham Rice
    8 Apr 2014 | 4:27 pm
    Well, that was a surprise. Last Sunday morning, March 30th… Sitting at my desk… Chest pain… Heart attack! Off to the hospital in the ambulance… Sirens... Catheterization… Clear the blockage, put in a stent, off to bed for recovery. First twinge to resting in bed: five hours. Prognosis is excellent.Thank you to the great team at Morristown Medical Center in New Jersey. And thanks, too, to Patrick in the ambulance who distracted me from the grim possibilities with a great story about a bald eagle swooping down, while he and his father-in-law were ice fishing, and stealing their catch…
  • Lies I Told My Little Sister - World Premiere!

    Graham Rice
    29 Mar 2014 | 7:42 am
    A few days ago we returned from Tampa, FL following the World Premiere of the movie Lies I Told My Little Sister – written by my wife judy! – at the Gasparilla Film Festival. And what a treat it all was.The 200 seat theatre sold out. The film was awarded “Best Of The Fest” and a second screening scheduled for the following day. There were lively Q&As featuring judy, director William J. Stribling, producer Jonathan Weisbrod, cinematographer Alex Gallitano and actress Michelle Petterson. There were the red carpet interviews with the press and with Fox News (see below, click to…
  • New! Graham Rice @ Organic Gardening

    Graham Rice
    20 Mar 2014 | 9:18 am
    Great news today! I’m delighted to announce that today sees the start of another new venture for me, my own pages on the Organic Gardening magazine website – Graham Rice @ Organic Gardening. Every week I’ll be writing about perennials or annuals, trees or shrubs or vines or ground covers, and even the occasional ornamental edible. Native plants will, of course, feature and my special themes will include choosing attractive and dependable plants for different situations around the yard and around country; I’ll be highlighting gorgeous plant combinations; I’ll also be recommending…
  • Free online magazine for rock gardeners

    Graham Rice
    13 Mar 2014 | 6:21 am
    For most readers of Transatlantic Gardener, spring is here or it’s on the way – and, in spring, a gardener’s attention turns to… rock plants. And for the serious alpine plant nut, there’s nowhere more interesting to go than the International Rock Gardener magazine.This free – yes, free (but donations welcome) – monthly online-only magazine is published jointly by the Scottish Rock Garden Club and the Czech Prague Rock Garden Club and features authoritative yet very readable articles about rock plants and alpines of all kinds. I was especially struck by the issue from January…
  • Powerhouse Plant For All Seasons: Cyclamen coum

    Graham Rice
    6 Mar 2014 | 1:00 am
    Time for a look at another Powerhouse Plant, these are Plants For All Seasons - individual varieties which bring colour and interest to the garden for at least two seasons of the year. I feature over five hundred of them in my latest book, Powerhouse Plants, and every month in Gardeners' World, Britain’s top-selling garden magazine (and also available in the US) I focus on one very special Plant For All Seasons, highlighting three features of a single variety that bring color to the garden at different times of the year. This month, in the magazine, I feature Spiraea ‘Goldflame’…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    WashingtonGardener

  • Fenton Friday: Frozen Foods

    WashingtonGardener
    18 Apr 2014 | 9:26 am
    The Mid-Atlantic was hot by a late cold snap this week and it is still lingering. The past three nights have hit below freezing (or close to it) temperatures sending many of us gardeners scrambling to cover up newly planting seedlings and all our tender plants. I threw a cover cloth over my Broccoli, but left everything else exposed at the Fenton community garden plot. Most of the rest is below ground, or like the perennial Asparagus and Strawberries are fairly frost-proof.Between arctic wind blasts, I did manage to plant several rows of cool-season vegetable seeds. Those include: ~ Radish…
  • Video Wednesday: PlantBot Genetics

    WashingtonGardener
    16 Apr 2014 | 5:00 am
    If you are in the DC area, I highly recommend spending a few minutes at a clever, interactive art exhibit "PlantBot Genetics" at the Montgomery College TP/SS campus on the Maryland-DC border. The artworks are a satire of modern industrial agricultural practices, but really, even if you don't care a fig about GMO or Big Ag, I think you'll still get a kick out a dahlia plant that sing's Warrant's Cherry Pie at full blast.Here is a video of the Attackaratus. I promise the other "plants" in the exhibit are a lot more friendly.
  • A Monsoon for Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day

    WashingtonGardener
    15 Apr 2014 | 3:58 pm
    New Gnome Friend This month's Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day arrives with a huge rainstorm and dip in the temperatures. Just as we dared hope that spring had finally sprung, we are getting hit by this one-two punch. In between the winds and rain, I managed to run out in the garden and take this two photos. The gnome above is one of a set of three I bought at last weekend's Beltsville Garden Club plant sale. What do you think of him? One friend remarked that he is appallingly phallic. I think he (or she) is adorable.   Below is the Spring Snowflake (Leucojum), which resembles the…
  • Best Spots for Viewing Virginia Bluebells

    WashingtonGardener
    14 Apr 2014 | 9:43 am
    Favorite Bluebell Peeping Spots (updated from a previous blog post) Native Virginia Bluebells are unfurling all over the Mid-Atlantic this week. (Yes, it is not just all about the Cherry Blossom here in the DC area!) Get out to view masses of these special local wildflowers while they are at their peak over these next few weeks.I asked the folks on the Native Plants East discussion list for their bluebell peeping suggestions. Here are their combined responses:~ On Sunday, the Virginia bluebells were blooming at McCrillis Gardens in Bethesda, MD. Not sure about when they peak. - Eric Raun,…
  • How to Grow Virginia Bluebells

    WashingtonGardener
    14 Apr 2014 | 9:33 am
    Guest Blog by Carol AllenWhen I first moved into my then-rural neighborhood, deer sightings were a chance occurrence and I loved to ramble the TROT maintained horse paths through the adjacent Seneca State Park.  I had known of Virginia Bluebells (Mertensia virginiana) through pictures and maybe seeing one or two plants.  Nothing quite prepared me for that first spring! I had noticed the huge numbers of the emerging cluster of leaves where the horse path forded a stream and the banks were wide and gently sloped. I wondered what could possibly be so numerous. Some sort of alien…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    A Tidewater Gardener

  • Bloom Day - Nearly Missed It

    Les
    15 Apr 2014 | 4:51 pm
         On the way home from work today, it suddenly dawned on me that today was Bloom Day, and I was not sure I could pull it off. A big ugly front is passing through today bringing heavy downpours and tonight much colder temperatures. Fortunately, I was able to get home during a break in the rain and was able to get some shots. Even more fortunately, we are not expected to get any freezing weather
  • In the Moments

    Les
    3 Apr 2014 | 6:22 pm
         Spring is not so much a season, but a sequence of moments. Last week's buds are this week's blooms and next week's fallen blossoms. This year the winter that did not want to leave pushed many early blooms later into spring, and it seems like everything is happening all at once. Blink and you might miss it. (All of the pictures in
  • 2014 Winter Walk-Off Wrap-Up

    Les
    24 Mar 2014 | 6:23 pm
         Until early last week I was worried that few bloggers would join in my Winter Walk-Off, but a parade of last minute entries came in at the deadline. These late posts reminded me of my college days, staying up all night to finish a term paper. I remember boarding the city bus once, bleary eyed, to hand deliver a particularly onerous paper to a professor's house in a vain effort at beating a
  • Bloom Day - A Little More Light and a Little Less Cold

    Les
    15 Mar 2014 | 7:06 am
         I am not prepared to say we have turned a corner yet on the weather front, but we are almost at the end of the block. Just this past week crocus and daffodils came out to play, the camellias are opening, albeit slightly bruised, and the ever-resilient hellebores are fully open, late, but unphased by the hateful winter. I think I will make it, and you?
  • Longwood Gardens' Orchid Extravaganza

    Les
    12 Mar 2014 | 6:59 pm
    "Nothing succeeds like excess." - Oscar Wilde (and the Lady Violet)      Before heading to the Philadelphia Flower Show I found myself in a dark place. I was travelling the length of Delaware while listening to moody prog rock from the 70's, fighting a week-long cold, and watching the bleak winter landscape roll past. Until you near Wilmington, most of Delaware is fairly flat with the most
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    clay and limestone

  • A Few Favorite Flowers For Friday

    Gail
    18 Apr 2014 | 5:00 am
    Aquilegia canadensisColumbine is found in rich rocky woods, north-facing slopes, cliffs, ledges, pastures, and roadside banks. Native to all states east of the Rockies, except Louisiana. A Duskywing skipper feeds on the leaves and hummingbirds seek out its nectar.Phacelia bipinnatifida Purple Phacelia is common biennial wildflower in Middle Tennessee where it's found growing in moist woodlands and rocky slopes. Phacelia is all about the bees and that makes this gardener happy. Trillium luteum Yellow trillium can be found in deciduous forests, open woods and along rocky stream banks…
  • Wildflower Wednesday: False Rue Anemone

    Gail
    26 Mar 2014 | 3:00 am
    My little pocket wildflower garden is waking up!It was my first wildflower garden. The False Rue Anemone and Dutchman's Breeches were already growing there and I transplanted Trillium from the way back woodland and Toothwort and Spring Beauties from the now disappeared front lawn. Their dormant roots are sheltered by The Dancing Tree and a large Shag Bark Hickory during the hot summer months, but, they magically reappear each spring. Eastern False Rue-anemone, False Rue Anemone or Enemion biternatum is a sweet little Spring ephemeral in the Buttercup family (Ranunculaceae). It's native to…
  • The Spring Ephemerals Are Awake!

    Gail
    19 Mar 2014 | 5:00 am
    The soil had barely warmed up before they pushed out and began to unfurl their leaves and buds.   leaves trap warm air to protect the buds from spring cold snaps Such remarkable and fragile beauties. Ephemerals emerge early each spring, taking advantage of the rich, moist soil and full sunlight streaming through the bare branches of the deciduous trees. In the short period of time before the tree canopy emerges and blocks the sunlight they must grow, leaf-out, flower, be pollinated, produce seeds and die back (retreat underground).the earliest to bloom are closer to the warm…
  • A Practically Perfect Panicum

    Gail
    6 Mar 2014 | 8:15 am
    Those of us who have been gardening with Panicums probably aren't at all surprised that Panicum virgatum 'Northwind' has become so popular. It's an outstanding native grass with a graceful upright form, year round beauty, deer resistance, cold and heat hardiness, good wildlife value, drought tolerance and soil adaptability. It's been named the 2014 Perennial Plant of the Year™by the Perennial Plant Association* and that's pretty cool! While P virgatum 'Northwind' is relatively new to the garden scene (1992), Panicum virgatum has a long history on this continent. It's native to the tall…
  • Wildflower Wednesday: Shrubs in a Wildflower Garden

    Gail
    26 Feb 2014 | 3:00 am
    I am crazy about the shrubs I've added to my garden. They're all lovely, some more than others, but, each brings something more to the table than good looks...they have good wildlife value.Lindera benzoin host plant for Spicebush Swallowtail butterflyIn fact, nearly every plant has been chosen with birds, insects and other critters in mind. My native shrubs  provide food, nesting and shelter for mammals and birds, as well as being a host plant to butterflies, moths and other insects that keep my wildflower garden thriving.  Euonymus americanusWhen we bought our house 28 years ago…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Dirt Therapy

  • Our house is for sale

    Phillip Oliver
    18 Apr 2014 | 4:58 pm
    This is a sad post to write. Our house and garden went on the market today. I have had an odd, disconnected feeling all day - one minute sad, one minute scared and the next excited. I may need therapy before it is over and done with!We have lived in this house for 22 years. The house was built in 1924 and we were only the fourth owners. It is a wonderful sound house with lots of character and you all know what the gardens are like! We have put a lot of blood, sweat and tears into the house and garden and it will be difficult to give it up but it is time to move onto the next phase of our…
  • April showers

    Phillip Oliver
    15 Apr 2014 | 9:27 am
    The April rains are really causing the garden to go into overdrive. Everything is popping out all over. The white wisteria has started to bloom as well as the spirea. I've never seen so many blooms on Leathleaf Viburnum (Viburnum rhytidophyllumThe pink blooms to the right of it are on the Piedmont Azalea (Rhododendron canescens) The Kerria (Kerria japonica) continues to shine - I could not find a good viewpoint without getting the oakleaf in the photo. :(  I love these Spanish Bluebells (Hyacinthoides hispanica) - they are among my favorite bulbs. The blooms on the Chinese…
  • Tulips at UNA

    Phillip Oliver
    11 Apr 2014 | 3:45 pm
    I have been admiring these tulips everyday as I leave the library. We have had a few that have come back year to year but generally, tulips are treated as annuals here and planted every year.  They are beautiful but I can't figure out why they only planted 1/4 of the bed? Text and photos by Phillip Oliver, Dirt Therapy
  • Transplanting Large Oakleaf Hydrangeas

    Phillip Oliver
    9 Apr 2014 | 4:19 pm
    A few weeks ago, Michael moved out of his salon (he sold it back in December but the new owner let him rent it until April 1). I had planted various shrubs and trees on the strip behind his salon that separates the salon from another parking lot. He kept telling me that I should dig up two large oakleaf hydrangeas because they were so pretty and who knows what will happen to the plants.In the meantime, a rather large Colorado Blue Spruce that I planted in our front garden the first year we moved into the house (1992) has continued to deterioate and several of the lower branches had died. I…
  • Spring is here

    Phillip Oliver
    5 Apr 2014 | 3:08 pm
    I love this time of year when everything seems to pop out overnight. I've noticed a few losses from our tough winter - at least one rose bit the dust ("Felicia") and the rosemary also looks like a total loss. Some of the obviously tender plants like the Armandi clematis and Sweet Olive (Osmanthus fragrans) survived but there are lots of brown leaves. The jury is still out on the Confederate Jasmine (Trachelosperum jasminoides). I have cut it back severely but it looks like it is still alive. Ditto on the Carolina Jessamine (Gelsemium sempervirens).But, on to the brighter spots in the garden -…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Natural Gardening

  • greens in flats

    Lisa
    17 Apr 2014 | 6:09 pm
    I've found that growing greens in flats is definitely rewarding.  They're often above the reach of woodchucks (like this flat on my potting bench) and they're easy to harvest, too, as baby greens, with a cut-and-cut-again approach, for several cycles.mixed greens in a flatIt's been an unusual year for spring greens -- they're bolting now everywhere, if they were planted early, or overwintered. It's a bit early, perhaps, for bolting, but the cold-warm-cold weather patterns have encouraged flowering, I'm thinking.
  • Coral honeysuckle

    Lisa
    15 Apr 2014 | 6:17 pm
    Coral honeysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens) is probably my favorite native vine.  It wants to go up, without popping up everywhere else (or being too rampant in its growth).  When it's happy, it's totally delightful.We have a number of really nice looking plants now (put in at various times).  Some look better in wetter years; others flourish in hotter and drier years.This one, next to the porch, is looking great, after a year with MORE than abundant rain (and I just noticed that it's jumped up to the porch railing, too!)  That's not necessarily where I want it, but it's…
  • A last flirt with cold weather?

    Lisa
    14 Apr 2014 | 4:29 pm
    The temperatures up in the mountains are predicted to get down to 27°F, as the Tuesday night low.  Brrr.  Happily, my mountain beds only have cool-season greens, lettuce, beets, and sugar snap peas! I'm hoping for a cool April and May so maybe I'll actually have something to harvest.Here in the Piedmont, my fingerling potatoes are sprouting nicely (especially evident in the grow bag) and my flats of spinach, lettuce, and mixed greens look pretty decent, too. The garlic, leeks, and chives are all doing well, too, undeterred by a cool March, apparently. I've snagged…
  • Finally, the first hummingbird(s) of the season

    Lisa
    10 Apr 2014 | 6:45 pm
    Yesterday evening, eating dinner on the porch, my gardening companion said "there's a hummingbird"  -- woo-hoo!  I didn't see it, but heard the whirring wings.This morning, out my study window, was perhaps the same hummingbird, visiting Carolina Jessamine flowers.And we saw another one this evening.There are certainly good nectar-producing plants (for hummingbirds) in flower now in our garden coral honeysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens), red buckeye (Aesculus pavia), columbine (Aquilegia canadensis) and crossvine (Bignonia capreolata).The early arrivals don't always cross paths with…
  • Greening begins

    Lisa
    6 Apr 2014 | 6:15 pm
    Coming down the Blue Ridge Escarpment this evening, the trees looked different. Leaves are emerging. Greening has begun.It still looked like winter, when I drove "up the hill" to the mountains on Thursday, but not anymore.  The soft greens, pinkish-greens, and pale greens of new foliage were evident across the landscape today.I wished that I'd had an opportunity to stop and take a photo -- I had my camera, but coming down the escarpment is steep, and there's not really a pull-off opportunity.But spring green is welcome, for sure, after an unusually long winter.Interesting to search my…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Outside Clyde

  • Spring At Client # 1's

    Christopher C. NC
    17 Apr 2014 | 6:47 pm
    I have not planted any tulips in this garden for three or four years after the great varmint feasting swept through one winter and ate hundreds of them along with all the lily bulbs and a few hosta. That spring's bulb show was cancelled. It was mostly daffodils planted from then on. These purple tulips were spared. After all these years it is beginning to dawn on me that
  • Turned To Mush

    Christopher C. NC
    16 Apr 2014 | 6:36 pm
    There was significant freeze damage. It was very hit or miss. Some things got zapped and some didn't and it very much fell along plant species lines. Some plant species took the sudden freeze with a low of 20 in stride and others got zapped. Any Asiatic lily that had poked its head up did not fair well. My new Ostrich Fern with the unfurling fresh green fronds is mush. It
  • A Snowy April Bloom Day

    Christopher C. NC
    15 Apr 2014 | 5:30 pm
    We've gone from 75 to 25 in 48 hours. The last 25 degrees was lost very quickly this morning in a cold rain that changed over to sleet. We won't discuss the current wind chill. Will the faint pinkish white blooms of the Serviceberry tree in the top left make it through the cold?  Flowers that open in 75 don't often make it through 25. Bloom seasons get shortened. I
  • In The Garden Before A freeze

    Christopher C. NC
    14 Apr 2014 | 6:04 pm
    There is a quick hard freeze, mid 20's, coming for Wednesday morning and a possible lighter freeze for Thursday. This is par for the course. It is only mid April, a full month before our last average annual frost date. We shall see what will happen. Good or bad, the garden will grow on. In the meantime, enjoy the abundance of a Bulbapaloozathon high on the low spot of a
  • Other Than Daffodils

    Christopher C. NC
    13 Apr 2014 | 6:15 pm
    The daffodils dominate the garden during their time. They are not the only things blooming though. Other floral forms can be found out there. The double petaled Bloodroot has returned for a second season. I take this to mean it has settled in well. Now it needs to multiply. The Bleeding Heart is back and blooming much better this year. In its first spring in the garden the
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Growing The Home Garden

  • Win a Firepit and Grill for the Garden!

    17 Apr 2014 | 6:11 am
    How would you like to add a firepit and a grill to your garden at the same time?  Well today you get your chance!  The people at Serenity Health and Home Decor have given me the go ahead to give away this amazing firepit/grill. All you have to do is comment in the comment section of this post on Growing The Home Garden and you will be entered to win.  The winner will be randomly selected at the end of next week.  Entries will be accepted until Midnight (CST) on Friday April 25th.  I'll announce the winner on the following Monday.  Please feel free to share this…
  • Preparing for a Freeze or Frost

    15 Apr 2014 | 6:23 am
    Middle Tennessee and much of the south is expected to receive a freeze tonight.  We all know how damaging a freeze could be and we have no to look no further back than 2007 to see the results.  That year many gardeners lost trees like Japanese maples and crape myrtles due to the flow of sap in the trunks freezing overnight which then split the bark.  Unfortunately we can't alter the weather on demand so we have to prepare our gardens for the cold temperatures. Tips to Protect Plants from a Freeze or Frost:Use plastic only if you can make sure the plastic does not touch the…
  • Five-Plant Gardens by Nancy Ondra (Book Review)

    11 Apr 2014 | 6:28 am
    Available on AmazonRecently I was given the opportunity to check out Nancy Ondra's latest book called Five-Plant Gardens. Nancy Ondra writes the blog Hayefield and has written several other books including The Perennial Care Manual.  She is definitely what I consider and expert on perennial plants! This latest book isn't about the care of the plants it's about how to go about creating a sustainable plan for your perennial garden.  If you are passionate about perennials then this book can help you plan a fantastic perennial garden that will return each year. Five-Plant Gardens does…
  • What is a Dandelion Good For?

    8 Apr 2014 | 6:17 am
    One of the most despised "weeds" in the lawn is the dandelion.  All sorts of chemical companies offer ways to get rid of them and get your "perfect" lawn.  It's too bad that we seek to eliminate this little flower because they have so many healthy benefits!  What is a Dandelion good for?  I'm glad you asked!The Benefits of DandelionsDandelions (Taraxacum officinale) are highly nutritious.  One cup of dandelion greens chopped up contains 112% of recommended daily value of Vitamin A, 32% Vitamin C, 9% Vitamin E, and 535% Vitamin K.  Dandelions contain calcium,…
  • Two Easy Projects For Patio Entertaining!

    4 Apr 2014 | 6:11 am
    Spring is in full swing here in Tennessee and that means people everywhere are headed outdoors.  Some to play, some to work, and others to just hang out on the front porch with glass of sweet tea.  That's what we do here in the south, sweet tea on the front porch.  This week I put together two small and very easy to do projects that will help with that front porch entertaining!  And because this is a gardening blog I used garden items to complete both of these projects.  What did I make?  A table/cooler/storage unit out of a pot and a sidetable from a plant…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Sharing Nature's Garden

  • Antique Rose Emporium in Brenham filled with vintage garden charm

    Diana
    15 Apr 2014 | 5:12 am
    The first stop my friend Pam, of Digging, and I made on our way to a delightful gardening weekend  Houston was at the Antique Rose Emporium.  Sadly, with our late Texas spring, we arrived before all the roses were in bloom.  We saw buds galore, though.In spite of missing the roses in bloom, the rest of this destination nursery's gardens were filled with beautiful plants, charming vignettes, and lovely gift shops.We were greeted upon our arrival by this beautiful monarch - having second breakfast on a lantana bloomAs I was perusing the plant table with 4" pots, I was suprised to…
  • Cottage garden entwined with beautiful edibles highlight of Houston trip

    Diana
    13 Apr 2014 | 8:32 am
    We saw lots of interesting, beautiful and creative gardens when my friend, Pam, of Digging, and I visited Houston for the Garden Conservancy's Open Day Tour two weeks ago.My very favorite -- a cacophony of color, texture and layers so entwined that taking it all in was a project in and of itself.  But a delightful one, not to be missed.It wasn't on the tour; it was recommended by Pam's sister.  We had high expectations for the house at 605 Peddie Street, and we weren't disappointed.  The owner, landscape consultant, Terry Gordon Smith, was hand watering the garden with a hose…
  • Whimiscal garden art makes Arbor Gate Nursery in Tomball a must-see visit

    Diana
    7 Apr 2014 | 5:07 am
    What would a weekend garden tour trip be without a nursery tour to go along with it?Not as much fun, that's for sure.  So when my friend, Pam, of Digging, planned our Houston Garden Conservancy Open Days trip last weekend, we had two nurseries on our fun-filled itinerary:  The Antique Rose Emporium in Brenham (I'll post about it soon), and The Arbor Gate in Tomball, a whimsical destination nursery packed with garden art of every imaginable type.They describe their nursery as: "an inspired collection that includes unusual plants, artisan-created decorative pieces, and a constantly…
  • Houston tour reveals hidden 'secret garden' treasures...around every corner

    Diana
    5 Apr 2014 | 9:23 pm
    Overflowing with gorgeous azalea blooms in full splendor, this garden was a stand out on the Garden Conservancy's Houston Open Days tour last weekend.The entrance to this estate was very subdued and formal.  My expectations were set as we walked across the boxwood-lined circular entrance.I was amused to see another tour visitor peering into the windows of the house.  It's something we've all thought about doing at one point or another, but I've never actually seen anyone pressed up against the door, fogging up the glass! Across the gravel, an iron gate beckons with a hint of…
  • Old-world patina of New Orleans style captured in inviting Houston tour garden...

    Diana
    1 Apr 2014 | 6:07 am
    Last weekend,  my friend and fellow blogger, Pam Penick, traveled to Houston for the Garden Conservancy's Open Day's Tour.   This was probably my favorite house on the tour.Located in the posh River Oaks, the New Orleans-style theme of the home was carried throughout the multi-layered gardens surrounding it.  The old brick, wrought iron and garden charm of plants typically found in old gardens really appealed to me. Not only was the wisteria cascading down the front balcony beautiful, its heady scent helped to set the mood for the tour visitors.This garden incorporated…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Transplantable Rose

  • In like a Lion and Out like a Shorn Lamb

    Annie in Austin
    1 Apr 2014 | 11:00 pm
    This post about my garden in Austin, Texas was written by Annie in Austin for her Transplantable Rose blog. Did my February post listing all the trees in the garden put a hex on them? This part of the privacy screen looked pretty good six weeks ago. By the first of March tiny leaves and buds had appeared on Spiraea, Redbud, roses, Arizona Ash, Fig and dwarf Pomegranate, and flower buds swelled on the native Texas Mountain Laurel But then came the March 3rd-4th Thundersleet that bent the Loropetalum to the groundWhile the iced Oleander leaned over to block the steps to the drivewayThe trees…
  • The Trees that Grow in my Garden

    Annie in Austin
    13 Feb 2014 | 5:06 pm
    A few days ago fellow Central Texas garden blogger Laura at Wills Family Acres wrote about the trees growing on her 2-acre property. It was fascinating to see the large numbers of live oaks and cedars on her plot, and also fun to see how many trees she and her family had planted. I really liked the idea, and decided to copy Laura and make my own Tree Inventory post. After subtracting the area covered by driveway, hardscape & house from my quarter acre lot the remaining plantable area is pretty small... how hard could it be to count the trees on 1/8 of an acre? "This should be a cinch," I…
  • When A Ginger Is Just A "Ginger"

    Annie in Austin
    8 Aug 2013 | 4:28 pm
    This post was written by Annie in Austin for her Transplantable Rose blog. What do you think of when you hear "Ginger plant"? The first one that comes to my mind is Hedychium coronarium, the fragrant white-flowering ginger, also called Hawaiian White Ginger or Butterfly Ginger. I brought a tiny root back from the airport gift shop in Hawaii more than a decade ago and have it growing in a few places in my garden. I can still remember how thrilling it was when my plant first bloomed in 2004.  You can find fancier, named varieties of Hedychium with larger flowers in many colors but I still…
  • A surprisingly Pleasant, Rainy GBBD for July, 2013

    Annie in Austin
    15 Jul 2013 | 10:42 pm
    This post was written by Annie in Austin for her Transplantable Rose blog.   Rain is a big deal here, and it rained today! I watched through the kitchen window as the rain ran down the chain into the barrel and then stood on the front porch listening to the welcome sound. Instead of dust we had raindrops. Instead of the 104°F of Saturday afternoon, temperatures on Monday afternoon never broke 80°F.  The chance to make a Garden Blogger Bloom Day post featuring petals and leaves dampened by raindrops doesn't come along very often! I caught a few photos, mostly of plants near…
  • When the Garden Is In Heat

    Annie in Austin
    29 Jun 2013 | 2:33 pm
    This post was written by Annie in Austin for her Transplantable Rose blog.  The plants aren't howling and writhing like cats in heat, but gardeners in Austin would probably like to howl today...Even though my garden has a lot of shifting, filtered shade, the combination of sun and heat makes the blossoms on some plants change color. Here's 'Vi's Apricot' daylily on May 1st - there is a rosy blush over the petalsThe first flush of blooms finished weeks ago, but the daylily sent up more stalks and is now reblooming. The flowers have lost the rosy blush, but the diamond-dusting shows up…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Kiss my Aster!

