Gardening

  • Most Topular Stories

  • The Water Beneath My Pond

    Outside Clyde
    Christopher C. NC
    17 Dec 2014 | 4:37 pm
    The Posh Estate #2 was a posh estate in it's own right from probably the early 60's to the mid 90's. Then things fell into disrepair. The forest made a valiant attempt to reclaim what it once controlled. The process of restoring its former grandeur is much like an archeological dig. You never know what you are going to find once you start clearing things away. When the draining of the pond for
  • One Last Time: Free Yourself and Your Oven and Grill the Turkey

    Defining Your Home, Garden and Travel
    22 Nov 2014 | 2:34 pm
    Friends: This annual posting of my favorite Thanksgiving story was inspired by my wonderful husband who passed away in May 2014 from brain cancer (glioblastoma multiforme)... the reason I've been off the blogs for the last year. It all started with Thanksgiving 2006. Expecting a crowd for the big meal, I couldn't work out a way to get everything in the oven since the turkey was so large.We had to figure out how to get everything cooked on time. The microwave wouldn't do it. Ah ha! What about using the grill? Would that work? My husband placed the turkey (in the pan) on the grill to see…
  • Frugal Gardening: Starting Perennials from Seed

    Backyard Gardening Blog
    Administrator
    14 Dec 2014 | 7:23 am
    I think everyone loves a nice mass planting. Mixed plantings look nice too, but it is hard to beat the statement of a mass planting. A whole bed of lilies, a whole bed of hostas, a whole bed of daylilies, or cone flowers, or rudbeckias, or phlox, or whatever. Maybe not all the same exactly […]
  • A Little Bit Potting, A Little Bit Party: Reuse THIS!

    Kiss my Aster!
    Kiss My Aster!
    3 Dec 2014 | 1:42 pm
    I've tried a lot of potting benches and I've also tried to be the kind of person that doesn't need a potting bench. I mean, what a luxury piece of furniture! Are potting benches in the same league as bidets? I really do like them. Potting benches, not bidets.So I really needed one and after looking around I realized there wasn't anything I wanted, specifically.And then Dan found this:It's a really old concrete laundry sink he found on Craigslist for nothing. I think he hurt himself in many ways getting it to me. I have a slice of old crappy melamine that covers the top, this is my work…
  • Carl Sagan's Insightful Quote - Garden Wisdom

    Serenity in the Garden
    Jan Johnsen
    16 Dec 2014 | 6:03 pm
    “What a marvelous cooperative arrangement - plants and animals each inhaling each other's exhalations, a kind of planet-wide mutual mouth-to-stoma resuscitation, the entire elegant cycle powered by a star 150 million kilometers away.”-- Carl Sagan, "Cosmos"
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    You Grow Girl

  • Heirloom Vegetable Embroidery Pattern Bundle Sale

    Gayla Trail
    15 Dec 2014 | 11:01 am
    We've Moved! Update your Reader Now. This feed has moved to: http://feeds.feedblitz.com/yougrowgirl Update your reader now with this changed subscription address to get your latest updates from us.
  • Amaryllis ‘Chico’

    Gayla Trail
    15 Dec 2014 | 9:47 am
    We've Moved! Update your Reader Now. This feed has moved to: http://feeds.feedblitz.com/yougrowgirl Update your reader now with this changed subscription address to get your latest updates from us.
  • Holiday Gifts for Gardeners 2014

    Gayla Trail
    10 Dec 2014 | 1:11 pm
    We've Moved! Update your Reader Now. This feed has moved to: http://feeds.feedblitz.com/yougrowgirl Update your reader now with this changed subscription address to get your latest updates from us.
  • On Travel

    Gayla Trail
    4 Dec 2014 | 2:08 pm
    We've Moved! Update your Reader Now. This feed has moved to: http://feeds.feedblitz.com/yougrowgirl Update your reader now with this changed subscription address to get your latest updates from us.
  • Tomatoes Worth Growing: Pink San Marzano

    Gayla Trail
    2 Dec 2014 | 9:17 am
    We've Moved! Update your Reader Now. This feed has moved to: http://feeds.feedblitz.com/yougrowgirl Update your reader now with this changed subscription address to get your latest updates from us.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Shawna Coronado

  • Tips on How To Reduce Plastic

    Shawna Coronado
    19 Dec 2014 | 6:44 am
    This plastic infographic (below) on putting down the plastic really hit home for me. I’ve been struggling for years to try to reduce plastic exposure in my family’s lives and find it a ginormous struggle because EVERYTHING seems to be wrapped in plastic. Help me do a better job of it — leave a comment below and give ideas on how we all might take some of the plastic out of our lives. Thanks for your help! Click to Enlarge Image Put Down The Plastic Infographic by CustomMade The post Tips on How To Reduce Plastic appeared first on Shawna Coronado.
  • Saving the Park Bench

    Shawna Coronado
    17 Dec 2014 | 8:51 am
    I’ve had two benches out for many years now and find they’ve greatly enhanced the community experience. My “kick ass green” park bench (right) had its slats pulled out by a person or persons who will not be named and park benches have  been important to this garden as it helps people in our community, so I sought a replacement. In order to find a replacement bench, I went to one of my favorite bench companies, Belson, and told them the story. They responded in less than an hour saying that they would be thrilled to donate a bench or two for the garden. I was blown…
  • 8 Last Minute Gift Ideas – Garden Books

    Shawna
    15 Dec 2014 | 4:21 am
    This year has been an amazing year for good garden reading. The garden books included in the post I read with interest and thought you might like them. Below (in no particular order) is a list of some of my favorites for 2014 with links so you can order them if you like along with a brief book review. I consider them wonderful last minute  holiday gift ideas that would please most any gardener. One book is even a good read for the chicken gardeners I know. Happy Holidays! 1. Fine Foliage By Karen Chapman and Christina Salwitz Fine Foliage is a magnificent little book that shows gardeners how…
  • Holiday Gift Idea – Glass Bee Preservers

    Shawna Coronado
    8 Dec 2014 | 4:41 am
    Glass bee preservers from Glass Gardens NW are a great holiday or Christmas gift idea. Attracting honey bees to your garden is a good idea if you would like better pollination of your flower plants and vegetables. Additionally, rescuing bees and other pollinators makes a lot of sense – we have a world pollinator crisis going on. Bees need water, but many water sources do not have a landing area for bees and they can drown in deeper water. Bee preservers are wonderful glass balls with bumps on them that float on top of a water source and allow honey bees to crawl to the water without…
  • Pomegranate Guava and Lemon Thyme Martini Cocktail Recipe

    Shawna
    1 Dec 2014 | 4:32 am
    Searching for the magnificent for your holiday cocktail celebrations? Try my Pomegranate Guava and Lemon Thyme Martini Cocktail Recipe. SUPER YUMMY! Watch the quickie video below that shows you the easy steps to put it together. If you do not have access to fresh lemon thyme, substitute a bit of lemon zest and muddle the thyme and lemon zest for a bright taste. One fantastically memorable cocktail recipe!. Pomegranate, Guava, and Lemon Thyme Martini Cocktail Recipe – Muddled Lemon Thyme — Handful (or plain thyme with some lemon zest added) Citron Vodka – 3.0 oz Simple Syrup…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Cold Climate Gardening

  • Amaryllis And Orchids For Garden Bloggers Bloom Day December 2014

    Kathy Purdy
    15 Dec 2014 | 3:09 am
    Thirty-seven days after I planted it, the ‘White Nymph’ amaryllis from Longfield Gardens is blooming. I was surprised to see how fast it grew. I like the pink flush on the tips of the petals, but I don’t know as I’d call this a double flower. Semi-double would be more like it. At any rate, […]
  • How To Turn Your Best Friend Into A Gardening Addict: Book Review

    Kathy Purdy
    8 Dec 2014 | 8:30 pm
    It is a truth universally acknowledged, that everyone who loves gardening wants everyone they love to love gardening. It may not be your best friend who you want to convert–uh, get hooked–that is, become interested in gardening. Perhaps it is your grown children, or the young couple who moved in down the street and keeps […]
  • Autumn Magic: Lilactree Farm Garden Notes, Postscript, 2014

    Brian Bixley
    26 Nov 2014 | 7:09 pm
    ‘How (my characters) look and move and speak and behave, always in the setting I have found for them, is my account of them – of which I dare say, alas, que cela manque souvent d’architecture. But I would rather, I think, have too little architecture than too much – when there’s danger of its […]
  • How To Get A Coupon Code For P. Allen Smith’s Gift Shop

    Kathy Purdy
    25 Nov 2014 | 6:04 pm
    While we’re on the subject of gifts–you may remember that I visited P. Allen’s Moss Mountain Farm back in May. One of the things I shared with you was this quirky bud vase pictured above, currently displaying autumn-blooming Crocus speciosus. Well, you don’t have to visit Moss Mountain Farm to shop at the gift shop […]
  • Should Gardeners Wear Jewelry?

    Kathy Purdy
    25 Nov 2014 | 5:28 pm
    Should gardeners wear jewelry? Not while they’re gardening. Not if they’re smart. At least, they shouldn’t wear dangly trinkets that could get caught while the gardener is leaning over weeding, pruning, or digging. But of course, there are plenty of other times when wearing jewelry is perfectly acceptable, such as garden club meetings, plant swaps, […]
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    A Way To Garden

  • top 50 stories of 2014: tactical help, great plants

    margaret
    17 Dec 2014 | 6:22 am
    TOMATOES AND GARLIC and things for the shade. Tricks for success with seeds, and for putting up the harvest so [read more…] The post top 50 stories of 2014: tactical help, great plants appeared first on A Way To Garden.
  • thinking ‘slow flowers’ year round, with debra prinzing

    margaret
    14 Dec 2014 | 9:06 am
    YES, IT’S WINTER, but take the “slow flowers” challenge now, anyway, says Debra Prinzing–especially with the holidays upon us. Slow, [read more…] The post thinking ‘slow flowers’ year round, with debra prinzing appeared first on A Way To Garden.
  • say thank you to a cooperative extension staffer today

    margaret
    13 Dec 2014 | 4:43 am
    ‘TIS THE SEASON to be jolly, but that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t still be giving thanks. How about sending your [read more…] The post say thank you to a cooperative extension staffer today appeared first on A Way To Garden.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Occasional Gardener

  • Painterly Whites

    25 Nov 2014 | 5:59 am
    The ribs on the Caladium Lindenii pictured left, look like they're painted on. In the background of the picture on the right, what looks like green paint spattered on white paper is Diffenbachia Star Bright I think, hard to tell with so many variations that look quite similar. The papery leaves in the foreground with the broad watercolor stripes belong to variegated Arrowroot, Maranta Arundinacea, possibly my favorite of this trio.I inherited these guys from my parents garden, which along with a collection of fragrant white flowered plants, I started organizing into a 'white corner'. To…
  • Craftsman's Garden

    22 Nov 2014 | 7:32 am
    This was my second visit to the garden at the National Craft Center in Kuala Lumpur. I had returned primarily to take another look at the garden having been really impressed with its design on my first visit. The visit reiterated my original impressions of the garden being not only well designed but uniquely suited to the purpose of the center to celebrate Malaysian handicrafts.The garden is not large, inhabiting space between buildings at the complex with a few small artisan cottage studios at its center where artisans work and sell their wares. That in itself is instructional in garden…
  • Autumn Leaves, Sort of

    15 Oct 2014 | 12:06 am
    Now that I am living in an endless tropical summer I realize how much an ever changing temperate environment drives you forward into new cycles of activity or states of mind.  The longing for warm summer days, the thrill of fall in New York City when everyone is back from their summer sojourns, the inertia of winter and for gardeners the rush of a new growing season.I have come to the realisation however that the botanical changes that define each season from bud to flower and fruit and then bare branches is something that happens here too - just not in synchronicity. Take the…
  • The Patient Path

    15 Aug 2014 | 8:17 am
    In the last few weeks, the stone path I laid in the dark verandah has finally 'clicked'. It's taken the best part of a couple of years. It's a short path that takes you from the concrete verandah, through the border and an opening in the bamboo fence. I found most of the 'stones' in the orchard where I think many years ago some renovation had occured and these broken pieces ended up being disposed there. They are really chunks of cement and gravel but having been laying around for years in the cooler shade of the orchard, had become mossy.Having transferred and laid them, which took a…
  • Malay Apples

    20 Jun 2014 | 8:11 am
    In the last few years of living in New York City I tried consciously to eat more seasonally which was all well and good in the summer months but as the seasons progressed into the colder months the selection would inevitably thin to root vegetables and apples. I ate a lot of apples. But then I did love going down to the farmers market at Union square and filling up my backpack with them.Here now in the tropics there are no heirloom apples to be found - just the bright red or green homogenous supermarket varieties - Granny Smiths and Red Delicious from Australia and New Zealand. Their…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    May Dreams Gardens

  • Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day - December 2014

    Carol
    14 Dec 2014 | 9:05 pm
    It's nice not to have snow on the ground right now Welcome to Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day for December 2014. Here in my USDA Hardiness Zone 6a garden in central Indiana, we are enjoying a few days of above freezing temperatures.   Out in the garden, the lawn is still green but clearly, this is the dormant season for us. I have just one hope for outdoor blooms in December. All eyes, all hope
  • Proof of the Existence of Garden Fairies, Once Again

    Carol
    11 Dec 2014 | 5:47 pm
    Once again, I have proof of the existence of garden fairies.  Evidence in the form of mail delivered by the postal services to one Violet Greenpea Maydreams, a garden fairy. What further proof do you need? And here are the little tools that were in the envelope along with a note.   Violet, clearly a garden fairy, is very grateful for both the mail and the tools, which were sent by the
  • How it is in my garden

    Carol
    7 Dec 2014 | 6:15 pm
    I finally found a picture of how it is in my garden, or at least how I like to think it is in my garden, when I am not around. Because we all know, of course, when we are not around our gardens, there are goings-on, as we like to say, the likes of which we probably cannot imagine. Or maybe we can imagine them? I was thrilled to find the picture and thankful to the artist, Molly Brett, who
  • Pansies, for all seasons

    Carol
    5 Dec 2014 | 3:59 am
    Vintage Postcard Pansies in the spring, Pansies in the fall, Pansies to wish seasons greetings to all.
  • When a gardener collects vintage Christmas postcards

    Carol
    1 Dec 2014 | 7:13 pm
    When a gardener decides to collect a few vintage Christmas postcards... She soon realizes she had better come up with some criteria for which postcards to collect before she has hundreds of postcards. She decides she will collect those with unusual Christmas flowers, like this one with Lily of the Valley flowers. Some of the cards have been sent and she likes to read what the senders wrote
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Backyard Gardening Blog

  • Frugal Gardening: Starting Perennials from Seed

    Administrator
    14 Dec 2014 | 7:23 am
    I think everyone loves a nice mass planting. Mixed plantings look nice too, but it is hard to beat the statement of a mass planting. A whole bed of lilies, a whole bed of hostas, a whole bed of daylilies, or cone flowers, or rudbeckias, or phlox, or whatever. Maybe not all the same exactly […]
  • Growing a Bee Friendly Garden

    Administrator
    27 Nov 2014 | 2:26 pm
    In the inland empire of California is a vast stretch of hundreds of square miles of almond trees. Every spring 1.6 million beehives, 60% of the managed beehives in the country, are trucked to California to pollinate these almond trees. It is the largest pollination event on earth, and is responsible for 80% of the […]
  • Growing William Shakespeare’s Garden

    Administrator
    16 Oct 2014 | 6:13 pm
    So there was a guy, you may have heard of him, William Shakespeare, he was sort of a big deal. He was of course an English writer and his works have been popular for almost 500 years, that is some staying power. I actually like his stuff, I’ve read Shakespeare for pleasure, I’m that sort […]
  • How to kill moles

    Administrator
    24 Sep 2014 | 6:17 am
    I hate moles, really I do. I know there are people out there that probably do not condone killing any animal, even moles, I’m not that type of person, but if you are, I can respect that, though this blog post is not for you. Personally I like animals fine, I try to encourage animal […]
  • GMO crops are safe, healthy, and good for the environment.

    Administrator
    15 Sep 2014 | 7:03 am
    Controversy time, as a man a science (ahem, real science) I’ve been perpetually annoyed at all the anti-GMO pseudo BS out there, and I thought “What if there is a nice, accurate, informative, article out there letting people know the facts?” Then I figured, I might as well write the article. This post will be […]
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Old Country Gardens

  • A New Blog For Me

    Melanie Vassallo
    30 Nov 2014 | 7:29 pm
    Hi there!It's been an awful long time since I've posted to this blog. As some of you know, there have been many changes to my life in the past four years. The good news is I'm in a wonderful place now and finally back on track for some writing and photography. While my gardens now are a small cottage garden and not yet ready for photos, I get to visit lots and lots of other gardens like the one photographed above, The Peconic River Herb Farm.My partner Andy and I travel quite a bit, even if sometimes its just to one of the stunning locations right here on Long Island. I've started a new…
  • Love at Sagamore Hill

    Melanie Vassallo
    14 May 2013 | 8:28 am
    In March Andy bought a brand new Harley Davidson Road Glide. It was chilly out for riding but we bundled up and went for some rides here on Long Island. Last Saturday he suggested we visit some places on the north shore, near us. The first was the Vanderbilt estate in Centerport, then we decided to visit Teddy Roosevelt's home, Sagamore Hill. The flowering trees were in all their glory and as we drove into the parking lot we drove right past a female turkey.It's courting season and soon we saw the male turkey, trying his best to gain the female's interest. I took a photo even though the…
  • In retrospect

    Melanie Vassallo
    28 Jan 2013 | 5:42 pm
    The end of January, bitter cold winds and temperatures but suddenly one notices the days getting longer. Winter still has it's icy grip on us but Spring is just around the corner.Beauty can still be found in the ice formations along the water front but brrrr, how much nicer to look at something green.I thought I'd choose a few old photos from the past to get our imaginations flowing...From the smallest frond unfurling to color in all it's glory, I love ferns!Fuzzy drumstick heads...Fat prickly fronds...Airy and delicate lady ferns...None of them are here in my new home but oh to dream that…
  • Raised beds & Edging materials

    Melanie Vassallo
    25 Nov 2012 | 5:12 pm
    Raised garden beds...  There's a million and one reasons why, where and how, here's a few of my ideas. It was many years into my gardening craze before we built the raised beds I longed for. Rock and stone hold a fascination for me, I remember many walks with my Dad where he'd find a cool stone and put it in his pocket (I still have a few!).Stone walls last longer than wood and many other materials. If built well they are also much sturdier. My new neighborhood here in Centerport is chock full of amazing rock walls I'll be photographing in the spring. This opening shot was in my old…
  • Hurricane Sandy...the day after

    Melanie Vassallo
    17 Nov 2012 | 3:58 pm
    As the world knows, the north eastern region of the USA was struck by Hurricane Sandy on October 29, 2012. These photos were taken as the storm subsided, October 30th. I've continued taking photos and will share them in a timely fashion.This first shot was taken right in front of my house, facing the corner of Garfield and Jackson Crescent.Power was out here by early afternoon.This was the first time I have ever been alone during a storm and frankly, I was scared. Dinner though was an adventure. I took some left overs from the fridge, cooked ravioli, pulled pork, homemade tomato sauce and put…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Bloomingwriter: Gardening in Nova Scotia

  • Gold foliage for brighter gardens

    Jodi DeLong
    15 Dec 2014 | 8:00 am
    Hello, fellow gardeners! Where have I been, you ask? Well, it's been a busy, busy few months, with lots of projects on the go. Now, with only 10 days til Christmas, the main deadlines are under control so I can do some catchup tasks, including updating my neglected blog. It's like that for gardeners, though, so often: during the main gardening months we're outside in our gardens, planting, weeding, harvesting, puttering, designing. Now that frost has come and things have stopped growing and we've gotten our bulbs planted (yes! I did! Before December, even!) we turn to the season of indoor…
  • Falling into autumn...

    Jodi DeLong
    22 Sep 2014 | 8:02 am
     Suddenly, it's September 22 and I haven't posted for a month. Why is that, you ask? Well, for sure I'm always busy and never bored, but there was a lot going on in August, some of it personal in support of a friend, and given that my friends have always been there for me when I need them, I pay it forward gladly. And the days are getting shorter, and suddenly, autumn is but hours away. (Top photo is of blue leadwort, Ceratostigma plumbaginoides, a terrific groundcover with gorgeous fall colour).Autumn is not without its beauty, to be sure--some would say that the coming month or…
  • A Midsummer Miscellany of Colour

    Jodi DeLong
    22 Aug 2014 | 6:55 am
     It's now beyond 'Half Past August' and I thought you might need some encouragement because this is the time of year that I hear "there's no colour in my garden" from some folks. Sure there is--and you can add more! I keep adding as I see things I want to change or acquire plants that I have been looking for.You may remember I talked about plants that I purchase and treat as annuals, including this 'Cherry Brandy' rudbeckia. THIS is why I buy this plant every year if need be--look at that colour. Nothing else quite like it.Amazingly, all the buddleia I had…
  • It's easy loving green...flowers!

    Jodi DeLong
    12 Aug 2014 | 8:04 am
     Perhaps no colour in the floral world is more polarizing than the colour green. Many people dislike green flowers, saying they don't show up well enough--others adore them. Put me firmly in the 'adore' camp. Let's kick off the festival with one of my favourite coneflowers, 'Green Jewel'--which is fragrant as well as gorgeously green.Read more »
  • The joys of daylilies

    Jodi DeLong
    1 Aug 2014 | 7:32 am
     This is the time of year where I regularly have people saying to me, "You have something on your nose." It is almost always either true lily pollen, or daylily pollen, because once those beauties start to flower, I can't help but check for fragrance. (Beautiful Edgings) So, you know the difference between daylilies and true lilies, right? (I'll save lilies for another post). Daylilies have foliage that looks like wide, large grass, and flowers grow up on stems arising from the foliage. Each flower lasts for only a day, and the proper name for these plants is Hemerocallis,…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Digging

  • Have a bright and merry Christmas!

    Pam/Digging
    17 Dec 2014 | 6:43 am
    Several neighbors on a nearby street go all out with Christmas lights and inflatables every year, and we enjoy crawling past with our headlights dimmed to take it all in. This is my favorite display on the block. It’s a fantasia of colored lights that run vertically up a large tree and turn to dripping icicles at the tips of the branches. A rainbow of miniature Christmas trees adorns the lawn, and colorful rivulets spill off the eaves of the house onto bushes below, splashing them with bright color. The tree even wears a skirt of banded light. I love the creativity of the display and…
  • Spiny fingers for Foliage Follow-Up

    Pam/Digging
    15 Dec 2014 | 10:04 pm
    Amid the crazy busyness of December, I’m opting for a quick and easy subject for my monthly Foliage Follow-Up post: a cute, orange-spined, somewhat profane-looking cactus in a goofy, skeleton-decorated Rick Van Dyke pot. Sometimes you just have to indulge the whimsy. What kind of foliage is making you happy in your December garden? Please join me for Foliage Follow-Up, giving foliage plants their due on the day after Bloom Day. Leave a link to your post in a comment below. I really appreciate it if you’ll also link to my post in your own — sharing link love! If you can’t post…
  • Wildflower Center aglow with the spirit of the season

    Pam/Digging
    15 Dec 2014 | 7:13 am
    Luminarias glowed and tree lights twinkled throughout the native-plant gardens at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center during last weekend’s annual Luminations event. I’ve been several times over the years, but this time the lights extended all the way to the new Family Garden. We got there at opening and enjoyed the lights as evening fell. My young nephew was with us, so we headed straight for the Family Garden, passing this golden bigtooth maple (Acer grandidentatum) along the way. That’s a russet bald cypress (Taxodium distichum) at the turn in the path. In the fading…
  • Pink cuphea still blooming in December

    Pam/Digging
    14 Dec 2014 | 6:12 am
    After our early freeze in mid-November, we’ve had a splendid spell of mild weather. There’s been no dragging of cold-tender potted plants inside to clutter the house. Fingers crossed, we’ll get through Christmas without another freeze. Somehow the pink cuphea escaped cold damage in November and is still blooming its head off. I find the fuchsia, tubular flowers so cheery. Paired with a potted (elevated) ‘Color Guard’ yucca, it adds even more late-season zing to the garden. All material © 2006-2014 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.
  • Plant This: Chile pequin will spice up your garden

    Pam/Digging
    11 Dec 2014 | 3:08 am
    Native perennial chile pequin (Capsicum annuum var. glabriusculum) adds hot color to the fall garden with a profusion of tiny, red peppers held upright on rambling green stems adorned with chartreuse, spade-shaped leaves. And if you taste one, you’ll find it heats up your tongue as well! These diminutive peppers pack a fiery punch that rivals the habanero, or so I’ve read, having never dared to sample one myself. I leave that to the birds, which are unaffected by spicy heat. Michael at Plano Prairie Garden passed along this volunteer to me, and I love how it works with the yellow…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Blithewold Blogs

  • Break in routine

    Kristin Green
    19 Dec 2014 | 8:10 am
    I have felt at sixes and sevens ever since the garden volunteers started taking their winter break. I miss their company, no doubt about it, but I also miss the structure they bring to my day. No two days are ever the same in any garden but here at Blithewold there’s a certain routine. We’re […]
  • Holiday houseplants

    Kristin Green
    12 Dec 2014 | 8:33 am
    Given how many wonderful winter-blooming houseplants there are in the world, I find it sort of astonishing that poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima) is listed as the best selling houseplant in the US and Canada. But I suppose that fact must be chalked up to a couple things: Poinsettia are festive and fun. What’s not to love about […]
  • Goodnight gardens

    Kristin Green
    5 Dec 2014 | 11:36 am
    After some festive weeks spent preparing for our Christmas display and this week’s wreath workshops, it was pure pleasure to be out in the gardens again. Despite the chill that crept into fingers and toes. Earlier this fall we got a jump on what’s commonly known as “putting the gardens to bed”. — I must have already […]
  • Greenhouse thanksgiving

    Kristin Green
    24 Nov 2014 | 12:34 pm
    No doubt about it, I have a lot to be thankful for. It might seem trivial compared to how grateful I am for things like my health and the amazing friends I’ve made here at Blithewold — and I also don’t mean to gloat — but I thank my lucky stars just about every time I […]
  • The Shop at Blithewold

    Kelly Sobolewski
    18 Nov 2014 | 10:57 am
    If you’ve visited Blithewold during our Christmas season before, I’m sure you’ve noticed the cheery, little shop tucked away in the Breakfast Porch. The Shop at Blithewold normally lives in the Visitor’s Center, but at Christmastime it moves to the Breakfast Porch and nearly triples in size, allowing them to carry more fun, festive, Christmas […]
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Flatbush Gardener

  • Extinct Plants of northern North America

    Flatbush Gardener
    30 Nov 2014 | 7:31 am
    I'm limiting this list for two reasons: Restricting this list geographically is in keeping with my specialization in plants native to northeastern North America.There are many more tropical plants, and plant extinctions, than I can manage; for... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Shrubberies

    Flatbush Gardener
    8 Nov 2014 | 8:09 pm
    Update 2014-11-23: Completed Step #4 today, nearly injuring myself in the exertion. Did I mention that established grasses have deep and extensive roots?Also completed Step #5, replacing the Panicum.Added Step #9. I'd overlooked this shrub, and... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Megachile, Leaf-Cutter Bees

    Flatbush Gardener
    10 Aug 2014 | 8:26 am
    A leaf-cutter bee removes a segment from a leaf of Rhododendron viscosum, swamp azalea, in my urban backyard native plant garden and wildlife habitat (National Wildlife Federation Certified Wildlife Habitat #141,173). You can see other segments -... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Synanthedon exitiosa, Peachtree Borer/Clearwing Moth

    Flatbush Gardener
    26 Jul 2014 | 5:35 am
    CORRECTION 2014-07-27: ID'd by William H. Taft on BugGuide as a male S. exitiosa, not S. fatifera, Arrowwood Borer, as I thought. A lifer for me. I never even knew such a thing existed. Synanthedon exitiosa, Peachtree Borer/Clearwing Moth, male, on... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Event: Saturday 6/21 NYCWW Pollinator Safari of my Gardens

    Flatbush Gardener
    14 Jun 2014 | 1:50 pm
    On Saturday, June 21, in partnership with NYC Wildflower Week, in observation of Pollinator Week, I'm opening my gardens for a guided tour, what I'm calling a "Pollinator Safari." This is only the third time, and the first time in three years, I've... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Ledge and Gardens

  • Blog Giveaway-Bee Happy-Gifts for the Nature Lover

    Layanee DeMerchant
    16 Dec 2014 | 10:00 pm
    Okay, there is not a bee in sight in my garden here in the northwest corner of Rhode Island but that doesn't mean I am not thinking of them along with the birds and the butterflies and the flowers they love. The butterflies are also long gone but the birds are flitting about the cotoneaster and the bird feeders. I do have many bird houses about the garden and I have mason bees. They like to drill holes in the eaves of the house and the shed to lay their eggs. I really would rather they pick somewhere else to get this task accomplished. As a gardener and a nature lover I do sometimes…
  • Odds and Ends

    Layanee DeMerchant
    2 Dec 2014 | 7:51 pm
    The grass is still green here...when it is visible. We have had two rather small snow events and right now there is no snow left on the garden. The witch hazel is 'last man standing' so to speak. This native, Hamamelis virginiana, has a very long bloom span. It takes little notice of the cold and continues to add a bit of brightness to the dulling landscape. I have been puttering a bit outside. Last week I planted garlic and raked the final drops from the oak trees. I also pulled all but two containers inside. Most of them I empty, sort and stack. There are a few I drag into the barn…
  • First Snow- November 14, 2014-A Very Short Post

    Layanee DeMerchant
    14 Nov 2014 | 6:42 am
    All I can say is that it is way too early for snow. As you can see, there are still leaves on this Parrotia persica. The snow will melt fast and it is pretty but it is too soon. I was also gifted with this rabbit this morning. There were two actually and since there are no dogs here now (a very sad state of affairs) they are becoming quite a regular sight. As for the snow, it is the poor man's fertilizer. I will enjoy its short stay. The rabbits may wear out their welcome though. 
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    the back quarter acre

  • Hoarders

    24 Nov 2014 | 11:31 am
    Not to get too personal, but certain members of my family have a hoarding issue. Well, one in particular. So, yesterday, when I saw an apple caught up high in the canes of climbing rose, I figured that our family hoarder had just parked a piece of fruit so that he could enjoy a snack later after completing his outside chores.  Our family hoarder likes to collect windfalls from a neighbor's apple tree, and this fruit looked just banged and bruised enough to be from that harvest.But after our hoarder denied all knowledge, I thought back to the other caches of food…
  • Daffodil inventory

    16 Oct 2014 | 6:00 pm
    Perhaps I shouldn't be surprised that, after several years of blithely shovelling dozens and dozens of daffodil bulbs into every available garden bed, when it came to placing this fall's bulb order, I had less than a total recollection of what had been planted where. I knew that there were lots of different varieties of daffodils and that some have petered out over the years while others are going strong. Great.  A few beds sport a single variety of daffodil--"Mount Hood" skirts the back property line and pheasant's eye…
  • Lobelia: les liaisons dangereuses

    24 Sep 2014 | 10:09 am
    Maybe I didn't know this?  Or I didn't care? Or I thought that I could make it all be different?  Oh, the stories that we tell ourselves!The Great Blue Lobelia Lobelia siphilitica that I tucked several years ago into the crook of the rain garden has adapted marvelously well. The parent plant is healthy and, this time of year, heavy-blooming. All it seems to need is moist soil, a cool corner, and a measure of sun and shade.  For these favors, I have been generously repaid.  Thanks, right? Well, gratitude has not yet tipped to grievance, but I can see…
  • I love living in a blue state . . .

    2 Sep 2014 | 2:04 pm
    . . . and I'm not limiting myself to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. No, I mean the blue--or almost blue--tones of late summer flowers. Sadly, I've got the blues this year from some of my favorites' failure to thrive: the larkspur has been effectively eliminated by rabbit predation and the blue flag iris sent up only a single flower.  But other cultivars have fared fair better.   Salvia farinacea "Victoria Blue"Spiky clumps of annual blue salvia flourish just about anywhere they are planted.  They look great--even when menaced by storm clouds--at the front of…
  • Sweet end of summer

    25 Aug 2014 | 7:27 pm
    Cool temperatures this past week have stirred up conversations about an early fall.  The plant world, too, seems to be pushing the seasons forward.The end of summer is sweetened by the sight and scent of the appropriately named Summer Sweet Clethra alnifolia "September Beauty." Because these natives flourish in damp, acidic soils, several are sited adjacent to the rain garden and another next to a down spout. This time of year, they are over-loaded with intoxicating pure white racemes. Bees and butterflies flit, land, and sip like reeling, happy drunks. No complaints from that…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    A Leafy Indulgence

  • Tending To The Tender Snacks

    Swimray
    30 Nov 2014 | 12:15 pm
    Root crops and I just don't mix well. Carrots are one of the first creatures (they are supposed to be easy) that I tried growing, year after year, without much success. They ended up dry, splitting, deformed runts. After a few years of adding sand to my garden soil more appropriate for clay pottery than gardening, the results were no better.Then, I discovered compost and organic material, and thought to try that to improve the soil density. Building upon last years's carrot success, I gave it another shot this year with the Tendersnax hybrid purchased a year or two ago. The results are truly…
  • Last Gasp Before Winter

    Swimray
    3 Nov 2014 | 3:42 am
    Most of the garden has fallen asleep before winter arrives, but some defiant plants refuse to give up. Acidanthera, members of the glad, family look as lush and healthy as a summer day. They continue to flower, albeit with fewer blooms than in summer.The pineapple sage (Salvia elegans) is in its glory at this time. It waits until just before frost to throw out its red threads against its chartreuse foliage. This year the plant really took off after a severe winter that I thought would have killed it off like its neighbor the rosemary. Now, every day brings new branches tipped with new flower…
  • Vacation In Quirky Cedar Key

    Swimray
    12 Oct 2014 | 7:26 pm
    A few days before the convention were spent on the gulf coast of Florida in the small, quaint, walkable, low-key town of Cedar Key. There are no stop lights, no chain restaurants, and no chain hotels in the town that is known as 'old Florida' (before the mouse arrived.)I will spare the 'where is this place' theme from last year's trip because I doubt anyone but local residents would know the answer. As this is a gardening blog, I will try keeping to that subject with some photos I found interesting around town.Tuesday was Burger Day at AdaBlue Cafe on the outskirts of town. The gardener's…
  • My Three Garden Tips

    Swimray
    27 Sep 2014 | 7:06 pm
    We all pick up secrets along our garden journey. I have a few that I will call tips since I picked them up from somewhere in the past, but they are no longer secrets since being published here. I wish I could take credit for thinking of them, but will take credit for passing them on.Tame Your BuddleiaEverywhere I look, I see Buddleia growing wild and free, out of control. I wanted to keep my buddleia tamed. First, I cut it down to within a foot (30 cm) of the ground for the winter. When it begins its spring growth, I will pinch every shoot after two pairs of leaves. Two shoots will develop…
  • Long Day At Longwood

    Swimray
    23 Aug 2014 | 7:45 am
    This gardener of over a decade has never been to Longwood Gardens in Pennsylvania, or to the other nearby gardener ports of call. Longwood Gardens was on the list of staycation day trips assigned to any weekend with nothing else planned.The battle plan was to attack on Saturday in August. The weather was to be glorious. The route was arranged, camera batteries charged, and walking clothes readied. Then it rained Friday evening and the meteorologists changed their tune to Saturday showers. Dark overcast skies ready to burst open greeted Saturday morning so the trip was off.After plans were…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    A Leafy Indulgence

  • Tending To The Tender Snacks

    Swimray
    30 Nov 2014 | 12:15 pm
    Root crops and I just don't mix well. Carrots are one of the first creatures (they are supposed to be easy) that I tried growing, year after year, without much success. They ended up dry, splitting, deformed runts. After a few years of adding sand to my garden soil more appropriate for clay pottery than gardening, the results were no better.Then, I discovered compost and organic material, and thought to try that to improve the soil density. Building upon last years's carrot success, I gave it another shot this year with the Tendersnax hybrid purchased a year or two ago. The results are truly…
  • Last Gasp Before Winter

    Swimray
    3 Nov 2014 | 3:42 am
    Most of the garden has fallen asleep before winter arrives, but some defiant plants refuse to give up. Acidanthera, members of the glad, family look as lush and healthy as a summer day. They continue to flower, albeit with fewer blooms than in summer.The pineapple sage (Salvia elegans) is in its glory at this time. It waits until just before frost to throw out its red threads against its chartreuse foliage. This year the plant really took off after a severe winter that I thought would have killed it off like its neighbor the rosemary. Now, every day brings new branches tipped with new flower…
  • Vacation In Quirky Cedar Key

    Swimray
    12 Oct 2014 | 7:26 pm
    A few days before the convention were spent on the gulf coast of Florida in the small, quaint, walkable, low-key town of Cedar Key. There are no stop lights, no chain restaurants, and no chain hotels in the town that is known as 'old Florida' (before the mouse arrived.)I will spare the 'where is this place' theme from last year's trip because I doubt anyone but local residents would know the answer. As this is a gardening blog, I will try keeping to that subject with some photos I found interesting around town.Tuesday was Burger Day at AdaBlue Cafe on the outskirts of town. The gardener's…
  • My Three Garden Tips

    Swimray
    27 Sep 2014 | 7:06 pm
    We all pick up secrets along our garden journey. I have a few that I will call tips since I picked them up from somewhere in the past, but they are no longer secrets since being published here. I wish I could take credit for thinking of them, but will take credit for passing them on.Tame Your BuddleiaEverywhere I look, I see Buddleia growing wild and free, out of control. I wanted to keep my buddleia tamed. First, I cut it down to within a foot (30 cm) of the ground for the winter. When it begins its spring growth, I will pinch every shoot after two pairs of leaves. Two shoots will develop…
  • Long Day At Longwood

    Swimray
    23 Aug 2014 | 7:45 am
    This gardener of over a decade has never been to Longwood Gardens in Pennsylvania, or to the other nearby gardener ports of call. Longwood Gardens was on the list of staycation day trips assigned to any weekend with nothing else planned.The battle plan was to attack on Saturday in August. The weather was to be glorious. The route was arranged, camera batteries charged, and walking clothes readied. Then it rained Friday evening and the meteorologists changed their tune to Saturday showers. Dark overcast skies ready to burst open greeted Saturday morning so the trip was off.After plans were…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Bumblebee Blog

  • The Totally Real Dangers of Rural Living

    Robin Ripley
    30 Nov 2014 | 11:15 am
    Thank you for subscribing and visiting http://bumblebeeblog.com Living here in a fairly rural part of Maryland, I see things that the average suburbanite wouldn’t encounter in a year living in a sanitized and manicured neighborhood. I can sit in my favorite chair and watch red foxes play fight in the back field. In spring, the tulip trees look like Christmas trees with […] The post The Totally Real Dangers of Rural Living appeared first on Bumblebee Blog.
  • Announcing My Big New Plan to Make a Whole Lot of Money

    Robin Ripley
    15 Oct 2014 | 10:58 am
    Thank you for subscribing and visiting http://bumblebeeblog.com Now that I have put the pack back on, so to speak, and am blogging again after my year-long blog vacation, I decided I better check in on those clever blog gurus. You know who they are. They’re the professional bloggers who tell us amateur-hour bloggers all the things we need to do to become […] The post Announcing My Big New Plan to Make a Whole Lot of Money appeared first on Bumblebee Blog.
  • What I Did on My Vacation from Blogging

    Robin Ripley
    25 Sep 2014 | 8:08 am
    Thank you for subscribing and visiting http://bumblebeeblog.com Well, hello there! Did you notice I was gone? Did you miss me? I missed you. Truly, I didn’t set out to take nearly a full year off from blogging here at Bumblebee. Sometimes, life just gets in the way. Sometimes you have to make a choice between living life or writing about it. Not […] The post What I Did on My Vacation from Blogging appeared first on Bumblebee Blog.
  • A Pause in the Run/Walk Through Life

    Robin Ripley
    27 Oct 2013 | 2:46 pm
    Thank you for subscribing and visiting http://bumblebeeblog.com I went out this morning for my daily run/walk. I say “run/walk.” I used to say “run.” Now I say “run/walk.” It’s really “walk.” I am still in denial about the whole knee pain situation. Anyway, I digress. I went out this morning for my daily run/walk. Most days I listen to books via Audible […] The post A Pause in the Run/Walk Through Life appeared first on Bumblebee Blog.
  • Panera Bread and My Garden Video Debut

    Robin Ripley
    29 Aug 2013 | 2:36 pm
    Thank you for subscribing and visiting http://bumblebeeblog.com I am in the movies! Okay, not the big screen. More like the little screen—say, the size of your computer monitor. I and my garden are the subjects of a  video and Q&A story for Panera Bread’s new website and to promote their new “Live Consciously” campaign. (Update: The story and video have moved temporarily […] The post Panera Bread and My Garden Video Debut appeared first on Bumblebee Blog.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Garden Rant

  • Novel ecosystems vs. urban wilderness by Thomas Christopher

    Thomas Christopher
    19 Dec 2014 | 5:30 am
    I’ve been thinking about a symposium (“The Changing Nature of Nature in Cities”) I attended at the New York Botanical Garden in November.   The topic  of the symposium was “novel ecosystems” – fundamentally, this is the idea that some ecosystems, especially urban ones, have been so radically transformed that it is impossible or impractical to restore them to a native status.  If the soil consists largely of construction rubble or has been chemically altered by decades of polluted rainfall, and the climate is changed (by the urban heat island effect) does it make sense to…
  • Welcome New Ranter Thomas Christopher! by Susan Harris

    Susan Harris
    18 Dec 2014 | 3:17 pm
    We’re all pleased as punch to announce an exciting new addition to our roster of GardenRant partners – Thomas Christopher, a horticultural journalist with 30 years under his belt, contributor to the New York Times, the Journal of the Royal Horticultural Society, Martha Stewart Living and many other publications. Thomas has authored, co-authored or edited some mighty fine books (examples below) and is currently working on a book about ecological gardening with Larry Weaner. Thomas is also a real gardener, having graduated from the New York Botanical Garden School of Professional…
  • Sign me up for a green burial, and make it decades from now by Susan Harris

    Susan Harris
    18 Dec 2014 | 5:39 am
    I recently attended a viewing and discussion of Dying Green, a short documentary about conservation or “green” burial, which I’d never heard of before.  Here’s the trailer. Click here to view the embedded video. I’d always thought burial plots had to look like this: During my lifetime, in the U.S., they did, though much earlier in history they looked more like the new conservation burial sites shown below. But it’s not about creating prettier or more natural sites, though that’s a nice result.  The point is to conserve land.  ”Dying…
  • Treasure the Winter Farmer’s Market by Evelyn Hadden

    Evelyn Hadden
    16 Dec 2014 | 9:50 pm
    The Farmer’s Market here in Boise lines the street for three city blocks and features local arts and crafts in addition to plant and animal products. Sadly, it is closed January through March; I can only hope someday it will thrive year-round, moving indoors in inclement weather if necessary. My heart goes out to urban dwellers with no access to a winter Farmer’s Market. Just as the twinkle lights on trees and houses offer comforting pinpoints of light in the dark winter nights, farm stands with freshly made products remind us that good local foods (not to mention other treats) are…
  • Don’t be a bad botanical gardens board member like me by Elizabeth Licata

    Elizabeth Licata
    15 Dec 2014 | 6:08 am
    A popular night lighting show is a big winter attraction at the Gardens. At the end of this year, I will have completed my two allotted terms on the board of the Buffalo and Erie County Botanical Gardens. I use the strictly technical meaning of the term “completed.” My name has appeared on the list of board of directors on the BECBG website, letterhead, and other official locations for six years. But here’s a situation where the cliché “in name only” really applies. Aside from attending a few galas and regularly visiting the gardens—which I would have done if I wasn’t on the…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Transatlantic Gardener

  • Books for the holidays

    Graham Rice
    16 Dec 2014 | 8:39 am
    Gardeners always like to receive books as holiday gifts. Here are a few suggestions.THREE BOOKS ON GARDENSGreat Gardens Of America by Tim Richardson (Frances Lincoln)A reduced format, paperback edition of a sumptuous book first published in 2009. With wonderful photography by Andrea Jones, it features a more extensive, and more insightful, text than many well illustrated garden books. And at a more affordable price than the original.                     The English Country House Garden by George Plumptre (Frances Lincoln)From classics such as Great Dixter and Hidcote Manor, under…
  • Supermarket surprises

    Graham Rice
    13 Dec 2014 | 1:00 am
    More unexpected things are happening in the produce aisle at the local Pennsylvania supermarkets – and not just the abominable blue and lilac poinsettias.First of all, I spotted a much derided, invasive alien species on sale next to the kale – dandelions. Nice, fresh, bundles at $2.99/£1.90 a pound. They vanished and never returned.And that’s another thing. Local supermarkets have started selling lettuce by weight. $1.99/£1.27 a pound I paid yesterday which is great: small heads no longer cost the same as large ones. Except that you end up paying for all the water they spray on the…
  • Blue poinsettias: A sin against nature

    Graham Rice
    10 Dec 2014 | 10:02 am
    Last night at the local supermarket I spotted these: Blue poinsettias – and lilac poinsettias! I’d heard about them but never quite believed it could be true. I thought the red ones were bad enough. Silly me. The lilac one makes me feel especially ill.These abominations are coming your way, Brits. Perhaps even with added glitter. They're the perfect present for someone you’re obliged to buy for – but secretly hate! But guess what: after about a week they will start turning red. And let’s be clear: any plant dyed blue is a sin against nature. Glad we’ve got that clear. Happy…
  • Erythroniums: Impressive new monograph from Kew

    Graham Rice
    4 Dec 2014 | 1:00 am
    Botanical science is the basis for all serious discussion of garden plants, the foundation for everything we know about the plants we grow. By classifying and describing our garden plants in an impartial scientific way, science provides a dependable basis for discussing and growing the plants. And the public expression of this fundamental research is the botanical monograph.For more than twenty five years the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, the greatest botanical institution in the world, has been publishing a series of monographs in association with the venerable Curtis’s Botanical magazine,…
  • The snowy morning the deer got in

    Graham Rice
    29 Nov 2014 | 1:00 am
    Still in my pjs I wandered into my room with my breakfast at about 7am yesterday morning to take a look at the news online, looked out of the window – and a deer was looking in at me.This is not good news. The garden is fenced against the deer - without the fence we couldn't garden, the deer would eat everything. Or it was. It turned out that the weight a foot of heavy snow had sagged the fence and three deer had got in. So I scampered into my boots and coat and woolly hat and dashed outside – pausing for a moment to take a quick snap before they carried on my munching through our…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    WashingtonGardener

  • Washington Gardener December 2014 issue: Thomas Rainer at the Intersection of Wild Plants and Human Culture

    WashingtonGardener
    18 Dec 2014 | 4:15 pm
    Washington Gardener is the magazine for gardening enthusiasts in the Mid-Atlantic region.The December 2014 issue is being sent now as a PDF to all current subscribers.It is also now posted at:http://issuu.com/washingtongardener/docs/washingtongardenerdec14/0This issue includes:~ Thomas Rainer at the Intersection of Wild Plants and Human Culture~ Praying Mantis: Friend or Foe~ December Garden Tasks~ Local Garden Events Listing~ Growing Citrus Indoors~ Maryland Master Gardeners End Phone Line~ Grass Roots Exhibit at US National Arboretum~ New Grafted Tomato on Potato Roots~ Season’s Greenings…
  • Video Wednesday: The Flower Show “Celebrates the Movies"

    WashingtonGardener
    17 Dec 2014 | 1:51 pm
    Here is a preview of  the 2015 Philadelphia Flower Show: Lights, Camera, BLOOM theme.Personally, I cannot WAIT for the combination of my two passions -- gardening and movies!Travel to the Philadelphia Flower Show Trips 2015 with Washington Gardener Magazine• March 4, 2015 depart from downtown Silver Spring, MD• March 5, 2015 depart from Behnke Nurseries in Beltsville, MDRegistration and details on our trips will be posted in the next few days. Save the dates and stay tuned!
  • Christmas Roses for Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day

    WashingtonGardener
    15 Dec 2014 | 2:27 pm
    On the Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day as Christmas approaches, the Christmas Roses aka Hellebores (Helleborus niger) are coming up right on time here in my Zone 7 garden on the DC-MD border. Here is a photo: In addition to the Hellebores, I have PJM Phododendron and pansies going strong outside. Inside I have an assortment of typical holiday plants -- Paperwhites, Poinsettia, etc. along with a few violets and geraniums hanging on in bloom.What is blooming in YOUR garden now?
  • Register now for the 10th Annual Washington Gardener Seed Exchanges