  • Reconstructed Rabbit

    Kiss My Aster!
    16 Apr 2014 | 11:01 am
    I had a little purple glitter in my dinner last night. Here's why:I made this insane, glittered, purple, yard bunnyHe didn't always look like that. In fact, those are totally prosthetic paws! His original paws cracked off in a bizarre snow melt incident. And he had a banged up ear, too. I'm sure anyone else would have... hey, how do you dispose of an unwanted cement garden creature? Bury it?So I patched him up, but once he was whole again I had to find a way to make him look like he was never patched. And if glitter doesn't hide all the flaws, what does?Patching his earpatching the…
  • Small, Cheap and Hardy: Tiny Roses

    Kiss My Aster!
    14 Apr 2014 | 1:36 pm
    Those tiny little rose bushes you see at the grocery this time of year--The ones that look like they'll be dead in a week? Those little effers come from Canada and TEND to be hardy as all get out. Planting these this year and I'll keep you updated on their awesomeness.
  • Kitschy Easter-Themed Front Door Containers

    Kiss My Aster!
    11 Apr 2014 | 12:56 pm
    I went all out at the front door for Easter this year. Not my favorite holiday but my kid is almost 3 and she is OBSESSED with the whole thing. I totally enjoyed putting this together. But let me start with the BEFORE photo:Winter pots, in April. Not such a pretty thing. I'm happy with how the big pot with greens in it held up throughout the polar vortex and all-but holy guacamole, I was DONE looking at this.Now, here's SPRING!I think he chair needs a pillow, no?Here: butterfly chair from the thrift store, 3 vintage coolers and an old thermos, all thrifted, some Cynthia Rowley garden tools I…
  • Mud-Life Crisis

    Kiss My Aster!
    9 Apr 2014 | 1:45 pm
    A year ago, I quit my fancy-pants, high-end landscaping job that I totally loved... because it made me miserable. Really great things were happening to me outside of work every day, I had a badass book that had just been released, I was touring the country promoting it, we moved into my dream house*, my kid is cuter than a baby Ewok... I had no time to appreciate it because my mind was always girdled with work. And seriously, it was just landscaping. So, I quit and I've been trying to figure out what I want to be when I grow up since then. I tried a few part-time jobs and they were nice, but…
  • Photos From Succulents Workshop at the Chicago Public Library Maker Lab

    Kiss My Aster!
    3 Apr 2014 | 8:00 am
    I brought some cool stuff for a workshop on Monday at the Makers Lab at the Harold Washington Library. Here's what got made:I made the two on the left- succulents in a Pyrex bowl and Glass Bake dish used as planters with aquarium gravel toppers!Roseville pottery vase on the right, diamond shaped candy dish on the left. Succulent planters made by a workshop attendee I love this trio of succulent planters made by a workshop attendee This is pretty kick assThe duck makes itMy photo sucks, this thing was awesomeOne of my favorites from class, awesome Fire King mug filled with a…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    My Skinny Garden

  • Super Easy Potluck Finger Sandwiches With Homemade Pimento Cheese

    7 Apr 2014 | 6:21 pm
    When it comes to potlucks I have two options in my wheelhouse. If it's a snacky type potluck I dump a bottle of cocktail sauce over a block of cream cheese and throw some Club Crackers on the side. For the super fancy potlucks with proper dishes I always bring mini pimento cheese sandwiches.My friends love these and since several people have asked me for the recipe I thought I'd finally post it here along with a super easy way to make mini finger sandwiches.I never appreciated pimento cheese growing up in the South but I found a great recipe one day when I was feeling nostalgic for food my…
  • Brass and Smoked Glass Console Table

    21 Mar 2014 | 11:57 am
    I've been eyeing this console table at one of my favorite thrift stores for weeks. I can't decide if it just keeps being there because it's waiting for me to buy it or if it's just crazy ugly. Every week this table is like "I'm still here, Gina. You know you want me!"As you may have noticed from my refreshed logo, Me and gold stuff are in love.I'm thrilled that gaudy 70's and 80's stuff is back in decorating. I am mesmerized by this particular gold or brass or whatever it is. Shiny! And the shape of the table with its crisp, hard lines and sharp corners that are so much more awesome than…
  • On Whether Or Not To Change My Blog Name

    11 Mar 2014 | 10:27 am
    Does anybody even read this anymore?You guys, I want really badly to change the name of my blog and I'm having a mini freak out about it. I asked Google what to do and was directed to a bunch of other blogs that said I should basically ask you. At first I was all PA LEEZEEE...NOBODY EVEN READS THAT ABANDONED BLOG ANYMORE! But then I realized there's one way to find out.As evident by my lack of posting over the last couple of years I'm kind of over gardening. I can't decide if it's my lack of stickwithitness or if I've truly been defeated by the bindweed but it's just not that fun anymore. I…
  • Forest Park 2nd Annual Apple Pie Bake-Off Nov 3, 2013

    26 Oct 2013 | 6:31 pm
    www.fpcommunitygarden.orgGet your tickets here
  • On Buying Ugly Chairs Then Wanting To Run Away From Home

    4 May 2013 | 11:19 am
    Please have a seat in the lobby and I'll be right with you. Oh wait, that's my living room!Here's a design tip I learned today. If you are thinking of purchasing any piece of furniture and you find yourself sending urgent emails to decorators, posting pictures on social networks asking all your friends and family to please help you decide if you should buy it, you shouldn't buy it!In these chairs' defense, they are in impeccable condition. The ad said they were high end chairs with high end fabric and I believe it. They seem brand new. But my God! Please send me back to earlier this morning…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Our Little Acre

  • Bag Balm: It's Udderly Wonderful!

    Kylee Baumle
    15 Apr 2014 | 11:06 am
    Okay, I'll admit that's a corny title for a blog post.  But it's true.  When I was contacted last week about sharing the good news about Bag Balm with my readers, I jumped at the chance.  You see, I've been using Bag Balm since my parents and grandparents used it on me for all kinds of things when I was a little girl.Bag Balm comes in a 10 oz. tin, plus this cute 1 oz. mini tin, which is justperfect for travel!Bag Balm has been in our family households for longer than I am old.  My grandma will be 100 years old on December 26th and I'm pretty sure she was a young 'un when…
  • Do You Know What Type of Soil You Have?

    Kylee Baumle
    11 Apr 2014 | 8:34 pm
    When I took Master Gardener classes a few years ago, we looked at soil maps that plotted the soil type in our county.  What I found fascinating is how accurate it was.  Romie and I had remarked once how you could dig a hole to plant a tree in one part of the yard and just 20 feet away, the soil was entirely different.  One was heavy, mucky clay, and the other was noticeably less sticky.If you have clay soil, you'll recognize this!A friend of mine shared a website earlier today on Facebook that looked intriguing, so I thought I'd share it with you. Kelly posted a link to…
  • Home & Garden Spring Show 2014 - Defiance, OH

    Kylee Baumle
    10 Apr 2014 | 1:02 pm
    When many home and garden shows are falling by the wayside, Defiance, Ohio, stepped out with one of their own with the Home & Garden Spring Show, in its debut year.  Held in March at the Defiance College Athletic Center, more than 100 vendors opened the spring season with plenty of ideas for homeowners.My husband and I, with granddaughter Hannah in tow, spent some time at the show on a sunny Saturday.Expecting daughter, Kara, joined us and gave us a personal tour of the show, as she works for Clear Channel Media+ Entertainment, presenters of the show in conjunction with ProMedica…
  • Homemade Maple Syrup - It's a Wrap!

    Kylee Baumle
    9 Apr 2014 | 1:29 pm
    Maple sap normally looks clear like water, but as the seasondraws to a close, it becomes cloudy.Our first year at maple sap collecting and maple syrup making is in the books.  And it couldn't have been easier.The collecting season can last from two to six weeks, depending on the weather.  This year, for us here in northwest Ohio, it lasted about four weeks. We knew it was time to start when daytime temperatures reached above freezing, while nighttime ones dipped below that point.How did we know when to stop?  Once the nighttime temperatures stayed at freezing or above, the sap…
  • Maple Water: Drink to Your Health!

    Kylee Baumle
    30 Mar 2014 | 8:50 pm
    We've been collecting maple sap for about three weeks now and with only three maple trees large enough for tapping, I had no idea we'd get as much as we've gotten.  We've collected 35 gallons of sap so far and it's still flowing. I'm pretty sure that all three trees that we tapped are silver maples, which is fourth in line for sugar content. The usual ratio of sap to syrup is about 40:1, but ours is running more like 25:1, meaning it takes about 25 gallons of sap to make one gallon of syrup.The sugar content can vary year to year, depending on the weather, so maybe this was a "high sugar…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Our Twenty Minute Kitchen Garden

  • Transplanting Strawberries: How to help them thrive!

    20 Minute Jan
    15 Apr 2014 | 11:43 am
    When the school program where I work was preparing to move to a new building, I heard about the abandoned garden in the schoolyard– and the strawberries. Another teacher expressed dismay that the strawberries would be left behind, that is, if they had survived. Since I was returning to the building another day, I brought […] The post Transplanting Strawberries: How to help them thrive! appeared first on Our Twenty Minute Kitchen Garden. Related posts: Transplanting Rhubarb ...a clump of rhubarb plants from our kitchen garden in... Naturalizing Daffodils=Surprises in My Lawn Are…
  • Gardening as Protest: Activists Planted Tulips in Potholes in the Ukraine

    Jardinier
    12 Apr 2014 | 4:10 pm
    Reports from around the internet say that activists in the Ukraine launched a unique protest on the terrible condition of roads. Unknown protesters planted tulips and other flowers in potholes along major streets. I haven’t been able to track down the original source for this report. I note that our roads are pretty terrible too […] The post Gardening as Protest: Activists Planted Tulips in Potholes in the Ukraine appeared first on Our Twenty Minute Kitchen Garden. Related posts: Take a Class or Workshop to Learn More about Gardening In the life of a gardener, winter is the…
  • Pop-up Rain Barrel Workshop from Project Grow

    20 Minute Jan
    11 Apr 2014 | 8:44 am
    Local gardening heroes Project Grow will host a Pop-up Rain Barrel Workshop on Saturday, April 19 from 12:30pm – 2:30pm at The Yellow Barn located at 416 West Huron in Ann Arbor. The cost of building your own take-home-and-install rain barrel is $65. Participants will assemble their own rain barrel with help from Project Grow […] The post Pop-up Rain Barrel Workshop from Project Grow appeared first on Our Twenty Minute Kitchen Garden. Related posts: Build your own Rain Barrel at a Project Grow Workshop this Saturday On Saturday, February 25, Project Grow will host a “Build...
  • 5 Reasons to plant a vegetable garden this year… even if you’ve never done it before!

    Jardinier
    10 Apr 2014 | 7:12 am
    If you’ve ever wanted to have a vegetable garden, this is the year you should begin. No matter what scale you embark on — and we advise small to start — you’ll get satisfaction and more from gardening. Here are 5 reasons you should plant a vegetable garden this season: 1. Appreciate your food more […] The post 5 Reasons to plant a vegetable garden this year… even if you’ve never done it before! appeared first on Our Twenty Minute Kitchen Garden. Related posts: Plant an (almost) Instant Kitchen Garden this Weekend Maybe this was the year you planned to…
  • Festifools 2014: a great day for a great parade

    20 Minute Jan
    6 Apr 2014 | 2:36 pm
    It was a grand day for FestiFools 2014. The sun was shining, no wind, no rain, and a boisterous crowd turned out to watch giant puppets circulate the Main Street route in downtown Ann Arbor. Such a large crowd was on hand that people were standing 5 or 6 deep in spots, which made getting […] The post Festifools 2014: a great day for a great parade appeared first on Our Twenty Minute Kitchen Garden. Related posts: FestiFools 2011 and The Magic of Pole Beans 20 Minute Jan and I participated this year in FestiFools,... Local Crowdfunding Feast at Ann Arbor SOUP In spite of the cold weather…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Gardens of Petersonville

  • The Charm of Columbine

    Sheila
    14 Apr 2014 | 10:09 am
    Every garden, not matter how well planned and thought out, should always have a bit of whimsey and surprise, especially for the gardener that tends that garden. Nothing is more charming than self-seeding plants like columbine, also know as  aquilegia. A drought resistant perennial that shows up in the spring and comes in a number of different colors like this purple one or pink, white, yellow or red, they have sweet, clover-like foliage and are actually considered a staple of rock gardens. Deadheading will keep them blooming until it starts getting too warm, then be sure to leave some of…
  • Euphorbias

    Sheila
    13 Apr 2014 | 1:15 pm
     Before I forget and get carried away with the flashier flowering plants of spring and summer, let me say how much I love euphorbias in the garden. It is another plant I grow for the colorful foliage. I have them tucked in here and there and have long since lost the botanical names of each kind that I have, and there are so very many kinds of euphorbias that I couldn't even begin to guess. Most of the ones I have bloom in the chartreuse color family (it is actually the flower brackets you see because the flowers themselves are very small and insignificant) because I think they set…
  • Bee Hive Hose Covers

    Sheila
    12 Apr 2014 | 10:03 am
    For those of you that have asked me about the beehive hose covers (the gray mound at the base of the column in the picture) that are tucked in throughout my SJC gardens and were disappointed to learn that my source no longer carried them, good news! I just noticed that they are once again available at the Wisteria Catalog! Just a coincidence that the only picture I could find with the hose cover in my garden is covered with wisteria!
  • Focusing on Foliage

    Sheila
    10 Apr 2014 | 8:32 am
     Although this time of year is all about showy flowers, I have to give some space to the month-in, month-out performers that look good all year round with little or no care. In this case it is ligularia. An old fashioned perennial that is grown more for its foliage than the tall yellow flowers that I actually cut off as soon as they appear. I grow three varieties including the white variegated one in the top picture that was just divided and spread throughout the Moonlight Garden where it does very well. It thrives with early morning sun and stays about 12 to 18 inches high and is very…
  • A Gravel Garden Update

    Sheila
    9 Apr 2014 | 10:11 am
     I was recently asked for an update on the Gravel Garden by a reader, so here it is. As is the case with any low maintenance area, not much changes back here, at least not quickly.  You can see though, that the screening shrubs between our property and the neighbors are continuing to thin. This is in part due to the demise of the oleanders in the area due to oleander scorch disease and just the normal growth of the overhead plants shading out the under plantings. We planted Carolina cherries (Prunus caroliniana) to replace the dying oleander and continue to plant vines and…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Am I Bugging You Yet?

  • Syrphid Snapshots

    vanessa cardui
    30 Mar 2014 | 11:26 am
    The Aloe plicatalis is blooming again and I caught this syrphid fly snacking at one of the flowers on a sunny recent day.The fly adjourned to another flower to clean itself off:First the rearThen the face.Cute as they are, syphids are still flies after all.  Not sure of the species on this one; my lack of a dorsal view makes it hard to use the distinctive bee-like coloration and pattern for help in identification.
  • Notes on Transition through Spring

    vanessa cardui
    20 Mar 2014 | 8:36 pm
    Hello again.Found this dead moth in the planter 'neath the mailbox.  It's a white lined sphinx moth, Hyles lineata.    The larval food includes elm; could this moth have grown as a caterpillar way up in the elm canopy over the mailbox and planter of its ultimate resting place?  Or did it feed on the portulaca growing in someone else's yard. Either way, it's spent adult body is now food for ants.  My last post on this species was almost exactly one year ago; I guess that means something.Dried tulips from a funeral bouquet rest atop my rust-colored metal mesh…
  • 2013 Winter Solstice Bug Hunt and Count

    vanessa cardui
    29 Dec 2013 | 5:20 pm
    Whew!  It's a lot of working trying to find buggies in the scorching winter weather we're having here in SoCal.  Didn't quite get to the count on the 21st . . . sorry traditionalists (which btw includes myself)!  Yesterday and today have been in the 80s with a dry Santa Ana wind blowing.  Typically I get some out of the ordinary bug sightings in any season with a strong wind.  I guess when you weigh that little you get blown around a bit. Not this time, really, as the count is full of the usual suspects:SPIDERS:Lots of funnel web spider webs in evidence, and I saw…
  • Thank You Everything

    vanessa cardui
    28 Nov 2013 | 9:30 pm
    So it's Thanksgiving Day, and as much as I like eating turkey in general, I made no plans to slave in the kitchen cooking a feast.  Got some taters to mash and a pre-cooked turkey breast, add salad, voila:  thanks very much for the easy dinner.  And no, I have no plans to queue up for shopping tonight.I did get up early though:  needed to start soaking birch twigs . . . more on this later.  Took our usual walk this morning:  just another typical glorious southern CA fall day.  Found a gob of toyon berries, red grape leaves along the trail and brought them…
  • Succulent Pests

    vanessa cardui
    23 Nov 2013 | 8:09 pm
    Succulents . . . that ambiguous group of plants so in vogue right now because they are fool proof cast iron sure to succeed . . . do have pest problems.This cotyledon fell prey to a major aphid infestation.  The meristem here is covered with aphids which will likely deform the leaves as they grow.It's easy to brush or wash the pesky suckers off of succulents thanks to the lack of leaves and stuff.  Another reason to like 'em.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Whispering Crane Institute

  • Aquascape Goes Wild, Nat Geo Wild

    Rick Anderson
    25 Mar 2014 | 1:15 pm
    “We are extremely excited to be part of the Nat Geo WILD family and look forward to sharing our love for the water feature lifestyle with viewers around the world. […]
  • So You Want to be a Writer?

    Rick Anderson
    19 Jan 2014 | 9:56 am
    so you want to be a writer? by Charles Bukowski if it doesn’t come bursting out of you in spite of everything, don’t do it. unless it comes unasked out […]
  • December 7th, 1941

    Rick Anderson
    7 Dec 2013 | 12:28 pm
    “Reflections on Pearl Harbor” by Admiral Chester Nimitz. Sunday, December 7th, 1941–Admiral Chester Nimitz was attending a concert in Washington D.C. He was paged and told there was a phone […]
  • Acceptable Use for a Healthy Tree ?

    Rick Anderson
    21 Nov 2013 | 1:17 pm
    I’ll let you look at the pictures and decide on you own. Presented without comment —- One tree, four years of work and an indescribable amount of talent: that’s what […]
  • Florida Couple: 17-Year-Old Vegetable Garden or $1,500 a Month

    Rick Anderson
    20 Nov 2013 | 9:09 am
    Here we go again— the war on vegetables continues A new zoning ordinance supposedly designed to “protect the distinctive character” of a community in Miami Shores, Fla., has forced a […]
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Skippy's Vegetable Garden

  • planting squash and cukes

    kathy
    17 Apr 2014 | 6:58 pm
    Just planted a tray with squash and cucumber seeds. (in order of my favorites:) Squash: Waltham butternut, Buttercup Burgess strain, Jarrahdale pumpkin, New England Pie pumpkin, Hubbard blue ballet, and Acorn Honey Bear Cucumbers: Diva, Tokiwa, Sooyow nishiki, Straight 8, Sumter pickling
  • leveling my new raised beds

    kathy
    7 Apr 2014 | 8:48 am
    My raised beds are on a bit of a slope. To level them, my husband secured a 2x4 horizontally to the bottom of each bed at the downhill side. He used three 2x4 stakes on each and left these sticking out a few inches at the bottom. One some beds where the slope was steeper, we left the stakes at the soil surface and filled in below with a layer of brick. For most, the stakes were dug in leaving the horizontal 2x4 resting at soil surface. One or two were on a flatter ground and he dug the whole horizontal board in a bit. We used brick to fill in at the sides. Now all of the beds are pretty much…
  • germination test of old corn seeds

    kathy
    5 Apr 2014 | 8:24 am
    I'm doing a germination test of my old corn seeds. They were "Packed for 2009" - 6 years old. Any bets on whether they'll sprout?
  • forced forsythia

    kathy
    4 Apr 2014 | 8:28 am
    I have always wanted to be able to force forsythia. Our new house has lots of it around to cut. It bloomed within a couple days of bringing it inside. I suppose it won;t be long til its in bloom outside.
  • chickens and eggs

    kathy
    2 Apr 2014 | 7:53 pm
    We are doing some renovations upstairs of our new house where there's a good view of my chicken coop. The construction crew tells me they've seem a big red tailed hawk fly down and perch on my chicken coop a couple of times. Of all places! Can't he perch on some bird feeder or a random small tree?!! He might as well put in his order for a chicken lunch! The red tails out here are BIG! I've been impressed. They must be better fed than the ones in more urban Belmont. Stronger and better fed.... and able to carry off large chickens for lunch.... Usually, I let me hens run free an hour or so in…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Ilona's Garden Journal

  • Making Garden Video

    Ilona Erwin
    15 Apr 2014 | 8:56 am
     I have a long way to go admittedly, and I don't consider myself star material, but I am making videos on Youtube. I'd like you to subscribe to my lowly channel, give me improvement suggestions, like me.... and share my garden and experiences through the videos.I keep it real. You see the dandelions, the ground ivy, the undone tasks.... all kinds of mistakes, but you also see the beauty of a rural landscape, and the individual beauties of the changing season. I will make more how-to videos, as well, if all goes according to plan.My latest two (the second one was a spontaneous response to…
  • We Went South ...and now I'm wondering

    Ilona Erwin
    28 Mar 2014 | 11:24 am
    South, as in the state of Georgia, and so you won't hear me complaining about the interminable reappearance of cold in Ohio. Staying with my son who has a nice property right within Atlanta, he is like many young professionals, who just doesn't feel the desire for lots of yardwork.Yet, he likes the idea of a nice looking yard. So he talked with me about bulbs. I had him help a lot with our yard when he grew up, but he seemed to miss the notation on when we plant bulbs- or thought the rules changed when crossing the Mason-Dixon.Rule # 1 for spring blooming bulbs: they are planted in the fall…
  • Seeds For Trial Garden

    Ilona Erwin
    14 Mar 2014 | 11:45 am
    A few of the seeds that were sent to meThis year I received seeds to trial in my gardens from American Meadows. They arrived this last week, and the weather is finally warming up so that I can get ready to plant them. Exciting, is it not?I have a large amount that were sent in the nicest cloth bags, 1/4 lb. worth of an annual Wildflower mix, and equal amount of a Honeybee mix! Those are really generous amounts.  I plan to place some in my prairie style patch in the front yard, some in the vegetable patch ( a row of honeybee friendly plants should help with pollination) and go looking for…
  • The Amateur Speaks About Garden Enthusiasm

    Ilona Erwin
    8 Mar 2014 | 7:46 pm
    Garden Enthusiasm is what I christened my garden newsletter, the newsletter that all the blog experts said I should have to share what is going on in my gardens and on my sites with you. For years I wasn't convinced you could possibly care... you just want the bare facts about flowers, and pruning, and stuff. Right?But then along came social media, then I went to a garden blogger conference where I was told to put myself up front and center. The girl said I was likable... and I believed her. My daughter had told me the same thing. If I'm not, don't choose this moment to disabuse me of my…
  • Garden Chores For March, No Digging Yet

    Ilona Erwin
    5 Mar 2014 | 7:45 am
    Viburnum x bodnantense 'Dawn' buds on iceNo real attempts at garden chores yet, but not everyone is like Ohio, still in the throes of winter. There were some blue skies, yesterday, however!I will likely remember this winter for a long time to come.On Ilona's Garden some new pages were posted (1) a chores reminder for this month, along with (2) a new page on daffodils. I love daffodils, they are so easy for me to grow and propagate. And nothing bothers them! ( Unlike the tulips, which deer nip off, or crocus which suffer attrition to the fattening rodent population).Today I plan…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Bananas.org

  • What's the most chaters online in one day you ever saw

    sunfish
    18 Apr 2014 | 2:37 pm
    The most chatters online in one day was 17, 09-06-2009:08:
  • Can bananas cause damage?

    drobbins
    18 Apr 2014 | 9:09 am
    Hi Folks, I got some musa basjoo last year and they came through winter like champs, I'm really enjoying them. This spring I got some Mekong Giant plants and will be putting them in the ground soon. From what I read the Mekong spread by long runners off the corm. I'm wondering if these can be destructive like bamboo? I have some bamboo that caused some trouble with the driveway and I had to install a barrier. Are bananas capable of this kind of mischief? I have a good place for them away from anything, just curious. Thanks Dave
  • Happy Good Friday!!!

    Abnshrek
    18 Apr 2014 | 8:27 am
    It's a good Friday, and it's GOOD FRIDAY! Hope everyone has a Awesome Easter Weekend.. :^)
  • My Dwarf Namwah in southern Spain.

    pabloo120
    18 Apr 2014 | 8:18 am
    Well, I present my very first banana plant in its final location! I´ve had it for a long time in a pot, because it was quite small when I ordered it, and I wanted it to grow bigger before planting it into the ground. By then it was autumn, so I waited more yet, until now. It looked beautiful right? Well, it had to travel quite a long journey in car, so I choped out some leaves, and in the car, another leave broke off, and was hanging... So two leaves were left untouched... And then, we stopped to eat, and we left the car in the sun... And we came back... And in only one hour, nearly all of…
  • New Banana Guy

    bob21801
    18 Apr 2014 | 7:19 am
    I just want to say hello and ask a quick first question. My name is Bob. I live in Salisbury MD, Zone 7a. I'm an avid gardener but new to growing bananas and other tropicals, except a bit as houseplants. I've recently purchased a Musa Basjoo, about 6 feet tall, an unnamed red banana tree about 4 feet tall, an 18" what I believe to be Musa Basjoo, as well as a 3 foot tall windmill palm. I'm planning to crate a tropical area in front of my home, where I can enjoy the look and feel of it this summer. I'll ask my first question here, but you can count on me posting in other areas of the forums as…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    North Coast Gardening

  • Redefining “Low-Maintenance” Landscapes

    Genevieve
    15 Apr 2014 | 3:04 pm
    In my landscape design practice, it is rare to find a client who does not ask for a low-maintenance garden. However, the way people define low-maintenance varies so wildly that the term has almost lost its meaning. While the generally accepted definition of a low maintenance plant would be something that you do not need to maintain more than once per year, you could still put together a planting plan based entirely on plants that fit this definition of low maintenance, and have it be a yard where you have to be outside fussing with something almost constantly. (I’ve written more about that…
  • Review of The 20-30 Something Garden Guide by Dee Nash

    Genevieve
    16 Feb 2014 | 3:44 am
    Gardening marketers are always getting their pants in a bunch over whether enough new people are picking up the torch and continuing gardening, and initiatives aimed at getting young people to garden abound. Of course, from my own experience I can say that gardening as a hobby evolves over time. As we age, we shouldn’t be too eager to foist our own idea of a good time on people who are simply in a different time of their lives. If you don’t own your own home, have disposable income, or have much spare time during the day while the sun is still shining, then the type of gardening you do…
  • Stop! Don’t Prune That Grass (How to Prune Ornamental Grasses Right)

    Genevieve
    28 Jan 2014 | 7:47 pm
    (Article originally appeared in Fine Gardening Magazine) Most of us know what to do with our big grasses that go dormant each winter: Grab a bungee cord, tie the grass up, and use an electric hedge trimmer to buzz the column of foliage to the ground. But what about those tricky grasses that are evergreen or ones that have a ground-hugging habit? When and how do you prune those garden staples that don’t fit neatly into the “large and goes dormant” category? If you are hesitant to treat your sedge the same as your maiden grass, it’s for good reason. Unconventional grassy plants can’t…
  • Gardening Trend Predictions for 2014

    Genevieve
    28 Dec 2013 | 4:15 pm
    There are useful color trends, like this one above, and less “sticky” trends, like this year’s Radiant Orchid. Even a timeless activity like gardening is subject to the ebbs and flows of trends. Though I’m constantly reminded that there’s nothing really new in the world, a cleverly written book, new product, or a general societal trend can breathe new life into something that’s been around for a while. In previous years, edible gardening, succulents, and vertical gardening have been huge trends, while in 2013, indoor gardening with terrariums, air plants and houseplants, as well…
  • Local Christmas Gifts for Humboldt County Gardeners

    Genevieve
    19 Dec 2013 | 10:16 pm
    Hellebore photo courtesy of Skagit Gardens What’s that, my fellow Humboldtians? Time’s gotten away from you yet again, with no gifts purchased and only a short time until Christmas? Never fear, I’ve got you covered. I called up a variety of local shops to find out which gift they’d most recommend for the gardener on your list. Whether you’re looking for a hostess gift for that kind somebody who keeps inviting you over and stuffing you full of delicious flavors, or something special (and oddly-shaped) to put under the tree of a loved one, these eight gifts are sure to rack up bonus…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    High Altitude Gardening

  • Cactus Flowers

    18 Apr 2014 | 1:50 pm
    It's always summer somewhere... When you live as high up in the mountains as I do... searching out summer can be a full time job.Because our winters last for 6 long months.   Therefore this wildflower lover schedules warm weather escapes as often as possible. And, when we go, we take our girls. As in the horsie girls ~ because horses are the perfect transportation for hunting down elusive, and sometimes rare, wildflowers.Two weeks ago, we were trotting through the back country near Sedona, Arizona. On the Caballos del Sol annual benefit trail ride. I do declare our horses…
  • Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day ~ April, 2014

    15 Apr 2014 | 9:06 am
    BEHOLD! The first blossoms of 2014! At long last... a sunny warm weekend dedicated to playing in the mud.With the weather finally cooperating, I donned those much missed, and very tattered, garden gloves to clean up the first of the beds. 2 down, 10 to go. The bulbs are beating me to it, this year. Blooming without the usual TLC from me.Grecian Windflower (the whities are heirlooms) Peeking out from beneath the debris were these fancy little Windflowers.Peter Pan Heirloom CrocusPretty white Crocus trying hard to steal the show.Rip Van Winkle Heirloom DaffodilSparse bulbs in the 'danger'…
  • Nifty Little Loopholes and Veggie Garden Dreams

    14 Apr 2014 | 12:09 pm
    I've got Vegetable Gardening on the brain."Why haven't you been blogging?" So asketh nearly everyone who telephones me.Because ADD is getting the better of me? Well, sort of. I post something every day to Instagram and in my mind that means I'm blogging. Even though I'm not.But, there's another reason. A bigger reason! An infinitely more exciting reason!Call it the calm before the storm (I plan to do a whole lotta blogging once planting season begins.) Because this gardening season will be a grandiose attempt at defeating Jeannie.Jeannie is the gal who bet me a hefty sum of money (20 bucks!)…
  • Heavenly Blues...