    WashingtonGardener
    15 Dec 2014 | 11:43 am
    The 10th Annual Washington Gardener Seed Exchanges, hosted by Washington Gardener Magazine, takes place on January 31, 2015 at the Behnke Nurseries in Wheaton, MD AND at February 7, 2015 at Green Spring Gardens in Fairfax, VA. You can attend both or you have a choice on which side of the beltway you want to attend!Seed Exchange attendees trade seeds, exchange planting tips, hear expert speakers, and collect goody bags full of gardening treats.Registrations are streaming in now and we expect a sell-out of both locations. We urge you to pre-register to guarantee yourself a spot.The event also…
  • Win Passes to Lewis Ginter's GardenFest of Lights in Washington Gardener Magazine's December 2014 Reader Contest

    WashingtonGardener
    12 Dec 2014 | 2:16 pm
     For our December 2014 Washington Gardener Reader Contest, Washington Gardener is giving away a family 4-pack of tickets to Dominion GardenFest of Lights in Richmond, VA.The Dominion GardenFest of Lights,  A Legacy in Lights:  120 Years from Bicycle Club to Botanical Garden rins through January 12, 2015. (Note that it is closed December 24-25). A holiday tradition featuring more than half-a-million twinkling lights, hand-crafted botanical decorations, model trains, holiday dinners, firepit with s'mores and hot chocolate (for purchase); nightly family activities & more.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    A Tidewater Gardener

  • Bloom Day - Something is Better Than Nothing

    Les
    15 Dec 2014 | 2:05 am
          I went outside yesterday to see what was available for Bloom Day, but I saw nothing worth photographing, though I did get a lot of work done. The sasanquas are still flowering nicely, but I showed them last month. I've also got some violas blooming, but I am holding them back for a January or February post. However, the Christmas cacti (Schlumbergera) are blooming on the kitchen windowsill.
  • Technically It's Still Fall

    Les
    13 Dec 2014 | 8:30 am
         I know it feels like winter outside and the dominant colors are now red and green, but I am still sorting through my fall photos. Hell, I even have summer vacation photos yet to process. On my trip to Pennsylvania last October, primarily to attend the Perennial Plant Conference, I also got to roam around the Bucks Co. countryside and enjoy a bit of the season. My brother lives in this
  • Thanksgiving Roll (Camera Roll, not Dinner Roll)

    Les
    29 Nov 2014 | 3:16 pm
         Here are some of the photos I took over the Thanksgiving Day holiday, which as usual, we spent on Virginia's beautiful Eastern Shore.      The first photo was taken from my parent's front porch Thanksgiving morning. Unfortunately my camera did not adequately capture the pink glow happening in the sky, but some things can only be experienced and not explained, nor photographed. Weather-wise
  • Another Visit to Federal Twist

    Les
    21 Nov 2014 | 3:53 pm
         After attending the Perennial Plant Conference back in October, I was able to enjoy some of what fall offered in the Delaware River Valley. One of the things I did was to visit James Golden's garden as part of The Garden Conservancy's Open Days Program. On my first visit to Federal Twist the white glare of a blazingly hot summer afternoon made photography nearly impossible. On this trip the
  • Bloom Day - A Peck on the Cheek

    Les
    15 Nov 2014 | 10:45 am
         Winter tried to pay a little visit last night. It was the first time this season that temperatures dipped to freezing, fortunately they did not stay there long, and we had enough wind to put off our first frost for some other day. Honestly I am never ready for cold weather, and if weren't for colorful fall foliage and a big feast, the month of November would be tied with February as my least
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    clay and limestone

  • Wild Poinsettia, Fire-on-the-Mountain

    Gail
    17 Dec 2014 | 5:00 am
    Euphorbia cyathophora is a summer blooming native annual that has disappeared for the winter in my garden. Why, you may be asking, am I sharing this plant right now when it's no longer in bloom! Call it a counter balance to the ubiquitous Christmas poinsettia, Euphorbia pulcherrima, seen at every grocery store with the container wrapped in a garish foil and the petals too often sprinkled with glitter!Believe me when I say that if Fire-on-the Mountain were blooming right now, I would pot it up and use it for my holiday decorations.I am serious! It's a lovely over looked native!I love this…
  • Blooms and Foliage December 2014

    Gail
    16 Dec 2014 | 7:28 am
    Today, there's not a bloom to be found at Clay and Limestone, the way too early Arctic cold front flash froze everything except two stalwart plants, Hamamelis virginiana and Symphyotrichum praealtum. They put on quite a nice show until just last week, so I felt fine sharing them for my Bloom Day post! Willowleaf aster What's left to make a gardener smile on a winter's day?Ostrya virginica Trees that hold their leaves all winter!Foliage that twists and curls. Grasses that accent evergreens. Ex-aster's seed heads. Amsonia hubrichtii beginning to curlFluffy Goldenrod…
  • Willowleaf aster, a must for your garden!

    Gail
    8 Dec 2014 | 8:57 am
    While you're perusing the garden catalogs for beauties to add to your garden please look for Symphyotrichum praealtum. Just look at the color and bloom the morning after out temperatures dipped into the teens (Fahrenheit). A plant like this needs to be in your garden!"Symphyotrichum praealtum is a tall grass prairie native that is harder to find than a tall grass prairie in Tennessee. It's listed as an endangered and threatened species in several states, including Tennessee, and in several Canadian provinces. (Go here to read about rescue efforts in Canada.) " Luckily for me, blogging…
  • Wildflower Wednesday: Paw paws, the experiment

    Gail
    25 Nov 2014 | 11:00 pm
    Credit: JJJJ's PhotostreamSuch a pretty spring flower and I understand it smells like rotting flesh! Everything I knew about Paw-paws I learned from Captain Kangaroo...sort ofBack in TV land in the mid-fifties the Captain invited us to sing along and mime picking up Paw-paws and putting them in a basket! I hadn't the faintest idea he was talking about a fruit, actually a giant berry, but, I remember loving the game.That was the last I heard about Asimina triloba or Common Paw paws until I became a native plant gardener and began learning to identify native wildflowers and trees. After a small…
  • An almost Wordless Wednesday: Hamamelis virginiana

    Gail
    5 Nov 2014 | 5:40 am
    Is blooming in my Middle Tennessee garden right now.It's a splendid little native tree that is too often overlooked for its flashier Asian relatives. How any one could think this tree unlovely or unworthy of a place in their garden is beyond my understanding!The crepe papery blooms look especially enchanting with a backdrop of golden Shagbark hickory and Hophornbeam leaves and the Autumn blue sky!xoxogail PS I've written about witch hazels several times and you can read their story at Wildflower Wednesday: In praise of a native tree and When a tree blooms in Autumn.Gail Eichelberger is a…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Dirt Therapy

  • Easy Peasy Fudge

    Phillip Oliver
    17 Dec 2014 | 5:11 pm
    I think this was the first time I have made fudge. This recipe is so simple and so good. I can't hardly stay out of it. You can make this without the nuts.3 cups of  semi-sweet chocolate chips1 14 oz. can sweetened condensed milk1/4 cup butter (1/2 stick), cut into small pieces1 cup chopped walnutsSpray an 8x8 inch pan with cooking spray. Cut 2 pieces of wax or parchment paper long enough to extend outside the pan. Place them in the pan criss-crossed (this will create "handles" that make it easier to remove them form the pan).Place the chocolate chips, condensed milk, and butter in a…
  • The Elk Rock Garden at Bishop’s Close

    Phillip Oliver
    10 Dec 2014 | 4:59 pm
    What a delightful treasure this was, hidden in a residential neighborhood! I had never heard of Elk Rock garden and stumbled across it on Trip Advisor. This was once a private garden owned by Scotland native Peter Kerr, who moved to Portland in the 1888. It is located in the Dunthorpe neighborhood and overlooks the Wilamette River. Kerr, along with his brother, owned and operated a grain business. They both lived in a cottage on this property until his brother married and moved. Kerr lived in the cottage until 1916 when he and his wife built a larger home. The garden was designed by John…
  • Revisiting Columbia River Gorge and Multnomah Falls

    Phillip Oliver
    9 Dec 2014 | 8:58 am
     A major highlight of any visit to Portland would have to be the spectacular Columbia River Gorge and Multnomah Falls, just east of the city. My last trip to Portland was in June of 2013, a much sunnier and warmer trip than our recent visit. To see how it looked then, take a look at my post from last year. This time, the weather was rainy, dreary and very windy. Michael opted to stay in town since he has an aversion to heights so I went along with our friends from Alabama, Paul and Cindy and our tour guide, Rick. The wind was powerful along the upper cliffs but by the time we had…
  • The Pittock Mansion

    Phillip Oliver
    5 Dec 2014 | 10:24 am
    Henry Lewis Pittock (1835-1919) was a prominent resident of Portland, Oregon, where he reestablished the struggling Oregonian and turned it into the state's preeminent newspapers. He was born in England and his family moved to the United States when Henry was four. At the age of seventeen, he and his brother headed west. According to legend, Pittock arrived in Portland in 1853, penniless and barefoot. He had worked in his father's print shop in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania as a child and soon found a job in Portland as a typesetter at the Oregon Spectator. The newspaper owner, Thomas Dryer, was…
  • Tom McCall Waterfront Park, Portland

    Phillip Oliver
    4 Dec 2014 | 12:38 pm
    `The Tom McCall Waterfront Park (named for a former Oregon governor), stretches along the western side of the Willamette River. At the southern tip is a harbor, restaurants (we ate at a good seafood restaurant here) and an amazing garden filled with ornamental grasses and other plants. This is where these photographs were taken.If you head north, you approach a walking area (you can see it in the bottom photograph, next to the seafood restaurant), that extends all the way up to Naito Parkway and the downtown area where our condo was located. This area is popular with joggers, bikers, people…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Natural Gardening

  • Journeying

    Lisa
    11 Dec 2014 | 2:41 pm
    I went on a wonderful trip a couple of years ago to visit naturalistic gardens in Germany.  (This group of posts reflects on that trip and beyond).Traveling solo creates a different experience than traveling with others, and I've thoroughly enjoyed it, spending reflective time as well as active time.  Of course, traveling with a like-minded companion is wonderful, too.  Garden-visiting in the company of other gardeners is in that category, too.  I'm definitely excited about going to Toronto for my sixth Garden Bloggers Fling in June.  The smiles on our faces reflected…
  • Winter

    Lisa
    10 Dec 2014 | 4:49 pm
    This is a good time of the year, for me, as we move through the "holiday season" and pass through the Winter Solstice, in the Northern Hemisphere. Here in the Southeastern U.S., we have 4 distinct seasons, to be sure, but winter isn't normally too difficult, unless you're high up in the mountains (Southern Appalachians). Many of you, who might read this, are in MUCH farther northern areas than I am, so count me a wimpy winter person;  I'm mindful of that. I spent an academic year in Germany several decades ago, and thought the winter was pretty darn difficult and dark. Light at 8…
  • More holiday thoughts

    Lisa
    9 Dec 2014 | 4:17 pm
    This is really another test Blogsy post.Here's Woody on the trail. It's hard to leave him at home, when we're traveling, but he's always in good hands. Posted with BlogsyGeez, it actually worked!
  • Christmas lights

    Lisa
    9 Dec 2014 | 3:47 pm
    I was reminded, thinking about Christmas, and traveling to come, and various places that we've been over the holidays - of the wonderful lights in Lecce, in Southern Italy some years back.They were magical, above the streets of the old town's (now) pedestrian walkways. 
  • Traveling over winter break

    Lisa
    8 Dec 2014 | 5:42 pm
    Holidays are interesting times. We're heading off on Friday for three weeks of traveling, and I've been making sure everything is "battened down" here at home, etc. with house-sitters, mail and newspapers held, plant care instructions, and bills paid in advance, etc. etc.It's a familiar dance, but is always a bit stressful (an understatement) to make sure everything is taken care of! I'm blessed to be able to travel, for sure.We're headed to mountains, forests, and streams, with long summer days this time of the year (in Argentina). We'll be in Buenos Aires for a bit, but then mostly in the…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Outside Clyde

  • The Water Beneath My Pond

    Christopher C. NC
    17 Dec 2014 | 4:37 pm
    The Posh Estate #2 was a posh estate in it's own right from probably the early 60's to the mid 90's. Then things fell into disrepair. The forest made a valiant attempt to reclaim what it once controlled. The process of restoring its former grandeur is much like an archeological dig. You never know what you are going to find once you start clearing things away. When the draining of the pond for
  • Evergreen Progress

    Christopher C. NC
    16 Dec 2014 | 6:11 pm
    I have to look at the Under Garden while I can. It may be gone again by next weekend. Progress is being made on my evergreen winter interest. One day those two evergreens in the foreground are supposed to be trees. Quite a few varieties of evergreens have been planted on the slope below the scenic byway. Some trees. Some shrubs. Some bamboo. They are
  • NC Winter Lights

    Christopher C. NC
    15 Dec 2014 | 4:55 pm
    It's Garden Bloggers Bloom Day. There are no flowers in my garden at the moment. Most of the snow did melt though. That was nice. The Under Garden is back until the next round. I don't want you to leave empty handed. So, for December's Bloom Day we will visit the NC Winter Lights show at the NC Arboretum in Asheville. Just consider this a highly seasonal floral display.
  • I Have A Feeling

    Christopher C. NC
    13 Dec 2014 | 2:04 pm
    The post snow melt has been deficient this week. Three days later and I am still surrounded. It doesn't help that the sun is barely getting over the top of Hebo mountain across the scenic byway now. Poor kitties. I have been tossing them out in the cold when I leave thinking it will be a nice warm snow melting day. I'm thinking I may be in for another
  • On The Way Home

    Christopher C. NC
    11 Dec 2014 | 5:48 pm
    My neighbor across the scenic byway owns a good chunk of the white stuff up there. His plans for a couple thousand acres is to let them be. At least that is the impression he has given me. On my way home the stark contrast between where I live and the world below is a clearly visible dividing line.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Growing The Home Garden

  • Seeds and Where to Find Them

    10 Dec 2014 | 6:42 am
    By now you may have received your first seed catalog(s) in the mail. It's a fun time of the year for gardeners. We get to sift through the pages, read the descriptions designed to entice us, and dream of what we will plant next year. When the weather is cold and dreary the catalogs give us something bright and hopeful to look forward to!Which seed catalog is the best one? That really depends on the gardener and what they are looking to grow. Seed companies exist with many different combinations of products from vegetables and herbs to flowering and ornamental plants. Most companies offer a…
  • Making a Hoop House for Winter Vegetable Growing

    8 Dec 2014 | 6:48 am
    Many gardeners take the winter season off from gardening. They work hard from early spring through late far then take a little break but you don't have to stop growing vegetables in your garden just because the weather has changed. One way to continue growing vegetables in cold weather is to construct a hoop house. A hoop house is simply an unheated greenhouse type structure that will help keep the temperatures several degrees warmer. In areas with mild winters a hoop house can allow you to continue growing all the way through the winter. Hoop houses can be made of many different types of…
  • The Market Gardener by Jean-Martin Fortier (Book Review)

    18 Nov 2014 | 6:41 am
    Recently I purchased a copy of The Market Gardener written by the Canadian organic farmer Jean-Martin Fortier. As soon as I read the description I was immediately interested in its contents. The Market Gardener explains how to raise enough crops on just 1.5 acres of land to make a full time income and support one's family.With my love for growing the garden, farmers market experiences, and a hope to always be able to continue to do what I enjoy for a living The Market Gardener sounded like a great book.  I was not disappointed! I learned a lot from the pages of The Market Gardener.
  • Planning Your Next Garden: Evaluate the Garden

    13 Nov 2014 | 7:00 am
    The calendar hasn't said so yet officially, but winter weather is already here. As I write this post sleet is spitting through the air outside. Fortunately I have a pot of hot coffee available to offset the cold. What should a gardener be doing on these cold "winter" days when the garden isn't suitable for enjoyment? Cold winter days mean that it is time to plan the next garden. It's time to take what you learned from this year and plan how you want to do next year's garden better, bigger, and more efficient. Today I thought I would tell you about my thought processes for planning the next…
  • Enjoying the Fall Garden

    10 Nov 2014 | 6:29 am
    Fall is a great time of the year. It's always been my favorite season because of the fall colors, the cooler weather, and there are always events to enjoy. The vegetable garden is enjoys the cooler weather too. Gone now are the peppers and tomatoes, which both succumbed to frost, but instead we have kale, pak choi, mustard, and Brussels sprouts. All of those fall grown plantings enjoy the cooler temperatures and in fact have improved flavor due to the frosty temperatures. Growing greens in the fall in a Tennessee garden is a fairly simple thing to do.The Challenge of a Fall GardenThe greatest…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Transplantable Rose

  • My Blog Does NOT Belong to Texas Outdoorsmen!

    Annie in Austin
    5 Dec 2014 | 10:48 am
    Are you seeing this blog post on blogspot? Or are you seeing it at TexasOutdoorsmen dot com?  if you're seeing my posts and photos on the TexasOutdoorsmen dot com site, it is absolutely without my permission. This website has been copying my garden blog and garden blogs belonging to many of my garden friends, and we want it to stop. I may not post that often, but putting my copyrighted words and photos on my blog does not mean that other websites can proceed to repost my work - and it's especially annoying when my work is used to pump up those websites to attract revenue-producing ads.
  • Passalongs and Reseeders Say Happy Autumn

    Annie in Austin
    30 Sep 2014 | 8:34 pm
    DECEMBER 5, 2014: Are you seeing this blog post on blogspot? Or are you seeing it at TexasOutdoorsmen dot com?  if you're seeing my posts and photos on the TexasOutdoorsmen dot com site, it is absolutely without my permission. This website has been copying my garden blog and garden blogs belonging to many of my garden friends, and we want it to stop.This post, Passalongs and Reseeders Say Happy Autumn, was written by Annie in Austin for her Transplantable Rose blog. After August 2014 tied the tile for Second Driest August on Record in Austin, many of us gardeners were not looking forward…
  • Clerodendrum incisa - the Musical Notes Plant

    Annie in Austin
    24 Sep 2014 | 11:44 pm
    DECEMBER 5, 2014: Are you seeing this blog post on blogspot? Or are you seeing it at TexasOutdoorsmen dot com?  if you're seeing my posts and photos on the TexasOutdoorsmen dot com site, it is absolutely without my permission. This website has been copying my garden blog and garden blogs belonging to many of my garden friends, and we want it to stop. If you live in Central Texas you probably know one of the most interesting nurseries in Austin- Barton Springs Nursery on Bee Caves Road It's a fine place to buy full-size plants, shrubs, trees, native plants and roses. For experimentally…
  • Still Posting After All These Years

    Annie in Austin
    18 Jun 2014 | 4:13 pm
    This post, Still Posting After All These Years, was written by Annie in Austin for her Transplantable Rose blogThe Transplantable Rose turned eight years old last week. Eight years is long enough for two presidential terms. Eight years covers all the grades in an old-fashioned grammar school, and is also long enough to change a 13-year-old child into a fully-fledged, 21-year-old adult. Did my blog change in eight years? The format changed as Blogger evolved but that’s about all.  But blogging did change something in this blogger’s mind and habits.Before the Transplantable Rose ever…
  • Absolutely April

    Annie in Austin
    26 Apr 2014 | 10:31 pm
    This post about my garden in Austin, Texas was written by Annie in Austin for her Transplantable Rose blog. Three weeks can make a big difference in the garden! Since that last post the garden plant spreadsheet shows fewer plants with question marks next to their names. The Barbados Cherries appear to be alive. They also appear to be about 6" tall now. But you don't want to see that photo and I don't want to take it. Averted eyes is the way to carry on while the boxwoods decide exactly where they'll regrow - don't want to take that photo either. This photo of the ice-and-freeze damaged…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Kiss my Aster!

  • A Little Bit Potting, A Little Bit Party: Reuse THIS!

    Kiss My Aster!
    3 Dec 2014 | 1:42 pm
    I've tried a lot of potting benches and I've also tried to be the kind of person that doesn't need a potting bench. I mean, what a luxury piece of furniture! Are potting benches in the same league as bidets? I really do like them. Potting benches, not bidets.So I really needed one and after looking around I realized there wasn't anything I wanted, specifically.And then Dan found this:It's a really old concrete laundry sink he found on Craigslist for nothing. I think he hurt himself in many ways getting it to me. I have a slice of old crappy melamine that covers the top, this is my work…
  • Dug up my Dahlias Today

    Kiss My Aster!
    10 Nov 2014 | 12:25 pm
    I don't know about this batch of dahlias. I don't have a good place to store them (my garage is too cold, Ryan, but thanks for the offer!) and they are so cheap to just BUY new ones every spring. PLUS I get to choose new ones instead of the same ol' Dahlias I've known since, like, forever.Hrrrmmph. They are dug and drying and... we'll see. Maybe I can find a good spot for them.Also, this happened and I'm too lazy to type it again.
  • Celluloid Heroes: Vintage Cupcake Toppers for Your Terrariums

    Kiss My Aster!
    5 Nov 2014 | 11:10 am
    Now that the weather is turning evil, I want to blog about junk you can get for next-to-nothing that can be used in your garden. I want to do this regularly, like, weekly. But let's not rush into anything. The first thing I'll drivel on about is kicking up a terrarium a notch using vintage cupcake toppers.Some of my hoardIt's that time of year where I become interested in terrariums, again. And for me, a terrarium can't just be plants. Nope, it's gotta have some sort of crap decor in there, too, to make it interesting. I do terrariums just like I do gardens, so bring on the weensy…
  • Hey Girl: WINTER IS COMING Edition

    Kiss My Aster!
    31 Oct 2014 | 12:53 pm
  • Halloween: As Good As It Gets

    Kiss My Aster!
    31 Oct 2014 | 11:29 am
    Halloween used to be my THANG and now it's starting to strike a little fear in my heart and not in a horror movie kind of way. I used to have Halloween stuff up all year, as I was very much an Every Day is Halloween , a whiff of Wicca, Hey-I-want-to-dress-like-Stevie-Nicks, too-happy-to-be-Goth sort of 20 & 30 something. Now I'm 40 and stuffing candy-free, nut-sensitive treat bags and making sure my kid's costume is warm enough and her shoes match her costume. I still live in a house full of costumes of all sizes (including a certain "one size fits all" bunny costume that…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Our Little Acre

  • Elizabeth and Her German Garden

    Kylee Baumle
    14 Dec 2014 | 11:41 am
    This is a story about a book. As you're reading this, you're probably going to think to yourself, "Well, that's rather historical, how nice," and then your attention might wane unless you're interested in that sort of thing. But this is not going to end like you might think... Thanksgiving weekend, my husband and I spent three days watching the first four seasons of Downton Abbey since we were both too sick to do much of anything else. We're both DA addicts and we thought we'd just start from the beginning and watch them all again in preparation for Season 5, which begins here in the U.S. on…
  • Postcards From the Past

    Kylee Baumle
    29 Nov 2014 | 8:50 pm
    Last week, I wrote about collections for my garden column that I write each week for our local newspaper, the Paulding Progress. Gardeners collect plants, certain genera of plants, garden tools (such as hoes), and old garden books. I do the former and the latter, but I used to collect something else.Long before I ever knew or even thought about becoming a gardener, way back in the sixth grade, I collected postcards. Cheryl, my best friend at the time, and her family were antique buffs and I often went with them on their journeys to local antique dealers to look for treasures. I often came…
  • Pumpkin Torte on the Thanksgiving Table

    Kylee Baumle
    26 Nov 2014 | 10:43 am
    It's been two years since I posted my pumpkin torte recipe, but since there are always new readers to this blog, and I get asked for this recipe every year around this time, I'm posting it again. This is seriously good stuff and it's my personal favorite dessert of all time. Enjoy, and happy Thanksgiving to all!With Thanksgiving looming on the horizon, thoughts turn to food and those special dishes we enjoy as we dine with family. I'll be doing the turkey again this year as well as the pumpkin torte that I'm known for. With the exception of my husband, our family likes this dessert better…
  • Updated Lowe's Creative Ideas Project: Swing Shelf Planter

    Kylee Baumle
    22 Nov 2014 | 7:26 pm
    Swing Shelf Planter in March 2013About a year and a half ago, I did a project as a member of Lowe's Creative Ideas Garden Team in which I potted up a trio of herbs in a shelf planter that hung in a window. I designed it and making it and putting it together was a joint effort with my husband. My herbs grew well for several months in that south window, but the day came when I wanted something different.In the summer, that window can really generate some heat, and I had a few cacti that I thought would work out better. The herbs were constantly thirsty, so I transplanted the herbs to the garden…
  • Growing Amaryllis: Easy for Everyone (and a giveaway!)