    13 Apr 2014 | 11:41 am
     And, she said it couldn't be done... She, being my good friend, Hazel, who was the original inspiration for growing Heavenly Blue Morning Glories. I love them so much, that I now grow them indoors, as well.
  • Bath Time for Bonehead

    12 Apr 2014 | 11:29 am
    This is Bad Dog. He's been 86'd from every dog groomer in town. So, now this messy chore is up to me..
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Ewa in the Garden

  • 15 Great Easter Decoration Ideas

    18 Apr 2014 | 7:26 am
    If you are looking for ideas how to decorate for Easter, I’d like to share some Easter ideas that could be inspirational. There is still some time to catch up. I hope you will enjoy as much as I do.  Photo by Yvonne Eijkenduijn  Photo above and below by Christina Campisi  Photo by ZeHawk  Photo by Kate Skegg  Photo by Sam Agnew  Photo by Emanuelle Bourgue  Photo by
  • 22 most Awesome Wisteria Tunnel Photos

    16 Apr 2014 | 10:09 pm
    Wisteria – you name it, I love it. From the very beginning wanted to have it in my own garden. Is there any obstacle to plant something if you really want? No… so I planted one. Unfortunately wrong specie and obviously in wrong place. At the beginning of our garden venture, mistake is our daily experience, right? After 4 years at the end of every summer my wisteria was reaching the roof of my 2
  • 5 photos of small shady backyard landscaping ideas direct from Holland

    15 Apr 2014 | 5:08 am
    These photos were taken in Holland. Just look at this neat and beautifully maintained spaces. Whenever I am in Holland I have this surprising feeling that concept of space is really abstract. I am telling you… it is streaching… whatever you may think about it now.   Just give me your hand and let's have a look at the photos, okay? These are relatively small spaces to arrange and yet, so much
  • How to grow asparagus from seeds?

    8 Apr 2014 | 11:55 pm
    You may ask yourself whether it’s at all worth the ado. In some cases definitely yes: 1. When you don’t have possibility to buy the tubers to plant. 2. You want to have more plants at once. 3. You are on the budget. 4. The variety you want, you can get as seeds only. On the photo you can see my asparagus Argenteuil, for me best variety. This is an old, French  heirloom variety, loved for
  • Chicken-coop? NO! House for chickens!

    3 Apr 2014 | 7:24 pm
    <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 21 false false false PL X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]>
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Your Small Kitchen Garden

  • Yay! It’s Bloom Day!

    Daniel Gasteiger
    15 Apr 2014 | 9:51 pm
    There go the last crocuses of spring. The first appeared on the south side of the house on March 11 while there was still much snow about. These are in my wife’s main flower bed on the west side of the house and they usually hold on until other bulbs get into the act. It’s Garden Bloggers Bloom Day, and I’m so happy to have a few blooms to show off. Despite the calendar and increasingly longer days, spring started only a week ago… and then it was very wet. Amazingly, while I (along with everyone else around here) felt we’ve experienced the most horrendous and permanent winter in…
  • Runup to Spring Planting

    Daniel Gasteiger
    14 Apr 2014 | 9:41 am
    On February 15th in Ithaca, NY, a snowstorm added several inches to a well-established snow pack. By this time, there was a similar covering in Lewisburg, PA, though a few February storms passed either north or south of Lewisburg, leaving our problems mild compared to those of neighboring states. Who wasn’t talking about winter this winter? For most of us, it was unusual. Here, we’d gotten used to remarkably mild winters. I’d been able to play golf until January (we’d be cold, but snow-free), and whatever snow we’d get in January and February would melt away before March.
  • Start Your Own Seedlings

    Daniel Gasteiger
    4 Apr 2014 | 11:35 am
    One week old tomato seedlings grow under lights in my office. While I planted 16 seeds per container, some didn’t sprout. There are, perhaps, 70 going strong. To the right are pepper seedlings barely visible under their shop light. That light is so much closer to the plants because I lifted the fixture above the tomatoes to fit the camera under it for the photograph. Sprouts are up! One hundred and six sprouts grace my seed-starting shelf. Most are tomato plants though about 24 are pepper plants and another 8 are lettuce. I live in USDA hardiness zone 6b or 7a, depending on how you squint…
  • Wordless Wednesday: A Fave from the Philadelphia Flower Show

    Daniel Gasteiger
    19 Mar 2014 | 8:31 pm
     
  • Seeds Have Left the Cityslipper Ranch!

    Daniel Gasteiger
    17 Mar 2014 | 8:49 am
    I wasn’t in great shape when it was time to pack and mail seeds. Happily, I had enough complete seed sets for everyone who qualified in the giveaway. It has been a rough month: harsh punctuation to a difficult year. As my annual seed giveaway closed, I jumped from garden conference to garden conference and crashed with a sinus infection when I should have been mailing out seeds. Despite the plugged pipes, I managed to get seeds in the mail, and they should all have arrived at the homes of their new gardeners. Start Your Peppers and Tomatoes! For pretty much everyone in the United…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Dirt Du Jour Daily Blog

  • Drought gardening with Ollas

    cindymcnatt@gmail.com
    17 Apr 2014 | 8:03 am
    Here is one way to garden in a severe drought - plant an Olla (pronounced O-ya.) Pot irrigation is an ancient practice. You plant the pot up to its neck, fill it with water, cover the hole with a stone and the porous terra cotta seeps moisture into the soil. Nothing is lost to evaporation. The way it works is plants wrap their roots around the Olla. Good for raised bed gardens and containers of all kinds. whatever Washington Post—Scientist weed out “bad seeds”
  • Plastic Easter grass alert

    cindymcnatt@gmail.com
    14 Apr 2014 | 8:47 am
    Nobody wants to spoil the fun for egg hunts and Easter baskets, but know that Easter grass seriously harms the health of backyard birds. The first problem is that birds are attracted to plastic Easter grass as sparkly as it is. And it happens to be just the right size and weight to make a soft landing for real bird eggs. The trouble begins when the chicks hatch and get tangled up in the grass. Not only can plastic Easter grass strangle newborn birds, it can grab hold of the mother’s leg leaving her unable to leave the nest to feed her chicks. Bird lovers everywhere ask us not to use plastic…
  • 24th Annual Spring Garden Show

    cindymcnatt@gmail.com
    11 Apr 2014 | 7:57 am
    SPONSORED POST—Tour season is upon us and one of the stops that makes us feel like kids in a candy store is the Annual Spring Garden Show in Costa Mesa. Mark your calendar for four days of garden design displays, plant and gadget vendors and speakers galore April 24-27. Thursday meet Dan Hinkley of Heronswood fame, Friday hear Johanna Silver of Sunset magazine, Saturday meet Pat Welsh, Julie Bawden-Davis and Shirley Bovshow and Sunday nosh on the wild side with Teresa O’Conner of Seasonal Wisdom. The best part is is it’s all free and there are restaurants. Lots of restaurants. If you…
  • Cherry Blossom Festival cam

    cindymcnatt@gmail.com
    9 Apr 2014 | 11:17 am
    Gardeners in all the united states can enjoy the cherry blossoms at the D.C. Jefferson Memorial with this 24-hour cam of the blooms at the Tidal Basin. Peaking now! Watch the trees tossing in the breeze and imagine that you’re strolling beneath the branches. whatever In the Capital—-What year was Lady Bird planting those trees? Charlotte
  • Digiplexis Illumination Flame

    cindymcnatt@gmail.com
    8 Apr 2014 | 8:27 am
    Everybody is going a little nutty over this new plant - no seriously - the plant is new - a cross by Charles Valin between foxglove and isoplexis. It’s a stunner with 3-foot blooms in tequila sunrise colors, best in show at Chelsea Flower Show and popping up everywhere like Armstrong Nursery, Annie’s Annuals and Wayside Gardens. whatever Take Part—Big city soils not so safe
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Native Sons - Plant of the Week

  • Ceanothus x pallidus 'Marie Simon'

    Melissa Berard
    18 Apr 2014 | 2:58 pm
    Deciduous (or partially so in coastal California) and bushy, growing 5’ by 5’ with green, broadly oval leaves and wine-red young stems. Conical clusters of soft-pink flowers are carried in profusion from mid-summer to early autumn. Hardy to 5F. Ceanothus x pallidus 'Marie Simon' is available this week in five gallon containers (see below).
  • Aristida purpurea var. purpurea

    Jimmy Alcantar
    2 Nov 2012 | 10:19 am
    Purple three-awn. Upright clumping grass native to dry regions of North America and Mexico, this rugged species can be used in meadows, dry gardens, grass borders or native gardens. Self-sowing may be a nuisance in some areas, but the beauty of the backlit purple flowering heads often surpasses any disappoint in the plant’s spread. Provide full sun, well-drained soils and only infrequent water. Hardy to 0F. Aristida purpurea var. purpurea is available this week in four inch and one gallon containers.
  • Polemonium caeruleum 'Brise d' Anjou'

    Jimmy Alcantar
    26 Oct 2012 | 11:54 am
    Variegated Jacob's ladder.  Delicate white and green striped foliage add just the right amount of fair and plays nicely off of nearby green or purple leafed companions.  Grows up to 18" tall with an equal spread.  Blue-violet, bell-shaped flowers appear in the summer.  Plant in full sun along the coast, afternoon shade or elsewhere.  Hardy to 0F. Polemonium caeruleum 'Brise d' Anjou' are available in one gallon containers this week.
  • Salvia chamaedryoides 'Marine Blue'

    Jimmy Alcantar
    19 Oct 2012 | 11:21 am
    Marine blue sage. An evergreen perennial with small, silvery leaves forming the perfect backdrop for dark blue flowers. This sage grows to 3’ wide and  18" when in bloom and eventually forms a small mound. Flowers are borne during warm periods throughout the growing season peaking in early summer and again in fall. Tolerant of light shade and modest drought, plants are best suited to full sun and well-drained soils. Prune spent flowers for repeat blooming. Moderate water. Hardy to 10F. Salvia chamaedryoides 'Marine Blue' is available this week in four inch and one gallon containers.
  • Dudleya pulverulenta

    Jimmy Alcantar
    12 Oct 2012 | 12:53 pm
    Chalk lettuce. Rosette-forming succulent with strap-shaped, pointed silvery-gray leaves, dusted with white powder. Masses of star-shaped, red flowers bloom from spring to summer on 2’ high stalks. Attractively used in pots, rock gardens or on walls. Tilt the rosettes when planting to prevent rain from settling in the crown. Hardy to 20F. Dudleya pulverulenta is available this week in two gallon containers.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Bay Area Tendrils

  • Echium Blooms .. San Francisco Marina

    Bay Area Tendrils
    2 Apr 2014 | 12:38 pm
    Amazon.com WidgetsAll along San Francisco's Marina Green walkway the Echiums are attracting bees & hummingbirds to their lavish spikes!The bluest blue, purple and even pink specimens are on display. Simply gorgeous, wouldn't you say!
  • Magnolias .. Spring in the Bay Area

    Bay Area Tendrils
    23 Feb 2014 | 8:46 am
    Magnolia sighting while strolling a lovely side street north of the Golden Gate Bridge:                                                                                 A sure sign of Springtimein the San Francisco Bay Area! Amazon.com Widgets
  • Nature Travel ~ San Francisco to Central Coast California

    Bay Area Tendrils
    16 Oct 2013 | 10:06 am
    Amazon.com WidgetsLooking back ..  Nature Travel ..  2013The Pinnacles .. Central CaliforniaPoint Lobos ... Succulent RockscapeSan Francisco Conservatory of Flowers .. Golden Gate ParkGreen Gulch Zen Center Gardens ~ Muir BeachIt's been a very good year!
  • Hibiscus Sugar Tip .. One Sweet Shrub!

    Bay Area Tendrils
    20 Jun 2013 | 8:02 am
    I've always been dotty about variegated foliage. Combine splashed leaves with a flower that's so alluring and it's difficult to imagine one lovelier. I'm over the moon about this stand-out shrub in Alice's Garden.Hibiscus 'Sugar Tip' offers a delicate white tracery on its leaves, while the petite blooms with their colorful centers are sweet additions to flower arrangements. The double frilly flowers are subtle, about 1 and 1/2 inches wide with an eye-catching vermillion center. It's won me over completely.And I'm not known for selecting pale pink…
  • Point Lobos Vista

    Bay Area Tendrils
    14 Apr 2013 | 10:15 am
    A day of hiking ... Point Lobos State Nature ReserveLife is good."Walk Gently, Breathe Deeply, & Reflect"
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Veggie Gardener: Organic Vegetable Gardening Tips

  • Planning Your Veggie Garden, Part One: Deciding What to Plant

    Lauren M
    2 Apr 2014 | 8:02 am
    Spring is officially here, and so it is time to start thinking about your outdoor garden. Even though the ground may still be frozen, planning for your spring planting now will make sure that you are successful in your gardening this year. Deciding what to plant is one of the first things you will need […]
  • The Best Veggies to Grow Indoors

    Lauren M
    7 Mar 2014 | 1:19 pm
    When deciding which plants to grow indoors, you have a lot to consider. The best indoor vegetable choices are ones that are more compact, thus taking up less space. Other plants that do well indoors are ones that don’t require much special attention, like fertilizers or immense amounts of sunlight. Here are some of the […]
  • The Five Best Herbs for Indoor Gardening

    Lauren M
    7 Mar 2014 | 12:47 pm
    Herbs are great indoor growers because they require little room, and little attention. Most herbs can easily grow on your windowsill because they require such a small amount of light, water, or other maintenance. If you are a novice indoor grower, choosing one of these herbs will make sure you have a great indoor growing […]
  • Are My Garden Seeds Too Old?

    Brenda
    18 Feb 2014 | 7:58 am
    Growing flowers, vegetables, and herbs from seed is thrifty and rewarding. However, buying seeds can become addictive, and most gardeners end up with leftovers. How long do vegetable and herb seeds remain viable? There are many charts online from seed companies and university extension programs showing the possible life span of popular seeds. This information […]
  • Should I Start Seeds Indoors or Outdoors?

    Brenda
    13 Feb 2014 | 9:20 am
    Starting plants from seed is an extremely rewarding and frugal method of obtaining vegetables, herbs, or fruit for your garden. Many new gardeners start out with transplants from a local nursery or garden center when planting. While there is nothing wrong with buying plants, it can be costly and the choices are limited. When shopping […]
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Miss Rumphius' Rules

  • A Tale of Two Garden Sphinxes

    Susan aka Miss. R
    14 Apr 2014 | 4:56 am
    Imagine my surprise, while visiting Hillwood Museum and Gardens, when I saw this sphinx at the entrance to the formal gardens.  There are four of them.  I’ve seen them before, in bronze at Blairsden–the house that is also the location for a garden I’ve designed for APLDNJ for this year’s Mansion in May. The sphinx at Hillwood… The slightly different but not all that much sphinx at Blairsden. I don’t know a lot about these types of sphinxes, but the similarities are remarkable don’t you think?
  • Garden Trends: Rattan Seating

    Susan aka Miss. R
    31 Mar 2014 | 3:30 am
    I first noticed this emerging trend in Paris at Maison et Objet in January. Rattan furniture is back. As a material, it’s been out of favor for a while, but in the 1940s and 50s it was popular and chic. The new rattan is lyrical and colorful and doesn’t include the large scale banana leaf prints that gave it the feeling that it belonged on a porch in Malaysia somewhere. These pieces will be at home with a wide variety of contemporary, transitional and traditional styles. The best part is that rattan pieces are available at all price points and a wide variety of colors making them…
  • Garden Trends in the Mall

    Susan aka Miss. R
    25 Mar 2014 | 4:06 am
    Mall stores like Restoration Hardware, Pottery Barn and Crate & Barrel have made major investments in outdoor furniture and accessories, so I went to the mall to see what was new. Catalogs just don’t do it for me, I can’t see and touch the quality. The only one of the three that had anything interesting was Crate & Barrel.  On trend as far as lifestyle and color, their selection made the neutrals at Restoration Hardware and Pottery Barn seem dreary and tired. The pieces are very fairly priced for the level of quality. Here’s what I liked. Colorful ceramic pots with…
  • The New Garden Design

    Susan aka Miss. R
    20 Mar 2014 | 3:30 am
    The new Garden Design magazine promises to be full of inspiration and ideas for all of us.  I lamented when the previous one stopped publishing so I’m happy about this. Their primary focus is now American gardens and designers–not just the ones on both coasts either.  How do I know this for sure?  I’m a Contributing Editor.  That doesn’t mean I’m giving up my landscape design practice, it just means I have another outlet to express my love of  great design. It is going to be a beautiful book like publication without any advertising and printed on beautiful…
  • Spring Bulb: Asphodelus fistulosus

    Susan aka Miss. R
    17 Mar 2014 | 8:38 am
    I don’t usually write about plants I haven’t grown, but I’m so starved for spring I started looking through some images thinking to do a post about early spring bloomers. Instead I found some lovely images of  Asphodelus fistulosus (Hollow stemmed asphodel) from my trip to Morocco in January.  It took a bit of sleuthing to figure out what this plant was…I hope I’m correct!  It was blooming everywhere in Volubilis, a Roman ruin, in the northeast near Fes and made me so happy to see it thinking that spring wouldn’t be far away at home.  Boy was I wrong!
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Garden Therapy

  • Oh So Pinteresting!

    Stephanie
    16 Apr 2014 | 1:38 pm
    Hey! Look who is on the Pinterest Blog? Read the interview here. I was thrilled to be asked for a Pinterview from my absolute favorite addiction, Pinterest. I started Pinning years ago and immediately fell in love. Didn’t we all? I mean if you have ever created a scrapbook, dream board, or heck a Post-It Note, you know that Pinterest made it, like, a million times easier to save things you find online for later. Right clicking? See ya. Bookmarks? Yeah right.  I know I’m not the only one. There are 70 million people using Pinterest and it has completely changed how we interact…
  • Top Tips for Arranging Home-Grown Flowers

    Guest
    13 Apr 2014 | 6:35 am
    Have you ever wanted to grow your own cut flower garden? Imagine a garden packed full of deliciously colorful blooms who’s only purpose is to adorn bouquets and will provide material for gorgeous and fragrant displays for years to come. Horticulturist and writer, Louise Curley, shares all you need to know about creating an economical and environmentally-friendly cut flower patch in her book, The Cut Flower Patch: Grow your own cut flowers all year round. In her book you will find all you could ever want to know about sowing, planting, care, and cutting flowers from you garden. Today…
  • Gardening with Kids: Easy DIY Birdbath

    Stephanie
    10 Apr 2014 | 5:28 am
    Stacy Tornio and Ken Keffer are at it again! The creators of Destination Nature are now on their next book promoting all the ways that you can get kids outside. In their most recent book, We Love Nature!: A Keepsake Journal for Families Who Love to Explore the Outdoors, you’ll share in the discovery of nature with your child and preserve his or her sense of wonder in this keepsake journal filled with activities and ideas. As the Destination Nature team, we’re always looking for creative ways to get kids outside more. Having birds, butterflies and other critters in your backyard adds…
  • Gartending: Jalapeno and Cucumber Green Gargoyle

    Guest
    8 Apr 2014 | 3:28 am
    Who says cocktails are always frou frou, pink, super sweet concoctions? Not Greg Henry, the author of Savory Cocktails, a recipe book that shakes, stirs, and strains 100 hard-hitting distilled delights for your drinking pleasure. As we always like to take our recipes from the garden, Greg has joined us today as honorary Gardtender, mixing up this cool and spicy Green Gargolye. The spice in this cocktail proves that you needn’t be afraid of a little fire when it comes to liquid refreshment. I was given this recipe by my friend Linda Miller Nicholson, the woman behind the blog Salty Seattle.
  • A Good Garden May Have Some Weeds

    Stephanie
    6 Apr 2014 | 7:35 am
    Not long ago I hosted a party at my home and was surprised that one of the guests’ first response to the garden was, “It sure needs a lot of work!”. This wasn’t said to me, for if it was I would have simply brushed it off as 1. I like the “work” (it’s more like play), and 2. garden guilt be damned. No, this was said to Mr. Garden Therapy who then could only see how much work needed to be done. He repeated the phrase with exasperation and has since offered many times his desire to get out there and clean it up. Year round I catch him out there weeding…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Urban Organic Gardener

  • Photo Contest – Show Off Your Urban Organic Garden!

    UOG
    17 Apr 2014 | 11:13 am
    How are you growing your own organic food on your balcony, deck, or in your apartment windows? How do you make the best use of your space for gardening in an urban environment? Winner will receive an “All-in-One” Lettuce & Greens Variety Pack of Seeds!
  • Urban Organic Kiddie-Pool Rooftop Garden

    UOG
    16 Apr 2014 | 8:04 pm
    The produce grown on the roof goes directly to a restaurant one floor down. The practices are innovative — like growing arugula in round kiddie pools to save space and resources — and sustainable.
  • UOG is now on INSTAGRAM!! Follow us…

    UOG
    16 Apr 2014 | 10:49 am
    Want to see more Urban Organic Gardening pics? Follow us on Instagram! “UrbanOrganicGardener” http://instagram.com/urbanorganicgardener    
  • The “Truck Farm” in Brooklyn

    UOG
    15 Apr 2014 | 2:27 pm
    Here, Curt Ellis, gardens in his “Truck Farm” in Brooklyn. Pretty sweet ride! http://www.truckfarm.org/ Watch the video here:
  • Grow lettuce and/or herbs in gardening gloves

    UOG
    14 Apr 2014 | 3:38 pm
    Anybody need a hand with gardening today? A fun way to show off your old gardening gloves! Hang them from a line, & grow some lettuce or herbs inside of them. Cut a small hole in the ends of the fingers to allow good drainage.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Ecosystem Gardening

  • Look Closer

    Carole Sevilla Brown
    15 Apr 2014 | 8:42 am
    Slow down. Look carefully. You may be missing out on a lot of wildlife in your garden! When I travel around the country speaking at conferences about Ecosystem Gardening for wildlife, I teach people that the best garden tool is a lawn chair. Take the time to look closely and observe what is happening in your wildlife garden. You’ll be surprised at all the fun stuff you’ve been missing! Kevin J. Railsback has also mentioned the joys of taking time to look closer: Don’t be in a hurry to capture your gardens and the creatures that call it home. Pull up a lawn chair, a blanket or…
  • Birding Festivals Through the Year

    Carole Sevilla Brown
    11 Apr 2014 | 5:15 am
    If you want to learn more about the birds in your wildlife garden, one of the best things you can do is to attend birding festivals near you to learn more about birds in their natural habitiats. One of the big things on my bucket list is to travel around the country going from birding festival to birding festival. Combine that with another item on my bucket list: to travel around the country attending all of the native plant conferences, and I can assure you that I would be a very happy person! Actually, to be totally living the dream, I’d love to sell my house and buy an RV and drive…
  • Ecosystem Gardening for Wildlife in Rehoboth Beach

    Carole Sevilla Brown
    8 Apr 2014 | 9:02 am
    I’m so thrilled that I’ll be presenting Ecosystem Gardening for Wildlife at the 14th Annual CAMP Rehoboth Women’s Fest in beautiful Rehoboth Beach, DE on April 12, 2014. This workshop will teach sustainable landscaping, conserving natural resources, and creating welcoming habitats for wildlife in your garden so that you will attract more birds, butterflies, native pollinators, and other wildlife to your garden. The CAMP Rehoboth Women’s Fest is a weekend full of fun events, workshops, concerts, and sports. Other workshops at Women’s Fest will include: iPhone…
  • Winter Ducks and Early Spring Migrant Birds

    Carole Sevilla Brown
    3 Apr 2014 | 1:09 pm
    It’s a great time of year to observe both wintering ducks and early spring migrant birds at a local national wildlife refuge, like John Heinz NWR in Philadelphia. Last weekend I took a roadtrip to Oakley Terrace in Cambridge, MD to see huge flocks of wintering ducks: Canvasback, Lesser Scaup, American Wigeon, Surf Scoter and much more. Soon these ducks will be traveling to the far north for the breeding season. Then we traveled just a few minutes south to Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge where I got to observe large flocks of Snow Geese, more wintering ducks, and got to see a…
  • Early Spring Birds Blackwater NWR

    Carole Sevilla Brown
    28 Mar 2014 | 8:19 pm
    Seasons overlap for late winter and early spring birds at Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge near Cambridge, MD. Last weekend Debra and I headed out for our weekly birding adventure, this time to visit Blackwater NWR after going to see the winter ducks at Cambridge waterfront on the Choptank River. Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge: Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1933 as a waterfowl sanctuary for birds migrating along the critical migration highway called the Atlantic Flyway. Blackwater Refuge is located on Maryland’s scenic Eastern Shore, which is just 12…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Garden Plot

  • Good Friday Find: 5 Easy DIY Easter Eggs

    Garden Media Group
    18 Apr 2014 | 8:08 am
    Spring is here! and that means that Easter is just around the bend, here are some ways to spice up your Easter egg decorating, whether it's a fun craft to do with your kids, or are just letting your inner child come out to play, these 5 ideas are sure to put a spring in your step this Easter.1. Foliage Easter EggsUsing mostly items grown in your own garden, you yourself can create these elegant looking Easter eggs. You can use different color vegetables in a mixture of vinegar in order to give your Easter eggs an earthy hue, combined with some flowers found in your garden or yard to give them…
  • Enter to Win a Border Dahlia Garden from Longfield Gardens

    Garden Media Group
    15 Apr 2014 | 5:38 am
    Dahlias offer a world of possibilities. Used en masse or planted alongside annuals and perennials, border dahlias, add a bold, late summer punch that no other flower can.Beginning April 14, bulb-lovers across the country can enter for a chance to win a variety of melody and gallery dahlias in Longfield Garden’s Facebook contest, the Border Dahlia Garden Giveaway. One random grand prize winner will be drawn on Monday, April 21.The winner will be able to fill a large garden space with a premium variety of colorful melody and gallery dahlias. Spring-planted bulbs that bloom continuously summer…
  • Celebrate Earth Day This Year with These Mighty Houseplants

    Garden Media Group
    9 Apr 2014 | 8:44 am
    This year celebrate Earth Day with a houseplant that keeps giving all year. Houseplants may be thought of as décor accents; however they’re far more than pretty faces.The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates Americans spend 90% of their time indoors, where air quality can be two to five times more polluted than outdoor air. You can easily cut down the indoor pollution of your home using houseplants, as certain kinds can remove VOCs (Volatile Organic Compounds) from indoor air. And this is just one of the many benefits of houseplants!Reap the full power of plants this Earth Day…
  • Don't Let Stink Bugs Make You a Fool This April!

    Garden Media Group
    1 Apr 2014 | 7:41 am
     Stink bugs are no joke. When they wake from hibernation this spring they have only one thing on their mind: mating. Once they mate, two stink bugs become hundreds in a matter of weeks.“April 1 is the start of the stink bug mating season,” says Rod Schneidmiller, president of Sterling International and developer of the environmentally responsible insect control line, RESCUE!®. “This is when their numbers begin to multiply exponentially, as a single female stink bug can lay up to 400 eggs over the course of a summer.”Experts recommend trapping emerging stink bugs now when they're…
  • GMG's Friday Find: Grow Your Own - the Mighty Mushroom

    Garden Media Group
    28 Mar 2014 | 9:00 am
    Photo Credit: PA Farms CSAMushrooms have been digested for centuries, in fact in ancient Egypt they were reserved only for royalty and the ancient Romans fed them to warriors to confer strength. Mushrooms are loaded with essential nutrients. They are a great source of Vitamin D, contain many antioxidants and B vitamins, are high in selenium and they boost your immune system.Neither a fruit nor vegetable, mushrooms are not even plants but a special type of fungus. Now if that part doesn't put you off, and if you're a lover of the many kinds of mushrooms available, you can now enjoy the many…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Thanks for today.

  • Little Signs of Natives in My Garden

    Jan
    28 Mar 2014 | 9:19 am
    The native plants in my garden are finally beginning to wake up. Everything is much later than last year due to this unusually cold winter and prolonged colder temperatures. I thought I would show them in their current state, even though there are only a couple of plants with buds/blooms.Mertensia virginica -- Virginia Bluebells -- are in various stages throughout the garden, with this one plant surpassing the rest in size  Sanguinaria canadensis -- Bloodroot -- this one has some buds but others haven't even broken ground yet Erythronium americanum -- Trout Lily -- a tiny leaf…
  • Blooms in Snow

    Jan
    18 Mar 2014 | 6:43 pm
    When I posted for Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day on Saturday I thought I'd photographed all the blooms that were out, on that 60+ degree day. But today, as I walked through the 6"-7" of snow that was dumped Sunday night, I noticed some green sprouts and thought they looked familiar. I uncovered them and found Iris Reticulata blooms! I should have taken a photo before I uncovered them...they were totally hidden except for a bit of green.They had to have been in bloom 2 days ago...I just didn't notice them. In fact, I thought the critters had finished them off and I no longer had any.
  • Wait...what?!?

    Jan
    18 Mar 2014 | 6:16 pm
    It snowed between 6" and 7" Sunday night. After temps in the 60's the day before, the birds were as surprised as the humans were!Although it looks like a Christmas scene to me, and I'm ready for spring, I do appreciate the beauty of a good snowfall.The backyard looked silent and peaceful, covered in a blanket of white. My kitchen garden/potager (fancy names for pots I fill with herbs and veggies!) lies in wait...The untouched deck...before the dogs ran around on it.We should invest in some stock with the bird seed company...The driveway and side yardThe front yard was just as quiet and…
  • Floating Hellebores

    Jan
    15 Mar 2014 | 7:26 pm
    After a day in the high 60's we're expecting another snowstorm tomorrow night, so I thought I'd snip off some hellebores and float them in a bowl of water. Might as well enjoy them inside if they're just going to get covered up with the white stuff!What gifts have you discovered today? Until next time, Words and photos ©Thanks for today.™, by Jan Huston Doble @ http://www.thanksfor2day.blogspot.com/Not to be reproduced or re-blogged without express permission of the author.
  • Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day: March 15, 2014

    Jan
    15 Mar 2014 | 6:42 pm
    The 15th of every month is Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day and I've finally got some blooms to show off! I'll start with the Hellebores, in various shades of pink, purple, white, green, yellow and even black as well as spotted and doubles.           I planted hundreds of daffodils last fall and this is, so far, the only one with a bud:Tete-a-tete narcissus is getting ready:Pink Hepatica:White Hepatica:Galanthus:Crocus:What gifts have you discovered today? Until next time, We're expecting yet another snowstorm tomorrow night so I wanted to get…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Yarden

  • Gardening with History

    LaManda Joy
    6 Apr 2014 | 11:04 am
    As you may know, our original garden at Peterson and Campbell was a WW2 Victory Garden. Our name "Peterson Garden" comes from that location. The "Project" part stems from our desire to use the WW2 model to see if it would work in our age. And we learned quickly, at that first garden in 2010, that our goal of getting neighbors together on short-term land to grow, learn and connect was a good one. Worked in the 1940's - works now!
  • Tater Time

    LaManda Joy
    31 Mar 2014 | 2:18 pm
    When I go to the Northwest Flower and Garden Show ...
  • 15 Tips for Trough Planters

    LaManda Joy
    29 Mar 2014 | 4:12 pm
    Troughs, also known as stock tanks, make a great and attractive alternative to wooden raised beds. They're easy to use (no building required!) and cost-wise not a bad investment as they will last forever and keep burrowing animals out. If you pick one 36" or higher, they'll also keep bunnies out, too
  • New Home Cooking School

    LaManda Joy
    20 Mar 2014 | 6:53 am
    As Peterson Garden Project enters its 5th year of teaching ...
  • Telling Garden Secrets

    LaManda Joy
    19 Mar 2014 | 6:28 am
    Looking forward to talking at Macy’s on March 26 at ...
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    My Garden is My Space

  • What Should You Feed the Birds in Your Garden

    Rodger Cresswell
    2 Apr 2014 | 8:00 am
    What Should You Feed the Birds in Your Garden What should you feed the birds in your garden? Are you a first time garden bird feeder and wonder whether you are going to be doing the birds more harm than good with the food you are putting out? A golden rule is that if you are not sure, don’t put it out for the birds! Here are some hints and tips of what you can and cannot feed your garden birds. Bird Seed Mixtures With numerous wild bird seed mixes for sale it can be very confusing choosing the best bird seed. Widely available are mixes ideally suited for bird tables and ground feeding…
  • How to Attract Wild Birds into Your Garden

    Rodger Cresswell
    14 Mar 2014 | 7:39 am
    How to Attract Wild Birds into Your Garden How to attract wild birds into your garden? Firstly you have to want to do so and secondly you have to manage and design your garden to make them feel at home. What better way to beautify your garden than to fill it with birds? Birds add colour and life to any garden. Even if you do not have a large garden, attracting wild birds can provide hours of pleasure. How to Attract Wild Birds into Your Garden -Planting Your Garden for Birds Birds need somewhere they can dive or run into to disappear and feel safe. Dense planting will provide the cover they…
  • Study of Plants – Understanding Plant Life Cycles

    Rodger Cresswell
    7 Jan 2014 | 3:28 am
    Study of Plants – Understanding Plant Life Cycles The study of plants is lifelong. Nature continually surprises us but one basic we all need to understand is plant life cycles. When starting a garden it stands to reason that you need to know what to grow in a garden. Part of your garden design consideration has to be the type of soil, acid or alkaline, and the direction that your garden beds face. Planting a garden that is north facing with sun loving plants is never going to be a success. So does choosing flowers to plant just depend upon whether they are sun loving or do not mind some…
  • How to Grow Blackcurrants With Blackcurrant Growing Tips

    Rodger Cresswell
    27 Nov 2013 | 9:38 am
    How to Grow Blackcurrants With Blackcurrant Growing Tips How to grow blackcurrants? The blackcurrant is relatively easy to grow and if grown well is a good cropper producing bunches of dark purple to black fruits in mid-summer. Blackcurrants Health Benefits The blackcurrant is a very popular fruit both to grow and to eat and no wonder. The fruit has high food value and is a great source of vitamin C. Delicious to eat with a tart flavour. Buying Blackcurrant Bushes You have a choice when buying blackcurrant bushes: Bare rooted blackcurrant plants – this used to be the only way to buy them.
  • How to Make Compost – How to Make a Compost Heap

    Rodger Cresswell
    5 Nov 2013 | 8:01 am
    How to Make Compost – How to Make a Compost Heap Is there some dark secret to making good garden compost? Sometimes you would think so.But let us look at how to make compost and leave out the alchemy! Image by Jay@MorphoLA via Flickr How to Make Compost – What is Compost? The terms composting and organic gardening go hand in hand. Compost is a great asset for any gardener. However for organic gardeners or no dig gardeners it is essential. Adding organic material helps the garden soil to hold the correct quantity of water. It also improves the organic structure to aid plant growth…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Gardener's JournalGardener's Journal

  • Enter Our Photo Contest: Signs of Spring

    Gardener's Supply
    14 Apr 2014 | 1:25 pm
    Trillium grandiflorum, submitted by Susan McGee via Instagram For the gardener, no season is as eagerly anticipated as spring. And after the winter of 2013-14, we are ready! So, what are the signs of spring in your area? Is it the first crocuses? The swelling buds of the oaks? Is it your neighbor, washing his boat? Share a springtime image and you could win a $75 gift certificate from Gardener’s Supply. Submit entries until April 20. Voting to determine the top 10 photos runs from April 21 to 27 on Facebook. We’ll announce the top 10 shortly after April 27, and our in-house judges…
  • Enjoy Clean, Blemish-Free Berries with New Strawberry Supports

    Gardener's Supply
    31 Mar 2014 | 12:12 pm
    Learn more: Planting and Growing Strawberries Don’t let a rainy day spoil a crop of just-ripening strawberries. Our easy-to-install, adjustable Strawberry Supports elevate ripening fruit and allow air to circulate. This promotes even ripening and minimizes rot. Use the supports in place of straw to decrease mold and mildew problems, especially during wet growing seasons. The plastic supports are 11.5″ in diameter, with a 3″ opening in the center. Innovative design makes it easy to install on established plants. The post Enjoy Clean, Blemish-Free Berries with New Strawberry…
  • Miniature Vegetable Garden Thrives Under Lights

    Gardener's Supply
    20 Mar 2014 | 4:59 am
    I’m deep in the heart of a bitter cold northern winter and something strange is happening. I’m rejecting gardening books and seed catalogs. I really don’t know why, as I’ve always enjoyed snuggling with garden literature. Lately though, I just can’t drum up the enthusiasm for a good, long, green-thumbed read. What I really need is to get my hands dirty. I really miss my garden. Instead of reading about someone else’s magical relationship with the land, I want to get to work in my own soil. Unfortunately, that possibility is still another month or two away.
  • Mystery Seeds Yield a Sweet Surprise

    Gardener's Supply
    18 Mar 2014 | 9:55 am
    A packet of free seed became a row of free-flowering annuals. Here at Gardener’s Supply we have something called “the free table.” It’s where employees put things they want to give away, so it’s always interesting to see what shows up. The free table is a great place to recycle. You’ll find everything from last year’s bestseller to a sparkly cat figurine. Last spring, I grabbed a packet of seeds. I was unfamiliar with the variety, but it was described as a “Victorian favorite” heirloom flower, so I decided to give it a whirl. I planted the seeds…
  • B Corps: People Using Business as a Force for Good

    Gardener's Supply
    6 Mar 2014 | 6:35 am
    What’s in the name? The B is for benefit, and it’s Corp as in corporation. We’re excited. Today, Gardener’s Supply has joined a class of companies called B Corps. With this certification comes a dual mission that combines bottom-line success and social responsibility. In short: Do well and do good. Since we started back in 1983, Gardener’s Supply has been a socially responsible business, which we’ve expressed by supporting employee volunteerism, sourcing sustainable products and donating goods and grants back to the community. As a B Corp we strengthen our…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    About.com Organic Gardening

  • New Organic Gardening Guide

    31 Mar 2014 | 9:24 am
    Hello! My name is Angela England and I wanted to introduce myself as the new Organic Gardening Guide (Expert). I started just four days ago but hurried to put up some fun posts for you for the month of March so you'd have new ideas for fun garden designs and resources this spring....Read Full Post
  • Ordering Seeds: Favorite Heirloom Tomato Varieties

    31 Jan 2014 | 6:13 am
    I've been busy the last few days trying to finalize the tomato seeds I want to order for this year's garden. I have plenty saved of tried and true favorites such as 'Brandywine...Read Full Post
  • Questions to Ask Before You Start Seeds Indoors

    15 Jan 2014 | 9:50 am
    About Container Gardening guide Kerry Michaels has a useful (and fun) list of questions one should ask oneself before deciding to start plants from seed indoors. There are several things to consider before diving into the world of indoor seed starting. First, there's the equipment and space issue. Seed flats take up space, and often more than you think they will. If you don't have a really nice, bright window, you will have to rely on artificial light. This takes up even more space, and relies upon having a power source nearby....Read Full Post
  • Reader Question: Growing Sprouts Indoors

    30 Dec 2013 | 2:29 pm
    This week's question: "I've heard that growing sprouts indoors is easy, but then I read about E. coli in sprouts and I wasn't sure if it was safe to try. Can I grow my own sprouts? And how would I do it?"...Read Full Post
  • Great Books for Gardeners

    28 Nov 2013 | 12:43 am
    I don't know about you, but I am in full holiday shopping mode. We're just about finished shopping for the kids, and now my attention is turning to the gardeners on my shopping list....Read Full Post
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    This Grandmother's Garden

  • Spring Blooms!

    Carolyn ♥
    15 Apr 2014 | 6:21 pm
    Did you read BLOOM as a noun... "Spring Blooms"or as a VERB... "Spring Blo-o-o-oms"?Actually, you could read it either waybut I wrote itas a verb.  As in... Ta da! (Drum Roll Please)Spring has finally arrived!    Is there any seasonthat brings such SWEET anticipation?I don't think so.In the Fall we plant bulbs deepin rich garden soil and wait PATIENTLY throughout the Winterfor the warmth of the golden sun to wake them up.And when they do...it's a really BIG deal.Oh we do get excited when the Tulips bloom. Springs brings RENEWAL to our gardens... every bud…
  • House For Rent

    Carolyn ♥
    28 Mar 2014 | 5:41 am
    This House sits stillsilentwaiting...waiting.  Won't someone please move in?The rent is free!All content created by Carolyn Bush | Copyright © 2010 - 2014 All Rights Reserved This Grandmother's Garden | Highland, Utah, USA All content created by Carolyn Bush | Copyright © 2010 - 2014 All Rights Reserved | This Grandmother's Garden | Highland, Utah, USA
  • If I Post It... Will She Come?

    Carolyn ♥
    19 Mar 2014 | 6:18 am
    The Spring Header is UP!So, if I post about Spring will she finally come? Hey, it's worth a try don't you think? Here's a post from last Spring... surely one of my favorites. Enjoy!(Our Redbuds are actually very tiny and tight as I write this. Sunshine... we need SUNSHINE!)  ♥♥♥  Early morning snow in my gardens! QUICK! Grab a sweatshirt and run out in your PJ's! Theres MAGIC in the gardensand it won't last long...Spring Snow always melts so quickly. Redbuds in SnowThe Redbuds are waiting patiently for sunshineand when it comes, those tiny little buds will…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Annie's Gardening Corner

  • Spring = Tulips

    18 Apr 2014 | 6:56 am
    Wishing all a Happy Easter weekend…and when you need a hint of spring, try Tulips. © Image by Ann Bilowz  If you like this blog, hope you check in for your daily share's worth of inspiration, design, and garden tips; always original, not cookie cutter and copied. Just like our design work, we strive for unique! Like our Facebook follow on Twitter or subscribe to the blog to receive posts daily via email or a feed. Either way, we hope you follow the postings somewhere in cyberspace and share it with your gardening friends. Contact me direct at Annie You can follow with visuals on…
  • Spring’s Strength

    15 Apr 2014 | 6:58 am
    It’s an archive post from last year, April 16th, 2013. It’s just a reminder about the strength of Boston despite all that occurred one year ago today to weaken the spirit. It's a day most of us will never forget but let’s remember the rally, the strength, the day after when all pulled together. And as it rains on this one year anniversary, the vital rain that strengthens our trees, our plants, and our earth - today it's important to remember spring’s strength. As Mahatma Gandhi once said, “Strength does not come from physical capacity. It comes from an indomitable will.”…
  • A break in the posts

    7 Apr 2014 | 5:56 am
    There's been a break in the April blog post flow - literally and it may be that way for a bit. This morning's post is not about design or garden related tips but a special thank you for a group of folks that too often are overlooked - the Sterling PD, the Sterling fire and rescue and our local dog officer. Thank you for the assistance on my mishap last Thursday. Never once did I doubt that you could haul me out safely as we (me & the dogs) patiently waited for your help. Thank you from my two border collies, too - they so appreciated the extra kindness and special treatment as I was…
  • Stem to Stem

    3 Apr 2014 | 6:13 am
    Do you ever think about the simple functionality of a stem? To keep it simple, that part of the plant that serves as a pump or its circulatory system? It’s amazing how much movement actually takes place in this often underrated but essential piece of these living things we call plants.  We focus elsewhere but the stem is vital and too often overlooked. So let’s take a peek at another STEM. It’s the buzz word/acronym for what’s critical in today’s educational process – SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING, & MATHEMATICS. So why compare a plant’s stem to this STEM? For…
  • Wednesday’s Limes

    2 Apr 2014 | 7:29 am
    No pun intended on this wordless Wednesday - there's only a few lines of prose to offer today, especially when the only tree in blossom, well, it's the indoor Lime basking in the morning sun. It was deemed worthy of a wordless Wednesday image accompanied by the usual quote. Today's bit of wisdom (in the form of a Jennifer Paterson quote) offers a couple of citrus tips.  No deep philosophical or inspirational thinking. In this case, not even lime but lemon tips. Yes, our indoor/outdoor Meyer Lemon tree should offer a blossom soon as well. Paterson shares these lemon tips, one…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Serenity in the Garden

  • NY Botanical Garden - a Springtime Delight

    Jan Johnsen
    16 Apr 2014 | 5:21 am
    A wonderful class at NYBG - Jan Johnsen      I am off to give a class on the 'Secrets of Creating Serene Outdoor Spaces' at the NY Botanical Garden this morning.  I love this class because it allows me to really go into depth on many little known aspects of garden design. The NYBG venue is also so inspiring and I hope to take some photos of their magnificent daffodil walk...so many types of daffodils!And if I am lucky, after class, I  can walk on some hidden paths and enjoy NYBG at its most sublime.NYBG pathWhat a treasure that place is...go explore - and take a class…
  • O sweet spontaneous - e.e. cummings

    Jan Johnsen
    15 Apr 2014 | 5:40 am
    AN ODE TO SPRING....  O sweet spontaneousby: e.e. cummings (1894-1962) sweet spontaneousearth how often havethedoting fingers ofprurient philosophers pinchedandpoked thee, has the naughty thumbof science proddedthy beauty, howoften have religions takenthee upon their scraggy kneessqueezing and  buffeting thee that thou mightest conceivegods(buttrue to the incomparablecouch of death thyrhythmiclover thou answerest them only with spring)
  • Plant a Child's Vegetable Garden!

    Jan Johnsen
    14 Apr 2014 | 7:01 am
     I am reprinting this post from last April...it is so timely! 3 secrets to a successful CHILD'S VEGETABLE GARDEN:They should not be too demanding, They should offer fairly quick results The must not  require too much maintenance.But how to achieve this in a garden in the short few months before school is over in June? Go to kidsgardening.org and then, prepare, prepare, prepare.1. First, your veggie garden site has to have full sun for over 6 hours a day. This is a must! And morning sun is preferable over 6 hours of late in the day sun.2.
  • 'Before and After' - Garden Photo of the Day

    Jan Johnsen
    13 Apr 2014 | 11:51 am
    before and after  Everyone loves 'before and after' photos...Here is a a B & A of a flower bed....time to plan for the flowers....
  • 'Purple Smoke' - The best Baptisia

    Jan Johnsen
    10 Apr 2014 | 4:48 am
    Photo - Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden - Puple Smoke Baptisia and Carolina Moonlight Baptisia This year I am planting Baptisia 'Purple Smoke'. A deer resistant, native, drought tolerant, purple, long lived perennial! Wow!It is a hybrid of B. australis and B. alba and is a vigorous grower.  Discovered by Rob Gardener of the North Carolina Botanical Gardens, it has charcoal-gray stems and is purple.  Baptisia is a native perennial that has a long taproot, loves sunny sites with lean or poor soil. Average to dry soil is best.  Its deep tap root…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    MySecretGarden

  • Spring Surprise In a Little Grey Box

    18 Apr 2014 | 10:16 am
    I like to have dry plant material on my potting bench in fall and winter. When I clean the garden, I select nice looking pieces and leave them on the bench.  Poppy heads are my favorites. I watch them changing their color from light grey to almost black during the winter. In spring, they usually go to the compost pile. Recently, I was cleaning my potting bench and reached for
  • Garden in the Beginning of April

    13 Apr 2014 | 7:59 am
    In April, every day brings something new to the garden. Here are some pictures.  Forget-me-not is a star of the early April garden: Camellia growing in the big pot: This Euphorbia is the smallest of all my euphorbias.  I'd say it's very small. I can't figure out what she needs. Herbacious peonies are doing fine: Meanwhile, my tree peony got some frost damage
  • Beautiful Spring at the Campus of the University of San Diego

    9 Apr 2014 | 6:03 am
    Spring break is over. Friendly California pampered us with gentle sun, pleasant breezes and bright blooms that I still miss in my garden. One of the pleasant surprises of our trip was discovering the beautiful University of San Diego (USD). If you are visiting San Diego, I recommend touring the USD campus and enjoying the elegant 16th century Spanish Renaissance architectural style, beautiful
  • Early Spring Garden Pictures

    25 Mar 2014 | 6:48 am
    With warmer temperatures and more sun, the garden is changing every day. Chinese rhubarb. Its first leaves are beautiful: It grew well in the container last season.  Clematis montana got a haircut: Japanese maples are awakening: Anemone: Another arch with Clematis montana. It receives less sun than the first one and is not as tangled as it.
  • Fragments of some miniature gardens at NWFGS - 2014

    22 Mar 2014 | 7:15 am
    Succulents, tropicals and orchids were the focus of several small space gardens at the Northwest Flower and Garden Show in Seattle. Air plants (Tillandsia) could be seen here and in the show's marketplace too.  Nice post by Karen Chapman about the display 'Beyond The Potted Plant' is HERE * A miniature garden for those who like fairies and gnomes:
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Veg Plotting

  • Bumblicious

    VP
    17 Apr 2014 | 12:30 am
    It's not often that mine and NAH's interests collide, but I had to show you this amazing picture of the bee Halictus ligatus from his car magazine of all things.The bee is 7-10mm and the picture is a composite of many photos taken with a macro lens which are then stitched together as only part of the bee is in focus at any one time at this magnification.The photographer is Sam Droege, an American biologist. He used a camera system originally devised by the US army to help soldiers identify biting insects such as mosquitoes.This picture forms part of the Bee Inventory and Monitoring Program at…
  • GBBD: Batchelor's Buttons

    VP
    15 Apr 2014 | 12:30 am
    The most striking feature of the front garden side border at this time of the year is Kerria japonica 'Pleniflora' aka Batchelor's buttons, Jew's mallow or Japanese rose. As you can see it's definitely living up to the 'Pleniflora' part of its name.I chose this shrub because it's tough as old boots and to brighten up a heavily shaded area. It's repelled footballs with aplomb and flowers for a long period. If it flowered later in the year, it would be too yellow as the harsher light of summer - even in shade - would make it too strident. It's classed as spring flowering, though I have…
  • Book Launch Party: Jade Pearls and Alien Eyeballs

    VP
    13 Apr 2014 | 12:30 am
    Welcome everyone!I'm delighted to be the latest stop on Emma Cooper's tour for her new book, Jade Pearls and Alien Eyeballs. Lots of authors have book tours, so why not Emma? I'm glad she's not allowed the publication of an ebook to get in the way of having a party :)Jade Pearls and Alien Eyeballs is a guide to the world of unusual edible plants. Depending on your experiences some may already be familiar to you like oca or achocha, others will be completely new.If you've read Mark Diacono's A Taste of the Unexpected or James Wong's Homegrown Revolution, Emma's book makes a superb…
  • Paint the Town Red... or Gold... or Wild

    VP
    11 Apr 2014 | 12:30 am
    Our nation's streets are set to look very different this year with 3 key initiatives helping to make it so...A single red poppy at the Yeo Valley Organic GardenAnniversary of the start of World War IPerhaps the most moving display of them all will be the bright red poppies many places will sow (or have sown) to mark the centenary of the start of WWI. Expect to see the most poignant outbreak of them all timed to flower on the exact anniversary, August 4th.WWI will also be one of the main themes for this year's RHS Chelsea Flower Show, where Birmingham City Council - famed for their…
  • Edible Masterpieces

    VP
    9 Apr 2014 | 12:30 am
    Picture courtesy & copyright of Art Fund. Food styling by Kim Morphew, prop styling by Lydia Brun, photography by Maja SmendThere's often a heated debate about whether gardens are art, so today I'm pleased to present a new twist on this theme via Art Fund's Edible Masterpieces initiative.I was particularly taken by their version of Van Gogh's self-portrait, especially as the ploughman's design recipe calls for some salad leaves. I feel I need to issue a further challenge for the 52 Week Salad Challenge - let's create some art with all those leaves! My Tiny Plot has a head start on us…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    GardenDesk

  • Chickens in the Grass Again!

    7 Apr 2014 | 11:52 am
    We live in an area with many chicken predetors. Many of our neighbors have said it to be imposible to keep chickens alive. Our solution has been to not let them roam free and to keep them protected at all times. This posses a bit of a problem when the chickens kill or eat up all the grass in their pen, so I built them a new yard addition this weekend! This yard is still covered, but is a bit more temporary in nature. It isn't as safe as the other two yards. They were built as a permenant structure with heavy wire on all sides and even buried into the ground. This new yard is just to give the…
  • Finally Getting Started with the Garden!