    Kylee Baumle
    20 Nov 2014 | 9:58 pm
    Hippeastrum 'Gervase'For as much as I dread winter every year, there are some things about it that I look forward to. Thanksgiving. Christmas. Fluffy snowfalls. The smell of winter air. Curling up on the sofa with a blanket, a kitty, and a good book.And amaryllis.Gardening continues for me, in spite of the outside gardens going dormant during the winter months. I've got plenty of houseplants to keep me busy, both in the house and in the conservatory. Most of those simply need to be watered, but I'll pot up my collection of amaryllis all winter long and have beautiful blooms from winter…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Blog the blogging nurseryman- The Golden Gecko Garden Center

  • Blueberries in your garden

    Trey Pitsenberger
    2 Dec 2014 | 12:11 pm
    It seems blueberries have become one of the most popular home fruits to grow. Especially here in California where blueberry culture was difficult in the past. New varieties, many of which are known as "Southern Highbush", have enabled Californian's to grow fantastic fruit.  These Southern Highbush types we're bred for heat resistance, unlike the blueberries know as Northern Lowbush. Northern Lowbush we're the only types available to us in the day, and getting them to produce was difficult. The Southern Highbush have changed all that.We sell 5 varieties of blueberries. All have been…
  • 2000 year old seed grows "one of a kind" tree

    Trey Pitsenberger
    5 Nov 2014 | 10:55 am
    During excavations of  Herod the Great's fortified mountaintop palace at Masada in Israel, archaeologists uncovered a cache of seeds stowed away in a clay jar about 2,000 years ago. Botanical researcher Elaine Solowey received one of them for an experimental planting in 2005. "Solowey planted a seed in a pot at Kibbutz Ketura in January, immediately after receiving them. Since then, it has sprouted into a seedling, produced its first blossom in 2011, and now flourishes as a young date palm. It has been nick-named 'Methuselah', after the oldest person who ever lived, according…
  • The natives are restless

    trey pitsenberger
    24 Sep 2014 | 3:00 am
    In this case the natives are insects native to Africa, who have decided that California is the place they ought to be. The Bagrada Bug arrived in Southern California just 6 years ago and already had decides to move north. The experts were hoping the colder winters might kill them off, but they decided to hide in the top layers of soil during winter. Come spring they emerge to eat stuff like "cabbage, kale, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts and broccoli, but they don't appear to be picky eaters. They have been known to feed on a wide variety of garden vegetables in California, including green…
  • Becoming indispensable

    trey pitsenberger
    28 Aug 2014 | 1:02 am
    One of the nicest comments to hear from customers is, "we want you to be here for us". They sometimes preface it with, "we shop here because...we want you to be here for us". While it may not keep you in business, or cause you to become profitable, it is an important first step. The goal is to find out why you are indispensible to them. Let everything else fall to the wayside. Becoming indispensable to your customers means you provide them with products, or a feeling, that causes them to go out of their way to maintain. There are cheaper places to shop. There might be more convenient places…
  • So you want to be a farmer?

    trey pitsenberger
    25 Jun 2014 | 12:51 am
    "Roy Skeen is a 32-year-old farmer with a degree in history from Yale University. When he graduated in 2004, he moved to New York to work in investment banking, but he found the work unfulfilling.After a trip to the Caribbean, he discovered his true calling: farming. 'It exposed me to culture that grows food and lives in one place,' he told CNN. 'It was pretty simple, but it was nice and I liked it.'Skeen moved to his hometown of Baltimore, Maryland, and now runs his own urban farm and sells produce at the local farmer's market. He says the work is hard but satisfying."I have been in the…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Terra Nova Ecological Landscaping blog

  • Our ‘Tread Lightly’ Indiegogo campaign has completed.

    ken
    17 Dec 2014 | 9:59 am
    Was our ‘Tread Lightly’ Indiegogo campaign a wild success?… No, not exactly. Was it a success? …Yes it was! Thank you! Now that the ‘Tread Lightly’ campaign is over my honest reflection is that Crowdfunding is a bit of an enigma with tons of exciting potential. An alluring mystery. I have had a lot of advice on how a campaign aught to be run. It was clear I was making some missteps even early on. And there was a learning curve like you wouldn’t believe. We set the start date and then reset that date when it was clear we needed more preparation time. The night of the…
  • Today is the last day of our Indiegogo ‘Tread Lightly’ campaign, your last chance to donate to the cause!

    ken
    16 Dec 2014 | 10:33 am
    Our Tread Lightly Indiegogo campaign that started Oct. 17th is over at the end if the day today, Dec. 16.  We have raised $2,000.00 so far. *OUR NEW GOAL is at least $2,000 – To Outfit Two Bike Gardeners for the Road* Terra Nova is a low-tech business operating a high-tech funding campaign, and it’s a learning curve (yikes!). Clearly $50k was way too high of a goal. However, we have authentically redefined a more modest success for the last 3 weeks of the campaign. We hope you will support us. Our new goal is to raise atleast $2,000  to purchase two custom-made bike trailers, two good…
  • BEFORE AND AFTER

    ken
    19 Nov 2014 | 1:12 pm
    TRANSFORMED LANDSCAPES 2014        
  • Tread Lightly with Terra Nova! Please contribute to our Indiegogo campaign

    ken
    21 Oct 2014 | 6:29 pm
    Collectively Catalyze the Tread Lightly Movement to Regenerate our Cycling Ecological Landscaping! Hello! my name is Ken Foster, I am a native of Santa Cruz, California, where my parents, Herb and Ellie Foster, were well-known peace and environmental activists. As a long-time organic gardener and landscape designer, and as a permaculture teacher at Cabrillo College, I believe I’m continuing the work they started here in the 1950s. Terra Nova’s Tread Lightly Service : Bicycle Powered Landscaping In 1991 I started a service I dubbed Tread Lightly. This was a bicycle-powered…
  • Tread Lightly with Terra Nova ! Party! Party!

    ken
    16 Oct 2014 | 11:32 am
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Skippy's Vegetable Garden

  • chicken cam testing

    kathy
    12 Dec 2014 | 12:12 pm
  • chipmunks (or voles?) party in the tunnel

    kathy
    7 Dec 2014 | 8:17 pm
    My plastic tunnel with winter greens has hit the end of its season. :-( Last week, chipmunks discovered it. They tunneled in and out in many places. They feasted on the greens. They ate tops off the most tender lettuce, baby romain, butterheads and oak leaf. It looks like a little weed whacker went through. They stretched up and ate baby broccoli heads. They started to eat escarole frisée heads and kale. Once I discovered the damage, I harvested almost everything I could. The baby broccoli, all the frisée, any romaine and butterhead they missed, also Asian greens that they hadn't found yet.
  • necklace giveaway results

    kathy
    30 Nov 2014 | 4:35 pm
    It was fun doing a give-away. I wish I could give a necklace to everyone who entered a guess. The contest was to guess how many dried red chilies were in my chili bowl. The answer: 248. I think a lot of people guessed low maybe because smaller chilis tended to be at the bottom of the bowl. Anyway, the winners are: The winners are Barb (273), Tomato Thymes (156) and Sarah (150). If you are a winner, please email me at kathy@skippysgarden.com and let me know your mailing address. Congrats!
  • today's harvest - happy thanksgiving!

    kathy
    27 Nov 2014 | 4:13 pm
    These are the greens I harvested for our Thanksgiving salad bowl. In spite of our normal weather for this time of year, we have bitter cold (20*F) and several inches of snow on the ground for Thanksgiving this year. My brother, traveling in to our house from western MA, has no power out in his area due to the snow storm. We will give thanks for the warmth of our homes and family and the abundance of our harvests.
  • my little horseradish plant

    kathy
    25 Nov 2014 | 10:53 am
    I've got a little horseradish plant in the back corner of my garden. It's the first time I've tried growing this. I looked up information on horseradish culture and it sounds like I should let it grow another year before I harvest some of the offshoots. When grown as an annual, it requires a long growing season. It needs warm temperatures during the summer growing season and cooler temperatures in the late summer and fall to enhance root development. In the annual system, the crop is usually planted in the early spring, and the entire root mass is harvested after the first killing frost in…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Ilona's Garden Journal

  • Rural Landscape

    Ilona Erwin
    12 Dec 2014 | 7:54 am
    Shepherds from my nativity setI've been in the middle of my Christmas devotions on my Advent blog. While writing about the shepherds watching their flocks (from the Christmas story), I thought about the fact that while sheep were once a common sight in fields around here, there has not been a flock in recent years, now that I think about it. I know that agriculture business changes quite a bit and sheep raising in Ohio was once big business, before it all moved out West. Then some years ago there seemed to be a resurgence of flocks, so that they were a common, if not ubiquitous…
  • Winter Arrived Early

    Ilona Erwin
    25 Nov 2014 | 2:30 am
    Blustery Day, Past Year's LossesToday is briefly warmer and blustery with high winds and rain, but it is more like a January thaw than the beige autumn Indian summer that we might normally expect. I don't know that there is a clear sense of "normal" in our gardens anymore. Still, the patterns of the seasons are not so far off that they would be unrecognizable.Ignore those weeds.... I do The winds have blown the dawdling leaves off the trees, so I asked my helpers (grown children) to rake up the yard again. The Red Oak still is loathe to let go of his leaves. Despite the fact that…
  • The De-clutter Journey

    Ilona Erwin
    20 Nov 2014 | 2:35 pm
    Specifically, How Did You Do It?For those who are struggling, like I have, here are some of the practical steps of getting rid of clutter and the whole lifestyle that goes with it.Like some physical maladies, this one might have a different root for some people than it has for others. It might be the result of more than one contributing factor.What causes our messiness and proclivity to collect clutter?Perhaps we just don't know how to organize and sort, with the additional problem of not wanting to throw away something useful or which holds sentimental value.Along with that second factor: we…
  • And Now It Is Arctic, But My Home Is Cozy

    Ilona Erwin
    18 Nov 2014 | 6:16 am
    Bookcases, boxes, magazines -I can't get rid of everything!While it was a personally productive fall for me, the blogging and the garden had to take a back seat. I made good on decades of promises to de-clutter and come to grips with the pile of life's detritus and accumulation. You see, I come from a line of "collectors" on my mother's side. My dad was spare in his living and his spending, but I inherited the idea that everything is good for something... someday from my mother. Then the fact that I had ten children kind of caught up with me. The economics of those days meant saving…
  • Word To The Wise

    Ilona Erwin
    6 Oct 2014 | 6:51 am
    Do you wait around for the last minute to put your gardens to bed for the winter? That may not be the best thing to do this year. Winter seems to be fast approaching in many areas, and Ohio might get cold quickly. In 2013, the deep cold came with the Thanksgiving holiday, and in 2014 many gardeners are complaining that the temperatures are dropping earlier than usual.What sort of delays did I rue in the past?I especially regret leaving out a large pot all winter a couple years ago. It filled with water and froze. Made of resin, I was lulled into believing it would be immune to frost cracking.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Bananas.org

  • Why won't my sale post work on craigslist ?

    blownz281
    19 Dec 2014 | 12:59 pm
    We have been posting for years an never had a issue. Post says published and check your email. But nothing ever shows up?
  • Dwarf Namwah wanted

    HarmonyNoel
    19 Dec 2014 | 10:35 am
    I would like to buy 1 or 2 dwarf namwah banana plants. If anyone has any to sell or knows a good nursery site to buy them, please let me know! Thank you! _Harmony Winter Park, FL
  • For those who think they've seen some bad drivers.....

    pmurphy
    19 Dec 2014 | 8:33 am
    For those of you who are stressed out by the Christmas season and need a chuckle, here's a link to watch 'Calgary's worst driver' in action, and why she has been given the title while trying to leave a parking lot.......and taking over 4 minutes to do so. And if you can watch it without chuckling/laughing or making comments about the driver you did better than me :) Calgary's Worst Driver Is Really Bad And Really Slow (VIDEO) FYI, she only received a $115 fine for "unsafe backing" but I understand the police are also going after her for hit and run......
  • Veinte Cohol blooming!

    Pancrazio
    18 Dec 2014 | 4:58 pm
    I'm unsure if this post should go here or in container section, since I grow my plants 6 months in ground and 6 months in container. However my first Veinte Cohol is blooming right now! That was unexpected! I would have preferred for sure a summer bloom, however I can't complain. :woohoonaner: As far as i know this must be the first time blooms in europe (maybe? at least, i have searched for evidence if it blooming in europe in last two years and i didn't find anything). I'd also like to thank the generous member who donated me the corms a couple of years ago. I'm unsure if he wants to be…
  • Taste Report - Muraru Mshale

    robguz24
    17 Dec 2014 | 11:23 am
    It's been a while since I tried a new banana, so I was very excited about this one that I got from Julian. 1st tasting a bit underripe. 2nd tasting 3 days later. TEXTURE-Pasty and creamy. I’m not a fan of pasty texture in some Cavendish bananas, but this is more appealing. A few days later it was more pasty, much like a store bought Cavendish, but still more pleasant. FIRMNESS-Medium firm and dense. Remained firm even when tried a few days later. SWEETNESS-Slightly sweet when tasted as green as shown in first pic. A bit of astringent taste on the few threads that stuck to the fruit,…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Defining Your Home, Garden and Travel

  • One Last Time: Free Yourself and Your Oven and Grill the Turkey

    22 Nov 2014 | 2:34 pm
    Friends: This annual posting of my favorite Thanksgiving story was inspired by my wonderful husband who passed away in May 2014 from brain cancer (glioblastoma multiforme)... the reason I've been off the blogs for the last year. It all started with Thanksgiving 2006. Expecting a crowd for the big meal, I couldn't work out a way to get everything in the oven since the turkey was so large.We had to figure out how to get everything cooked on time. The microwave wouldn't do it. Ah ha! What about using the grill? Would that work? My husband placed the turkey (in the pan) on the grill to see…
  • Yes, The Deer Ate the Yucca

    8 Feb 2014 | 4:26 pm
    Deer damage. February 2014Well, not the entire yucca. Not yet—and there's no sign of spring around here.It's been a cold winter and food is scarce, so hungry deer seek out plants that aren't on the regular menu. The deer ignore the yucca from spring through fall. This is not the first winter when the yucca was ripped up, so I wasn't surprised. I should have put a cage around it, but I didn't. While the yucca is ragged, it will recover and bloom again this summer.The victim here is yucca filamentosa 'Color Guard' but the deer will nibble the tips on any variety of yucca. For photos of this…
  • Baked Gifts: Chocolate Biscotti Recipe

    7 Dec 2013 | 1:11 pm
    For the holiday season, I'm repeating this post from 2012. This Chocolate Biscotti Recipe from David Lebovitz is easy to make. Bake a delicious gift!Start out with good ingredients such as Valrhona Cocoa,demerara sugar, slivered almonds and chocolate chips.As a fan of food and bigger fan of Paris, I follow the blog of expat American +David Lebovitz, pastry chef, author of cookbooks and one of my favorite iPhone apps, Paris Pastry®. I made his Chocolate Biscotti Recipe for holiday gifts. Is it possible for an amateur like me to turn out great biscotti?I took…
  • Do You Know the Way to Monet's Gardens at Giverny?

    18 Oct 2013 | 5:07 pm
    The Grande Allée in Monet's Clos Normand.Giverny, France. September 2013In Paris, the weather is anything but predictable, but you cannot wait around for a sunny day. So it was with umbrellas and raincoats that my husband and two friends left our apartments in the Marais neighborhood and descended into the Saint-Paul Métro station at seven that September morning. Destination: Giverny.Switching once at the Châtelet métro (but we prefer to switch at Concorde), we traveled to the regional train station, Gare Saint Lazare. There, we purchased roundtrip SNCF tickets on the Rouen-bound…
  • Pics from Paris: Seeing Red at Luxembourg Gardens

    17 Sep 2013 | 12:24 am
    Luxembourg Gardens, Paris.  15 Sept 2013The fashionable color combo around the Senate building at Luxembourg Gardens is red and purple. This is another favorite garden in Paris where I've never seen the same combinations repeated on my many visits over the years.Familiar flowers combined for a unique design.Castor bean, dahlias, petunias and geraniums dominate.Panoramic view of public section of the gardens.Pink (begonias and anemones) and blue plumbago towers (corners) are introduced.I like the use of purple fountain grass and purple spires of salvia.Add captionI'm inspired by the…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    North Coast Gardening

  • Beguiling Bergenias: 5 Varieties for Dry Shade

    Linda
    9 Dec 2014 | 11:54 am
    While many gardeners find shade challenging enough, add in dry soil and deer, and the list of plants which will perform gets shorter and shorter. Yet Bergenia, an unassuming perennial with leathery evergreen leaves, does admirably under all of these conditions. Though you may have grown Bergenia in the past and been unimpressed by its tendency to sprawl, new varieties are smaller and form petite clumps which stay full and attractive year-round. One of the things I particularly love about Bergenia is that the large, rounded leaves are a strong textural contrast to so many of the finer-leaved…
  • Amazon Deals: The Drunken Botanist and Sunset Magazine

    Genevieve
    1 Dec 2014 | 8:26 pm
    This is just a quick post to let you guys know that I discovered two great deals on Amazon today. Amy Stewart’s latest on sale Fans of Amy Stewart will be thrilled to know that the digital version of The Drunken Botanist is on sale for only $1.99. Yes people, for the princely sum of two dollars you too can have all the stories, history, and quirky facts about the plants which make up your favorite alcoholic beverages, right in the palm of your hands on your smart phone, Kindle, or tablet. Wicked Plants is also on sale. $5 magazine steals I also found some $5 magazine deals. The plant…
  • Review of Fiskars Quantum Hedge Shear: How Does it Compare to the PowerGear Model?

    Genevieve
    25 Nov 2014 | 8:18 pm
    Over many years of managing a fine landscape maintenance company – one which focuses on the pruning, training, and finer work in the garden beds rather than the mow ‘n’ blow-type service so ubiquitous in the field – I’ve developed some strong loyalties to the workhorse tools which make the day’s pruning faster, more comfortable, and let’s just admit it – more fun. Using well-designed tools turns what could be a gardening chore into an opportunity to reconnect with your body, your plants, and the natural world. Even as my roster of employees has expanded over the years, one…
  • Low-Maintenance Water Features: Downsizing Ponds and Fountains

    Linda
    22 Nov 2014 | 2:54 pm
    A small pond in the garden of Paul Abels. When you envision a water feature, it may evoke the gentle sound of a soothing waterfall, or perhaps your thoughts go to the splashing of a brook over rocks. Maybe a lovely pond with koi and water lilies will give you a sense of peace. What you don’t picture, though, is the hard work it can take to keep your new joy clear and your expensive koi healthy. What can cause a water feature to become so high maintenance? And are there types of water features which aren’t so high maintenance but still give you the feeling of pleasure and serenity that…
  • Monday Miscellany: Autumn Colors Year-Round, Edible Garden Designs, and Great Book Deals

    Genevieve
    16 Nov 2014 | 11:01 pm
    The best articles and ideas from around the web, curated by North Coast Gardening. Fall colors year-round. Though I’m usually a fan of cool colors like blues, silvers and purples in the garden, there’s something about the fiery tones of fall which makes me feel extra enthused about plants with cinnamon, orange, and golden foliage color. For this month’s North Coast Journal column, I talked about nine of my favorite plants with these colors, so you can incorporate these warm hues into the garden year-round. Also included is the usual monthly to-do list outlining the essential…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    High Altitude Gardening

  • Jingle Jangle

    13 Dec 2014 | 11:48 am
    I wish there was a fragrance app I could add to this blog! The sweet perfume of Paper Whites fill the air. It's intoxicating. Paper WhitesThey're just about the easiest (and fastest) indoor bulb to grow ~ but they can be a little dickens. Some sprout incredibly fast. Others, quite slow. The only guarantee is how delighted you'll be once they bloom.It's sort of the same situation with Amaryllis ~ some fast, some slow ~ and I could jinx the entire holiday season by saying this...But, I think I timed it right this year! This big, beautiful bud should be fully open by December 25th.Update on the…
  • Full of Life

    2 Dec 2014 | 11:58 am
    If you got a late start on planting Amaryllis bulbs, plant in water vs. soil. Speeds up growing time. :)Wow. What a difference it makes to be looking out a new window, at a new view. (Which I will show you. Just as soon as I get in gear and wash the windows! :) I had no idea I was in such a rut until I pulled up stakes and moved back into town. Where everybody walks funny.I should probably explain that... when you live in a ski town, winter is a deluge of tourists. They show up here to ski and when the day is done, they go shopping in their ski and snowboard boots. (Which don't work very…
  • Coinkydinks

    20 Nov 2014 | 9:10 am
    Most folks take one look at my blonde hair and instantly write me off as a blithering idiot. Like yesterday, when the Home Depot guy launched into a 10 minute tutorial on slab vs. pre-hung doors."I know the difference," I said, impatiently. Hoping to shut him up."You do?" He replied, more than a wee bit shocked.It's always a surprise to people that I can handle most fixer upper projects all by my lonesome. I can wire my own light fixtures, install a door if I have to. And... I'm a ceramic tile expert. I am! Thanks to Hurricane Katrina.My best bud, BK, and I, bee-lined it to the Gulf Coast,…
  • Wreck of the Hesperus

    16 Nov 2014 | 10:38 am
    When's the last time you moved? 5... 10... 20 years ago?As we get older, we tend to stay put and I wonder... is it because we were finally able to afford a house? A place to call home?  Or... is it because moving is such a pain in the arse? :)I've searched, in vain, through the many boxes demanding my attention, and have yet to find any of the kitchen items I so desperately need. Have been limping along with one iced tea glass for 12 days.  And, I broke it yesterday so now I am highly motivated... My Mother lived in the same house her entire adult life.Mom & Dad purchased their…
  • The Summer of Discontent

    13 Nov 2014 | 6:23 pm
    They say you can never go home again. But, there's always a loophole in pretty much everything people swear to be true.You most certainly can go home again. March right up there and pound on the front door! Sure! The new home owners will probably call the cops. But, what do you care? With any luck, you'll be handcuffed in the living room - so you'll get a glimpse of the new decor and decide if you approve.The easier loophole is if you happen to own two homes.Back in the dark ages of 2002.. I made the smartest dumb move one could ever imagine. I purchased a second home 3 miles outside the Park…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Ewa in the Garden

  • Plants that bloom in winter: ALOE ARBORESCENS

    19 Dec 2014 | 9:49 am
    What can I say to express it? Enormous, fascinating, breathtaking flowering you can experience?  And that would be not enough to say how magical moment you enter  while bumping suddenly on the sea of flowering aloe!   This very modestly looking plant, so popular as indoor plants in colder climates, can’t be suspected of producing so spectacular inflorescence (the entire stem with
  • Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day - December Flowers in Algarve, Portugal

    17 Dec 2014 | 11:37 pm
    I am truly happy to share with you today the December flowers of Algarve, Portugal. Winter here is the season I would call Spring to my standards. 17-19C/65F in the day, 7C/45F at night. That's what I am used to when the Spring is warm in my country (Poland). Yep. Warm. Sometimes its colder in the Summer :( Climate is a great unjustice...  Algarve looks so different than in the Summer.
  • 3 Gardening Books for Christmas [REVIEWED]

    12 Dec 2014 | 11:32 pm
    Are you are looking for the garden related book for Christmas for yourself or someone else? I realized that I have reviewed 3 great gardening books here at Ewa in the Garden, so maybe this could be the moment to start to build up a list of books which could be a great gift idea. I linked each book to the full review page and also to the Amazon page. Enjoy! 1. Sissinghurst: Vita
  • Book Review: Organic Gardening

    6 Dec 2014 | 11:53 pm
    *Organic gardening* is a book written by Geoff Hamilton, one of the best British organic gardening experts. Perfect for beginning gardeners and veterans as well. If you are on either side of the experience lane or somewhere between and want to learn to garden without chemicals or pesticides, you want this book to be first hand information about organic gardening in your collection. Definitely
  • Touring Italy: Tree Cathedral

    2 Dec 2014 | 9:48 pm
     Photos above and below by Perangelo Zavatarelli If you are touring Italy you shall put this amazing place on your travel itinerary. This piece of art resembles a skeleton of a cathedral, built exactly in the shape, proportions and dimensions  of a gothic cathedral. Named Cattedrale Vegetale, created by artist Giuliano Mauri. More than 600 chestnut and hazel branches around 1,800 fir tree
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Your Small Kitchen Garden

  • Happy Birthday, Bren!

    Daniel Gasteiger
    3 Dec 2014 | 3:03 pm
    The part of our visit that most resembled a formal tour began with the flower bed in front of Bren’s house. It was instantly apparent Bren’s garden plan preserves habitat for felis catus, the domestic cat. If you spend any time online and you’re serious about gardening, you’re likely to have heard of Brenda Haas. The curator of #gardenchat, Bren is a garden photographer and a social media guru. I got to visit Brenda at her home earlier this year and I wrote about the experience in a post titled Visit in Brenda Haas’s Garden. There you’ll find information about #gardenchat and how…
  • Crazy Squash Story

    Daniel Gasteiger
    19 Nov 2014 | 8:37 pm
    You could describe a neck pumpkin as a megagigantic butternut squash. This one is about 30 inches from stem to blossom end. At harvest it weighed 19 pounds. In central Pennsylvania, people favor neck pumpkins (also known as Pennsylvania Dutch Crookneck Squash) for pumpkin pie. This same squash appears (ripe) in two other photos in this post. I had some fun with squash this year. Actually, I had a series of fortunate unlikely accidents. Each one was minor and seemingly unimportant, but when I think it through, the accidents together make a story worth sharing. I present the accidents in the…
  • Bloom Day After Freeze

    Daniel Gasteiger
    15 Nov 2014 | 8:59 pm
    My pea plants have been in bloom for four weeks, but cool autumn temperatures have slowed growth. I’d bet many blossoms are all of four weeks old and still looking fresh. The few pods that remain from blooms that have dropped petals haven’t even hinted at thickening. I might have harvested them to eat as snow peas, but I couldn’t spot even half a dozen on 28 foot-rows of plants. A two-night deep freeze has finished off the pea plants. Just last night we experienced a deep freeze—down to about 24F degrees. It was cold enough to wipe out almost all the annuals I grow in my kitchen…
  • Wordless Wednesday at Autumn’s End

    Daniel Gasteiger
    5 Nov 2014 | 8:58 pm
     
  • Cruising Autumn in Pennsylvania Farm Country

    Daniel Gasteiger
    31 Oct 2014 | 11:17 pm
    Weeds in the foreground provide a glimpse of some crop nearing harvest that stretches back to barns, silos, and storage buildings. Behind all that, a wooded hill shows off in early autumn. About five minutes by car from my home, this scene represents the beauty of Pennsylvania farm country in autumn. Screamin’! As in, fall colors have been screamin’ for the past five weeks and I’ve enjoyed them more than I remember ever enjoying autumn. I wish you all could have joined me! Because that didn’t happen, I put together a slideshow. I hope you’ll have a look and let it inspire you to…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Garden Therapy

  • Homemade Gift Ideas

    Stephanie
    17 Dec 2014 | 6:18 pm
      Making gifts for the holidays or an occasion can be a lot of fun, but is end-product something you really would want to get as a gift? I have given handmade gifts (and in some cases received homemade gifts) for many a birthday, neighbour, teacher, Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, Valentines Day, etc. The number one rule in gift giving is to think about the receiver’s wants and give them that, but if you are making a large number of gifts for Christmas or wedding favours, then you can personalize it by giving a little bit of yourself in a package. Sharing homemade soap…
  • Soy Beeswax Jar Candles

    Stephanie
    16 Dec 2014 | 1:41 pm
    Warming up with the the fragrance and glow of handmade candles is even more pleasurable when you use healing essential oils and natural wax. These soy and beeswax candles are easy to make as you can see from this step-by-step tutorial. I like to use a blend of both soy wax and beeswax and don’t add additional colour. The more beeswax you use, the more honey coloured the candle will be. Beeswax also gives of a sweet honey aroma, so the more you use the less fragrance you will need. I like to add a bit of essential oils in a complementary scent to the beeswax, citrus or floral goes well.
  • Gardening For Your Front Door: Making Fresh Wreaths

    Stephanie
    13 Dec 2014 | 8:55 am
    Every year we like to hang a different wreath on our front door during the holidays. We’ve amassed a collection of wreaths to match the holiday season trends of sparkly red berries, Christmas ornaments, peacock feathers, and square-shaped boxwood but my favorites are most certainly natural, fresh wreaths. A fresh wreath makes for an individual work of art that smells as good as it looks.  Florists and garden centers are wonderful places to find one to suit any style but if you are feeling adventurous, a homemade wreath made with garden clippings or purchased greens, can be most gratifying.
  • Chalk Painted Wood Ornaments and Gift Tags

    Stephanie
    10 Dec 2014 | 5:21 am
    I like to include an handmade ornament as embellishment to holiday gifts. I believe that packaging is important to the overall gift giving experience. Wrapping is where the magic begins. The anticipation of what lies beneath sparkly wrap and ribbon adds to the overall joy of receiving the gift. It increases the fun in giving the gift too for those of us who love to decorate. A tree filled up with pretty presents with stamped paper, handmade ribbons, and the little je ne sais quoi of a kitschy ornament blows away dollar store gift bags. Plus, when the gift is unpacked, the wrap can be…
  • How to Make a Nine-Foot Grinch Tree

    Stephanie
    9 Dec 2014 | 9:08 pm
    There are many versions of the Dr. Seuss-inspired Grinch Christmas tree, from Whoville-esque trees adorned with candy-coloured ornaments to snow-covered, oddly-shaped trees that set the scene outdoors. Perhaps the most iconic is a tall, skinny evergreen wound up with wire with a heavy ornament dangling from the curved-over top. These represent the trees that Mr. Grinch robbed of ornaments then shut like an umbrella before tossing it in his giant sack. Quirky looking and cartoonish, a Grinch tree’s message is that Christmas isn’t about presents, or ornaments, or trees, or even…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Urban Organic Gardener

  • Minnesotans Don’t Care About the Snow! Still growing strong.

    UOG
    19 Dec 2014 | 10:13 am
    StarTribune article and images from December 17 by Kim Palmer Season-extending structures are helping some Minnesota gardeners defy winter. Even in late November, Dawn Pape’s newest garden was a welcome sight for winter-weary eyes. In her Shoreview yard, under a blanket of snow, is a polycarbonate-topped, 2- by 8-foot box — or “cold frame.” Brush aside the show, lift the lid, and inside was an improbable vision: healthy spinach, kale, salad greens and other veggies growing in the frigid ground. “It’s so uplifting to see green when it’s kind of bleak outside,” said Pape, a…
  • Why Cant All Supermarkets Grow Food On The Roof Like This One Did?

    UOG
    3 Dec 2014 | 11:40 am
    Two London supermarkets are supporting the production of safe, healthy food by sourcing food locally, or growing it themselves. Jennifer Glasse reports from the British capital about the latest efforts in food sustainability, a term often associated with the developing world.
  • COMING SOON! Urban Organic Gardener’s MONTHLY SEED CLUB

    UOG
    25 Nov 2014 | 8:51 am
    Join the Urban Organic Gardener’s (UOG) SEED CLUB and get exclusive access to new and exotic seed varieties delivered to your door. Click here to fill out the online registration form.
  • WHAT?!! 66 Things You Can Grow At Home?? In Containers?!?!?!?

    UOG
    24 Nov 2014 | 12:23 pm
    Growing your own food is exciting, not only because you get to see things grow from nothing into ready-to-eat fruits and veggies, but you also don’t have to worry about the pesticides they might contain, and you definitely cut down on the miles they—and you—have to travel. If you’re up to the challenge—and it really isn’t much of one—growing your own food can be so rewarding. And so much cheaper! Just be sure to choose the right planter or container, learn how to maintain it properly, and go find yourself some seeds! (Or starter plants.) Here’s a starter list of all the…
  • How To Make An Awesome Aquaponics System [VIDEO]

    UOG
    14 Nov 2014 | 3:52 pm
    It’s obvious Ann Forsthoefel of “Aqua Annie” is excited by aquaponics, the growing of plants fed by nutrients from fish, which in turn provide a source of food when they reach maturity. “There are so few inputs compared to growing crops in the soil,” she said. With her gardens, she’s constantly building up the soil that is depleted at the end of each growing season. The beauty of aquaponics, she said, is that there isn’t that constant work because the fish are giving nutrients to the plants. Read her full post on Cooking Up a Story:…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Ecosystem Gardening

  • The Wild Turkey So Much More Than Thanksgiving Dinner

    Carole Sevilla Brown
    24 Nov 2014 | 2:55 pm
    Wild Turkey Male Tail The Wild Turkey is a very different creature than its factory farmed cousin. You can see them in forested areas with interspersed clearings, and even attract them to your wildlife garden. It’s the time of year when we’re in search of the perfect turkey to grace our Thanksgiving Day table. A time when family and friends gather round to celebrate all that we are grateful for. These birds with overplump breasts who are raised in cramped conditions at factory farms can barely fly because they’ve been bred to have giant breasts so they will quickly fly from…
  • Water Taxi Ecotour

    Carole Sevilla Brown
    14 Aug 2014 | 12:02 pm
    Snowy Egret Marine ecosystem tour with Cape Water Taxi in Indian River Bay, Delaware. Thanks to my dear friends Linda and Donna who invited us to spend a long weekend with them at their home in Lewes, Delaware–a retreat they fondly call the Redneck Riviera. We got to celebrate Linda’s birthday by joining her on The Cape Water Taxi ecotour through Indian River Bay in southern Delaware: Schedule a 90-minute tour with us and find out where the Fiddler Crab got its name, if the Glossy Ibis is really glossy or where the term “crazy as a loon” came from. You will have an opportunity…
  • Late Summer Birds At An Urban Oasis

    Carole Sevilla Brown
    5 Aug 2014 | 7:05 pm
    Birds of late summer at the urban oasis of John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge near the Philadelphia, PA airport 6:30 am alarm clock on a drizzly Sunday morning. Sounds like a great reason to stay in bed, snug as a bug under the covers. But this morning I have a wonderful reason to drag my buns out of bed. It’s time to see what birds can be found on this August morning at my local wildlife refuge near the Philadelphia airport. John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge is a welcome natural respite from the concrete jungle that is the city of Philadelphia, providing habitat for many birds and a…
  • What’s All the Fuss About Neonicotinoids?

    Carole Sevilla Brown
    14 Jul 2014 | 1:49 pm
    Neonicotinoids are systemic pesticides that will kill the very pollinators you’re trying to attract to your wildlife garden. A systemic pesticide is absorbed into all parts of the plant: leaves, flowers, pollen, and nectar which means that any caterpillar feeding on that plant, any butterfly sipping some nectar, or any native bee collecting pollen are often killed simply by visiting plants treated with neonicontinoids. Neonicotinoids affect the central nervous system of insects resulting in paralysis and death, which is surely not your goal if you’re goal is to create a pollinator garden!
  • Growing for Pollinators 10th Annual Garden Symposium, with Carole Sevilla Brown, William Cullina, and Dr. Frank Drummond

    Carole Sevilla Brown
    5 Jun 2014 | 11:39 am
    Growing for Pollinators: 10th Annual Garden Symposium, with Carole Sevilla Brown, William Cullina, and Dr. Frank Drummond at Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens On Friday June 20 I’ll be speaking at the Growing for Pollinators symposium at Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens with William Cullina and Frank Drummond: Maine’s bird and insect pollinators are crucial to the life cycle of most flowering plants – in the wild, in our home gardens, and in agriculture. In Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens’ 10th annual symposium, you’ll discover the intricate interdependencies between flowers and…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Garden Plot

  • Christmas Cactus or Poinsettias?

    Garden Media Group
    16 Dec 2014 | 7:59 am
    First introduced to the United States in 1825 by Joel Roberts Poinsett, the first Ambassador from the United States to Mexico, the poinsettia has played a starring role in Christmas celebrations ever since.The poinsettia's main attraction is not its flowers, but its leaves. The flowers of the plant are the yellow clustered buds in the center. The colored leafy parts are actually bracts or modified leaves that turn color when the plant flowers. When buying a poinsettia, make sure it has buds, preferably not yet open.Red is the most popular color, accounting for roughly three-quarters of all…
  • Add Living Decorations to this Year’s Holiday Theme

    Garden Media Group
    10 Nov 2014 | 7:21 am
    Put a spin on traditional seasonal design with blooming decorations. Amaryllis is one of the few flowers that bloom during the coldest winter months and adds a splash of much needed color around the home.From stripes and solids to pinks and white, the multiple colors and styles of amaryllis bulbs coordinate with any holiday décor.Longfield Gardens’ select amaryllis come in a variety of colors, shapes and styles this year. From the bold ‘Red Pearl,’ whose deep crimson, velvety petals are overlaid with burgundy and maroon, to ‘Apple Blossom,’ which adds a soft touch with its snow…
  • Create a Supernatural Halloween with Spooky Plants from Costa Farms

    kmdubow
    31 Oct 2014 | 5:07 am
    Add a supernatural touch to your Halloween festivities. Decorate this season with spooky indoor plants that have creepy names, devilish shapes and weird colors. While everything else this season goes bump in the night, these ‘living decorations’ add a fun, eerie twist to traditional Halloween décor. These spooky plants all have great names and fun stories that give children, party guests and trick-or- treaters something fun to talk about. Plus they are easy to grow year round.African Mask. The dark, shield-shaped foliage of an African Mask is an eerie…
  • Celebrate a Special Mother-in-Law this October

    Garden Media Group
    8 Oct 2014 | 9:53 am
    Sunday, Oct. 26 marks Mother-in-Law Day, a special day to honor the woman who gave birth to your spouse and the grandmother of your children. This unofficial holiday offers a chance to get to know “mom” and show her the appreciation she deserves. “Whether you’ve known her for years or you’re new to the family, every mother-in-law deserves recognition and thanks,” says Katie Dubow of Garden Media Group, a public relations firm specializing in the gardening and outdoor lifestyle industry. Before choosing a gift, think about her interests and hobbies. Everyone loves a present that…
  • Protect BrazelBerries® From Old Man Winter With These Easy Steps

    Garden Media Group
    6 Oct 2014 | 6:43 am
    The new line of BrazelBerries® blueberries and raspberries shrubs that grow easily in containers or gardens are a snap to care for over the winter with some simple steps. Most varieties within the BrazelBerries® collection can take cooler temperatures and actually need a certain amount of chill to set fruit the next year. The blueberry varieties Jelly Bean™ and Blueberry Glaze™ and the thornless Raspberry Shortcake™ raspberry all are specifically bred to survive during cold months either inside in a protected spot or out in the garden or landscape. Peach Sorbet™ is a hybrid that may…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Yarden

  • My new book!

    LaManda Joy
    4 Dec 2014 | 3:28 pm
    I wanted to call this post “be careful what you ... The post My new book! appeared first on The Yarden.
  • Grow2Give

    LaManda Joy
    30 Nov 2014 | 3:01 pm
    This post first appeared on We Can Grow It. I’m proud ... The post Grow2Give appeared first on The Yarden.
  • Community Garden Universe

    LaManda Joy
    25 Jun 2014 | 8:40 am
    Peterson Garden Project is one bright star in a big ... The post Community Garden Universe appeared first on The Yarden.
  • Food Gardening Advice To Go

    LaManda Joy
    8 Jun 2014 | 9:02 am
    The Garden Minute provides basic food garden instruction that you can watch on your smart phone or on your computer. The post Food Gardening Advice To Go appeared first on The Yarden.
  • Food Gardening Education

    LaManda Joy
    4 Jun 2014 | 10:33 am
    For the past five years I have been working diligently ... The post Food Gardening Education appeared first on The Yarden.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Gardener's Journal » Gardener's Journal

  • Horticulture is Healing

    gscadmin
    18 Dec 2014 | 12:41 pm
    Making a wreath Donna Covais “Donna, your wreath looks better than mine, except I can see what I am doing!” After being a florist for more than 30 years — and gardening for the majority of her life — it is no wonder that Donna Covais can design beautiful gardens, wreaths and floral arrangements. What separates her from the crowd is that she lost her vision 18 years ago. Frank Oliver, senior product developer at Gardener’s Supply, reached out to Donna in 2001. Without taking no for an answer, he encouraged her to start gardening again. “Donna can feel a plant and…
  • Congratulations, winners!

    Gardener's Supply
    8 Dec 2014 | 10:55 am
    Congratulations to Jacquelyn and Suzanne, winners in this year’s Win Your Wish List contest. From Jacquelyn Nappa, Lakewood, NJ, who won in October: “I’m a Jersey Shore home gardener with sand as my soil base, so I have three large raised beds in my front yard. We’re surrounded by large oak trees, so the front yard is where the sun is! I’m using a number of your space-saving and easy-watering products to get the most out of my raised beds. I love everything I’ve gotten from Gardener’s Supply over the years and recommend the company to gardening…
  • Colossal Carrot Harvest

    Gardener's Supply
    22 Oct 2014 | 8:02 am
    We’re getting more great entries in our 2014 Harvest Photo Contest. This one is from Annmarie Mones in Trumbull, CT. Here in CT I used the square-foot gardening method. I had several different patches and varieties of carrots, beets, and some parsnips planted this year. Unfortunately, voles moved into my garden, and I lost all my beets and some of the carrots and parsnips. I decided to pull almost all the root vegetables to see what I could salvage. I am happy to say I have carrots to last me awhile! This pile of carrots are all keepers and waiting for me to clean them, along with a few…
  • A Great Gift that Gives Back

    Gardener's Supply
    10 Oct 2014 | 6:45 am
    Heritage Honey and Beestick Set  “Who Needs Gift Wrap?” writes “Jessie the Gardener” from Philadelphia. In her review of the Heritage Honey and Beestick Set. “I purchased this to gift to a friend who loves tea, and I thought the honey and dipper might go well with a box of her favorite tea. It turned out to be such a beautiful product, both the honey and the hardwood honey dipper, that I decided not to wrap it up. She loved the beauty and thoughtful nature of this gift. She even upcycled the jar, filled it with button flowers, and gave it back to me! LOVE!
  • Turn Cherry Tomatoes into Something Special

    Gardener's Supply
    6 Oct 2014 | 10:22 am
    Thanks to everyone who entered our Tomato Recipe Contest on Facebook. Here’s the winning recipe, from Megan Miller of Carver, MA. Megan Miller, with her autumn garden in the background THIS summer — unlike many of my fellow local gardeners — I had a wildly successful crop of tomatoes. My heirlooms colored up and my cherries were extraordinarily prolific. In fact, I’m still harvesting yellow pear and black cherry tomatoes. My wife and I had tomatoes at almost every meal and I still had enough to share with my granny and mom, who live across the street. The garden wasn’t…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Annie's Gardening Corner

  • The Season is Green

    19 Dec 2014 | 7:17 am
    The Kissing Ball is decorative and beautiful swaying in the windDo you decorate with fresh greens during the holiday season? There’s a bundle of goodies out there and it’s worth one or two for extra oomph. As Tae Yun Kim reminds us about this color, “Green strongly influences the heart and helps alleviate tension. Positive qualities associated with green are generosity, humility, and cooperation.” Add a bit of fresh greens during the holiday season and let its color immerse you in the positive it brings. Holiday greetings to all. © All Images – Property of Bilowz Associates Inc. If…
  • Thursday’s Nature Break

    18 Dec 2014 | 6:31 am
    One of my favorites that can be spotted during spring nature walks - Rhododendron vaseyi (Pinkshell azalea) During the hectic holiday season, one might need to seek a stillness that can be difficult to find.  So if you need some nature suggestions, here are a few worth noting. Plus, these ideas might prove helpful in getting the children outdoors during their holiday break. Introduce them into nature and even history rather than immerse them in only the electronics and technology of today's fast-paced world.Check out the John H. Chafee Blackstone River Valley National Heritage Corridor,…
  • Cut Out the Unnecessary

    16 Dec 2014 | 6:37 am
    Obvious pruning should be done before the winter sneaks in. It’s the holiday squeeze, which reminds me that cutting out the unnecessary (whether it’s extra nibbles or too many commitments) can make the season a bit more manageable.  The irony is this simple advice applies to your landscape as well.Need a holiday breather? Consider taking a walkabout to peruse your property. See if everything is winter tight and buttoned up. If you notice any dead branches or split crotches on a tree, take care of them before heavy snow and ice. Remove any dead or weakened limbs and attend to any…
  • Flower Break

    15 Dec 2014 | 6:53 am
    Flower break...such is my idea of happiness.During the Hanukkah and Christmas Season, it’s another flower to break up what often becomes the rushed and hurried part of the holidays. As Leo Tolstoy profoundly puts it, “Rest, nature, books, music…such is my idea of happiness.” That’s the purpose of the flower breaks.© All Images – Property of Bilowz Associates Inc.If you like this blog, check in for your daily share's worth of garden inspiration, landscape architecture and design tips; always original, not cookie cutter and copied. Just like our design work, we strive for unique!
  • Pre-Holiday Flower Break

    12 Dec 2014 | 6:40 am
    With the holiday scramble on for certain, hopefully you can afford a ten second breather. It’s a pre-holiday flower break, no reading necessary.Pre-Holiday Flower BreakJust Breathe...Ten tiny breaths...Even when things feel hectic, stressful, or overwhelming...Take a breathe...and enjoy the season. © All Images – Property of Bilowz Associates Inc. If you like this blog, check in for your daily share's worth of garden inspiration, landscape architecture and design tips; always original, not cookie cutter and copied. Just like our design work, we strive for unique! We invite you…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Serenity in the Garden

  • Carl Sagan's Insightful Quote - Garden Wisdom

    Jan Johnsen
    16 Dec 2014 | 6:03 pm
    “What a marvelous cooperative arrangement - plants and animals each inhaling each other's exhalations, a kind of planet-wide mutual mouth-to-stoma resuscitation, the entire elegant cycle powered by a star 150 million kilometers away.”-- Carl Sagan, "Cosmos"
  • Three Requirements for a 'Healing Garden'

    Jan Johnsen
    15 Dec 2014 | 5:44 am
    Robert Ulrich was in the hospital with a badly broken leg.Forced to lie flat on his back, Ulrich, an environmental psychologist, stared for hours at a too-bright ceiling light surrounded by acoustic ceiling tile. “I remember...how much I wished I had an attractive image on the ceiling,” Ulrich recalls.Coleus - Jan JohnsenNow the director of the Center for Health Systems & Design at Texas A&M University, Ulrich produced groundbreaking research that found that viewing natural scenes in a hospital aids stress recovery by evoking positive feelings, reducing…
  • '100 Years of Design on the Land' opens through March 6, 2015

    Jan Johnsen
    14 Dec 2014 | 10:13 am
    This show tells the stories of ten important American places. Contemporary landscape photographs evoke  the original spirit of a site and capture the change that has occurred since the site was first designed. It opens December 15 at 1285 Avenue of the Americas Art Gallery in New York City. (between 51st and 52d Sts) with a free public reception. 6 - 8 pm.  The show runs through Friday, March 6, 2015.See more at: http://aslany.org/event/lalh-100-years-design-land-opening-reception
  • In praise of Rose Hips! A Garden Tip

    Jan Johnsen
    13 Dec 2014 | 6:57 am
    rose hips - photo by Jan Johnsen Allow your roses to form hips. Did you know that, like many plants that produce fruit, the formation of rose hips is a signal to the rose to go dormant for the season?Rose hips provide wonderful color in the garden and are a good source of vitamin C for birds in the fall and winter. They are one of the highest plant sources of Vitamin C. 'Cherry Pie' Rose makes great rose hips:Oso Easy Cherry Pie Rose -from May Dreams Garden Blog You can eat them too. Rose hips are used for jam, jelly, syrup, soup, beverages, pies, bread, and…
  • Two more gift ideas for the gardener in your life....