    4 Apr 2014 | 9:15 am
    It has been raining for the past 3 days but I still feel like I'm getting things started with this year's garden. I began excavating the new garden site earlier in the week and am actually making progress leveling the ground where my new garden beds will be going. I will be showing you that here very soon. I also finally am getting some tomato seeds potted indoors. It was fun to get out my Portable Potting Tray, some seed starting mix and my stash of tomato seeds. I only planted one tray, but crammed in as many different varieties as I could. In addition to putting tomatoes in my main garden…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    GrowBlog

  • Growing Vegetables in Containers – What Went Wrong?

    18 Apr 2014 | 12:53 am
    I usually grow a few crops in containers whenever I run out of garden space, but I do have mixed feelings about using containers for growing vegetables. On the one hand, they're really useful for extending your growing space and invaluable for setting up a garden in places, such as on a patio or a balcony, where it would otherwise be impossible. On the other hand, plants growing in containers are very sensitive to changes in watering, weather and temperature, so it's important to plan ahead and act swiftly to rectify any problems that arise.
  • Growing Asparagus in Your Vegetable Garden

    10 Apr 2014 | 10:45 am
    In my garden, the first crop of the year to be weeded, fertilized with rich compost, and tucked in with a weed-suppressing mulch is the asparagus. My plants are entering their fifth spring, so this year I get to gather all the spears I want for six whole weeks. The grand fruition of my asparagus patch feels like a celebration, probably because it has taken so long. But when it comes to growing asparagus, good things do come to those who wait.
  • Growing Vegetables Vertically for Urban Gardens

    4 Apr 2014 | 2:04 am
    When space is tight and when, as a keen kitchen gardener, you've simply run out of space there's only one option left – head skywards! Given the burgeoning popularity of container gardening, it's evident that garden sizes are steadily shrinking, especially in my crowded island home of the United Kingdom. Vertical growing is the ultimate technique for bijoux gardens that makes use of the one dimension that there's plenty of; in this instance the sky really is the limit!
  • The Charm of Cherry Tomatoes - Which Varieties to Grow

    27 Mar 2014 | 5:15 pm
    The first vegetable I ever grew was a robust cherry tomato, and this started me on my way to a lifetime of growing good things to eat. I still enjoy growing cherry tomatoes every year, and recommend them to gardeners who are just getting started, because there is little that can go wrong when growing cherry tomatoes.
  • Choosing the Best Position for Your Vegetable Garden

    20 Mar 2014 | 4:11 pm
    Would you grow vegetables next to a leaky (and very stinky!) septic tank, or plant fruit trees in a small patch of damp ground between tall conifers? Probably not, but others have – as I can attest having worked in these gardens! These two gardens had one thing in common – a complete lack of planning.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Enduring Gardener

  • Tulips on Parade

    The Enduring Gardener
    16 Apr 2014 | 12:47 am
    The tulips are in their prime right now and this gallery is a reminder that all the effort involved in planting them is worthwhile. Black Hero Clusiana Flaming Spring Green Jan Reus Negrita (I think) Purissima Roccoco Spring Green Whittallii Dior(in the background) Ballerina Jaqueline
  • Why Mess with Perfection?

    The Enduring Gardener
    12 Apr 2014 | 12:04 am
    Green Pearl Just because you can doesn’t mean you should. It is very easy to cross breed narcissus – and daffodil breeders have a lot to answer for. Contrast the simple perfection of Narcissus ‘Green Pearl’ which is in flower in my garden at the moment with two monstrosities that I saw recently at the RHS Spring Show. I think the pink frilly effort is called ‘Vanilla Ice’ but I failed to remember the name of the other.
  • Is Your Garden Gorgeous?

    The Enduring Gardener
    10 Apr 2014 | 12:20 am
    If so, Alan Titchmarsh would like to know. To mark his 50th year in horticulture he is on the lookout for thirty of the nations best private gardens to feature in a programme being made by ITV. This is not about gardens that are grand, or laid out by famous designers – it’s about people with a passion for gardening who have transformed their own space in their own individual way. If you think your garden is a possible contender – or know someone else whose garden you can recommend – email Alan@spungoldtv.com with information about the garden, including its location and size and…
  • Woodland Wonders

    The Enduring Gardener
    9 Apr 2014 | 12:18 am
    Erythronium Bluebell – I suspect a hybrid between the wild bluebell and its Spanish cousin, both of which are in the garden. Spot the difference. Primose Tulipa Sylvestris – the wild tulip Wood Anemone and Celandine (the prettiest weed in the garden) Although it is something of an exaggeration to call the area beneath the tulip tree a woodland, the dappled shade it creates and the gentle slope make it a perfect habitat for plants that like these conditions. Over the years I have added many layers of shredded bark that have created the damp humus-rich soil they like, so now I find…
  • A Lovely Pile of Peasticks

    The Enduring Gardener
    8 Apr 2014 | 12:14 am
    I’ve recently visited the cobnut farm where they generously allow me to cram my car with their prunings. I am using the short twiggy ones for support in the borders while the taller ones will, in due course, be used for beans, peas and sweet peas.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Gardening with Cheryl

  • Don’t Mow Your Lawn When Easier Lawn Alternatives are Available

    Cheryl Jones
    12 Apr 2014 | 8:49 am
    This is the time of year, most of us become disillusioned with our lawns. Water, aerate, water, reseed, water, fertilize, then repeat and that doesn’t include the mowing. It’s a never ending cycle and the time has come to replace the lawn. Customers send emails wanting to know how they can forget the grass and [...]
  • The Biggest Problem with Flowering Shrubs and How You Can Fix It

    Cheryl Jones
    9 Apr 2014 | 8:01 pm
    Most people use flowering shrubs to enhance the appearance of their homes and along property lines and fences, but sometimes these shrubs will grow so exuberantly that they overgrow their allotted spot in your garden and must be cut back. Indeed, one of the biggest problems with these shrubs is knowing when and how to prune them. [...]
  • Simple Ways to Bring Butterflies into Your Garden and Yard Areas

    Cheryl Jones
    8 Apr 2014 | 8:53 pm
    Try these simple ways to bring butterflies into your garden and yard areas for summer entertainment for you and your family. As spring warms its way into summer, we see caterpillars crawling around looking for food. Try planting Spicebush to provide plenty of food for them. Then before we know it, MAGIC! Butterflies are all [...]
  • 8 Reasons Why You Should Have a Container Garden

    Cheryl Jones
    7 Apr 2014 | 9:24 pm
    Even if you don’t have a generous room for gardening plants, you can certainly grow a container garden. You can make your patio look green and fresh with beautiful potted plants. Also, the tiniest porch at your place can vaunt with beautiful hanging basket of pretty flowers or a crop of vegetables. 8 reasons encouraging [...]
  • Tips for Hiring a Home Gardener to Help You in the Garden

    Cheryl Jones
    31 Mar 2014 | 7:16 pm
    Can you imagine owning a gorgeous garden? You can have a lovely place where plants, shrubs, flowers and trees fill your own backyard with beautiful scenery. Even if you don’t know how to cultivate a breathtaking garden yourself, you can hire someone who can help…a home gardener. The Cost Of A Gardener Many people spend [...]
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Urban Gardens

  • Three Orchids You Can Grow In Your Garden

    Nicole Brait
    18 Apr 2014 | 9:57 am
    Bletilla striata. One of the many terrestrial orchids you can grow in your garden. Photo by Takashi Hososhima. Beautiful. Ephemeral. Elusive. Fickle. Tantalizing. These are some of the words that come to mind when I think of orchids. Long … Read More...The post Three Orchids You Can Grow In Your Garden appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • From an Insect’s-eye View: The Ceramic Gardener

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    8 Apr 2014 | 8:34 am
    Frances Doherty, The Ceramic Gardener, sold her restaurant to instead feast on ceramics, something she got hooked on after evening classes. Her work comes from the flowers and plants that we see around us, even in the cracks in the … Read More...The post From an Insect’s-eye View: The Ceramic Gardener appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • The High Line; Manhattan’s Garden Park

    Nicole Brait
    7 Apr 2014 | 1:10 pm
    A perennial combination along the walking path of the High Line. Photo by Steven Severinghaus. Unlike Central Park or Prospect Park, the High Line has no swaths of grass, no baseball fields, no pond. In contrast to most urban parks, … Read More...The post The High Line; Manhattan’s Garden Park appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Milan Design Week 2014 Preview: Angelo Grassi Grows Vegetables on Furniture

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    2 Apr 2014 | 10:54 am
    Fuorisalone is where Angelo Grassi’s Ortofabricca will be on view. I’m packing for my trip to Milan Design Week where I will be joining a stellar team of eleven design bloggers on the Modenus BlogTour. From Milan, I’ll report back … Read More...The post Milan Design Week 2014 Preview: Angelo Grassi Grows Vegetables on Furniture appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Japanese Commuters Tending Train Station Rooftop Gardens

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    27 Mar 2014 | 1:47 pm
    Oh how dreadful that morning commute can be. Even with the help of podcasts, books, game apps, 16 gigs of music– it can still be a soul draining bore. Good news! Japan may have come up with a cure to … Read More...The post Japanese Commuters Tending Train Station Rooftop Gardens appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Busch Gardens in Virginia Blog

  • Introducing Our Coaster Tree

    Emily Bea
    17 Apr 2014 | 8:15 am
    A flower? A bunch of ribbons?  A stalk of broccoli?  Those are just some of the interpretations we have heard about our brand icon since it was introduced last year.  And now that it has taken a prominent place as a large sculpture at the entrance of Busch Gardens, the symbol is sure to create even more conversation. The icon is officially known as the “coaster tree” and is intended to evoke the images of a looping roller coaster track and a tree.  Symbolically, it represents the intersection of thrills and nature that can be found at Busch Gardens. Unless…
  • A Day in the Life of an Operations Manager

    Emily Bea
    8 Apr 2014 | 1:39 pm
    I was challenged with writing a post about what I do as a Duty Manager in the park.  At first I thought this would be a pretty easy blog to write since I’ve held this position for 14 years, but then I started thinking about my daily responsibilities.  I like to think that I have a plan when I come to work.  I have tasks and assignments that I’m responsible for and that I work on, but on operating days, my plans don’t always come to fruition. One of the things I like most about my job is that it is ever changing.  I don’t sit behind a desk all day; I…
  • Water Country USA® Is Hosting A Colossal Pool Party This Spring

    Koy Grant
    24 Mar 2014 | 6:20 am
    Click the image above to watch a video from our Water Country USA team Spring may have officially sprung, but Water Country USA has set its sights on summer. We are launching a video submission contest to celebrate the summer season and the opening of our newest family-thrill attraction, Colossal Curl. High school students in grades nine through 12 are invited to join with their schools’ administration to enter the Water Country USA Colossal Pool Party Giveaway. One lucky school will be awarded the following:        • VIP admission for up to 250 students and up…
  • Taste-Testing For the Second Year of the Food and Wine Festival

    Emily Bea
    18 Mar 2014 | 2:00 pm
    Around this time of year, when people find out that I work at Busch Gardens, they say, “you must be so bored when the park is closed”.  Quite the contrary!  The amount of planning, training, testing, and set-up that goes into having a successful year at the park is astounding.  Our goal is to ensure our guests have a phenomenal experience at Busch Gardens. But all of this work is fun, especially in culinary.  Our team is constantly trying new products or recipes to keep our menus delicious and up-to-date.  That translates into playing around with and,…
  • We're Looking Forward to Opening Day

    Emily Bea
    14 Mar 2014 | 8:02 am
    Busch Gardens Fans, It seems like just yesterday when we wrapped up another great season, and here we are again ready to spring into fun with an action-packed year. We have some very exciting experiences planned for the 2014 season, and after a long winter, I’m ready for Busch Gardens to open. Photo courtesy of Sheila, Inside Busch Gardens Blogger We have lots of excitement with all our great rides and shows, and a few surprises up our sleeve.  We’ll be celebrating Land of the Dragons’ 20th anniversary on April 26 with a special party and fun…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    My Tool Blog

  • Yale PostMaster Postboxes

    Beth
    11 Apr 2014 | 4:58 am
    Yale, the World’s favourite lock since 1843, have introduced their new range of steel Post Boxes & News Holders, available in 7 designs and 4 different colours! Delaware Arriving in either a black or stainless steel finish and featuring a stylish narrow design, this postbox comes fitted with a high quality Yale lock and coming with two keys. Additionally, it has a drop down door which gives simple removal of its contents. The extended anti-phishing plate on this postbox ensures added protection, whilst it also features a strong interior strap for holding the door open for mail…
  • Stanley Limited Edition Tech 3 Socket Sets

    Beth
    11 Apr 2014 | 4:13 am
    These Limited Edition Stanley Tech 3 Socket Sets are made with black chrome socketry to ensure premium resistance to corrosion! Stanley STA072653 Tech 3 66 piece 1/4in Drive Socket Set This set includes screwdriver bits, sockets, extensions, an adaptor and ratchet which all contain 1/4 inch socketry. Supplied in a handy, sturdy carry case, this socket set provides great value for money with its diverse range of pieces included. 1 x Ratchet 13 x Sockets (4, 4.5, 5, 5.5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14mm) 11 x Deep sockets (4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14mm) 2 x Extensions: 75 and…
  • The NEW DeWalt DCN692N XR 18v Li-ion Cordless Gasless Framing Nailer

    Beth
    26 Mar 2014 | 4:35 am
    DeWalt have done it again! After the hugely successful launch of the DCN690 cordless, gas free Framing Nailer they decided to work on improving their ground breaking tool and have now announced the newest addition to their brushless cordless range – the NEW DeWalt DCN692N XR 18v Li-ion 2 Speed Cordless Gasless Framing Nailer! We can exclusively reveal that we have the specs for the new model, which will be available as a naked unit only, and www.my-tool-shed.co.uk will have stock by early May! Much like it’s predecessor, the DCN692N has an ergonomic design allowing the nailer to fit…
  • The NEW DeWalt DCR019 XR Compact FM AM Radio is available soon at My Tool Shed!

    Beth
    11 Feb 2014 | 7:19 am
    The brand new DCR019 XR Compact FM/AM Radio from DeWalt is due to hit My Tool Shed this April 2014! Compact and robust, it accepts 10.8V, 14.4V and 18V XR Li-Ion batteries. Features include a 3.5mm auxiliary port that allows for connection to portable audio devices, an integral roll cage to provide impact resistance for maximum durability, a 1.8m power cord with wrap-around cord storage and a massive memory storage for 10 FM and 5 AM presets! Specification: Battery chemistry: XR Li-Ion Voltage: 10.8/14.4/18 V Radio Power Source: AC/DC Radio Frequencies: FM/AM Length: 240 mm Height: 245 mm…
  • NEW to My Tool Shed! The DeWalt D25124K SDS Plus QCC Heavy-Duty Combi Hammer Drill

    Beth
    4 Feb 2014 | 12:51 am
    The DeWalt D25124K 240 volt SDS plus QCC Hammer drill is a heavy duty tool that can drill holes in concrete, masonry and metal from 4 to 26mm   The D25124K is fitted with a electronic variable speed function for total control when drilling into different materials and a impact-stop setting for drilling and screwdriving applications. Including a rotation stop setting useful for when chiseling into brick or soft masonry, the safety clutch eliminates sudden high torque if the bit jams. Delivering up to 4300bpm with a maximum drilling depth of 30mm in wood and 26mm in concrete, it is an…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    A Charlotte Garden

  • Intense Cherry

    Daricia McKnight
    4 Apr 2014 | 6:41 am
    April cherry blossoms in Charlotte, NCA little too saturated, huh? It's just hard to get the petal edges to show up, and I wanted to keep the photo as bright as possible, so this is the way I decided to go with it. Sometimes the feeling you get from a plant is better represented with these tweaks added than from the photo straight out of the camera. Especially my camera. ;)Happy Friday!~ Daricia
  • Beautiful Bulbs

    Daricia McKnight
    27 Mar 2014 | 4:58 pm
    During some of the coldest, most miserable days of winter this year, I had this little bulb garden to keep an eye on, and all these beautiful blooms to look forward to.Living Gardens sent it to me with instructions to water it and keep it in a cool room. I had just the place, I thought, and put it on my enclosed porch. The temperatures there are always above freezing, but sometimes not much—it took weeks longer to bloom than had been indicated.Maybe 45 degrees was a little cooler room than they had in mind, but it has helped the blooms last a long time and kept the heavy scent of the…
  • Remember This Next Fall

    Daricia McKnight
    11 Mar 2014 | 6:00 pm
    Ruby Giant Crocus.My yard is abloom. You would think it's spring already! It did feel like it today with temperatures in the 70s.This year the daffodils all bloomed at once and the King Alfreds are larger and more floriferous than ever before. Maybe it was the extra cold period we had? Or the abundant rain last spring? Whatever it was, it's time to appreciate them, and all the other blooming bulbs.I added pink daffodils to my garden a few years ago and I love them! One day I'll have as many of those as the yellow ones I hope.Pink Charm DaffodilConjoined twins!Delnashaugh DaffodilDelnashaugh…
  • Native Plants of the Southeast—We have a winner!

    Daricia McKnight
    18 Feb 2014 | 11:30 am
    Coastal plain Joe-pye weed (Eutrochium dubium) with yellow swallowtail butterfly.Taken from Native Plants of the Southeast(c) Copyright 2014 by Larry Mellichamp. Photo by Will Stuart.  Published by Timber Press, Portland, OR. Used by permission of the publisher. All rights reserved..By random number generator, our winner for Native Plants of the Southeast is #1—Roseann Blacher! Congratulations, Roseann! Roseann's favorite place to visit native plants is The Pocket, north of Rome, Georgia. She also mentioned the Berry College campus which I just happen to have a…
  • Outside, Snow

    Daricia McKnight
    12 Feb 2014 | 11:54 am
    Here's what it looked like in Charlotte yesterday afternoon. Today the second round of snow has come with a prediction of 5–10 inches. All the tracks from yesterday are covered and the air is thick with flying flakes as I write this.One of my favorite trees is the hemlock in my front yard. Don't these trees look especially beautiful in snow? They're so graceful. That's my Alice oakleaf hydrangea to the left of the hemlock, another favorite.A couple of days ago it was over 60 degrees and look what suddenly showed its face:Now this:The first snowdrops two days ago:And now this:Kinda gives new…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Thanks for today.

  • Little Signs of Natives in My Garden

    Jan
    28 Mar 2014 | 9:19 am
    The native plants in my garden are finally beginning to wake up. Everything is much later than last year due to this unusually cold winter and prolonged colder temperatures. I thought I would show them in their current state, even though there are only a couple of plants with buds/blooms.Mertensia virginica -- Virginia Bluebells -- are in various stages throughout the garden, with this one plant surpassing the rest in size  Sanguinaria canadensis -- Bloodroot -- this one has some buds but others haven't even broken ground yet Erythronium americanum -- Trout Lily -- a tiny leaf…
  • Blooms in Snow

    Jan
    18 Mar 2014 | 6:43 pm
    When I posted for Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day on Saturday I thought I'd photographed all the blooms that were out, on that 60+ degree day. But today, as I walked through the 6"-7" of snow that was dumped Sunday night, I noticed some green sprouts and thought they looked familiar. I uncovered them and found Iris Reticulata blooms! I should have taken a photo before I uncovered them...they were totally hidden except for a bit of green.They had to have been in bloom 2 days ago...I just didn't notice them. In fact, I thought the critters had finished them off and I no longer had any.
  • Wait...what?!?

    Jan
    18 Mar 2014 | 6:16 pm
    It snowed between 6" and 7" Sunday night. After temps in the 60's the day before, the birds were as surprised as the humans were!Although it looks like a Christmas scene to me, and I'm ready for spring, I do appreciate the beauty of a good snowfall.The backyard looked silent and peaceful, covered in a blanket of white. My kitchen garden/potager (fancy names for pots I fill with herbs and veggies!) lies in wait...The untouched deck...before the dogs ran around on it.We should invest in some stock with the bird seed company...The driveway and side yardThe front yard was just as quiet and…
  • Floating Hellebores

    Jan
    15 Mar 2014 | 7:26 pm
    After a day in the high 60's we're expecting another snowstorm tomorrow night, so I thought I'd snip off some hellebores and float them in a bowl of water. Might as well enjoy them inside if they're just going to get covered up with the white stuff!What gifts have you discovered today? Until next time, Words and photos ©Thanks for today.™, by Jan Huston Doble @ http://www.thanksfor2day.blogspot.com/Not to be reproduced or re-blogged without express permission of the author.
  • Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day: March 15, 2014

    Jan
    15 Mar 2014 | 6:42 pm
    The 15th of every month is Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day and I've finally got some blooms to show off! I'll start with the Hellebores, in various shades of pink, purple, white, green, yellow and even black as well as spotted and doubles.           I planted hundreds of daffodils last fall and this is, so far, the only one with a bud:Tete-a-tete narcissus is getting ready:Pink Hepatica:White Hepatica:Galanthus:Crocus:What gifts have you discovered today? Until next time, We're expecting yet another snowstorm tomorrow night so I wanted to get…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Pacific Outdoor Living | Landscape Design - Landscape Contractor La

  • 2014 Pasadena Showcase House of Design

    admin
    16 Apr 2014 | 4:59 pm
    Pacific Outdoor Living celebrates its 15th year at Showcase! We are very proud to have been a part of such an amazing organization for so many years, and for the chance to work with such a dedicated and talented group of individuals. Here’s to 15 more amazing years! The Pasadena Showcase House of design is […]
  • Which Landscape Design is Right for You?

    admin
    17 Jan 2014 | 1:25 pm
      When it comes to remodeling your backyard or making changes to your patio, you’re presented with an unlimited number of choices regarding the style, colors, materials and overall design. The best way to begin is to choose the landscape style you like the best and design within its guidelines. Of course, these styles don’t […]
  • Courtyard Designs – 6 Ways to Transform Your Backyard

    admin
    11 Dec 2013 | 3:49 pm
    Courtyards have been around for thousands of years, and while styles and materials have changed since then, the basic meaning and use has remained the same. Courtyards should be open, secluded spaces to mingle with friends, host events or just sit and contemplate the day. How you decide to design the space and make it […]
  • Why is Winter the Best Time to Think About Landscape Design?

    admin
    5 Nov 2013 | 6:09 pm
    For those of us who live in Los Angeles, winter means rainy days, overcast skies and cold weather. Thinking about landscaping and spending time outdoors is usually reserved for spring and summer. So why do landscape experts recommend designing in winter? Let’s take a look at a few of the benefits of designing for spring, […]
  • The Best Winter Flowers for Your Garden

    admin
    28 Oct 2013 | 11:16 am
    Winter doesn’t have to mean dead flowers, drab colors and a lifeless backyard. There are certain flowers that can still bloom and add a rich, vibrant appearance to your garden, even during the winter months. Let’s take a look at a few of the best winter flowers for your garden: Hydrangeas Well known as a […]
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Lead up the Garden Path

  • April Flowers for GBBD.

    Pauline
    14 Apr 2014 | 11:59 pm
    This month of April is rushing by without giving me a chance to catch my breath and enjoy all that it has to offer. No sooner does one lot of plants come into flower, than another is pushing forward, trying to be the centre of attention. Trying to appreciate  them all is almost impossible. I’m starting with a small flowered ground cover, Claytonia virginica, which has almost white flowers, striped with pink. It seeds gently around, all mine seem to be in semi shaded borders where they show up nicely. They have spoon shaped succulent leaves and grow from tiny black tubers. They never…
  • Who’s looking over our hedge?

    Pauline
    12 Apr 2014 | 12:05 am
    Some of you may remember me writing a couple of posts about the land next door, in the grounds of what was the village school,  being sold for development, click here and here if you would like to read  about how I was trying to protect our dormouse habitat. This post is an update on how the building is going. This is the view taken last August before the building could be seen over the hedge. Taken from almost the same spot by the border by the field. I’m hoping that when the leaves are on the trees and shrubs that the house will be hidden. The house is absolutely huge. It is…
  • It’s Blossom Time again.

    Pauline
    9 Apr 2014 | 8:04 am
    The garden has been producing wave after wave of flowers, snowdrops, crocus, narcissus and now it’s blossom time once more. Time to lift up our heads and look above head height at all the flowers that are open at the moment. By the entrance is a cherry which the previous people planted, it has two seasons when it stands out, now with all its lovely blossom and then later, in the autumn when the leaves turn a delicious orange/red. I’m going to have to prune it a bit because now the branches sweep the car roof when we go in and out. I’m sure that my next door neighbour curses…
  • Through the window.

    Pauline
    6 Apr 2014 | 7:06 am
    When starting the garden here, many, many years ago, I felt that whichever part we were doing had to look right from inside the house as well as from outside. So many times, I would mark things out, usually with a hosepipe, then rush back inside to see if it looked ok, if not, then back outside, move the markers a bit and try again. Eventually when I was satisfied with the shapes I had marked out, grass could be cut back, (everywhere was just grass to start with, except for a few shrubs) soil improved and planting started. We’ll start with a view from the landing window, the shape of…
  • The Woodland in March. EOMV.

    Pauline
    31 Mar 2014 | 11:40 am
    The white of the snowdrops has changed into the yellow of the narcissus, which means that the woodland looks totally different now that the warm sunshine has finished off the flowers of the snowdrops and crocus. Each day when I come for a wander, I find something new which has opened overnight, but also, looking with a critical eye, I’m thinking of what I can add to make it look more interesting in certain places where all the early flowers have faded. The first view is the woodland border from the back garden. The woodland from by the archway. This is the border to the left of the…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    leavesnbloom gardening and nature in Scotland

  • The April Garden

    Rosie Nixon
    14 Apr 2014 | 4:00 pm
    It's April and the garden finally is bursting into life.  As each week goes by less and less soil is visible as green starts to become the predominate colour again.  April is always blustery here and with every gust a little more of the Cherry blossom is carried across the garden like confetti. As well as cherry blossom in the air so too are the bees, bee -flies and ladybirds while the bats have started their night time sorties again.   Glorious sunny days also bring frosty nights and there's always the threat to the camellia flowers and plum blossom.  Weather forecasts are…
  • The Golden Days of Spring

    Rosie Nixon
    31 Mar 2014 | 12:01 am
    Yellow and gold dominates my garden at this time of year while neglect often rules it.  Truth be told I'd rather be sitting in the spring garden with the camera instead of weeding.   Though I must admit that a little bit of sunshine and heat goes a long way.  It can even entice this lady outdoors without the camera and get on with a few gardening jobs.  Read more »
  • Floral Eye Candy in March

    Rosie Nixon
    15 Mar 2014 | 3:13 am
    March is synonymous with blustery and breezy days.  There's the stirring of new life and dew wet mornings.  The sap is rising and buds are swelling.  Frosty mornings give us a nip in the air. While a little warm sunshine coaxes the flowers to open and encourages the bees out of their winter slumber ...along with the gardener! I'm never all that sure when to start calling it Spring.  As far as the UK Met Office are concerned we're already in spring but astronomically we've still got to wait another 5 days  for the equinox.  Here on the blog I use the meteorological…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Sage Butterfly

  • Tracking the Journey North

    The Sage Butterfly
    9 Apr 2014 | 1:07 pm
    Since we had a harsh winter, I was wondering if there would be a delay in the arrival of the Ruby-throated hummingbird. The delay only seems to be about a week according to reported sightings of these creatures on their migration journey northward.The Ruby-throated hummingbird migrates north in the spring to breed. They fly from Central America up to the U.S. In winter, they feed from southern Mexico to northern Panama. Their journey north may begin as early as January, feeding off of insects found in northern Mexico. They fatten up, nearly doubling in weight, for the long journey, sometimes…
  • My Garden Notebook - April 2014

    The Sage Butterfly
    1 Apr 2014 | 4:46 am
    King of the Striped CrocusWinter seems to have made a strong refusal to leave and allow spring to take over. We have had snow this month, very cold temperatures, and some periods of rain and wintry mix precipitation. However, all of that does not seem to hinder the emergence of spring for many of the plants in the garden. Spring manages to squeeze in a few days here and there of warm temperatures that whisper a soft tune to all the plants that spring is coming despite winter's resistance.statsGardening Zone: 7aMarch High Temperature: 73 degrees FMarch Low Temperature: 10 degrees…
  • The Magic and Wonder of Leaves

    The Sage Butterfly
    27 Mar 2014 | 6:02 am
    Leaves sprinkle across the landscape, unmistakable and established. They are a token of most landscapes, providing the backdrop for a pleasant view or gorgeous vista. Beautiful alone, in pairs, or in groups, they hold the dazzling charm of nature's breath.Draped over a fence or resting on the snow, they often go unnoticed because they are seen by many each day.They hold water...and ice.They gather frost...and find respite.They catch the sun...and drift across water.Some Facts About Leaves1. Leaves use photosynthesis to convert energy from sunlight to feed the tree or plant.2. The green in…
  • Wordless Wednesday

    The Sage Butterfly
    12 Mar 2014 | 6:29 am
    © copyright 2014 Michelle A. Potter
  • My Garden Notebook - March 2014

    The Sage Butterfly
    28 Feb 2014 | 9:02 pm
    Hello, dear friends. This time away has been a great time to get things in order and to look ahead to the gardening year. Grief has a way of transporting us to a place where we can see the mist in front of the sun, hear the low chortle before a bird's chirp, and sense the enormity of silence. It is a time to do many things, it is a time to ponder.Winter has a way of slowing me down, forcing me to sit back and ponder. With all of these snowy days, the best place to do that is in front of a window--to see nature paint the bare branches or brush the evergreens with just enough crystals as to…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Garden Walk Garden Talk

  • How Much Should We Show in Photographs?