    Jan Johnsen
    12 Dec 2014 | 8:10 am
    I suggested some fun gift ideas a few days ago and forgot to mention 2 other gifts that gardeners love.Garden Design Magazine SubscriptionThe new rendition of the famous Garden Design magazine is better than ever!  A great gift for anyone who loves gardens and plants.get a gift subscription here And a heavy duty lopping shearsFiskars 32-Inch PowerGear Bypass Lopper We all need this and try to use our pruning shears instead...and then we ruin a great pair of pruning shears (I know - I have done it).So this is a gift that gardeners all want but never buy for themselves....great…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    MySecretGarden

  • Lakewold Gardens Beautiful Tables Showcase: Winter Tables

    12 Dec 2014 | 5:42 am
    These are several tables from the Lakewold Gardens Beautiful Tables Showcase-2014 decorated for winter that can help us to get into the holiday spirit.  Celebrating Under the Snowflakes and Stars Novice - Seasonal/Holiday Designer:Wendy Simmons *  A Winter's Night Dinner in the Woods Novice - Seasonal/Holiday Designer: Neve Norton
  • First Snow in My Garden, Zone 8a

    2 Dec 2014 | 12:52 pm
    I'm glad we had this light snow before the latest hard freeze killed a lot of foliage and some late blooms. It laid graciously on the stems, trunks, leaves and buds, thereby transforming the garden into a winter wonderland. New this season were some splashes of color juxtaposed on otherwise  green-black -white tapestry. 1 2 Mediterranean palm, Clematis montana,  Escalonia 3 4
  • Abyssinian Banana Overwintering

    28 Nov 2014 | 9:52 am
    It became one of my favorites the moment I saw it - big dark leaves, strong stem, overall tropical look and not-prohibitive price. Abyssinian Banana (Red Maurelii), Ensete (Musa) ventricosum (Ethiopian Banana, Red Abyssinian Banana, False Banana). .   Even if they won't survive the winter, it was worth it to have the plants from May to November.  I bought two of them last year.  They
  • Garden's View - First Half of November, Before the Freeze

    17 Nov 2014 | 11:53 am
    The first half of November didn't look very autumnal in my garden. A large number of evergreen plants kept it enthusiastically bright and cheerful. Grapes, Hosta and Japanese maples gave the garden most of its yellow and crimson colors. Yellow and red leaf grapevines with Solomon Seal (Polygonatum multiflorum ) in between I am in love with grapes which grow in my garden not only
  • Leucosceptrum stellipilum ‘Ogon'

    1 Nov 2014 | 8:14 am
    I was asked about this plant when I posted several pictures of it earlier this season, so I decided to tell  more about it in a separate post. It's Leucosceptrum stellipilum ‘Ogon'. In this picture, it's the furthest plant on the right, next to Northern Sea Oats (Chasmanthium latifolium), with the hardy Schefflera (Schefflera delavayi) in the foreground. I bought it from  Far Reaches
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Veg Plotting

  • Unusual Front Gardens #19: Nativity

    VP
    19 Dec 2014 | 12:30 am
    Winter interest in the garden is always a challenge in December. Chippenham's Methodist church  solved the problem by planting a Nativity in theirs.Merry Christmas everyone and here's to a peaceful New Year.If you're not reading this on vegplotting.blogspot.com, Blotanical or your own web reader such as Bloglovin' or Feedly, then the website you're using is a blogpost feed scraper. Why not go straight to the source instead? That's vegplotting.blogspot.com
  • Wordless Wednesday: A Perfect Place for Plant Lovers

    VP
    17 Dec 2014 | 12:30 am
    If you're not reading this on vegplotting.blogspot.com, Blotanical or your own web reader such as Bloglovin' or Feedly, then the website you're using is a blogpost feed scraper. Why not go straight to the source instead? That's vegplotting.blogspot.com
  • GBBD: Unexpected Honeysuckle

    VP
    15 Dec 2014 | 12:30 am
    I expect to see my winter honeysuckle starting to bloom at this time of the year, so it was a bit of a surprise to find this summer flowering version instead on my walk around the garden this morning.It's a self-sown flower too, so it qualifies as a double Against the Odds for my front garden this month. It suddenly appeared through my Euonymus 'Silver Queen' last year, presumably a gift bestowed by a passing bird. It must be a keen survivor as it germinated in a deeply shaded spot.The scent alerted me to the second flush of flowers appearing after its usual summer blooming earlier…
  • Plant Profiles: Mistletoe

    VP
    12 Dec 2014 | 12:30 am
    I walked past this spot for years before I noticed the tree had mistletoe. There used to be two distinctive balls of it sitting side by side, but when I went to take a photo for this post, I found there's now just one. As far as I know it's the only tree in central Chippenham which hosts this parasitic* plant. Having gone round the shops to find some, I see it's the only place in town to have it on display too.Mistletoe (aka Viscum album**) is one of our most romantic native plants. I don't just mean because of our tradition of kissing beneath it at this time of year, there are also a host of…
  • Evolution Plants: One Year On*

    VP
    10 Dec 2014 | 7:00 am
    Late October saw my latest trip to Evolution Plants, to take stock of the first year and to see what else has changed since May's visit. It was a very busy summer and autumn for us all so the timing was much later than originally planned. **The visual clue above hints at more changes at the nursery. I usually go though the gate, but now visitors are asked to take the side path on arrival.But first I needed to take one of the standard photos I've taken for every visit; the view of the nursery from the gate. This time I poked my camera through a gap to get my desired shot. For once my arrival…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Eat Your Landscape

  • Blog is moving - Join Me At GardenInspire.com

    Garden Inspire
    12 Dec 2014 | 4:23 pm
    Rather than keep up multiple gardening blogs I will be writing at GardenInspire.com where you can join me for gardening information including edible landscaping.  http://gardeninspire.com
  • Edible and Medicinal Plants Book

    Garden Inspire
    28 Oct 2014 | 9:28 am
    I am co authoring a book on finding, using, and growing, wild edible and medicinal plants.  The book will be available in a printed version and a bit later as a PDF, for Kindle, and for Nook.To find out more join this blog so you will receive notification when this book is available. This book will have common and botanical names, description, photographs, how to use medicinally, what parts are edible and medicinal, how to eat, and how to grow.  This pocket size book will have a spiral binding for portability and usability even in the outdoors. Great addition to an emergency…
  • Potted Plants

    Beuna Tomalino
    5 May 2014 | 11:54 am
    When growing plants in containers there are some things to keep in mind for the best chance of success.Choose a container 2” larger than the pot the plant is already in. If the pot will stay outside year round choose a material that can handle temperature changes. Fiberglass, resin, concrete, and heavy duty plastic will last longer than unsealed terra cotta. If the container does not have drainage drill holes in the bottom so water does not sit in the bottom of the pot. A unsealed terra cotta pot will allow water to evaporate through the sides of the pot.  This may be desirable when…
  • Guest On Joy In Your Garden

    Beuna Tomalino
    21 Apr 2014 | 5:22 pm
    I was a guest on Joy In Your Garden, April 19, 2014 with Joy Bossi! This was a remote broadcast from Red Butte Gardens. You can listen here.
  • Rosemary - Growing Indoors

    Beuna Tomalino
    14 Jan 2014 | 7:23 am
    RosemaryRosemary is sometimes hardy in my climate (zone 6) - depending on the winter weather and where it is planted.  If you grow rosemary indoors for whatever reason here are some tips you may find helpful.When watering rosemary, check the soil moisture first by sticking your finger into the soil.  The soil should be almost dry.Every third time you water pour the water over the rosemary plant.  If you water this way every time you may notice a whitish color almost like someone had dumped some flour on it.  This whitish color is from powdery mildew.  Keep your…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    GrowBlog

  • Composting During Winter

    19 Dec 2014 | 1:39 am
  • Winter Care for Fruit Trees

    12 Dec 2014 | 2:02 am
    We're all familiar with the concept of spring cleaning – shaking off the old, dusting down the decks and freshening things up. When it comes to fruit trees a more accurate description would be 'winter cleaning', as this is the time of year when we draw a line under the past year and look ahead to the next. It's our opportunity to get on top of bothersome weeds and lurking pests, check that trees are growing unhindered, and generally prepare the ground for another stellar season of fruitful rewards.
  • Nature's Wisdom: What Your Garden Knows

    4 Dec 2014 | 4:03 pm
  • Growing and Cooking Spaghetti Squash

    20 Nov 2014 | 3:58 pm
    Recently my young friend Leah was traumatized by a spaghetti squash. A few minutes after putting a prime specimen in her microwave, it exploded like a bomb, blew open the microwave door and sprayed half the kitchen with sticky strands of squash. Note: The safest way to cook a whole spaghetti squash is to use a slow cooker. Before baking, steaming or microwaving spaghetti squash, they should be cut in half.
  • A Guide to Growing Your Own Hazelnuts

    13 Nov 2014 | 11:07 am
    Winter's when we go nuts for nuts! Enjoy them roasted (on an open fire...or in the oven), munched naked straight out of the shell, or baked with herbs and pulses to create a satisfying vegetarian alternative to traditional roast meats. Nuts are highly nutritious but eat them in any quantity and your wallet will take a fair whack. The solution, as with any premium produce, is to grow them yourself.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Enduring Gardener

  • At last – Blight-free outdoor Tomatoes

    The Enduring Gardener
    16 Dec 2014 | 11:35 pm
    There’s a new year promise of a totally blight-free outdoor tomato from Suttons Seeds.  If you, like me, have watched you lovely fat tomatoes – just on the point of ripening – succumb to the dreaded blight,  you will be as keen as I am to try them. ‘Crimson Crush’ is resistant to all common blight strains in the UK and is reported to carry a good crop of large flavoursome fruit. You can order 3 plants for £7.99 from January 9th onwards.
  • Titus gets ready for Christmas

    The Enduring Gardener
    14 Dec 2014 | 11:18 pm
    Titus decided to get into the festive spirit while we were in the garden and climb up into one of the holly bushes – I’m just hoping he doesn’t decide to practice his climbing skills on the Christmas tree when I bring it indoors tomorrow and decorate with the help of my 4 year old grandson. Even if the decorations are all round the bottom of the tree it will be well illuminated because I finally threw away all the old lights last January and ordered new ones in the sale – and I’ve just found them – as well as the ones I bought the year before and didn’t find in time!
  • A Quintessentially Lovely Camellia

    The Enduring Gardener
    13 Dec 2014 | 11:12 pm
    Camellia ‘Quintessence’ is the perfect camellia for growing in a container. It is slow growing with a spreading habit and will never grow taller than 1.25m. Its white flowers are delicately flushed with pink and have a light but distinct scent. My plant has been growing happily in a pot for the past ten years.
  • Rather Keen on Roses

    The Enduring Gardener
    12 Dec 2014 | 3:10 am
    Carolyn Dunster absolutely loves roses – she trained in floristry so that she could arrange them, she trained as a garden designer so she could plant gardens filled with them, and then started a company, Simply Roses, selling the very best rose-related products to other rose enthusiasts. At this time of year her deliciously scented Rosa damascena hand wash, floral water and candle perfectly evoke the delicious tea rose scent of mid summer.
  • 5 Tried & Tested Gifts for Gardeners

    The Enduring Gardener
    9 Dec 2014 | 7:57 am
    Genus Performance Garden Wear (for men and women) is similar to the technical clothing worn by mountaineers and rock climbers – it’s tough, breathable and very flexible – and stylish too. From £35 www.genus.gs Castor Copper Trowel – once used, all other trowels are pale imitations. It is lightweight and cuts through soil effortlessly. £32 from www.implementations.co.uk The Gardener’s Full Apron saves changing into gardening clothes when time is short. Made from waxed cotton with deep leather pockets and ties. £45 www.worm.co.uk The Kneelo cushion is supremely comfortable and…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Urban Gardens

  • Getting Into the Sling of It

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    15 Dec 2014 | 4:30 pm
    Infinity by Trinity Hammocks I think it’s time for a nap. After gazing at the following gang of glorious hammocks, I’m already dreaming. I can’t resist the allure of lounging somewhere that envelops my shape and suspends me in midair. Imagine yourself relaxing in one of these … Read More...The post Getting Into the Sling of It appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Reclaimed Boat Sails Upcycled as Portable Planters

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    14 Dec 2014 | 1:40 pm
    In the hands of Parsons School of Design grads, Miriam Josi and Stella Lee Prowse, a local sail maker’s post-production sailcloth waste and scrap boat covers have been reborn as planters. Not just planters, but portable flat-folding, space-saving babes that can … Read More...The post Reclaimed Boat Sails Upcycled as Portable Planters appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Urban Gardens 2014 Holiday Gift Guide

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    3 Dec 2014 | 6:35 pm
    Drumroll! It’s that time of year and we’re excited to present our 2014 holiday gift guide, a curated list of 12 fun, functional, and fashionable items for home and garden. Have you been naughty or nice? No matter, we’re not judging. Go ahead, treat yourself … Read More...The post Urban Gardens 2014 Holiday Gift Guide appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Hydroponic Vertical Gardens and Heliostats Flourish on Sustainable Skyscraper

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    19 Nov 2014 | 6:01 am
    When iconic French architect Jean Nouvel and his botanist and landscape “artist” colleague and friend Patrick Blanc collaborate, you can expect a novel and cutting edge statement combining the best of their respective talents with the latest in green technologies, aka a work of … Read More...The post Hydroponic Vertical Gardens and Heliostats Flourish on Sustainable Skyscraper appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Back to Basics: Chic Multitasking Easy-to-Assemble Plant-Loving Furniture

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    4 Nov 2014 | 11:08 am
    Basics #1 Having recently downsized from a 3800 sq. foot house to a 680 sq. foot apartment, I am now the poster girl for small space living. As I optimize every square inch in my new place, double or even triple-duty designs are becoming … Read More...The post Back to Basics: Chic Multitasking Easy-to-Assemble Plant-Loving Furniture appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Busch Gardens in Virginia Blog

  • Webisode Wednesday: The Santa Situation

    Emily Bea
    17 Dec 2014 | 9:01 am
    Dear Readers, Are you doing some last-minute shopping? I know that I am.  It's often tough to find that perfect gift and it's even harder when you're trying to find a gift for the top gift-giver in the entire world. This week my cousins set about the unenviable task of trying to find the perfect gift for Santa.  Will they suceed in finding just the right present to present to Santa? I guess you'll just have to watch and find out for yourself. Happy Shopping,
  • Webisode Wednesday: Elf-Assment

    Emily Bea
    10 Dec 2014 | 9:07 am
    Dear Readers, Yesterday I gave you some tips on how to make the most of your visit to Christmas Town in preparation of the park being open daily through the end of the year.  Today, I want to show you another webisode from our Real Elves of Christmas Town and show you how they're getting prepared to for daily visits from our smiling fans.   Enjoy,  
  • How Tuesday: How to Enjoy Busch Gardens Christmas Town

    Emily Bea
    8 Dec 2014 | 1:48 pm
    Dear Readers,   Starting this Friday, Christmas Town will be open every day (except Christmas Day, of course!), which means a lot more photos, fireside feasts and overall merry-making. Tomorrow I’m going to show you how we elves are getting prepared in our next Real Elves of Christmas Town webisode. Today, however, I’m going to give you some tips for how YOU can make the most of your Christmas Town: 1.       Dress Warmly.  Nothing can dampen the Christmas spirit than being under dressed for the weather.  Skip the shivering and…
  • How Tuesday: How To Dress Up Your Hot Chocolate

    Emily Bea
    3 Dec 2014 | 2:03 pm
    Dear Readers, Aside from being the head elf of Christmas Town, I’m also a pretty big hot cocoa (or “ho-cho” as young Jolly calls it) aficionado. I love cocoa, especially the peppermint fudge hot chocolate Busch Gardens serves during Christmas Town.  I mean, it’s not just peppermint hot cocoa, it’s peppermint fudge hot cocoa.  It’s so decadent and delicious.  Which made me think, what are some other ways that you could dress up hot chocolate?     Jolly and I put our heads together and came up with these twists on the classic cocoa:…
  • Real Elves of Christmas Town: #PlayItForward on #GivingTuesday

    Emily Bea
    2 Dec 2014 | 7:08 am
    Dear Readers, I'm postponing today's How Tuesday to bring you something new, a brand new set of "Webisodes" starring my fellow Christmas Town elves, including the other Holly and Jolly. Normally, these webisodes will come out every Wednesday, but seeing as today is #givingtuesday, I just couldn't resist releasing this video a little early.  I think you're really going to like it. Busch Gardens Cares is participating in the Toys For Tots toy drive to help local families provide Christmas presents for their children this holiday season. They've invited their guests to bring an unwrapped…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Appalachian Feet

  • News: Eliza on TV, Upcoming Events, and Our Favorite “How To” Articles

    Eliza Lord
    12 Dec 2014 | 1:34 pm
    Eliza was on TV Wednesday doing a foraging recipe demonstration (involving a failed attempt to use a hammer) and talking about a couple things happening this weekend with Grow Journey and the Swamp Rabbit Cafe & Grocery’s Holiday Flea Market on Saturday from 11am – 3pm.  If you’d like to see Eliza’s segment during Wednesday’s Studio 62 on the CW channel, here’s the video (may not load immediately): The holiday flea is free to attend and there will be local vendors from all over the upstate. Eliza and Nathaniel will be at the Grow Journey booth selling…
  • How to Have Perennial Food Plants & No Disease for Your 2015 Garden

    Eliza Lord
    3 Nov 2014 | 9:57 am
    Okay, maybe not NO disease, but insignificant diseases and pests sounds good, right? Plus, perennial fruits and veggies mean less work for more harvest. Eliza loves teaching the two class topics available this week at the Swamp Rabbit Cafe & Grocery. Click here to sign up for class or click here to see the full 2014-2015 class schedule. Photo Caption: Passionfruit (Passiflora incarnata) are one of the perennial food plants that can be grown in this area — and they also happen to be native! Come Tuesday to learn more than 30 types of garden foods that only need to be planted once. We…
  • How to Attend Our Upcoming Garden Open House (& a Virtual Tour)

    Eliza Lord
    9 Jun 2014 | 12:59 pm
    Our garden open house (rain or shine) is THIS coming Saturday! APPALACHIAN FEET GARDEN OPEN HOUSE DETAILS: Drop-in June 14th, 9:00am – 5:00pm Recommended donation of $2-$5 440 Summit Drive, Greenville, SC You may also want to catch Eliza’s TEDx presentation at Zen on Tuesday, June 17th at 5:30pm. Additionally, Eliza wrote the feature article (on pawpaws) in the latest Edible Upcountry magazine, available for free at area locations like the Swamp Rabbit Cafe & Grocery, The Carolina Honeybee Company, or The Community Tap. Our plans for the garden open house are not as far along…
  • How to Eat Well While Learning on March 1st

    Eliza Lord
    18 Feb 2014 | 11:07 pm
    The SC Organic Grower’s Conference just announced their locally sourced menu and it’s worth the price of the ticket just to eat lunch. Photo Caption: The SC Growers School is locally sourcing as many ingredients from their lunch menu as possible, including greens like this chard. CONFERENCE MENU: “The Culinary Institute of the Carolinas does a magnificent job preparing local food. (The chefs also will ensure that we have plenty of choices for those of you who need a vegetarian lunch.) Winter Kale Salad with Rebecca’s Ginger Dressing Sea Island Pea Hoppin’ John…
  • How to Get Our Email Newsletter

    Eliza Lord
    13 Feb 2014 | 4:55 pm
    Who else can’t wait until spring? I mean, besides our dog… Photo Caption: Ceres had a blast rolling and running in the snow. We thoroughly enjoyed this week’s token snow of the year, but we’re just as excited about next week’s projected highs in the 60s! Spring fever has bit hard and we have so many plans for an urban farm open house, plant sale, workshops, classes, and more! You may already be receiving our blog posts via email, but now you can sign up for our email newsletter, too. The newsletter will come out once a month (or less) and will contain Appalachian…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Lead up the Garden Path

  • In the Pink.

    Pauline
    18 Dec 2014 | 3:44 am
    When I drew the bedroom curtains back this morning, I was surprised to see that the Camellia in the corner of the garden was covered in buds and flowers. It must have been flowering for a while but I just hadn’t noticed it. I have never known it to flower this early before, usually it is February when it starts to flower. I’m not complaining, it is lovely to have that corner of the garden showing lots of pink flowers. I’ll just have to hope that frost stays away and doesn’t spoil the blooms. Also in the pink, are the flowers of the Chaenomeles by the back door. I know…
  • Sheltering indoors. GBBD.

    Pauline
    15 Dec 2014 | 12:47 am
    First of all a little bug got to me, not the computer this time, then I had to catch up with writing all my cards and Christmas preparations, at last I’m free to get back to you all! It’s a couple of weeks since I was in the garden, so I thought for this months GBBD I would stay inside and show the few flowering plants that are in the conservatory at the moment. We also use the conservatory for overwintering pots of plants that are out in the garden for the summer, but get brought in as they wouldn’t survive a frost, so there isn’t much room in there in the winter…
  • Back in business.

    Pauline
    7 Dec 2014 | 4:33 am
    At last, we are back in touch with the outside world! More gremlins unfortunately, more visits from Talk Talk engineers, BT engineer is supposed to be coming but suddenly everything has started working again so I’m making the most of it before we are in limbo again! We have had a couple of frosts so far and actually a week without rain, hooray! We are still waiting for the lawn to dry out, even after a dry week, we still can’t get the lawn mower on it to cut the grass, which is rather long by now. Most of the leaves are down now and have been hoovered up to make lovely leaf mould…
  • Wonderfully colourful November.

    Pauline
    21 Nov 2014 | 11:22 pm
    The twenty second of the month is Garden Bloggers Foliage Day. Lots of the leaves have fallen already and the trees and other plants are just the bare skeleton which will last until March when they start sprouting again. Some plants though are hanging on to their leaves and giving a wonderful finale to the year before they finally fall. The beech hedge at the side by the field is now assuming lovely colours before it eventually goes brown, these leaves will stay all winter and only drop when the new leaves come through in spring. I had to plant a hedge here because the easterly winter winds…
  • The last few Flowers. GBBD.

    Pauline
    15 Nov 2014 | 1:44 am
    It was a hard job to find some flowers to photograph for today’s Garden Bloggers Bloom Day, everywhere in the garden is so wet and everywhere looks a mess with plants collapsing all over the place. I went out with the camera yesterday because the forecast for today was even more torrential rain. I took my usual route through the garden, starting in the front, but I had to watch my step because everywhere is so slippery and the lawn was absolutely sodden. By the front door, Winter Jasmine is flowering with lots more flowers opening every day. Anthemis Sauce Hollandaise is still putting…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Garden Walk Garden Talk

  • Blue Eyes are Not Only for Santa

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    19 Dec 2014 | 4:00 am
    I am partial to blue eyes since I have them myself, but this pinto really has blue peepers with a merry little twinkle. I found it eking out a bit of grass in the snowy field. The jolly, Santa blue … Continue reading →
  • On and On, Show Us Already

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    15 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    What would you think if I go on and on about all the wildlife I see, like eagles flying overhead and big game wandering through my gardens? But not once did I ever photograph the said wildlife? Instead I show … Continue reading →
  • Charles Cresson Gardens – Part 3

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    12 Dec 2014 | 5:00 am
    Here we are in the Swarthmore, Pennsylvania gardens of Charles Cresson in May 2014. I showed you his Hedgleigh Spring gardens from the rear of the property in the last two posts. Charles lives in his family home that his … Continue reading →
  • No Ugly Landscapes

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    9 Dec 2014 | 5:00 pm
    This is just a view of a large water body of the Niagara River where the Tundra Swan can be found. It is not the prettiest landscape, but it certainly is not an ugly one either. “God never made an … Continue reading →
  • Charles Cresson Gardens – Part 2 – The Pond

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    7 Dec 2014 | 4:00 am
    It is hard to pick a favorite garden room on this property, but one that many might, is the area of the pond. Many moisture loving plants surround the pond and as you will notice, a rock garden gives some … Continue reading →
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Gardenerd

  • Giveaway: Sprouting Seeds for Greens All Winter

    Christy
    10 Dec 2014 | 6:08 am
    It’s holiday time, which means thoughtful gifts and good cheer with loved ones. It also means, for many people, a winter without fresh greens in the garden. Thankfully, we can sprout seeds indoors for snipping into salads, soups and more … Continue reading → The post Giveaway: Sprouting Seeds for Greens All Winter appeared first on Gardenerd.
  • Scoring Big with the Rain Barrel Rebate

    Christy
    9 Dec 2014 | 6:08 am
    We try to write blog posts with a nationwide focus, but every once in a while, something with a local flare is in order. This is one of those times: Los Angeles is finally seeing some rain, and our rain … Continue reading → The post Scoring Big with the Rain Barrel Rebate appeared first on Gardenerd.
  • Field Trip: Ocean View Farms and Will Allen

    Christy
    3 Dec 2014 | 6:16 am
    I had the pleasure of arranging a visit to Ocean View Farms organic community garden for a group of innovative folks who are working to solve several issues at once: food waste, food deserts, soil fertility, and carbon loss. What’s … Continue reading → The post Field Trip: Ocean View Farms and Will Allen appeared first on Gardenerd.
  • Big Changes for a Big Front Yard

    Christy
    2 Dec 2014 | 9:44 am
    Our largest Turf Removal Rebate project to date involved eliminating 3,000 square feet of lawn in a big front yard and parkway in Beverlywood. The owners wanted to reduce their water bill and make their front yard an inviting place … Continue reading → The post Big Changes for a Big Front Yard appeared first on Gardenerd.
  • Making Carob Powder

    Christy
    20 Nov 2014 | 6:10 am
    Autumn brings with it an array of colorful fruits and vegetables from the garden…and seeds. This Thanksgiving, as we dig into our root cellars for orange carrots, purple potatoes, and red beets, as well as colorful persimmons, pomegranates, and grapes,  … Continue reading → The post Making Carob Powder appeared first on Gardenerd.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Perennial Meadows

  • Form and Structure within Perennial Planting Design

    Michael
    3 Dec 2014 | 3:10 am
    Perennials are by their very nature loose and informal especially when combined into contemporary naturalistic planting schemes. The traditional herbaceous border was created as a tableaux to be viewed from outside and was given structure by being given a framework of formal hedges and fronted with neatly mown lawn. Perennial meadows as an example of today’s interest in naturalistic planting invite their visitors inside, amidst the plants, to become engulfed and enraptured by their loose, expansive nature. Bringing structure to such informal arrangements of plants is of paramount…
  • Chasmanthium grasses tolerate shade

    Michael
    26 Nov 2014 | 7:04 am
    Grasses are mostly used in our gardens in sunny sites to bring texture, contrast and movement to our planting schemes, but in shade their are few that will thrive and offer us the same qualities. Instead we tend to use similar looking alternatives such as sedges (Carex sp.) and woodrushes (Luzula sp.). Whilst very useful, these are generally low or rounded forms which are not the most dramatic for setting up contrast within a woodland floor situation which tend to consist of a low and flat perennial layer punctuated by understory shrubs. There are of course grasses adapted to shady situations…
  • Gardening with Grasses

    Michael
    19 Nov 2014 | 12:30 am
    The introduction of ornamental grasses into planting plans was one of the most significant changes to occur within garden design in the past twenty years. Through their inclusion amidst an evolving planting pallet of perennials, contemporary gardens took on a naturalistic feel, far removed from the stiff block plantings of traditional herbaceous borders; grasses introduced an informal air with strong associations with wild nature. The distinctive characteristics that set grasses apart from the other plants that we grow in our gardens results in them having a powerful influence wherever they…
  • Autumnal Textures over Perennial Colour

    Michael
    14 Oct 2014 | 1:01 am
    My trial gardens in Amsterdam have teetered on the edge of chaos this year as a result of moving house. Weeds are under control and wayward growth ruthlessly chopped down, but I long for a clean sweep and the fresh growing season in 2015.   Although colour is everywhere in the garden this autumn from bright yellows, hard reds, glowing oranges and rich browns, it is the textures of the plants that really stands out and dominates.   The sense of being overwhelmed by burgeoning vegetation has been emphasised by the tangle that encroaches upon every path and impedes perambulation;…
  • Managing Soils

    Michael
    7 Sep 2014 | 12:31 am
    Healthy soil is the foundation of any perennial meadow planting I have already written about my decision to mulch newly planted perennial meadows following initial planting in order to suppress weeds. Time and again I am amazed just how much work it saves and the fact that we don’t have to walk in amongst the plants to weed means that the soil does not get trampled and compacted; in every way, that initial mulch is a good investment. Surprisingly though most contractors and designers in Europe don’t include mulches in their plans. I suspect the main reason is cost as clients are…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Beautiful Wildlife Garden

  • Happy Holidays 2014

    Loret T. Setters
    19 Dec 2014 | 2:55 am
    I’ve done Christmas theme posts in the past including “In the Wildlife Garden, Naughty or Nice?” (2011), “Revising the 12 Days of Christmas” (2012-NPWG),  “The Color of Christmas in the Garden“ (2013), “A Berry Merry Christmas“ (2010) to name some. In keeping with what has become a tradition of sorts, this year will be no […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Pest Free?