    Donna Brok
    16 Apr 2014 | 5:00 pm
    This is a question that faces all photographers, experienced and novice I believe. Garden, landscape and wildlife photographers alike look at a scene and make a decision on how to make their photos paint a mental picture for the viewer. … Continue reading →
  • Playing Tourist – Or Photos of Substance?

    Donna Brok
    15 Apr 2014 | 5:00 am
    That is a question I ask myself often. Many times it seems that way as the excitement builds getting to see animals and birds not often seen. In fact, I recently have seen quite a few birds new to me … Continue reading →
  • Lesser or Greater

    Donna Brok
    12 Apr 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Yellowlegs that is. Morning is clear, bright and plays across the marsh as the temperature changes, the breeze blows cool, and frost kisses leaves and grasses. That is how the day started. Life awakens  grand. A busy day trolling the … Continue reading →
  • Our Story Looking For Eagles

    Donna Brok
    9 Apr 2014 | 4:00 pm
    How about a post about eagles, that is lacking in pictures of eagles. Well, my friend and I did see eagles, in fact many times we even THOUGHT we were seeing eagles. We were joking that we are terrible birdwatchers … Continue reading →
  • A Bird I Did Not See in Twenty Years

    Donna Brok
    7 Apr 2014 | 5:00 pm
    OK, just call me uninformed. When I lived in Pennsylvania, I saw these birds everyday. They would take flight every time I rode my horse through a field, sometimes startling my steed. When I first moved to Niagara Falls, I … Continue reading →
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Gardenerd

  • Volunteers: Nature’s Helpers

    Christy
    15 Apr 2014 | 11:47 pm
    This time of year, we have a lot of sprouts popping up in odd places. We didn’t plant them, they are “volunteers.” Volunteers are a godsend in filling in spaces around the yard with spring flowers, extra lettuces, and even … Continue reading →The post Volunteers: Nature’s Helpers appeared first on Gardenerd.
  • Native Garden Tour- Part 2: The coolest thing ever

    Christy
    14 Apr 2014 | 11:39 pm
    Plants are interesting. Birds are interesting. Put them together and you get a Xerces Society Certified Pollinator Habitat. Last week on the Theodore Payne Native Plant Garden Tour, we started off with a jaw dropping experience in Beverly Hills that … Continue reading →The post Native Garden Tour- Part 2: The coolest thing ever appeared first on Gardenerd.
  • YouTube: How to Plant Tomatoes

    Christy
    8 Apr 2014 | 11:31 pm
    It’s tomato season, and we’ve got ours in the ground already. It may be early for some, but we’re experiencing 80 degree days this week, so we took a chance and were so bold as to plant tomatoes (18 of … Continue reading →The post YouTube: How to Plant Tomatoes appeared first on Gardenerd.
  • Native Garden Tour – Part 1: Great Plants for Pollinators

    Christy
    8 Apr 2014 | 9:16 am
    I was gifted two tickets to the Theodore Payne Native Plant Garden Tour this past weekend and set out with my co-chair for the Mar Vista Green Garden Showcase to see what native plants people are growing in Los Angeles … Continue reading →The post Native Garden Tour – Part 1: Great Plants for Pollinators appeared first on Gardenerd.
  • Climate Change Round Up (AKA Things I Care About)

    Christy
    1 Apr 2014 | 11:16 pm
    #Climate Change was trending on Twitter yesterday. As gardenerds, we don’t need Twitter to point out the changes in seasonal behavior. We can spot when things are off. Things are definitely off. Mudslides, more intense icy winters, more frequent flooding, … Continue reading →The post Climate Change Round Up (AKA Things I Care About) appeared first on Gardenerd.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Fine Gardening - Gallery category posts

  • Mystery soft low shrub

    14 Apr 2014 | 12:20 pm
    Posted by SaraAR This plant is soft and low to the ground, almost like a ground cover but has not spread at all...any ideas? It's a pretty blue green color
  • New Gardens (help)

    14 Apr 2014 | 6:48 am
    Posted by KalieL I need help with my south facing, 5b zone front gardens. We have pretty bad clay soil, but I always mix peat moss and mulch in with my holes when planting. I grew up just randomly placing plants and...
  • Turn Your Balcony into a Garden

    14 Apr 2014 | 4:54 am
    Posted by AllisonTaylor If you live in London, you're probably an inhabitant of a small flat. This almost removes any opportunities for growing a garden. Almost! There is still a chance, especially if you have a balcony or...
  • Please help me identify this plant

    13 Apr 2014 | 1:28 pm
    Posted by marge2014 Greenl and slightly red
  • What are those?

    11 Apr 2014 | 11:54 am
    Posted by Denis25 Moved to a new house, where the previouse owner was a great gardner (tha what the neighbour says). I'm totaly new to this and never had a garden before. Was wondering what those flower might be and...
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Perennial Meadows

  • Shades of Green

    Michael
    28 Mar 2014 | 4:33 am
    In Perennial Meadows The mild winter and spring in the Netherlands has triggered everything into growth. The overwhelming colour is green even though a lot is actually in flower. Green in its many shades is at the heart of all garden planting. Celebrate it:
  • Combining Perennial Meadows and Shrub Feature Borders

    Michael
    25 Mar 2014 | 4:40 am
    I have been telling everyone about Pachyphragma macrophyllum over many years, but still it is a little known ground cover perennial. Shrub feature borders combine special shrubs with other plants to create bold units of planting that play a role in the design and organisation of garden landscapes. In this square feature border shrubs including spring flowering Corylopsis spicata and the tree-like and later flowering Chionanthus virginicus rise out of a carpet of perennials. In spring the perennial meadow that forms the ground covering layer of this shrub feature border is dominated by one of…
  • Shrubs in Perennial Meadows

    Michael
    7 Mar 2014 | 5:18 am
    A shrub feature border consists of a selection of characterful woody plants presented within a mixed perennial meadow planting. The concept has arisen from a need to use shrubs with more effect in planting designs. In the same way that perennial meadows are created using a mix of theme plants and complementary plants, the shrubs in a feature border fall into the same two categories. Shrubs with a graceful or characteristic habit that have an extended season of interest, by flowering, by producing fruit or by developing dramatic autumnal tints are chosen as the main theme plants in such…
  • “New” Naturalistic Planting

    Michael
    20 Feb 2014 | 3:25 am
    I have always been uneasy with the term naturalistic planting, not with what it actually means, but with the way it is used in the media to describe any “new” planting scheme in which perennials together with ornamental grasses are mixed in an informal arrangement. The true underlying principle of naturalistic gardening is the intrinsic chaos that exists in ecological processes that resolve themselves, through a myriad of outside influences, into patterns and plant communities that are distinctive and that can be recognised and categorised by humans. Using the trigger of…
  • Never New Gardening

    Michael
    12 Feb 2014 | 7:46 am
    Never say new when trumpeting gardens, garden designers or trends in gardening. If anything is new it is seized upon by its followers and all too quickly becomes aspirational. I once wrote a book with Piet Oudolf and Henk Gerritsen entitled New Plants, New Gardens (A new movement in garden design). That was in 1997 when the then-called “Dutch Wave” had reached a point that the rest of Europe was watching with interest the innovative ways perennials were being deployed in mixed planting schemes. The Dutch Wave was nothing really new, but it looked like it at the time. In reality it…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Beautiful Wildlife Garden

  • Birds Who Tease: Purple Martins

    Loret T. Setters
    18 Apr 2014 | 7:53 am
    Bluebird babies fledged this week from their nest high up in the Purple Martin house. Next day, the Purple Martins (Progne subis) arrived. I guess it was a sublet and the lease was up for the bluebirds. Purple Martins are a picky bunch. They zoom round and round and round some more. They peer into […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Fireflies in the Garden

    Kathy Vilim
    17 Apr 2014 | 4:36 am
      Fireflies in the Garden, a Poem by Robert Frost Here come real stars to fill the upper skies, And here on earth come emulating flies, That though they never equal stars in size, (And they were never really stars at heart) Achieve at times a very star-like start. Only, of course, they can’t sustain […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Loblolly Pine Wildlife Value

    Carole Sevilla Brown
    15 Apr 2014 | 9:59 pm
    Loblolly Pine (Pinus taeda) is a native tree of the southeastern United States. Often growing in wet woodlands, Loblolly Pine provides great habitat and value for wildlife. The native range of Pinus taeda covers eastern Texas to northern Florida, and all of the southern coastal states up to Delaware. Pinus taeda Botanical Description Pinus taeda: This tree […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • For The Love of a Tree

    Donna Donabella
    12 Apr 2014 | 1:00 am
      Keep a green tree in your heart and perhaps a singing bird will come.  ~Chinese proverb       You may remember last year I wrote about the plight of our ash trees.   It was just about this time, in early spring, that we were saying goodbye to 4 of our mature ash trees […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Squirrelly Squirrels in the Garden

    Loret T. Setters
    11 Apr 2014 | 7:50 am
    Squirrels are a normal occurrence in a great many beautiful wildlife gardens.  Up until this year, suprisingly my yard was not one of them. Perhaps not so surprisingly after all.  When I purchased my plot back in 2006, it was pretty much clear cut sans a smattering of long leaf pine trees.  Squirrel have a […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Vegetable Gardener - All featured posts

  • Time for Spring Planting

    16 Apr 2014 | 1:27 pm
    Posted by WesternGardener If you’ve never planted a spring garden, it’s time to get growing. Now’s the time to start sprinkling seeds like lettuces, spinach, chard and more.
  • Build Your Own Potting Bench

    14 Apr 2014 | 5:00 am
    Posted by yourownvictorygarden This potting bench is solidly built, and will serve you well for many years to come. It features plenty of work space and an extra shelf for storage.
  • Springtime Chores

    12 Apr 2014 | 1:22 pm
    Posted by cookinwithherbs Finally the warmer spring weather has arrived and we all want to be outdoors. As a gardener, though I delight in everything bursting forth, I want to feel the soil and sow seeds. However, once I go outside I am distracted by all there is to do--here are a few chores, which need taking care of...
  • New Guide to Vegetable Gardening in the Mountain States

    5 Apr 2014 | 7:12 am
    Posted by WesternGardener A new vegetable gardening book by Idaho author Mary Ann Newcomer is designed to help gardeners grow great gardens in spite of difficult conditions in the Rocky Mountain Region. She advises vegetable gardeners to "start small and dream big."
  • Artemisia: Herb of the Year 2014

    31 Mar 2014 | 9:57 pm
    Posted by cookinwithherbs Artemisia is herb of the year for 2014 and I am gearing up for growing them in my garden. Next weekend is the Medicinal Herb Fieldtrip and Workshop at the Ozark Folk Center, where I will be giving a program on the medicinal aspects of some artemisias... here are a few excerpts from my handout for the program. Why don't you try growing a few of these easy-to-grow plants? Celebrate Artemisia!
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Fine Gardening - Blogs category featured posts

  • Breaking Up Is (Not So) Hard To Do

    18 Apr 2014 | 4:57 am
    Posted by Julie_Moir_Messervy Concrete pavers are an increasingly popular (and affordable) material for patios and terraces, but their appearance is not always as aesthetically appealing as natural stone pavers. Here are some suggestions for making them more beautiful.
  • Becky's garden in Pennsylvania

    17 Apr 2014 | 11:00 pm
    Posted by MichelleGervais Today's photso are from Becky Shubert. She says, "I live in south-central Pennsylvania, a few miles from the Pennsylvania/Maryland line (USDA Hardiness Zone 6). My garden consists of a variety of...
  • Jeri's garden in Alaska

    16 Apr 2014 | 11:00 pm
    Posted by MichelleGervais Today's photos are from Jeri Walters in Anchorage, Alaska. Who knew there were so many gardens/gardeners in Alaska? So exciting! Jeri says, "This is my garden in USDA Hardiness Zone 3 in Anchorage...
  • Through the garden gate in Gail's garden in Oklahoma

    15 Apr 2014 | 11:00 pm
    Posted by MichelleGervais We visited Gail Wynne's garden in north central Oklahoma almost a year ago (refresh your memory HERE), and today she's back with a few more photos. She says, "These are photos of the garden gate...
  • Daylilies and more in Betsy's garden in New York

    14 Apr 2014 | 11:00 pm
    Posted by MichelleGervais Remember Betsy Thompson's garden? We've visited a couple of times before (refresh your memory HERE and HERE), and she was one of the gardeners I profiled in my talk in Seattle in February. Betsy, Im...
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    About.com Trees and Shrubs

  • Mystery Monday - Name This Plant Reaction

    14 Apr 2014 | 3:42 pm
    Welcome to Mystery Monday! For this week, please name the botanical term for the reaction you see in the picture, where tendrils have curled around the stem. I'm working on a new piece that explains the biological reactions that plants can have in response to stimuli. This is the one in reaction to touching....Read Full Post
  • Mystery Monday - Name That Shrub!

    7 Apr 2014 | 2:44 pm
    Happy Mystery Monday. It's springtime! Buds are popping open everywhere. Can you name what this one is? It is somewhat easy, so let's try it without any clues. If no one guesses within a few days, I will add some. Good luck!...Read Full Post
  • March 2014 Tree and Shrub Roundup

    31 Mar 2014 | 3:43 pm
    I am so excited that it is officially spring now! I am starting my vegetable and herb seeds this week. I need to go shopping and see if I want to buy a new dwarf fruit tree. This is definitely my favorite time of the year....Read Full Post
  • Mystery Monday - Name That Shrub!

    24 Mar 2014 | 3:44 pm
    Your clues for this week: This shrub is a member of the Fabaceae (pea) family. The common name includes a metal. You would originally find this in prairies in North America. Image by gmayfield10 via Flickr Creative Commons Attribute-ShareAlike License
  • Mystery Monday - Name the Irish Tree!

    17 Mar 2014 | 2:08 pm
    Beannachtaí na Féile Pádraig oraibh! That's Irish Gaelic for "St. Patrick's Day blessing upon you". For fun, you can tell people Tabhair póg dom, táim Éireannach - the famous "Kiss Me, I'm Irish"....Read Full Post
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Miss Rumphius' Rules

  • A Tale of Two Garden Sphinxes

    Susan aka Miss. R
    14 Apr 2014 | 4:56 am
    Imagine my surprise, while visiting Hillwood Museum and Gardens, when I saw this sphinx at the entrance to the formal gardens.  There are four of them.  I’ve seen them before, in bronze at Blairsden–the house that is also the location for a garden I’ve designed for APLDNJ for this year’s Mansion in May. The sphinx at Hillwood… The slightly different but not all that much sphinx at Blairsden. I don’t know a lot about these types of sphinxes, but the similarities are remarkable don’t you think?
  • Garden Trends: Rattan Seating

    Susan aka Miss. R
    31 Mar 2014 | 3:30 am
    I first noticed this emerging trend in Paris at Maison et Objet in January. Rattan furniture is back. As a material, it’s been out of favor for a while, but in the 1940s and 50s it was popular and chic. The new rattan is lyrical and colorful and doesn’t include the large scale banana leaf prints that gave it the feeling that it belonged on a porch in Malaysia somewhere. These pieces will be at home with a wide variety of contemporary, transitional and traditional styles. The best part is that rattan pieces are available at all price points and a wide variety of colors making them…
  • Garden Trends in the Mall

    Susan aka Miss. R
    25 Mar 2014 | 4:06 am
    Mall stores like Restoration Hardware, Pottery Barn and Crate & Barrel have made major investments in outdoor furniture and accessories, so I went to the mall to see what was new. Catalogs just don’t do it for me, I can’t see and touch the quality. The only one of the three that had anything interesting was Crate & Barrel.  On trend as far as lifestyle and color, their selection made the neutrals at Restoration Hardware and Pottery Barn seem dreary and tired. The pieces are very fairly priced for the level of quality. Here’s what I liked. Colorful ceramic pots with…
  • The New Garden Design

    Susan aka Miss. R
    20 Mar 2014 | 3:30 am
    The new Garden Design magazine promises to be full of inspiration and ideas for all of us.  I lamented when the previous one stopped publishing so I’m happy about this. Their primary focus is now American gardens and designers–not just the ones on both coasts either.  How do I know this for sure?  I’m a Contributing Editor.  That doesn’t mean I’m giving up my landscape design practice, it just means I have another outlet to express my love of  great design. It is going to be a beautiful book like publication without any advertising and printed on beautiful…
  • Spring Bulb: Asphodelus fistulosus

    Susan aka Miss. R
    17 Mar 2014 | 8:38 am
    I don’t usually write about plants I haven’t grown, but I’m so starved for spring I started looking through some images thinking to do a post about early spring bloomers. Instead I found some lovely images of  Asphodelus fistulosus (Hollow stemmed asphodel) from my trip to Morocco in January.  It took a bit of sleuthing to figure out what this plant was…I hope I’m correct!  It was blooming everywhere in Volubilis, a Roman ruin, in the northeast near Fes and made me so happy to see it thinking that spring wouldn’t be far away at home.  Boy was I wrong!
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Native Plants and Wildlife Gardens

  • Perennials Emerging in our Woods

    Pat Sutton
    18 Apr 2014 | 5:00 am
    After the endless winter who isn’t eager for spring? Each day I stroll through the garden and woods looking for signs of spring, perennials peeking through the woodland leaf litter and garden soil. It all happens so quickly that I am afraid to be away even for a few days. I remember when, as a […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Grow Your Own DYC Birdseed

    Jacqueline Soule
    17 Apr 2014 | 10:24 am
    Over the past few months in my blogs, I have been discussing “DYC’s” which are “Darned Yellow Compositae,” or “Deliciously Yummy Compositae” depending on your viewpoint.   You may already entice seed-eating birds such as the lesser goldfinch into your garden with DYC seed you purchase in a store.  Called “thistle,” “niger,” or “Nyger” seed, […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Mindful Management

    Jennifer Baker
    16 Apr 2014 | 5:00 am
    Outfitted in yellow Nomex and armed with a rubber flapper, I wait for the drip torch to start a burn line along the base of last year’s bluestem stalks that still tower over a five-acre prairie. The winds are in our favor and the flames are out almost as quickly as they started, leaving a […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Two Simple Tips for Filming Native Plants and Wildlife Gardens

    Kevin J. Railsback
    15 Apr 2014 | 4:00 am
    The past month has been a brutally busy one for me from a filmmakers perspective. Panasonic sent me their latest prosumer camera the PX270 for a couple of weeks to shoot a bunch of footage for them so that they could showcase what the camera could do at the National Association of Broadcasters convention in […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Snake Sedge Rockpile Resort — a wildlife habitat installation

    Tony McGuigan
    13 Apr 2014 | 7:37 pm
    This week was the second Wednesday of the month, which means that Sunny Galbraith’s biology class at Orchard View School in Sebastopol, California was eager to get to a new project at the Laguna Environmental Center.  The class and I have been installing wildlife habitats around the pond.  Our installations have been mostly bird perches […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Big Blog Of Gardening

  • Prune those tomato suckers!

    Todd Heft
    5 Apr 2014 | 12:04 pm
    Big Blog Of Gardening Tomato suckers are the growths that appear in the "crotch" between the leaves and the main stem. They should be pruned to encourage more fruit. Continue reading → Prune those tomato suckers!
  • Help Scientists Track Climate Change By Observing Your Garden

    Todd Heft
    22 Mar 2014 | 4:05 pm
    Big Blog Of Gardening Climate change analysis requires enormous data, and you can contribute by reporting on life cycles of plants and wildlife in your backyard. Continue reading → Help Scientists Track Climate Change By Observing Your Garden
  • The Real Definition of GMO Will Surprise You

    Todd Heft
    16 Mar 2014 | 2:40 pm
    Big Blog Of Gardening Think you know what a GMO is? I bet your definition isn't the same as the US government's. Continue reading → The Real Definition of GMO Will Surprise You
  • Is your lawn a chemical dump?

    Todd Heft
    6 Mar 2014 | 7:16 am
    Big Blog Of Gardening How to fertilize and care for your lawn without lathering it in chemicals every spring and fall Continue reading → Is your lawn a chemical dump?
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Pond Blog

  • The Importance of Choosing the Right Pond Net

    Bill Dubert
    8 Apr 2014 | 6:32 pm
    I have a terrible confession to make. I’m not proud, but here it goes: I’ve been using the wrong pond net. For years. For more than a decade. Just completely wrong. My pond is directly beneath a beautiful oak tree, and I’ve been using a net that isn’t fine enough to stop acorns. Why have I been committing this travesty upon my pond? Because the nets with bigger holes are cheaper. Or, at least I thought they were. This year I found out just how wrong I’ve been on that score.  The Cost of the Wrong Net In my case, the net was wrong because it didn’t hold…
  • Springtime Water Changes

    Bill Dubert
    11 Mar 2014 | 12:53 pm
    I’m a big advocate of small, regular partial water changes in a pond. It’s one of the best ways to keep pollutants from building up in your pond’s system. I’ve talked before about how, when, and why to do partial water changes, but I didn’t mention the Springtime water change that I recommend for most pond owners. The spring ritual is different for different pond owners, and it changes from year to year. No matter what your ritual is, though, if you experience anything like a real winter, the effectiveness of your biological filtration has gone way, way down with…
  • 5 Lessons Learned Building an Indoor Water Feature

    Bill Dubert
    20 Jan 2014 | 1:32 pm
    Our pond was not this cool. This is in Berlin Gather round children, and I’ll tell you a tale with not just one, but five morals. It was several a few* years ago, shortly after I graduated from college. I was living in a pretty large apartment with a couple of friends, a place that, well, let’s be generous and say that it had a lot of character. We decided, obviously, that we needed to build an indoor water feature. Not a little zen water trickler, but a full-on pond. Upstairs. I had a little bit of experience in the area, having built a few ponds before, so I was pretty…
  • Three Super Easy Tricks for Getting Rid of String Algae

    Bill Dubert
    13 Jan 2014 | 1:44 pm
      1. Add Quick-growing Plants The main cause of too much string algae in your pond is an overabundance of the nutrients that string algae lives on. One way to reduce those excess nutrients, and thus the algae that lives on them, is to add plants that use the same nutrients to your pond. Two great ways to have your plants soak up tons of nutrients is to add plants that either reproduce quickly or grow larger. A little bit of a quick-reproducing floating plant like water lettuce in your waterfall box will reproduce like crazy, taking up a lot of those excess nutrients. Just grab some of…
  • Lotus on Black and White

    Bill Dubert
    12 Dec 2013 | 7:42 pm
    This week’s free desktop wallpaper is a photo that I’ve always loved. On a whim, I decided to do a vastly different version with the same data, removing the color from all but the petals. It’s an effect that comes and goes in popularity, usually called selective black and white, but it’s one that has always made me smile. One of the major goals in photography is to use composition, color, and lighting to draw the viewers eye to what you want them to notice. Selective black and white is sort of a blunt instrument in the toolbox for that, but it can really make for some…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Nigel Gnome grows a vegetable

  • Marching to an end

    Nigel Gnome
    29 Mar 2014 | 10:40 pm
    Yes another month gone and another summer also passing. The tomato plants are gone and the big bean climbing frame too. I poked a hole through the water mains again, so this time we had the plumber put in a tap at the repair point. And to make sure I never poke another hole again I have made a small path extension to cover it over.New garden pathA very good tree person came to remove the rest of the poor Titoki tree in the front yard, still not used to the amount of extra sky we see now. There's a great pile of very good firewood to be sorted though. There is now room for serious…
  • The sound of summer

    Nigel Gnome
    21 Feb 2014 | 5:31 pm
    The cicadas have really started to sing now, it does feel like summer as the temperatures are into the 24-27C range most days. The humidity has been quite high which makes it all very close and uncomfortable. The plants however are loving it and we have a major tomato mountain we are all helping to consume. So far a chutney sauce has been made as well as a large batch of butter chicken sauce and also a lot just pulped and reduced before freezing. The long shaped roma tomatoes do make a very nice rich red sauce. Ripening tomsBusy bumble bee on the chive flowersThe black krim tomatos are lowly…
  • End of the plums

    Nigel Gnome
    29 Jan 2014 | 12:31 am
    All over for another year. The tomatoes are doing their thing, the first batch of chutney is in progress, many more to come, trimmed all the bottom leaves off, I think we had psyllids, they need an oil type spray to penetrate their defences. beefsteak tomato The beanery is pumping out beans at a handfull a dayoverviewThe chilli plant went limp fo nor paricular reason, there's a new $1 wonder in it's place. Fingies crossed. Leek seeds have been planted. Black krim tomato has babies! Zucchini plants are getting mildew, the older one will be removed forthwith.
  • Potato fail! :(

    Nigel Gnome
    7 Jan 2014 | 11:47 pm
    After happily getting a few potatoes around the edges of the plants for three weeks or so they were increasingly becoming glassy after cooking. Very frustrating as it can't be detected by eye before hand. I think the reason for my 'very early' varieties of swift and desiree turning bad was leaving them in the ground after the leaves had wilted due to blight.Wilted desiree tomato leavesThey then started to grow again and at that stage the sugars turn to starch I gather (These early types need to be eaten as soon as possible as well, they do not keep).Note to Nigel, plant late potatoes next…
  • 2014 is looking good so far

    Nigel Gnome
    2 Jan 2014 | 11:30 pm
    There has been rain and sun in even numbers so everything is happy as Larry!I thought I'd shake the plum tree to see which ones were ripe, to my surprise about half of them dropped off all at once. At least it's not such a battle keeping the blackbirds and waxeyes off them.Fortune plumsPulled up the old carrots, each one was a work of art I thought. Some were huge.wild and woolly character carrotsquick pick for dinnerBean potato tomatoDug up four of the early swift potato plants to see what was happening underground, the tops were all dead and brown. There were quite a few good sized tubers…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Flowerona

  • Hillier Gardens…two new books & details about their RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2014 exhibit

    Rona
    18 Apr 2014 | 4:01 pm
    Last week, I attended a Double Press Launch at Hillier Gardens in Hampshire.  It was the official launch of two books…the new edition of The Hillier Manual of Trees & Shrubs in association with the RHS and also Hillier: The Plants, The People, The Passion. Held at Jermyn’s House, which is pictured below, it was wonderful to hear the process involved in revising the manual and the history of the gardens themselves. Below is the front cover of the 8th edition of The Hillier Manual of Trees and Shrubs which is extensively revised, updated and enhanced by John Hillier, Roy…
  • Florist Friday: Interview with Emma Newson Smith of Arcade Flowers

    Rona
    17 Apr 2014 | 4:01 pm
    This week in my Florist Friday blog post series, I’m delighted to feature a florist who is involved in creating wedding flowers for beach weddings in the UK (!)…Emma Newson Smith of Arcade Flowers. How long have you been a recommended supplier for Beach Weddings Bournemouth? We’ve been a recommended supplier since Beach Weddings Bournemouth started in 2011. The first ever beach wedding in the UK was televised live on Daybreak. Which months of the year & what days of the week do beach weddings generally take place? The beach wedding season starts in April and ends in…
  • Transforming a space with houseplants…#ChangingPlants from The Joy Of Plants

    Rona
    17 Apr 2014 | 1:35 am
    You may remember that recently I was involved in some filming for The Joy of Plants? Well, I’m delighted to say that the video is now online.  Similar to the TV show ‘Changing Rooms’ concept, they took an empty space and showed how it can be transformed with plants. Garden designer, Alex Froggatt was the presenter and here’s the #ChangingPlants video below: Isn’t it amazing how just a few houseplants can really make a big difference to a room? For me, it’s like bringing a touch of the outdoors, inside. And there are health benefits too.  The Phalaenopsis…
  • Selina Lake’s Outdoor Living Book Tour at The White Orchid

    Rona
    16 Apr 2014 | 4:01 pm
    Isn’t it a small world? Ten years ago, I started working as a Saturday girl in The White Orchid, a florist shop in Esher. Now based in Weybridge, it was the venue for the first leg of Selina Lake’s Outdoor Living Book Tour, which started last weekend. I went along on Saturday afternoon and had such a lovely time, making a flower pom-pom in a workshop led by Selina and catching up with Nicole.  The White Orchid, as well as selling flowers and plants, also sell wonderful home and garden accessories. Plus there’s a cafe. Here are some photos from my visit… The next stop…
  • Sweet Pea Flowers at A Most Curious Wedding Fair – April 2014

    Rona
    15 Apr 2014 | 4:01 pm
    In this week’s Wedding Wednesday blog post series, I’m delighted to share with you photos of Sweet Pea Flowers’ fabulous stand at A Most Curious Wedding Fair, which took place earlier this month. It was so lovely to meet the very talented owner of the company, Marianne Johnson. Based in London, she specialises in weddings, events and contracts. I loved the style of her wedding designs, reminding me of a wonderful spring meadow…in the midst of Hackney! If you’d like to see more of Marianne’s beautiful work, please do pop over to the Sweet Pea Flowers…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Sprinkler Juice

  • 16 Apr 2014 | 12:29 pm

    16 Apr 2014 | 12:29 pm
    This is a good time of year to go over some of the do’s and don’ts of lawn care.   It may not always be as simple as it seems.  You may be falling for some common lawn care myths. If... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Getting Your Sprinkler System Ready For Spring

    10 Apr 2014 | 4:33 am
    It seems spring is finally here for much of the country. This means it’s time to get your lawn sprinkler system ready for the spring and summer season ahead. If your lawn sprinkler system is just... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Moving Out the Moss

    2 Apr 2014 | 11:55 am
    Moss on your lawn can be unsightly. Moss can also be a sign of something in your yard that is impacting conditions for growing grass. Things like low soil pH, poor drainage, excessive shade and lack... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Getting Rid of Standing Water

    25 Mar 2014 | 12:57 pm
    Standing water. It can be a problem for many homeowners. “I love my lawn sprinkler system but I have standing water in my yard. How do I get rid of the standard water?” There are ways to get rid of... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Growing a Green Grass

    18 Mar 2014 | 1:49 pm
    So you think a lush, green grass is not something you can achieve? Think that kind of lawn is for the other guy, the neighbor down the road with the perfect yard, beautiful wife and trustworthy dog... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Your Easy Garden

  • Starting Your First Vegetable Garden – Part 2

    judieyeg
    16 Apr 2014 | 8:42 am
    The miracle! Welcome to the wonderful world of vegetable gardening! Growing your own produce can be fun and economical if you’re careful to not go overboard the first year. In our earlier post we talked about the importance of starting small and selecting vegetables and herbs that are relatively easy to grow. This allows you to learn how much time you’re able to spend in the garden and whether or not you actually enjoy having a vegetable garden. After getting your garden beds created – whether it’s by removing sod and working the soil under the sod, or with a raised bed – it’s…
  • Gardening Quotes

    Guest Bloggers
    10 Apr 2014 | 1:22 pm
    We all have our favorite gardening quotes and from time to time here at Your Easy Garden we like to share a few. Please feel free to leave a comment with your favorite quote and we might feature it in a future post. Happy gardening! “Fortunate are those to whom gardening is a joy.”- author unknown  Pictured above: Black Tulip® Magnolia The greatest gift of the garden is the restoration of the five senses. – Hanna Rion  Pictured above: Flower Carpet White rose bloom “In every gardener there is a child who believes in The Seed Fairy.” – Robert Brault  Pictured…
  • Human Hands on Nature

    Anthony Tesselaar
    9 Apr 2014 | 7:03 am
    Each of our gardens is a piece of the larger landscape, a small part of the world that we happily tinker with to suit ourselves. Our gardening hands shape these spaces – literally – and whether that space includes a mile-long avenue of trees or a kitchen window ledge, everyone’s take will be different. What’s coming below is a collection of images I’ve taken, each one celebrating what we gardeners manage to achieve. Not all will appeal to everyone, but it’s fascinating (well I find it engrossing) to see what gardeners from all over the place manage to think up and make happen.
  • Starting Your First Vegetable Garden – Part 1

    judieyeg
    4 Apr 2014 | 10:20 am
    Start small with your first garden. So, you’ve decided to grow your own produce this year.  Congratulations and welcome to the wonderful world of vegetable gardening! Start small and go with simple plants. Vegetable gardens can be a lot of work, and if your first garden is too large it may be an overwhelming task to just keep up with it all summer.  If you start with exotic, hard-to-grow vegetables you may get easily discouraged. So, start with a few of your favorite vegetables and herbs and then build on your successes (and yes, failures too)! Trellising plants saves space. What you…
  • Garden Design Ideas to Suit Any Style and Need

    Phillip Townshend
    24 Mar 2014 | 11:08 am
    When it comes to garden design there are a number of practical considerations that you need to think about: Maintenance – how much time do you want to spend (or pay someone to spend) in the garden Location – what climate restrictions impact your area, availability of water, sun exposure, etc. What size garden do you have or how much space to you have to work with What do you want your garden to achieve i.e. functionality with fruit and vegetable production, or decorative Organic  or non-organic preferences (or somewhere in the middle); Other – heritage listings, local restrictions on…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Mini Garden Guru - Your Miniature Garden Source

  • Miniature Gardening in the Southeast

    Janit Calvo
    18 Apr 2014 | 7:52 am
    Miniature Gardening in the Southeast When you start looking for the plants that will suit miniature gardening, you’ll find a new world of plants will open up to you. The same thing happened when I was asked to do a talk at the wonderful Epcot Flower and Garden Festival at Disney World. Southeastern climates with […]
  • Adjusting to the New Winter Weather in the Miniature Garden

    Janit Calvo
    11 Apr 2014 | 4:30 pm
    Adjusting to the New Winter Weather in the Miniature Garden As our winters get colder and more ruthless in some parts of the country, we are finding ways to garden around the extreme temperatures and endless snow by planting in-ground, choosing hardier plants, and re-thinking of the ways we use plants. New challenges are in every part […]
  • A Look into the Future: Miniature Garden Trees

    Janit Calvo
    4 Apr 2014 | 3:18 pm
    A Look into the Future: Miniature Garden Trees It’s that time of year, Fellow Miniature Gardeners, the time for new trees, new plantings and new ideas realized. It’s been a long, cold and dreary winter for a large part of North America, and it’s still going in some parts with snow last night. Ugh! I feel […]
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Lunar Home and Garden

  • Moon in Aries

    CJ Wright
    29 Mar 2014 | 2:30 am
    March 29, 9:55pm ~ April 1, 1:20am This is a mixed period for the Aries Moon. It is waning through the 30th, New at exactly 2:48pm on the 30th, and is waxing from that moment until 1:20am on April 1st. … Continue reading →
  • Waning Moon in Pisces

    CJ Wright
    27 Mar 2014 | 2:30 am
    March 27, 8:12pm ~ March 29, 9:54pm EDT Pisces days, in general, have a sensitive, ethereal feel to them. Overall, Pisces days are good for spending some time in solitude. Finding some alone time just might help you process the … Continue reading →
  • Waning Moon in Aquarius

    CJ Wright
    25 Mar 2014 | 2:30 am
    March 25, 6:40pm ~ March 27, 8:11pm EDT Aquarius is associated with the legs, shins, and ankles. I had a rather sedentary winter, and I noticed that my calves are really tight. If you had a sedentary winter, too, try … Continue reading →
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Organic Gardening Tips - Smiling Gardener

  • Guess What I’m Doing Right Now!

    11 Apr 2014 | 9:58 pm
    My sis took this photo late last summer while we were digging up some potatoes. If you have any questions this week about my: Organic fertilizers, or Online gardening course ...my sister is going to do her best to answer them for you. That’s because I’m currently in the middle of a 10 day Vipassana course. As some of you will know, what that means is that I’m in a place with no access to phone or internet or even a pen and paper. And I’m meditating. I actually wrote this post early last week, a couple of days before leaving, and scheduled it to go out to you today, so by the time…
  • How To Plan A Landscape Design - 6 Steps To A Well-Designed Garden

    4 Apr 2014 | 9:58 pm
    For many people, it’s getting to be time to figure out how to plan a landscape design for your organic garden. I show you how in the video below - and I’d love to get your questions in the comments section at the bottom of this page. Your landscape design plans might mean putting in new gardens entirely, or maybe just coming up with a planting plan for this year. You could just go out, buy a bunch of plants, and then decide where to plant them when you get home. But doing some good old fashioned proper landscaping design planning will result in a much better garden. Here are 6-ish steps…
  • Dry Fertilizer - For Supplying Soil With These 3 Important Minerals

    28 Mar 2014 | 9:58 pm
    I’m a big fan of organic liquid fertilizer. But there’s also an important use for organic dry fertilizer. I use liquid fertilizers mainly to provide small amounts of 80+ nutrients directly as a plant fertilizer, and also as a soil fertilizer. Doing this plays a big part in helping me grow nutrient-dense food. And yet some nutrients we need in the soil more than others, the big three in the organic world being calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K). We need to have enough of them in the soil, but not too much. (I know that npk fertilizer is stressed in the conventional world, and…
  • How To Make Your Own Garden Inoculant For Less Than $1

    21 Mar 2014 | 9:58 pm
    Applying a garden inoculant. A garden inoculant is really just anything we use to bring beneficial microbes into our organic gardens. These microbes are often deficient for various reasons, but if we can get more of them back in there, they: Make nutrients available to plants and even feed them nutrients and water directly Protect plants from disease both in the soil and above ground Improve the structure of the soil so it has the right amount of air spaces, water spaces, nutrient availability, pH, etc. Plus there’s a whole list of other services they provide for plants and soil. Pretty…
  • Homemade Liquid Fertilizer - 4 Do-It-Yourself Options

    14 Mar 2014 | 9:58 pm
    I felt very lucky to spend this past week vacationing with my family on Hilton Head Island. I recently started selling my favorite organic liquid fertilizers, the same ones I use at home. But I also like to make my own homemade liquid fertilizer when possible, and that’s what I’m excited to show you today. Many of our best liquid fertilizers come from the ocean. But there are ways you can approximate them, if like me, you don’t live near the ocean. All of these can be used as a liquid lawn fertilizer, liquid plant fertilizer and liquid soil fertilizer. You might even make enough for…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Sow and So

  • C is for Capsule – Word up!

    Bridget Elahcene
    17 Apr 2014 | 10:33 pm
    Capsule /ˈkæpsjuːl/ Dry seed case, often containing many seeds, which splits open to disperse its contents.
  • Itsy Bitsy Spiders – Wordless Wednesday

    Rogier Noort
    16 Apr 2014 | 2:27 am
  • Growing Dahlias at the Villas – for the very first time!

    Bridget Elahcene
    13 Apr 2014 | 9:57 pm
    This year, for the first time ever, we are growing Dahlias at the Villas …and already I’m wondering where they’ve been all my life! Since Laila told me a couple of years ago how very fond she is of them, I have wanted to have a go at growing them myself but never got round to it until one damp, drizzly day last October when I bit the bullet and ordered a dozen tubers on line – The Bishop Collection comprising two each of Bishop of Canterbury, Bishop of Dover, Bishop of Llandaff, Bishop of Leicester, Bishop of Oxford and Bishop of York. I was particularly drawn to this…
  • B for Bract – Word up!

    Bridget Elahcene
    10 Apr 2014 | 10:36 pm
    Bract \brăkt\ Modified leaf, usually protecting the base of the flower. Most bracts take the form of small green or brown structures but they may be coloured and petal-like in some species, such as euphorbia and hydrangea. Some bracts have become brightly coloured in order that they may perform the function of petals: that of attracting insects to the flower for pollination purposes.
  • Blackthorn Blossom; Wordless Wednesday

    Bridget Elahcene
    9 Apr 2014 | 11:08 am
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    I Love Arugula: My Gardening Life

  • Indoor Worm Bin: Pros and Cons

    Erica
    31 Mar 2014 | 1:32 pm
    Last night, I freaked out, thinking that my worm bin could be a part of our mouse problem, and wrote a post called The Worm Bin Must Go.  I was extremely upset to come back from vacation and find that a new family of mice had moved in while we were away and our cat and dog were being boarded.  I didn't even sleep in my bed--I slept downstairs on the couch, since the mice are upstairs.  After
  • The Worm Bin Must Go

    Erica
    31 Mar 2014 | 12:35 am
    EDITED:  I wrote this when I was very upset, and after going to bed, I had a different point of view.  Still, I am leaving it up just to show that even a compost enthusiast can get creeped out  by keeping worms inside the house. We've been out of town for a week (and the pets have been boarded for 9 days), and we returned to a disturbing discovery: mice. Late in 2013, we had a minor mice
  • Radishes, Parsnips, Carrots, Dill, Mache, Borage, Arugula--I can't wait

    Erica
    19 Mar 2014 | 8:09 pm
    I am so happy--I got everything planted that I wanted to get planted today.  (I'm not going to have time for the next week or so.)  Last spring, I was traveling and missed the early spring.  This year, I'm really hoping to make a delicious salad for Easter.  Not only that, but I harvested a wheelbarrow full of beautiful compost that I really needed to spread on half of one of my beds.  And
  • Early Spring Planting

    Erica
    16 Mar 2014 | 2:32 pm
    On  Friday, I went to the local garden center and bought spinach and, yes, my favorite, arugula.  I also bought some beets on a whim.  I've grown beets from seed before in the fall.  It warms up here so fast, I thought they might do better if I got plants, so that they could mature before it got too hot. Time to get the garden started after a winter that was colder and wetter than usual.  We
  • Worm Bin: One Year

    Erica
    8 Jun 2013 | 9:39 pm
    Wow, I can't believe it's been a whole year since I got my worm bin, the Worm Factory 360.  I am just now getting ready to harvest my first tray.  I meant to do it quite some time ago but didn't get around to it.  I have four trays in use now.  When I examined them today, the bottom one was seemingly empty of worms and is completely made up of castings, except for some very little bits of paper,
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Hortiholic

  • Winter, Bunnies & Ice - Not So Nice

    Tony Fulmer
    15 Apr 2014 | 5:53 pm
    I wish I had never ended the last post with, "Here's hoping the spring thaw brings you a garden unfazed by winter weather." Talk about a jinx- geez! If your garden escaped without burned evergreens, a moldy lawn, broken branches, shrubs girdled by rabbits, roses that appear dead... Well, run and get a lottery ticket, 'cause you're one of the lucky ones.Let's not dwell on how our plants got in this fix. We know how it happened. Let's get to solutions. There are some symptoms that we can be proactive about. Other damage is going to require patience and a wait-and-see-what-happens…
  • What to Know about Plants and Snow

    Tony Fulmer
    20 Jan 2014 | 10:08 am
    Recent snowfall and record-shattering temperatures are impossible to ignore. Can you imagine being a plant out in those conditions 24/7 with your roots in wet, frozen ground, snow knee high, and the rest of your "body" exposed to brutal winds? It certainly goes beyond my definition of chilling.What's a plant to do? There is good news. Snow is an incredible insulator. So, things like perennials and shrubs that are buried under snow are really safer than tender stems that are above the snowline exposed to the full force of below-zero temperatures and wind. Further, plants recognize real air…
  • TO YOU: Clean Air..... FROM: Hardworking Houseplants

    Tony Fulmer
    6 Jan 2014 | 10:06 am
    Jade PlantHave you thanked your houseplants recently for the gifts they give you? Sure, you know they produce oxygen. Did you know they're working 24/7 to detox your home? Unfortunately, I've taken them for granted, too. I water, give them periodic showers, feed regularly during the growing season, check for livestock infestations, and think that's enough. Do I consciously think about what my tropicals do for me every day besides being beautiful, calming and oxygen-producing? Not so much!Our emphasis on energy efficiency and "tight" construction comes at a cost. Toxic compounds like benzene,…
  • Pointers on Points and Flowering Faves

    Tony Fulmer
    12 Dec 2013 | 2:17 pm
    If you're overwhelmed by the beauty of a holiday poinsettia you have Joel Roberts Poinsett to thank. As history is recorded, Mr. Poinsett, the first U.S. ambassador to Mexico, discovered a large shrub covered in red flowers literally along the road. He found it different and interesting. So, he sent cuttings back to his home in South Carolina. The annals of government service are "mum" (horticultural pun intended, maybe) on whether he was a particularly skilled diplomat or not. But 185 years later his claim to fame is still the foundling poinsettia.Hybridizers have made astonishing…
  • Getting a Fir for Christmas?

    Tony Fulmer
    24 Nov 2013 | 7:34 pm
    Let's be honest. Holidays, while joyous, are stressful. Is the dog going to cooperate and wear the reindeer antlers for more than 5 seconds this year? Will the kids remember the words to their first speaking parts in the holiday play? Will you have to cable the tree to the wall to keep it from crashing during Christmas Eve dinner? You do remember this, don't you?For those that love the tradition of a fresh cut tree, the wonderful choices available now may seem overwhelming. Sure, there are a lot of things to consider. How long will the tree be up? How tall? How wide? Do I want…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    guzmansgreenhouse.com

  • Colorful bedding plants for the southwest

    Paul Guzman
    13 Apr 2014 | 10:42 am
    The other day while doing online research for a gardening article I read a banner that made me chuckle.  The author is unknown to me – “Spring is Here – I am so excited I wet my plants”  I get a ton of questions from customers asking me “when can I start fertilizing my plants?” […] The post Colorful bedding plants for the southwest appeared first on guzmansgreenhouse.com.
  • Vine plants that have great color in the Southwest

    Paul Guzman
    30 Mar 2014 | 2:30 pm
    Have you ever seen plants in the desert southwest beaming with beautiful, gorgeous color?  I see them every day…of course I work and help manage a good size nursery in Southwestern New Mexico.   It still amazes me how vivid all the colors are.  Here are some vine plants that have great color in the […] The post Vine plants that have great color in the Southwest appeared first on guzmansgreenhouse.com.
  • Zinnia Plants for Southwest Color

    Paul Guzman
    23 Mar 2014 | 2:43 pm
    Zinnia plants for southwest color.  Zinnia’s are great looking colorful plants that require and they are considered an annual here in the southwest.  They like full sun and well drained soil, they can also tolerate sandy southwestern soil.  Using these types of soil will make your Zinnia’s happy.   They love the southwestern sun their […] The post Zinnia Plants for Southwest Color appeared first on guzmansgreenhouse.com.
  • The Native Mesquite Trees Have Spoken

    Paul Guzman
    23 Mar 2014 | 10:19 am
    The native Mesquite trees have leafed out.  It is now safe to plant vegetables, herbs, fruit trees and other edible type plants.  I would just keep an eye on the weather…just in case.   Spring has sprung in the Southwest It’s also time to start fertilizing plants and trees that are showing signs of new […] The post The Native Mesquite Trees Have Spoken appeared first on guzmansgreenhouse.com.
  • Early Vegetable Gardening

    Gary Guzman
    3 Mar 2014 | 6:47 pm
    Early Vegetable Gardening. We still have cold freezing nights in February, so don’t be tempted by the warm days to plant items that are not frost tolerant. This includes, but not limited to tomato plants, peppers, squash, and melons. If you still insist on planting the fore mentioned now, you can use a product called “Wall […] The post Early Vegetable Gardening appeared first on guzmansgreenhouse.com.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Primrose Blog

  • Happy Easter from Primrose!

    Primrose
    18 Apr 2014 | 4:34 am
    Whether you’re celebrating with family or just relaxing, we hope you’ll have a fantastic time this Easter holiday. If you’re looking for a day out this Easter and are local to the Henley-on-Thames area, we’d love to see you stop by our new concession area at Toad Hall garden centre. We’ve also got a voucher for a free tea or coffee on us. Read more about it in our blogpost. Still missing some essential items to make your garden look as beautiful as it deserves to be? Take a look at our popular categories below to get it delivered for next weekend which is looking…
  • Primrose – now in Toad Hall garden centre in Henley-on-Thames!

    Primrose
    17 Apr 2014 | 10:02 am
    We are now in Toad Hall Garden Centre in Henley-on Thames! We’re proud to announce the launch of our large concession area within the Toad Hall garden centre in Henley-on-Thames. Come and find a selection of our products from garden furniture to barbecues, greenhouses to garden screening, shade sails to clocks. It’s perfect to see some of our most popular products before placing the order for convenient home delivery. Have a free tea or coffee on Primrose whilst you browse. Simply print the below voucher and take it with you. Voucher valid until 22nd April 2014. Cat works in…
  • Patio looking bare?

    Primrose
    4 Apr 2014 | 11:22 am
    We’ve got the solution! An empty patio is an easily solved problem – simply get some gorgeous garden furniture, a barbecue, and some garden decorations, such as a mirror. We’ve got over 250 pieces of metal garden furniture which are made from a durable rust-proof frame and come in multiple sizes guaranteed to fit even a tiny balcony! Did we mention there’s free delivery on most of our Alium furniture? If you’re looking for a different style then take a look at our wooden or rattan sets. “Extremely pleased with the garden dining set, all very well…
  • Stop changing your clocks!

    Primrose
    29 Mar 2014 | 5:05 am
    Sometimes it feels a bit like groundhog day – here we are again, changing all our clocks and trying our hardest to remember how to change that clock in the cooker again. Didn’t we just do all that? Make today the last time you change your clocks and get a radio controlled clock. Take a look at our range of seven clocks that change themselves or our best seller with 23 great reviews! “This is an EXCELLENT clock and weather station. The bezel is made on a brown alloy and the face is very clear. I RECOMMEND THIS PRODUCT as an accurate time-piece and what, to date, has been…
  • Be Your Mum’s Favourite this Mother’s Day

    Primrose
    22 Mar 2014 | 1:15 am
    Mother’s Day is just eight days away and it’s time to get your present. You can even have it delivered straight to your mum! How about a hamper gift set, a personalised planter with your message, some pretty solar garden lights or something from our carefully selected garden gifts range. And we’ve still got our garden furniture pre-season sale with 10% off selected lines if you use the code Preseason10 at the checkout. Cat works in the marketing team and is responsible for online marketing, social media and the newsletter. She spends most of her time reading about a…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Chicken Waterer

  • Resource For Exhibiting Poultry

    ChickenWaterer
    11 Apr 2014 | 6:39 am
    If you are interested in exhibiting poultry, I wanted to share a resource with you that I discovered earlier this week.The site is called PoultryShowCentral.com and it is a great place to learn all about exhibiting poultry. The site was created by the Miller Family after they became interested in showing poultry and discovered that there wasn't a single source dedicated to the subject.The site includes a beginners guide to exhibiting poultry, a breeders directory, and there is a comprehensive calendar listing various show dates around the country.If you've ever been interested in exhibiting…
  • Five Mistakes In Chicken Coop Design

    ChickenWaterer
    10 Apr 2014 | 5:44 am
    While there are many good coops sold as kits on the market today, many backyard chicken owners choose to design and build their own coop designs.  Building one's own coop can be a satisfying experience and allows owners to create a unique coop that reflects their personal tastes and budgets. However, first time chicken owners lack experience and may create coops with design flaws that make the coop unhealthy for chickens and inconvenient for the owner.To help DIY coop builders, we are providing our list of the top five design mistakes.  Top Coop Design Mistakes:Inadequate…
  • Free Smartphone App Backyard Chickens Android iPhone

    ChickenWaterer
    8 Apr 2014 | 6:23 am
    ChickenWaterer.com Launches Free Smartphone App That's The Most Comprehensive Ever Created For Backyard Chicken OwnersCluck-ulator Main MenuWe are pleased to announce the release of the Cluck-ulator™ smartphone app, the most comprehensive app ever created for backyard chicken owners. The Cluck-ulator helps users make decisions about the composition and management of their flocks and is six tools in one:Breed Selector - chooses the ideal breed of chicken when you selects the characteristics you want from a wizard like menu including: type of breed (egg layer, meat bird, dual purpose),…
  • Polish Chickens

    ChickenWaterer
    4 Apr 2014 | 3:26 pm
    The polish is one of the most beautiful of ornamental chicken breeds. The most distinctive feature of the breed is large crest of feathers on the head that resembles a chrysanthemum flower in shape.  Birds that meet the standard of perfection will have a crest that completely covers the comb. This crest derives from a large bony protrusion on the top of the breeds head that is found only in crested breeds such as the Polish, Crevecouer, and Houdan chickens. Polish Chicken Skull (A) Compared with Typical Chicken Skull (B)Polish come in a very wide variety of colors and some sport…
  • New US .9999 Gold Coin To Feature Image of Rooster

    ChickenWaterer
    1 Apr 2014 | 7:12 am
    New US .9999 Fine Gold Coin To Feature RoosterThe U.S. Mint revealed plans today to produce a new .9999 fine gold coin.  Studies show that pure gold coins account for over 70% of the world bullion market and that the Canadian Maple Leaf hold the number one spot in today’s Market.  The U.S. Mint hopes to take a bigger share of this market by releasing a pure gold alternative to that offered by The Royal Canadian Mint. Using an image of a rooster on the new U.S. gold coin was the idea of current Secretary of the Treasury Jacob Lew.  The new coin features an image of Walking…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Growing Patch

  • Cures for Insomnia: Facts and Myths.