    Ellen Honeycutt
    18 Dec 2014 | 7:24 am
    Pest free is a very desirable trait in plants according to the nursery trade. I watched a large cockroach race across my counter today and I certainly wanted to be pest free at that moment! Pest is just a derogatory term for bugs, of course, and I don’t feel that all bugs are pests. Do […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Holiday Giving for Wildlife Gardeners

    Carole Sevilla Brown
    17 Dec 2014 | 12:09 pm
    As we celebrate the holiday season with family and friends, put up our Christmas trees, bake delicious holiday goodies, and buy presents for our loved ones, I also like to give a little back to wildlife by working to create more wildlife habitats in our gardens and communities. There are many ways you can give a […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Is “Drink Your Tea” in Your Garden?

    Joni James
    16 Dec 2014 | 4:00 am
    Male Towhee Look low and listen for the rustling of leaves! You will often wonder what animal might be coming your way, especially in the fall when fallen leaves blanket the ground. Be patient and you might see the beautifully marked Eastern Towhee (Pipilo erythrophthalmus) using its two-footed backward hop to turn over leaves to […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Snuffleupagus: In the Garden Stuck on You

    Loret T. Setters
    12 Dec 2014 | 7:16 am
    The great reptile hunter was at it again.  I saw my dog Chili lying in the grass, alert and stretching out her paw like she was batting at something.  And, of course, she was.  Meet Timmy the turtle (named after a pull toy I owned as a toddler…ahhhh memories!). Timmy is actually a three striped […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Vegetable Gardener - All featured posts

  • New Crop of Winners for 2015

    15 Dec 2014 | 1:15 pm
    Posted by WesternGardener 'Tis the season to start thinking about what to plant in next year's garden. All-America Selections has a delicious new crop of winners for gardeners like you.
  • Fire Cider Vinegar

    10 Dec 2014 | 7:11 pm
    Posted by cookinwithherbs This elixir is well known amongst herbalists, created by Rosemary Gladstar, and has been made by many of us for years now. December 6 was World Fire Cider Vinegar Day. Check out this easy recipe--I make this every fall after I harvest my horseradish--to use throughout the winter months for a general tonic and to help fight colds and flu.
  • No More Gardening Guesswork

    4 Dec 2014 | 11:23 am
    Posted by WesternGardener If you’ve ever made your own seed tape with paper, glue and small vegetable seeds, you know the tape makes planting faster, easier and in straighter rows. What if you could plan and plant your entire garden that way?
  • Celebrate National Cookie Day with Herbal Butter Cookies

    2 Dec 2014 | 9:22 pm
    Posted by cookinwithherbs December 4 is National Cookie Day and since this is a special holiday month--why not celebrate with cookies? Check out this recipe for a delightfully versatile cookie featuring herbs from the garden--with many variations--they are really easy to make and can be made ahead.
  • Catalog Review: Kitchen Garden Seeds

    30 Nov 2014 | 6:09 pm
    Posted by yourownvictorygarden Kitchen Garden Seeds has been providing a great selection of vegetable, herb and flower seeds since 1908.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Gardening Blog

  • November gifts from my Garden

    Barbara
    1 Dec 2014 | 2:36 pm
    I am so glad to be in the dirt again! So much has happened these past months and to be back in the garden to see what gifts it brings makes my heart so glad!! My favourite is the summer tomatoes!! Nothing tastes like a sun-ripened red garden tomato!! My salads are jumping for joy! I am harvesting the most delicious varieties of lettuce and to add to this, great summer sweet [...]
  • Garden revival

    Barbara
    18 Sep 2014 | 11:57 am
    You know that feeling when you go away on a holiday and come back to your home – it feels like you are a stranger! It takes awhile to become familiar again with your garden. That’s how I felt! I felt as if I had been away or hibernating – I had to spend at least a day just greeting everything that was actively growing or peeping out of the soil. So [...]
  • The Mouse and the Provita

    Barbara
    24 Jul 2014 | 1:43 pm
    I am having so much fun with this little mouse who lives under our outside deck! He is the smallest of the bunch (family of 5!!) and he has been appointed the official Provita Scout! That’s why I named him Scout! Today was so funny!! I thought, what would he do if I held onto the Provita………     This was day two……. Scout the mouse was at my finger!!
  • The Mouse Whisperer

    Barbara
    21 Jul 2014 | 9:06 am
    This is the cutest thing! I have a family of striped field mice living under our outside deck and every day I throw them a Provita cracker. Lately, they have been waiting for me. I always whistle and make a “Provita feeding time” sound, so I decided to try hand feeding today. The smallest mouse – I call him Scout because he is the one they send out to collect the food [...]
  • May Day Blooms

    Barbara
    17 Jun 2014 | 2:13 pm
    I have been so amazed with the weather we had in May and early June. We had sunny & warm days and wet & windy days as well as snow-on-top of Table Mountain days!!! And this can all happen in one week!! The garden takes a real knock, though! The big confusion happens when the peach tree is dropping its autumn leaves and then, ….out of no where a PINK BUD! A [...]
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Native Plants and Wildlife Gardens

  • Cuckoo Bees: Invading the Nest of a Bee Near You

    Heather Holm
    19 Dec 2014 | 6:13 am
    Cuckoo bees are named after the European cuckoo bird that lays its eggs in the nests of other birds. A North American example would be the brown-headed cowbird that lays its eggs in the nests of other birds. Other terms for this practice are brood parasitism or cleptoparasitism. Why would a female cuckoo bee go to all the […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • My Evolution as a Hunter

    Jennifer Baker
    16 Dec 2014 | 3:00 pm
    Marquette County, where I call home, boasts the third highest deer density in the state of Wisconsin. Last I checked, numbers are bumping 50 deer per square mile. Not surprising given the habitat. The mosaic of cropland interspersed with fragmented woodlots and wetlands, considered prime by the deer herd. So prime that the biological carrying […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Happy Holly-days, the Robins Return

    Loret T. Setters
    13 Dec 2014 | 8:34 am
    I awoke this morning to temperatures that were a little cold by Central Florida standards (low 40s F). As the sun came up I grabbed a cup of coffee and headed to the kitchen window to watch the bird activity of the morning. I was greeted by the return of American Robins (Turdus migratorius).  On […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • A Bestiary: Part Thirty-six ~ Songbirds: Indigo Bunting

    Carol Duke
    11 Dec 2014 | 5:06 am
    Winter’s muted colors and chill leave me longing for spring’s bright hues, and the motley blues are some of my favorites. Siberian Squill and Chionodoxa sprout to mind, though it is the animated avian blues I thirst for.  Our Indigo Bunting Passerina cyanea, residents fill the glass to overflowing. I am not certain if the same birds […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • How Prairie Saves Lives

    Benjamin Vogt
    9 Dec 2014 | 5:31 am
    It’s flyover country out here in Nebraska. Each spring millions of waterfowl come through on their way to breeding grounds in the Dakotas (some 90% of North American ducks breed there), Canada, and the arctic circle. 90 minutes west of here is a pretty famous migration that brings in big tourist bucks — some 500,000 […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Big Blog Of Gardening

  • Get Your Plants Ready For Another Tough Winter

    Todd Heft
    7 Dec 2014 | 12:37 pm
    Big Blog Of Gardening Curse you, Polar Vortex! The winter of 2013-2014 was a record for plant damage in my garden. Frost heave appeared nearly everywhere, plants that typically overwintered didn’t, rhododendrons got beat up, rabbits chewed above-the-snow stems … Continue reading → Get Your Plants Ready For Another Tough Winter
  • Ultimate Tree Care Guide for the Mid-Atlantic U.S. (Infographic)

    Todd Heft
    30 Nov 2014 | 6:55 pm
    Big Blog Of Gardening Before you start digging, check out our ultimate tree care guide on how to plant your tree and take care of it from seedling to maturity. Continue reading → Ultimate Tree Care Guide for the Mid-Atlantic U.S. (Infographic)
  • How To Build a Keyhole Garden

    Todd Heft
    27 Nov 2014 | 7:34 am
    Big Blog Of Gardening Living in an arid climate or an area plagued by drought can make traditional gardening nearly impossible. But with a sustainable gardening technique called keyhole gardening, used in areas as dry as sub-sahara Africa, growing … Continue reading → How To Build a Keyhole Garden
  • Garlic: How To Plant, Grow, and Harvest

    Todd Heft
    1 Nov 2014 | 10:17 am
    Big Blog Of Gardening If there is one plant-it-and-forget-it vegetable for your garden, it’s garlic. Garlic (Allium sativum) is easy to grow, has a high success rate, requires little maintenance, and is easy to harvest. Some gardeners I know … Continue reading → Garlic: How To Plant, Grow, and Harvest
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Nigel Gnome grows a vegetable

  • Black beans

    Nigel Gnome
    30 Nov 2014 | 11:06 pm
    A strange looking bunch, hard not to think of evil witch brews for young children. dwarf purple beansThey tasted OK, and we lived to tell the tale, a bit underwhelming though, other than the look.Sweet 100 tomatoes are starting to colour upSweet 100 tomatoesPlucked out some of the red onions and have left them out to dry the skins for a for a day or two, there are still quite a few smaller ones for later.Red onion harvest Pretty borage flowers, they seem to show pink and then go to bluepretty prickly borage
  • Tomato update

    Nigel Gnome
    26 Nov 2014 | 11:30 pm
    There have been some lovely summery feeling days, a couple at 27C even. The birch seeds have started falling, there are strongish winds. Have had to water the garden a bit, it's quite dry.The tomato plants are thriving and I have made a couple of new plants from strong laterals removed from the non grafted ones. The sweet 100 is going mad...sweet 100 going madThe roma tomato is starting to show some colourRoma tomatoes ripeningThe garlic, chillies, black beans and the toms have all had weekly Thrive flowering and fruiting soluble fertilizer applied to the root area. Black beans look…
  • November already! Guy Fawkes Night in fact!

    Nigel Gnome
    4 Nov 2014 | 9:19 pm
    It's been a while since we had fireworks but we do get to hear them and see the odd one flashing past. The best one ever was a few years ago when the local public display down at the river front went up in one big bang. We did wonder why the display was so brief at the time. :)http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10608007I have one more tomato now, a small shrubby one that hopefully will provide trusses of medium sized fruit. The plastic hothouse bags were off after a few days, tomato plants are wind pollinated so the flowers were not going to make babies. Growers…
  • Green for Go!

    Nigel Gnome
    13 Oct 2014 | 12:28 am
    Wonderful time of year and time of garden, the whole place is sprouting things.  A tub of mesclun lettuce sproutings, boysenberry growths, citrus trees all flowerings and sprouting forth. Plums fattening and there is already a tomato or two!Roma tomato babyFortune plum babies fattening upFrom under the plum treeNew/old cape cod chairPlanted 2 roma acid free grafted tomatoes and two different hot chilli plants. Went to the garden centre on Thursday to get first pick of the new delivery, rather than the last few stragglers on Sunday afternoon. There are a number of green houses now. Paving…
  • Asking for it!

    Nigel Gnome
    21 Sep 2014 | 11:01 pm
    Against all better judgement and advice I still insisted on buying a tomato plant, a drafted cherry. It looked great, had flowers on it and was raring to go. There was no more danger of frost or anything I said. Duly planted yesterday and looking happy. Today we have just had a small hail fall.However I had made it a light bag so the effect should not be too bad. This is made from the large plastic bags I have from my mat boards, any picture framer will have them. Four sticks and it's all good.Instant greenhouse with a mat board bagI cut a few slits in the bag to allow some airflow. I'll keep…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Flowerona

  • Florist Friday : Interview with Rosie Ansell of Rosie & Twine

    Rona
    18 Dec 2014 | 4:01 pm
    Last month, I had the pleasure of meeting Rosie Ansell of Rosie & Twine. And today I’m delighted to feature an interview with Rosie as part of my Florist Friday blog post series. Could you tell us what prompted you to set up Rosie & Twine? I grew up in the countryside as a gardener’s daughter, so flowers and plants were a big part my childhood. I grew to love flowers as a teenager and since then it has always been my dream to build my own floristry business. I wanted to build a flower delivery business that used predominantly seasonal British flowers and was simple, creative…
  • Book Review of Floral Contemporary by Olivier Dupon

    Rona
    17 Dec 2014 | 4:01 pm
    A perfect floristry book to put on your Christmas list or buy for a friend or relative who loves floral design is the new book by Olivier Dupon. Entitled ‘Floral Contemporary: The Renaissance of Flower Design’, it features the work of 38 very talented international florists. Together with a background piece on each florist, there are stunning images showcasing their designs. What makes the book so special is the wide array of different styles from around the world. UK contributors include Kally Ellis of McQueens who created the arrangement above, Lotte & Bloom, The…
  • Playing with flowers: A day in the life of a wedding florist

    Rona
    16 Dec 2014 | 4:01 pm
    You may remember last month that I featured an interview with Lindsey Kitchin of The White Horse Flower Company? Well, in this week’s Wedding Wednesday blog post, I’m delighted to share with you a special guest post written by Lindsey entitled ‘A day in the life of a wedding florist’.  It makes fascinating reading, especially for brides-to-be, florists-to-be and florists. Also included in the post are lots of beautiful images making up a visual diary and showing the process of Lindsey creating floral designs for a wedding. Over to you, Lindsey… “I’d love…
  • Introducing photographer, Cornelia Weber…

    Rona
    15 Dec 2014 | 4:01 pm
    Recently, I was contacted by German photographer and journalist Cornelia Weber. And today I’m delighted to feature an interview with Cornelia, together with a selection of her beautiful flower images. Could you tell us a little bit about how you became interested in photography?  As a child, I was fascinated by my parents’ developing equipment for black-and-white films. Times have changed and we’ve slipped into the digital age. But I’m still enchanted by the process of creating and developing a photo. I started as a journalist, producing reports and decoration…
  • Beautiful new Christmas collection of bouquets from McQueens

    Rona
    14 Dec 2014 | 4:01 pm
    I hope you had a lovely weekend. We went to stay with friends in a gorgeous thatched cottage in Buckinghamshire, ate delicious food and drank wonderful wine. Plus we managed to squeeze in a visit to Bicester Village and a lovely refreshing walk in the countryside! This week, I thought I’d start off by sharing with you a fabulous collection of Christmas bouquets by McQueens, starting with ‘Winter Wonderland’ above. It includes white roses, green Pon-Pon ranunculus, berried ivy, pine and frosted cones. I love this unusual Pon-Pon variety of ranunculus, with its layer upon…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Sprinkler Juice

  • Ice on the Lawn

    17 Dec 2014 | 6:49 am
    Winter officially arrives next week and the cold temperatures will settle in around most of the U.S. for a while. This impacts us in many ways, including our lawn. It’s no fun having ice on the lawn,... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Year-Round Lawn Tips

    10 Dec 2014 | 8:08 am
    No matter the time of year, there is always something you can do to make your lawn greener and healthier. We know things like watering are important. That’s why a quality lawn sprinkler system with a... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Hillside Watering

    2 Dec 2014 | 6:59 am
    If you have a garden on a hillside or sloped landscape, you know what a pretty setting this can be. However, the uneven setting can prove to be challenging when it comes time to water the garden. For... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • 24 Nov 2014 | 11:08 am

    24 Nov 2014 | 11:08 am
    We know how important it is to water your lawn. Yet, other parts of your yard also need the proper amount of watering. In this case, we are talking about watering your garden. Many people will... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • 18 Nov 2014 | 6:52 am

    18 Nov 2014 | 6:52 am
    When it comes to protecting plants in the winter, it’s hard to beat mulch as a natural protector. There are many types of mulch on the market. You can also make your own mulch. It’s important to... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Your Easy Garden

  • Pantone Marsala Grows Beautifully

    Anthony Tesselaar
    18 Dec 2014 | 1:25 pm
    Each year at a secret meeting, a single colour is chosen as Colour of the Year. Over two days, representatives from key colour standards groups are locked in debate. The decision they reach is a reflection of popular culture, so in a way, we’ve all helped pick the winner which in 2015 is… (drum roll)… Pantone 18-1438, aka Marsala. And I’m thrilled. It’s a colour that is rich, bold and somehow nurturing. It speaks of wine, delicious food, a glorious earthiness. It’s warm and welcoming and if you look around you’ll recognise moments where it’s already a part of our lives. Flip…
  • Fast Christmas Decorating

    Elizabeth DeFriest
    18 Dec 2014 | 1:04 pm
    It’s nearly Christmas everyone, and it’s happened again. Christmas has crept up on us: I’ve managed to loose a week somewhere between mid November and right now. And now is when I need to get the house feeling Christmassy because the Christmas drinks and catch-ups-before-Christmas are booked and happening. But I’ve still got a fair amount of other stuff to get done (like work), which is why this blog is Christmas-themed. Forgive me if it’s a bit left of field, but I had the bright idea to do two things at once. I’ve kept my camera by my side as I’ve raced around today…
  • Attracting Birds and Butterflies to the Garden

    judieyeg
    12 Dec 2014 | 1:36 pm
    Bees love Flower Carpet Amber! Attracting birds, butterflies and bees to your garden or landscape not only adds ambiance, but also helps our environment. Gardens that are filled with birds and butterflies (even at their munching-caterpillar stage) are filled with life! Birds play an important role in the garden, eating aphids and beetles; bees are important for pollination, and the list goes on and on. So, how to we attract nature’s beauties to our landscape? It’s simple if we follow these 3 steps: 1) Get rid of the pesticides and herbicides. Although they may be effective in…
  • Gifts from the Garden 2 – Lavender Eye Pillows

    Guest Bloggers
    9 Dec 2014 | 7:45 am
    Homemade Lavender Eye Pillow – a great gift from the garden! Learn how to create a beautiful, handmade, relaxing lavender eye pillow in 10 easy steps in Part 2 of our Gifts From the Garden series. Give it to someone who could use a bit more calm in her life and then make another one for yourself! The act of making gifts is rewarding, but this one is especially so.  What is better than a little aromatherapy during the hectic holiday season? It’s not just folklore! Although people have been using lavender to relax for forever, research shows that the smell of lavender produces a…
  • Flower Colour

    Anthony Tesselaar
    8 Dec 2014 | 2:43 pm
      People are like insects where it comes to flowers – it’s that basic. We look into the face of a flower and it speaks to us. So what if we don’t have proboscis to let us feast on the nectar? Just looking at a flower feeds us. So here’s a lovely, luscious, soul-enriching feast of flowers to enjoy…   This first pic (above) I took during a visit to a tulip trial field because the little people on the horizon reminded me of insects hovering over the flowers. Here (below) is more proof of the interconnectedness between flowers and other living things – on an orchid I…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Mini Garden Guru - Your Miniature Garden Source

  • 9 Fantastic Gift Ideas for Your Miniature Gardener

    Janit Calvo
    12 Dec 2014 | 11:50 am
    9 Fantastic Gift Ideas for Your Miniature Gardener Find the right gift for the miniature or fairy gardener at America’s favorite Miniature Garden Center! Last week we rolled out a few different kits that you can give with or without the plants. Today we’ve collected a few great ideas that can be put under the […]
  • Top 5 Miniature Garden Kits Make Gift-Giving Easy!

    Janit Calvo
    5 Dec 2014 | 1:51 pm
    Top 5 Miniature Garden Kits Make Gift-Giving Easy! Oh the weather outside is… um, who cares? We can still have some garden crafty fun with these wonderful indoor garden kits this season! Here’s what we have for YOU! Don’t you just love the thrill of a new kit? The expectation of spending time doing something […]
  • Hey Miniature Gardeners! Turn Black Friday Weekend Green

    Janit Calvo
    28 Nov 2014 | 1:04 pm
    Hey Miniature Gardeners! Turn Black Friday Weekend Green This Holiday. Filed under: The Business
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Sow and So

  • L is for Lichen – Word Up!

    Bridget Elahcene
    18 Dec 2014 | 10:40 pm
    Lichen \ˈlɪtʃ(ə)n\ A fungus and an alga growing symbiotically (to the mutual benefit of one another) to form a pale green crinkly crust on walls, pots, trees and similar. Lichen normally appears in wetter areas where air pollution is low, and on trees whose health is already poor (although it is worth noting that lichen is not thought to cause further damage).
  • The Difference a Year Makes – Wordless Wednesday

    Rogier Noort
    17 Dec 2014 | 1:16 am
  • Polytunnel in December

    Laila Noort
    15 Dec 2014 | 9:49 pm
    Outside it is -1°C, inside it is 10°C. Inside the polytunnel that is! On a beautiful winter’s day, with freshly fallen snow and lots of sunshine there is nothing better than to open up the polytunnel and do a bit of gardening. Chinese Cabbage This year I am not growing a whole lot during the winter months in the polytunnel. I have placed my pots inside, put on a nice layer of compost on some of the veg beds and have sown some green manure in others  giving the polytunnel a bit of a rest. Luckily our polytunnel is quite large so there is still enough space to grow some Chinese…
  • K is for Knosp – Word Up!