    Growing Patch
    29 Mar 2014 | 6:45 pm
    Cures for Insomnia: Facts and Myths. Many people, including myself suffer from insomnia. Some people it comes and goes in phases, while others have a constant struggle with it. I myself have a few times a year where it is especially difficult for me. I once couldn’t fall asleep for five whole days. What a […]
  • SproutSouth Terrarium Tips

    Growing Patch
    20 Mar 2014 | 1:23 pm
    SproutSouth Terrarium Tips   I chose tillandsia for terrariums, because they are the easiest to care for in the bromeliad family. I wanted the plants I use to be easily maintained so that my terrariums would be accessible even to those who may lack a green thumb! Tillandsia also produce a beautiful bloom, and come […]
  • Sprout South Terrariums an amazing world in my hands.

    Growing Patch
    16 Mar 2014 | 1:19 pm
    Sprout South Terrariums, an amazing world in my hands.    A few weeks ago, Sprout South had contacted me to inquire if I would do a review of their terrariums. I jumped at the chance for a few reasons. First, I am horrible at making my own terrariums. I can have something look nice for a […]
  • Boston Fern Care Guide

    Growing Patch
    14 Mar 2014 | 5:11 pm
    Boston Fern Care Guide I had mention in the Split Rock Care Guide, that next to the Boston Fern, I would suggest the Split Rock to beginner gardeners. So what makes the Boston Fern such a great plant for new gardeners? Boston Ferns are hard to kill. I mean really hard. The plant looks wonderful, freshens […]
  • Split Rock Succulent Care Guide.

    Growing Patch
    13 Mar 2014 | 5:30 pm
    Split Rock Succulent Care Guide.  Often times when starting to take care of plants people are worried that they will kill the plant. There are a few plants that I would suggest for a beginner, next to a Boston Fern, I would suggest a Split Rock Succulent. The split rock is great for a beginner […]
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Foodie Gardener™

  • Grow a Container Vegetable Garden on Your Patio: Tips

    Shirley Bovshow
    18 Apr 2014 | 2:42 am
      Grow a beautiful and bountiful container vegetable garden on your patio by following a few of my design tips. With careful planning, you won’t have to choose whether your small patio is  used for growing food, or for relaxing and entertaining.   You can do both!   I presented on this very subject on the Home & Family show recently where I appear as the garden design expert!   Have you watched the show on the Hallmark Channel? CONTAINER VEGETABLE GARDEN BASICS Follow these basic rules  to grow a successful container vegetable garden.   1. Select a sunny…
  • Peat Pots For Growing Seeds at 99-Cent Store

    Shirley Bovshow
    5 Apr 2014 | 6:05 pm
    The 99-cent store in my neighborhood sells peat pots for seed growing at an unbeatable price. A pack of 24 peat pots costs 99 cents! Compare this price with Walmart’s online price for a (set of 12) ,2.25″-inch peat pots  for $8.14!   You can start 24 summer vegetables for under a dollar! 5 tomato plants 5 peppers 3 eggplants 2 cucumbers 3 squash- different varieties 3 basil 2 oregano 1-mint   Think of the possibilities! Sure, you can make your own seedling pots from newspaper or old toilet and paper towel rolls, but 4 cents for a ready made pot is a good bargain. Peat…
  • How to Grow Kiwi From Store Bought Kiwi Fruit!

    Shirley Bovshow
    25 Mar 2014 | 11:29 pm
    You can grow kiwi fruit from store-bought kiwi and enjoy the process  if you have  a little patience. Growing kiwi from seed is not complicated but it will take between 3 to 5 years before you can take a bite into your home-grown kiwi fruit. Don’t despair though, there’s plenty to enjoy until your first fruit harvest.   Kiwi’s are beautiful landscape vines!   Before I share instructions on growing kiwi from seed, I want to fawn over the beauty that is the kiwi vine. Yes, kiwis are vining plants, although some of you may have envisioned a “kiwi tree!”…
  • Foodie Gardener Fact: Coriander Seeds

    Shirley Bovshow
    18 Mar 2014 | 1:39 pm
  • How To Grow Potatoes in a Bag

    Shirley Bovshow
    5 Mar 2014 | 1:34 am
    Growing potatoes is not a back-breaking chore when you grow them in a bag! I presented on “How to Grow Potatoes in a Bag” recently on the Home & Family show, airing on the Hallmark channel.   The most important detail about growing potatoes in a bag is that you use a bag such as the Smart Pot that comes in large sizes, suitable for potato crops.   A 20-gallon Smart Pot is an ideal size to grow your potatoes and costs about $10 dollars at the garden center, or you can find them online. The Smart Pot is a soft-sided aeration container that air root prunes your plants…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Greenhouse Megastore Blog

  • Growing Onions

    cjinspirations
    18 Apr 2014 | 4:00 am
    Growing onions can be very easy but they do require full sun.  You may have heard the term or have seen on a onion package the words “long day” or “short day”. What does the term long day and short day mean? When you are shopping for onion varieties to plant in your vegetable garden, you will often see them listed as either short-day onions or long-day onions. Which ones to grow depend upon where you live. Most onion varieties begin to form a bulb when the temperature and the number of daylight hours reach certain levels. Varieties listed as short-day onions bulb up…
  • Butterflies In a Blooming Garden

    Kathy Cox
    3 Apr 2014 | 4:00 am
    “The green grass and the happy skies court the fluttering butterflies.” – Terri Guillemets Let us not forget the flowers too! That is truly what the butterfly is seeking. When winter leaves and I see my first butterfly of the year, it excites me, because I know that spring has really arrived. Besides being graceful and beautiful flittering around your garden, they are extremely beneficial. They are great pollinators and the butterfly caterpillar loves to nibble on pesky insects, like aphids. Yes, they will eat some plants/leaves too, but in the whole scheme of things, the…
  • Vine Options Worth a View

    Kathy Cox
    27 Mar 2014 | 4:00 am
    When we bought our current home 7 years ago, it had a two-car detached garage that we wanted to use, but it had no real driveway leading up to it, and a fir tree that we had to cut down to gain access to the garage. In doing this, it exposed us to our neighbors’ backyard, and while we had a chain-link fence separating us, it felt like a huge open gap and offered no privacy whatsoever. So I started looking at ways to offer everyone a bit of privacy. We considered putting wood slats in the fence, but I really didn’t like that look, and planting another tree wasn’t really the…
  • Bringing Life to Planter Boxes

    Kathy Cox
    5 Mar 2014 | 4:00 am
    Here are the planter boxes after a little bit of T.L.C. A little over six years ago we bought the current house we live in. One of the things that drew me to the house was that yard was literally a blank slate. Grass and some trees, no shrubs, no flowers, not even bulbs that would come up later, so it was something I could truly make my own. Another thing it had going for it was the two stone planter boxes out front. One was fifty feet long and three feet wide and the other one was almost twenty-five feet long and its widest point three feet wide. It wasn’t until six months after…
  • Getting Started in Mushroom Growing

    cjinspirations
    27 Feb 2014 | 4:00 am
    In a recent interview, I asked a Mushroom Grower for Forest Mushrooms in St. Joseph, Minnesota, who grows some of the best tasting mushrooms, how to get started in growing mushrooms at home.  This will be a great help in getting you started. Winter is usually a down time in many gardens. But for intrepid gardeners who need some winter projects to keep their passion fed, why not try growing mushrooms? It’s easy, fun, and tasty. There are a variety of mushrooms that can be grown in the garden and indoors. While I could talk about shiitake, morel, and oyster mushrooms, I’m going to…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Urban Gardens

  • Three Orchids You Can Grow In Your Garden

    Nicole Brait
    18 Apr 2014 | 9:57 am
    Bletilla striata. One of the many terrestrial orchids you can grow in your garden. Photo by Takashi Hososhima. Beautiful. Ephemeral. Elusive. Fickle. Tantalizing. These are some of the words that come to mind when I think of orchids. Long … Read More...The post Three Orchids You Can Grow In Your Garden appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • From an Insect’s-eye View: The Ceramic Gardener

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    8 Apr 2014 | 8:34 am
    Frances Doherty, The Ceramic Gardener, sold her restaurant to instead feast on ceramics, something she got hooked on after evening classes. Her work comes from the flowers and plants that we see around us, even in the cracks in the … Read More...The post From an Insect’s-eye View: The Ceramic Gardener appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • The High Line; Manhattan’s Garden Park

    Nicole Brait
    7 Apr 2014 | 1:10 pm
    A perennial combination along the walking path of the High Line. Photo by Steven Severinghaus. Unlike Central Park or Prospect Park, the High Line has no swaths of grass, no baseball fields, no pond. In contrast to most urban parks, … Read More...The post The High Line; Manhattan’s Garden Park appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Milan Design Week 2014 Preview: Angelo Grassi Grows Vegetables on Furniture

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    2 Apr 2014 | 10:54 am
    Fuorisalone is where Angelo Grassi’s Ortofabricca will be on view. I’m packing for my trip to Milan Design Week where I will be joining a stellar team of eleven design bloggers on the Modenus BlogTour. From Milan, I’ll report back … Read More...The post Milan Design Week 2014 Preview: Angelo Grassi Grows Vegetables on Furniture appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Japanese Commuters Tending Train Station Rooftop Gardens

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    27 Mar 2014 | 1:47 pm
    Oh how dreadful that morning commute can be. Even with the help of podcasts, books, game apps, 16 gigs of music– it can still be a soul draining bore. Good news! Japan may have come up with a cure to … Read More...The post Japanese Commuters Tending Train Station Rooftop Gardens appeared first on Urban Gardens.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Home Gardening For Beginners

  • Worm Farms for Beginning Gardeners

    Richard Godke
    9 Apr 2014 | 6:03 am
    Posted in VideoBy Richard Godke Worm Farms for Beginning Gardeners provides a quick and easy instructional video on how to start a worm farm for beginning gardeners. Why Raise Worms? You can turn food waste into an Eco-friendly, economical, organic fertilizer. The worm castings are superior over traditional compost because it includes living organisms like microbes, bacteria, [...]The post Worm Farms for Beginning Gardeners appeared first on Home Gardening For Beginners.
  • Starting Seeds for Dummies – Beginners

    Richard Godke
    3 Mar 2014 | 9:26 am
    Posted in Featured ArticlesGardening IdeasBy:  Richard Godke Starting seeds for dummies can be easy, cost-effective, and fun for the whole family. As a gardener you are no longer held hostage by the plant suppliers. Starting seeds at home allows you to choose the vegetables and varieties you prefer, including heirloom and non-genetically modified organisms (GMO) varieties. By starting plants [...]The post Starting Seeds for Dummies – Beginners appeared first on Home Gardening For Beginners.
  • Easy Hydroponics for Beginners

    Richard Godke
    28 Feb 2014 | 5:06 am
    Posted in Featured ArticlesGardening IdeasBy: Richard Godke Easy hydroponics are a passive system that produces a large amount of vegetables, very quickly, in a small space. Hydroponics is the process of raising plants without soil. How can this be? The plants are started in a soil-less medium like: rockwool, foam cubes, or compressed peat pellets (Jiffy-7). To start the [...]The post Easy Hydroponics for Beginners appeared first on Home Gardening For Beginners.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Gardening-Koi Ponds-Landscaping Made Easy

  • Home Water Gardens – Things to Avoid

    timreeves1043
    18 Apr 2014 | 1:19 pm
    Please resubscribe on Gardening-Koi Ponds-Landscaping Made Easy subscription page to get the latest news! Whether you’re making your own backyard water garden or hiring a contractor to do it for you, there are things you should definitely be careful of. Given the time and money you’re investing in the project, it’s vital that you’re well-informed before you upturn a single shovelful of dirt or place a single stone. Common [...]
  • Latest In Chemistry

    timreeves1043
    18 Apr 2014 | 1:23 am
    Please resubscribe on Gardening-Koi Ponds-Landscaping Made Easy subscription page to get the latest news! Chemical substance In chemistry , a chemical substance is a form of matter that has constant chemical composition and characteristic properties It cannot be … Stanford bioengineer creates $5 chemistry setManu Prakash won The Science Play and Research Kit Competition (SPARK) to develop the 21st century chemistry set. His version, based on a toy music [...]
  • Astronomy News

    timreeves1043
    18 Apr 2014 | 1:20 am
    Please resubscribe on Gardening-Koi Ponds-Landscaping Made Easy subscription page to get the latest news! Astronomy Picture of the Day http://apod.nasa.gov/ A different astronomy and space science related image is featured each day, along with a brief explanation. Introductory Astronomy: Parallax, the Parsec, and DistancesVideo lecture that discusses the concept of parallax, the unit of the parsec, and how astronomers can determine the distances to the most nearby stars. , [...]
  • Conspiracies

    timreeves1043
    18 Apr 2014 | 1:19 am
    Please resubscribe on Gardening-Koi Ponds-Landscaping Made Easy subscription page to get the latest news! Dugway Proving Ground http://www.dugway.army.mil/ Colonel Ronald F. Fizer Colonel Ronald (Ron) F. Fizer was assigned to the Joint Staff in July 2010. He served in the J5 Strategic Plans and Policy section as the … Combine Solicitation – 58– Video EquipmentInsurance News Net (press release), on Thu, 10 Apr 2014 08:53:44 -0700Office Address: Department of the [...]
  • Earth And Climate News

    timreeves1043
    18 Apr 2014 | 1:17 am
    Please resubscribe on Gardening-Koi Ponds-Landscaping Made Easy subscription page to get the latest news! Weather satellite The weather satellite is a type of satellite that is primarily used to monitor the weather and climate of the Earth . Satellites can be … Weird Weather | Dusky's Wondershttp://www.duskyswondersite.com/nature/wierd-weather/ , on The Holdren 'cherry blossom vortex', Information Quality Act … http://wattsupwiththat.com/Source:…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Home Gardening For Beginners

  • Worm Farms for Beginning Gardeners

    Richard Godke
    9 Apr 2014 | 6:03 am
    Posted in VideoBy Richard Godke Worm Farms for Beginning Gardeners provides a quick and easy instructional video on how to start a worm farm for beginning gardeners. Why Raise Worms? You can turn food waste into an Eco-friendly, economical, organic fertilizer. The worm castings are superior over traditional compost because it includes living organisms like microbes, bacteria, [...]The post Worm Farms for Beginning Gardeners appeared first on Home Gardening For Beginners.
  • Starting Seeds for Dummies – Beginners

    Richard Godke
    3 Mar 2014 | 9:26 am
    Posted in Featured ArticlesGardening IdeasBy:  Richard Godke Starting seeds for dummies can be easy, cost-effective, and fun for the whole family. As a gardener you are no longer held hostage by the plant suppliers. Starting seeds at home allows you to choose the vegetables and varieties you prefer, including heirloom and non-genetically modified organisms (GMO) varieties. By starting plants [...]The post Starting Seeds for Dummies – Beginners appeared first on Home Gardening For Beginners.
  • Easy Hydroponics for Beginners

    Richard Godke
    28 Feb 2014 | 5:06 am
    Posted in Featured ArticlesGardening IdeasBy: Richard Godke Easy hydroponics are a passive system that produces a large amount of vegetables, very quickly, in a small space. Hydroponics is the process of raising plants without soil. How can this be? The plants are started in a soil-less medium like: rockwool, foam cubes, or compressed peat pellets (Jiffy-7). To start the [...]The post Easy Hydroponics for Beginners appeared first on Home Gardening For Beginners.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden

  • Yummy Cauliflorous Inflorescence

    Jonah Holland
    18 Apr 2014 | 4:45 am
    Text & photos by Brian Vick, Community Kitchen Garden Coordinator, Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden “Cauliflorous” or “cauliflory” is the term describing the production of flowers on the trunk and branches of woody plants, as opposed to the ends of the twigs. In this case, we’re looking at the ubiquitous eastern redbud (Cercis canadensis) – which happens to be a legume (member of the bean family: Fabaceae). Native Americans consumed redbud flowers raw or boiled, and ate roasted seeds. That’s the green seed pods, not the mature seed pods. The flowers contain anthocyanins.
  • Butterflies LIVE! Returns May 2, 2014

    Jonah Holland
    18 Apr 2014 | 4:31 am
    The joy of watching a butterfly up close. Photo by Scott Elmquist Can you believe Butterflies LIVE! starts in just 2 short weeks? We can’t wait! And guess what? We receive our first chrysalids today too!  Stay tuned for more info on what’s new this year in the exhibit.
  • The Power of Good: Shrinky Dink Edition

    Jonah Holland
    16 Apr 2014 | 11:26 am
    By Nicki, Youth Programs Developer, Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Check out Daniel Alonso’s Shrinky Dink portrait at the HandsOn Greater Richmond Power of Good art show!  The art show celebrates local volunteers and portraits were done by Tiffany Glass Ferreira‘s Shrinky Dink Selfie Campaign. We are so proud of Daniel and all that he has done for the Children’s Garden! Of course the Children’s Garden loves crafty artforms like Shrinky Dinks! To see more Shrinky Dink portraits visit HandsOnRVA’s Facebook album: Power of Good.  
  • A Mother’s Day Tradition

    Megan Compton
    16 Apr 2014 | 4:01 am
    by Megan Compton, Education Assistant,  Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden   Mother’s Day 2008 during the concert in the auditorium. Our first Mother’s Day Celebration at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden was actually before I even became a mom. My best friend’s father leads Glennroy and Company and we came to hear him play the Mother’s Day concert down at Bloemendaal House. It was a beautiful spring day and we relaxed and enjoyed  listening to the music. Mother’s Day 2009 When my daughter was born, it seemed natural to bring my family to the Garden for my first Mother’s…
  • Global Youth Service Day comes to the Children’s Garden

    Jonah Holland
    15 Apr 2014 | 11:06 am
    By Nicki, Youth Programs Developer, Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden This weekend Kylie helped plant a wonderful purple kale variety in the Youth Volunteer Display Garden. Kylie is in the Service Learning Program. We will harvest the kale in a couple of months so check in with us to see what recipes we come up with using purple kale! This weekend we celebrated Global Youth Service Day by planting kale and lettuce transplants that we started in the Children’s Garden greenhouse earlier this year.  Our Service Learning Program volunteers  helped us plant the vegetables  in our newly…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Horticult

  • Night at the Museum: Dancing With Plants and Paintings at ‘Art Alive’

    Chantal Aida Gordon
    16 Apr 2014 | 3:57 am
    Last weekend Art Alive happened — and to kick things off, Ryan asked if I would be his date to the plant prom. The party (alright, officially known as Bloom Bash) was thrown last Friday to celebrate San Diego Museum of Art’s annual show; in its 33rd year, the four-day event featured 120 floral interpretations of famous works of art.… ►
  • When Roses Meet Rembrandt: This Weekend, ‘Art Alive’ Returns to San Diego Museum of Art!

    Chantal Aida Gordon
    9 Apr 2014 | 1:30 pm
    It’s back! The show that puts the “culture” in horticulture, Art Alive is taking place this weekend at San Diego Museum of Art. The exhibition will feature 120 inventive, seriously sublime floral interpretations paired with famous works of art.… ►
  • Locals Only: A Surprising Tour of Southern California’s Native Plants

    Chantal Aida Gordon
    8 Apr 2014 | 4:37 am
    Last weekend we headed up the coast in search of indigenous plants, and were amazed by the colorful diversity we found. The low-lying chaparral we expected was punctuated by shocking, shoulder-high clouds of wild lilac (Ceanothus) and flannel bush blooming yellow, and one of the most stunning flowering euphorbias we’ve ever seen.… ►
  • Garden Tour: A Beach Bungalow With a Wild, Bohemian Heart

    Chantal Aida Gordon
    3 Apr 2014 | 8:30 am
    The riotous garden Joe Skoby has created is one that embraces you, absorbs you, tickles you on the ear. Tall philodendrons curve to create organic archways, a snail vine wraps a palm tree in a rich stole of purple flowers, and a creeping fig pokes a feeler through the bathroom window.… ►
  • Floral Mixtape: How to Say ‘You’re My Best Friend’ in the Language of Flowers

    Chantal Aida Gordon
    1 Apr 2014 | 10:37 am
    Time for Round Two of Tussie-Mussie Tuesday! Inspired by the Victorian language of flowers, we’re fixing up sweet and simple bouquets that you can give to the beloved buds in your life.… ►
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Bonsai Pot for All your Bonsia Needs

  • This Beautiful Bonsai in just 5 hours !

    9 Apr 2014 | 12:49 am
    Hi Everyone, We came across this amazing video the other day and had to share it. Great work to the guys at Kaizen Bonsai. Hope you all enjoy and feel free to send in any videos of your own to share. The Bonsai Pot The post This Beautiful Bonsai in just 5 hours ! appeared first on The Bonsai Pot for All your Bonsia Needs.
  • My Bonsai Surprise !

    6 Apr 2014 | 3:10 am
    Of course I love my new Bonsai ! So what do you buy a person who loves bonsai? Flowers.. um no. I am pretty sure we can all answer that one. Well my husband decided to spoil me last week and buy me a new bonsai. It was nothing flash or expensive just a little bonsai from a local nursery, but it is still a beautiful tree that needs my love and care. I thought I would share a couple of the first ‘baby’ photos.  Looks like I have some work ahead of me but really looking forward to it. Please feel free to share your photos and comments. The post My Bonsai Surprise ! appeared first on…
  • Bonsai Tree Kidnapping – Has it Happened to You?

    4 Mar 2014 | 9:50 pm
    Have you heard of anyone stealing a plant? or a Bonsai to be more precise? Surprisingly it is more common than you think. With the value of some bonsai trees exceeding thousands of dollars you can understand why people would go to extraordinary lengths to get their hands on these precious little wonders.   Also you do not often hear the theft of a plant or tree being referred to as a ‘kidnapping.’  But in the case of Walter Liew of Hawaii that is is exactly what he calls it. He and his family have spent the better part of their lives nurturing and training bonsai and they…
  • Quote of The Day – Friday 21st February 2014

    21 Feb 2014 | 1:00 am
    Quote of the Day Cannot fetch quote from source Quotes via Quotery.com The post Quote of The Day – Friday 21st February 2014 appeared first on The Bonsai Pot for All your Bonsia Needs.
  • Quote of The Day – Thursday 20th February 2014

    20 Feb 2014 | 1:00 am
    Quote of the Day Cannot fetch quote from source Quotes via Quotery.com The post Quote of The Day – Thursday 20th February 2014 appeared first on The Bonsai Pot for All your Bonsia Needs.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Diligent Gardener

  • Forcing Rhubarb

    Gaz
    15 Apr 2014 | 6:47 am
    Rhubarb produces its tasty pink stems throughout thr spring and early summer. However, you can extend the season by 'forcing' a significantly earlier crop by covering over the crown before it starts to sprout in say January or February with a bucket or an ornamental terracotta rhubarb forcer.You then need to cover over the bucked with straw to keep the temperature up especially if the weather is cold.Plants need light to photosynthesise and produce chlorophyll, which in turn makes foliage green. Exclude every last shard of light and plants cannot photosynthesise. Your light-excluded plant…
  • Garden maintenance tips for the beginner

    Gaz
    14 Apr 2014 | 3:56 am
    Gardening nourishes the mind, body and soul when you spend time caring for your plants, helping them to thrive and enjoying the meditative benefits of enjoying nature. If you love to garden but are not always sure how to keep your plants green and healthy, look no further, here are some great tips for newcomers on how to keep your garden thriving:Keep pruningBy regularly pruning your plants you will prevents them from growing out of control. Just go through and trim the ends off your plants every so often to keep them tidy. What’s more, keeping your plants trimmed helps then to grow more…
  • Your garden as another room

    Gaz
    10 Apr 2014 | 8:38 am
    If your garden seems impossible to maintain, tired-looking, or feral you might need to rethink your way of looking at the space. It could very well be time to start imagining your garden as another room in the house and lavishing as much attention upon it as you do the living room, dining room, or kitchen. By maintaining your garden properly, it can be enjoyed just like any other room and provide an extra area of functional leisure space for you and your family. We vacuum our lounge carpet and dust our shelves regularly, so why is it so hard to imagine keeping the grass clipped and the…
  • What do do on the Allotment in April

    Gaz
    2 Apr 2014 | 6:46 am
    Hopefully this cold weather wont stay too much longer and we will get into a more normal spring. With that in mind its a good time to remind ourselves what to be doing in April.TomatoesTomatoes are an essential crop on my allotment, and whether you have a big space or just a few pots on a balcony it's one you should not be without. There are fortunately many types that can be grown outside in the UK in summer so you don't even have to have a greenhouse. However in saying that the earliest crop of fruit will come from plants grown in a greenhouse. Tomatoes are very easy to grow from seed, so…
  • Hedgehog Garden for Hampton Court

    Gaz
    28 Mar 2014 | 4:09 am
    The British Hedgehog Preservation Society (BHPS) and People's Trust for Endangered Species (PTES) are pleased to announce that their joint submission for a hedgehog-friendly garden has been selected as one of this year’s summer gardens at the RHS Hampton Court Palace Flower Show.  The charities’ summer garden, called Hedgehog Street, aims to raise awareness of the plight of threatened hedgehogs and show how gardeners can help the species in their very own back yard.Created by award-winning garden designer Tracy Foster, the garden will feature various elements that are beneficial to…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Ten Minute Gardener

  • Use These Tips To Grow A Better Organic Garden!

    Chris
    17 Apr 2014 | 1:26 am
    When you take the time to apply the correct organic horticulture strategies and products, you will tell from your harvest! It demonstrates that you are serious about getting the most out of your organic plants. Like other skills, these are able to be improved. The following advice will help in your quest for the perfect organic garden. Select plant types that produce a higher profits and yield. You don’t need store-bought chemical treatments for plant mildew. Mix a bit of liquid soap and baking soda into water. Spray this mixture on your plants once a week until the mildew disappears.
  • Things You Need To Know If You Are Taking Up Organic Gardening

    Chris
    16 Apr 2014 | 7:11 am
    Organic gardening is a goal many families want to do but never actually try to accomplish. Your children can help you with your organic gardening endeavors. A garden can provide a wonderful learning experience for children, and it gives you a chance to bond while producing healthy food. After your seeds begin to sprout, you will not need to keep seeds as warm. Keep a close watch on your seeds to know when you should do this. Top Tip! Be sure to plant some strawberries for your children and grandchildren. Ever-bearing ones are especially nice. Have some plastic bags on hand that you can put…
  • Add Polish To Your Property With This Landscaping Advice

    Chris
    16 Apr 2014 | 3:56 am
    Keeping up with the latest trends can be hard at times, especially those regarding your home and yard. Everyone takes note when they pass a beautifully landscaped yard; however, but few think to improve their own.Read this article to find out what you better the look of your landscape. Curved borders create much more contemporary and up-to-date than sharp corners and straight borders of the past. Use local plants in your yard. Native plants are easier to care of because they are already comfortable in your climate and soil. This also means they are low-maintenance. You can find information on…
  • Learning Tips To Help With Your Organic Gardening

    Chris
    14 Apr 2014 | 12:22 am
    An organic garden is a fascinating thing that also requires your most astute and attentive care to thrive. That is why wise organic horticulture comes in handy.This can help you cultivating healthier and happier produce. Follow these tips to make your organic garden stand out above the rest! Having healthy soil in your garden is your plants avoid insect pests.Healthy plants with more able to resist both pests and various diseases. To give your garden the best chance of yielding the healthiest plants, make sure you begin with premium soil devoid of salt-accumulating chemicals. Pick the proper…
  • No Landscaping Experience? These Tips WIll Help!

    Chris
    13 Apr 2014 | 3:31 am
    Perhaps you’ve thought of hiring a landscaping professional landscaper for assistance in redoing your yard. You only need to know a bit about the best techniques to use. Read this article to learn some helpful tips that you can use to create a nice-looking yard. Curved beds are a lot more contemporary and sharp corners. Try to use native plants when you are landscaping.When choosing plants, shrubs and trees that are native to your area. Top Tip! When landscaping, use local plants. Local plants are simpler to take care of since they are used to the soil. Make the most of your yard look…
Log in