    Bridget Elahcene
    12 Dec 2014 | 1:51 am
    Knosp \nosp\ A flower bud before it has opened, from the German knopse meaning bud. Kniphofia (Red Hot Poker)
  • Winter Tree – Wordless Wednesday

    Bridget Elahcene
    9 Dec 2014 | 11:28 pm
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Hortiholic

  • A Year in the Life of a Fraser Fir

    Tony Fulmer
    25 Nov 2014 | 5:43 pm
    I was fortunate recently to have the opportunity to chat with a new friend, Fletcher, the Fraser fir. We talked long distance. He shared highlights of life on the Christmas tree farm before coming to Chalet. There's a lot happening down on the farm!Where I grew up in VirginiaWhere do you come from, Fletcher?Thanks for asking, Tony. My great-grandparents originally came from Mt. Rogers, the highest point in Virginia. I've kinda lost track, but I'm at least the 8th generation of Fraser fir coming from those cool mountains. I started out as a tiny seed from the cone of my parent tree. Did you…
  • The Garden Clock is Ticking....

    Tony Fulmer
    18 Oct 2014 | 11:50 am
    "The days dwindle down to a precious few" is so true for the October garden. As temperatures drop and you face the reality of rain becoming snow, the urgency to complete fall garden tasks becomes almost manic.You've probably already made the decision whether to cut your perennials now or let them stand as snowy winter sentinels. You've ripped the tired annuals out by their fuzzy little roots. What else could there possibly be to do? Want a few reminders?1) Don't let fall pass without planting bulbs. The soil temps are finally cool enough to put all the spring flowering beauties in. Who said,…
  • Conifers are the Cure

    Tony Fulmer
    30 Sep 2014 | 2:25 pm
    Does our Zone 5 plant palette ever seem limiting to you? Do you yearn for just one specimen plant that no one else in northern Illinois has? Do you ever look at your garden and think, "If I could just get a plant with year 'round interest for that spot I'd be so much happier with my garden?" I know I'm always thinking what would be hot in this or that spot. Do we need a support group for those of us looking for plants off the beaten path?If it existed I would suggest "Conifers are the Cure". For those that haven't been smitten or bitten yet, but want more landscape interest the world of…
  • "High" on 'Drangeas

    Tony Fulmer
    29 Aug 2014 | 9:21 pm
    Hydrangea macrophylla 'Endless Summer'If plant popularity is directly proportional to the number of new varieties debuting annually, Hydrangeas are HOT, HOT, HOT. Exciting new varieties are popping up like mushrooms after a summer rain.Why all the Hydrangea excitement?Something-for-everyone range of flower forms including mophead (softball), panicle (cone-shaped) and lacecap (flat-topped donut with a lacy, open center). Flowers not only last a long time, but many develop interesting seed heads for winter interest.Sun or partial shade tolerance. If you're putting them in sun in hot summer…
  • Garden Training for Excess Raining

    Tony Fulmer
    17 Jul 2014 | 10:42 am
    I thought I had a handle on just how wet the summer has been. My rain gauge (that measures 100ths of an inch, I'm proud to say) recorded 9.30" for June. I just spoke with a fellow horticulturist who was telling me that she was pruning and found gangs of slugs hiding in yew branches four feet off the ground. We've revealed a new definition of saturation point: So wet that even slugs seek higher ground!Short of dragging water-soaked containers under overhangs or setting up umbrellas over drought-tolerant perennials, there's only so much a person can do to stem the flood waters. Here are a…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Color Your World Greenhouse

  • How to start a container garden

    Paul Guzman
    18 Dec 2014 | 6:25 am
    Planning Your Container Garden  The first thing you need to decide when planning a container garden is whether you’d prefer to grow your plants indoors or outdoors.  A lot of people think container gardening is only for indoor growing and … Continue reading → The post How to start a container garden appeared first on Color Your World Greenhouse.
  • Getting your plants ready for winter

    Paul Guzman
    29 Oct 2014 | 6:16 am
     Here in the Southwestern part of the U.S. the summer and fall seasons are long.  As we know fall in this part of the country produces some of the best eye pleasing color for all to enjoy.  Getting your plants … Continue reading → The post Getting your plants ready for winter appeared first on Color Your World Greenhouse.
  • How to start seeds indoors

    Paul Guzman
    20 Oct 2014 | 9:18 am
    Article by: by By Diane Linsley Check out Diane’s outstanding website at: Dianeseeds.com- Diane’s Flower Seeds Heirloom flowers, rare perennials, daylilies and Starting Indoor Seeds This is a lot easier than it sounds. Even inexperienced gardeners can start seeds with … Continue reading → The post How to start seeds indoors appeared first on Color Your World Greenhouse.
  • Is fall a good to plant trees, shrubs and other plants

    Gary Guzman
    29 Sep 2014 | 3:02 pm
    Photo by danperry.com Is fall a good to plant trees, shrubs and other plants? Of course it is.  The recent rains in and around the southwest have made this an even more optimistic time to plant. The cooler nights, the windless days, the … Continue reading → The post Is fall a good to plant trees, shrubs and other plants appeared first on Color Your World Greenhouse.
  • Yuccas Agave and Bear Grass for Southwest Landscaping

    Gary Guzman
    24 Aug 2014 | 6:41 am
    Yuccas, Agave, and Bear Grass: Southwest Landscaping Here are a few drought tolerant plants that can be used just about anywhere the sun shines. They can be used as mass plantings, single specimen, and some in containers. First we start … Continue reading → The post Yuccas Agave and Bear Grass for Southwest Landscaping appeared first on Color Your World Greenhouse.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Chicken Waterer

  • Bantam Chickens Size & HIstory

    ChickenWaterer
    9 Dec 2014 | 6:19 am
    So What Exactly is a Bantam?Bantams, or "Bantys" as they are affectionately called, are small chickens that weigh between 1 and 2.5 lbs., or about 20-30% of the weight of a typical standard sized chicken.A Japanese Bantam chick (left) is about half the size of the standard Orpington chick (right)Bantam chickens come in two types:True Bantams - These are breeds that are naturally small chickens with counterpart that is standard sized. True bantams include breeds such as the Sebright and Silkie. Miniatures - These are chickens that have been made smaller by selective breeding and exist in…
  • Leghorn Chicken

    ChickenWaterer
    7 Dec 2014 | 3:59 pm
    When most people think "chicken" the image they see in their mind is most likely a White Leghorn. The fame of the Leghorn is justified. This breed is undoubtedly one of the most productive breeds. They are an excellent choice for owners looking for eggs from their backyard flocks.White LeghornThe American Poultry Association recognizes a number of varieties including: white, brown, black, red, Silver, golden and buff varieties but all have yellow skin and historically, they breed has been noted for their unusually yellow legs. They produce medium-to-large white eggs and are a good choice for…
  • Egg Shell Planters

    ChickenWaterer
    26 Oct 2014 | 7:58 am
    Here's a clever idea for using egg shells in your garden. Ours normally go into the compost bin anyway, so this is a way to get an additional use from them before they enrich the soil.A smart idea. I wish I had thought of it, but it comes from the folks at Listotic.com. For more gardening ideas, check out their post 20 Insanely Clever Garden Ideas. BriteTap chicken waterer. Clean water made simple! Visit us at ChickenWaterer.com.
  • Chicken Halloween Cartoon

    ChickenWaterer
    26 Oct 2014 | 7:32 am
    Happy Halloween from your friends at ChickenWaterer.com, makers of the BriteTap chicken waterer. BriteTap chicken waterer. Clean water made simple! Visit us at ChickenWaterer.com.
  • Salmonella Linked To Hatchery Chicks

    ChickenWaterer
    27 Sep 2014 | 8:02 am
    The Center for Disease Control is reporting 344 cases of Salmonella so far this year that can be traced to handling live chicks.  The illnesses are reported in 42 states with the highest concentration of reported cases in New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, North Carolina, and Virginia.The cases have been traced back to chicks purchased from Mt. Healthy Hatchery of Ohio. The same hatchery has experienced similar problems in 2012 and 2013.  Symptoms of Salmonella infection include the following:Most persons infected with Salmonella bacteria develop diarrhea, fever, and abdominal…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Foodie Gardener™

  • Foodie Gardener Community Garden Progress!

    Shirley Bovshow
    16 Dec 2014 | 9:42 am
    The fence for the Foodie Gardener Community Garden to benefit the “News From Heaven” outreach ministry is up! Next step is building the raised garden beds and planting the crops. Thank you to  American Soil in Simi Valley, California who will be providing our nutrient-dense soil!  
  • Grow Mint Indoors: Spearmint and Peppermint

    Shirley Bovshow
    10 Dec 2014 | 11:20 am
      Spearmint and peppermint are staples in a  foodie gardener’s herb garden and natural medicine cabinet. Tabouli, tzatziki, kebab, (can you tell I like Mediterranean food?) mojitos, peppermint hot chocolate, and other delectable food and drinks rely on mint for their signature taste! Peppermint tea can soothe a stomach ache like nothing else.   Fortunately, mint is easy to grow indoors, year-round, with proper care.   Take a look at the questions and answers below based on  my “Mint 101: Grow Spearmint and Peppermint Indoors”  segment  on the Home &…
  • Easy Hydroponic Planter: Grow Lettuce in Repurposed Coffee Container!

    Shirley Bovshow
    16 Oct 2014 | 2:08 am
    If you consider yourself more of a “foodie” and less of a “gardener” because you  don’t like the idea of getting your nails dirty, read on! You can grow lettuce, greens, and herbs year-round in a hydroponic planter made from a repurposed coffee container.   Before you start questioning how difficult it must be to make a hydroponic planter, stop! I want to share with you instructions for creating a specific, low-tech hydroponic planter that uses no electrical pumps or air stones to circulate the water. I’m referring to the Kratky Method of…
  • Recycled Wood Tree Box As Raised Vegetable Planter

    Shirley Bovshow
    12 Aug 2014 | 10:18 am
    Here’s a clever idea using recycled wood landscape tree boxes as raised vegetable planters. I was on a garden tour in Mar Vista California  when I stumbled across designer, Mary Lee Kuhlman’s practical idea.   Keep an eye open for landscaping projects in your neighborhood where tree boxes are found in abundance.   Some landscape companies will give them to you for free or at a nominal price if you ask. Chances are, the landscape company  has to haul the boxes back to the garden center for a small credit or to their office, where they are piling up.   Great For…
  • Grow Hot Peppers: Spiciness Rated by Scoville Heat Chart

    Shirley Bovshow
    7 Aug 2014 | 1:05 pm
    I’m growing peppers at the Home & Family show vegetable garden now that warm temperatures during the day and cooler nights are trending in Los Angeles. Peppers, both sweet and hot ones  can put up a fuss and drop fruit, or not set fruit at all, if the climate is not right. They are temperamental like that. If peppers weren’t so delicious, I wouldn’t put up with their fussiness!       I introduced co-hosts, Mark Steines and Cristine Ferrare  to the Scoville Pepper Heat Chart that rates  spiciness or “hotness” in peppers. As heads of the…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Urban Gardens

  • Getting Into the Sling of It

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    15 Dec 2014 | 4:30 pm
    Infinity by Trinity Hammocks I think it’s time for a nap. After gazing at the following gang of glorious hammocks, I’m already dreaming. I can’t resist the allure of lounging somewhere that envelops my shape and suspends me in midair. Imagine yourself relaxing in one of these … Read More...The post Getting Into the Sling of It appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Reclaimed Boat Sails Upcycled as Portable Planters

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    14 Dec 2014 | 1:40 pm
    In the hands of Parsons School of Design grads, Miriam Josi and Stella Lee Prowse, a local sail maker’s post-production sailcloth waste and scrap boat covers have been reborn as planters. Not just planters, but portable flat-folding, space-saving babes that can … Read More...The post Reclaimed Boat Sails Upcycled as Portable Planters appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Urban Gardens 2014 Holiday Gift Guide

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    3 Dec 2014 | 6:35 pm
    Drumroll! It’s that time of year and we’re excited to present our 2014 holiday gift guide, a curated list of 12 fun, functional, and fashionable items for home and garden. Have you been naughty or nice? No matter, we’re not judging. Go ahead, treat yourself … Read More...The post Urban Gardens 2014 Holiday Gift Guide appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Hydroponic Vertical Gardens and Heliostats Flourish on Sustainable Skyscraper

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    19 Nov 2014 | 6:01 am
    When iconic French architect Jean Nouvel and his botanist and landscape “artist” colleague and friend Patrick Blanc collaborate, you can expect a novel and cutting edge statement combining the best of their respective talents with the latest in green technologies, aka a work of … Read More...The post Hydroponic Vertical Gardens and Heliostats Flourish on Sustainable Skyscraper appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Back to Basics: Chic Multitasking Easy-to-Assemble Plant-Loving Furniture

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    4 Nov 2014 | 11:08 am
    Basics #1 Having recently downsized from a 3800 sq. foot house to a 680 sq. foot apartment, I am now the poster girl for small space living. As I optimize every square inch in my new place, double or even triple-duty designs are becoming … Read More...The post Back to Basics: Chic Multitasking Easy-to-Assemble Plant-Loving Furniture appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Epic Gardening

  • Distilled Water For Plants: What You Need To Know

    Kevin
    19 Dec 2014 | 12:14 pm
    The post Distilled Water For Plants: What You Need To Know is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog. Water is everywhere, so it all must be the same, right?Wrong.You might be using tap water for your garden and wondering if there's a better option, or already using some other type of water (distilled, reverse osmosis, etc).Regardless, as a gardener you can know a lot about plants, nutrients, and growth cycles and miss out on one […] The post Distilled Water For Plants: What You Need To Know…
  • Can You Use Tap Water For Hydroponics?

    Kevin
    18 Dec 2014 | 12:20 am
    The post Can You Use Tap Water For Hydroponics? is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog. One of the most common questions that I get from beginner hydroponic gardeners is:Can you use tap water for hydroponics?​It's a good question!  When you're just starting out, you want to get up and running quickly.  Your other options for water are all more complex than just using water straight out of the tap: Distilled […] The post Can You Use Tap Water For Hydroponics? is by Kevin and appeared first…
  • 8 Awesome Vertical Gardening Ideas For Your Garden

    Kevin
    13 Dec 2014 | 12:55 am
    The post 8 Awesome Vertical Gardening Ideas For Your Garden is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog. 8 Awesome Vertical Gardening Ideas | Stretch Your Green Thumb Creativity!Let's be honest...Some of these gardens you'll see below are a little...crazy.  But crazy is good, because it helps us stretch our creative muscles and inspire us to get back out into the dirt and create something.  Whether you have a ton of space or […] The post 8 Awesome Vertical Gardening Ideas For Your Garden is…
  • The Best Gifts for Gardeners

    Kevin
    4 Dec 2014 | 5:23 pm
    The post The Best Gifts for Gardeners is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog. It's always so hard to find the best gifts for the people that we love, and being gardeners we usually get flack for being "hard to buy for."  I know that in my own life, I simply don't WANT that much STUFF...but I'm always open to getting a gift that will help me learn, produce, […] The post The Best Gifts for Gardeners is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening,…
  • Which Plastics Are Safe For Gardening?

    Kevin
    3 Dec 2014 | 11:20 am
    The post Which Plastics Are Safe For Gardening? is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog. ​ One of the more common questions I'm asked on the blog is about plastic use, specifically, "What plastics are safe for use in the garden?"  Since a lot of Epic Gardening readers are into hydroponics and aquaponics over soil gardening, there are a lot of people with a lot of plastic in their setup […] The post Which Plastics Are Safe For Gardening? is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden

  • Can You Buy Happiness?

    Jonah Holland
    18 Dec 2014 | 9:05 am
    by Jonah Holland, PR & Marketing Coordinator, Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Can you buy happiness? That’s a great question. And timely too. It’s easy to get caught up in the holidays. Each year I tell my kids we’ll have a small Christmas and that we’ll save money for things that really matter — like a trip to California or Canada, or even trombone lessons.  Inside I know that you can’t REALLY buy happiness with stuff, yet each year I get caught up in the consumer culture that is America today. I see my buying habits creep out of control as we get…
  • Conservatory Tree Takes a Stroll Down Memory Lane

    Jonah Holland
    16 Dec 2014 | 9:45 am
    The North Wing Conservatory Tree, photo by Don Williamson The Conservatory Tree in the North Wing is one of our most elaborate holiday trees ever at Dominion GardenFest of Lights. This year, in an effort to commemorate the Garden’s 30th Anniversary and reflect on our rich history the Conservatory Tree is filled with symbolic ornaments and icons that take visitors on a tour through the Garden’s past. Who Was Lewis Ginter? Lewis Ginter was one of the foremost citizens of late 19th-century Richmond, his adopted home. The ornaments on this year’s North Wing tree symbolize various…
  • Volunteers Make GardenFest Magic Happen

    Jonah Holland
    14 Dec 2014 | 3:04 am
    Volunteer Jim Schiele “conducting” the trains & creating holiday magic for the thousands of kids who visit Dominion GardenFest of Lights. by Jonah Holland, PR & Marketing Coordinator, Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden If you’ve been to Dominion GardenFest of Lights before,  you will recognize some of our volunteers who come back, year after year, donating their time to a place that is near to their hearts, Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden. Did you know that we have over 200 volunteers who help prepare for GardenFest and they end up working nearly 4,000 hours throughout the…
  • Enter our GardenFest Instagram Contest to Win a $600 Prize Package

    Jonah Holland
    13 Dec 2014 | 3:06 am
    by Jonah Holland, PR & Marketing Coordinator, Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Photo by Don Williamson Have you entered our  ‪#‎GardenFest‬ Instagram contest?  Just visit Dominion GardenFest of Lights and share with us your favorite photos on Instagram — tagging them with the #GardenFest hashtag! We’ll choose a winner based on creativity, fun and photographic composition.  You could win a prize package valued at over $600 including a membership to Science Museum of Virginia, tickets to Richmond Ballet’s Don Quixote, tickets to see the Richmond Symphony, plus…
  • Time Lapse of Holiday Tree Bike Sculpture at Dominion GardenFest of Lights

    Jonah Holland
    12 Dec 2014 | 3:15 am
    by Jonah Holland, PR & Marketing Coordinator, Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden A few weeks ago we told you about local Richmond artist John Meola crafting a 20-foot  holiday tree out of recycled bikes and bike parts. Now, see how it was made in this Richmond Time Lapse video.  The sculpture will be on display during Dominion GardenFest of Lights! (through January 12, 2015). Enjoy!
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Diligent Gardener

  • Creative Places To Set Up An Allotment

    Gaz
    3 Dec 2014 | 6:09 am
    Securing and setting up an allotment can be a challenge, but there are innovative options for the creative and driven…Despite the legal obligations of authorities to provide allotments, and even new affordable options for securing allotment insurance, the dream of flexing green thumbs and embracing sustainability doesn’t always play out as smoothly or quickly as imagined.Aspiring gardeners in central London can certainly find allotment waiting lists long, even after property is designated. Between travel costs, commuting times, and finding a loo in semi-rural allotment locations more and…
  • 5 Tips on How to Make Your Sun Room the Best Room

    Gaz
    28 Nov 2014 | 5:00 am
    The sun room is the ideal room for daytime relaxation; an unspoiled view of your beautiful garden, great natural lighting, and natural warmth only serve to soothe the mind and body. But what can be done to really make the most of a wonderful space such as a sun room? Here are some great tips for cultivating the most comfortable and clear space in your home.FloraBring some of your beautiful garden into your sunroom, metaphorically break that barrier between you and the outside world! A few select potted plants and small trees, strategically placed in corners of your sun room towards your…
  • Hanging Basket Challenge

    Gaz
    16 Nov 2014 | 12:18 pm
    We have been challenged by Plant Me Now to create a hanging basket design for next year. Our normal approach to creating our baskets on the patio is to cram various bedding plants in left over from doing the pots without too much thought. So actually planning the basket has been a fun and different approach.Our central plant in our basket design is Fuchsia Snowcap an upright variety that produces masses of semi-double red and white flowers all summer long.This Fuchsia has an RHS award for garden merit and its easy to see why, with fantastic vivid flowers. In Fuchsia circles its a famous…
  • Things to Grow in the November Allotment

    Gaz
    13 Nov 2014 | 1:31 am
    Although the weather is still reasonably mild, and lots of trees are still hanging on to their leaves, there are plenty of signs that winter is on its way now. The days are getting shorter and after the clock went back last weekend its dark in the evening too. Frosts will soon be a regular visitor... so it is easy to relax and imagine that there is little to grow at this time of year. Think again! There's actually lots of preparation and plants to get started in November. So what vegetables can be grown in November in the UK? GarlicOf course it is possible to start your garlic in the the…
  • 3 Chances to Win our TD368 Plastic Garden Cupboard worth £59.88 each!

    Gaz
    11 Nov 2014 | 10:50 am
    In spring 2014 Filplastic introduced a range of plastic shelving & cupboards, perfect for outdoor use. We’re giving away 3 of our most popular plastic cupboards, the TD368.  The model has 4 adjustable shelves, and a compartment to store brushes or garden tools. It is lockable with a padlock (not supplied) and made from 100% recycled material. To see more about this model, plus the full range please visit http://www.filplastic.co.uk/collections/shelving/plastic-shelving-and-cupboardsThe cupboard retails at £39.95, plus delivery and VAT making a total of £59.88 per unit. We…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Grow Up Hydrogarden

  • 4 Things You Need to Know Before Setting Up Your Hydrogarden

    Erika Raia
    17 Dec 2014 | 1:00 am
    Setting up your hydrogarden is easy to do, in just minutes, if you follow the steps outlined in the user manual provided in your Kit or Unit. Preparation is the key to a speedy and accurate setup. Here are 4 things you need to know before setting up your unit: 1. Take Inventory. Lay out your user manual and all of the hydrogarden parts provided so thatRead More
  • How Hydroponic Gardening Works

    Erika Raia
    11 Dec 2014 | 12:39 pm
    Hydroponic comes from the Greek words hydro, meaning water, and ponos, meaning labor. For thousands of years, people have used hydroponics because of the higher yields and benefits it offers over traditional gardening. A hydrogarden is a garden that is grown using hydroponic gardening methods and its benefits are plentiful to the environment and to your health. The hydroponic gardening method was first mentioned in 1627 in a bookRead More
  • Primary Lesson Plan: Flower Freeway

    Erika Raia
    2 Dec 2014 | 11:30 pm
    Your Grow Up Hydrogarden is an example of hydroculture, growing plants without soil and using water to deliver nutrients to plants.  The word hydroculture is a combination of the Greek word “Hydro” which means “water” and “Culture” which means “to grow”.  And, “water growing” is exactly what you will be doing in this lesson titled, “Flower Freeway”. The Flower Freeway lesson plan was designed for grades K- 2Read More
  • 8 Ways An Office Garden Boasts Productivity

    Erika Raia
    26 Nov 2014 | 1:00 am
    Growing vegetables, herbs and flowers in an office garden is fun and is an excellent way to create a positive, cohesive environment for your employees. 8 Ways An Office Garden Boasts Productivity: 1.  Flowers have a calming influence and reduces stress and anxiety. 2.  Caring for plants decreases depression and improves positive outlook. 3.  Working on group activities stimulates creativity and energy. 4.  Being aRead More
  • 10 Eco-Friendly Ways to Celebrate the Holiday

    Erika Raia
    19 Nov 2014 | 1:00 am
    The greatest joy each holiday season is the gift of giving and what better gift than one that helps others and does not negatively impact the environment. With a little imagination, you can reduce your carbon footprint and give a sustainable holiday gift that your family member or friend will enjoy for years to come. 10 things you can do this holiday to be eco-friendly: 1. Oh Tree!Read More
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    No Soil Solutions

  • Using Rockwool For Seed Germination

    admin
    7 Dec 2014 | 10:44 pm
    Rockwool is a popular starter medium that has been used a long time with hydroponics. Smaller rockwool cubes are used for cuttings or seed germination and then transplanted into hydroponic systems. Larger cubes or slabs can be used to grow larger plants. It works well as a grow medium because it’s great at both maintaining The post Using Rockwool For Seed Germination appeared first on No Soil Solutions.
  • Nutrient Lockout

    admin
    22 Nov 2014 | 8:43 pm
    If you notice your hydroponic plants becoming stunted or showing odd colors resembling nutrient deficiency your plants may be experiencing nutrient lockout. It’s easier to diagnose nutrient lockout with hydroponic gardens because nutrients are measured to the exact amount (or should be) to supply the plants with enough nutrients. Nutrient lock out is exactly what The post Nutrient Lockout appeared first on No Soil Solutions.
  • How to Adjust The pH Of Hydroponic Nutrient Solution

    admin
    14 Nov 2014 | 9:13 pm
    Proper pH levels are important with hydroculture gardening. Most hydroponic nutrients have a pH buffer that helps keep the pH level of your solution at its proper levels, but a spike or dip a spike or dip in your pH levels. When this happens, it’s important to adjust the pH levels back to the proper The post How to Adjust The pH Of Hydroponic Nutrient Solution appeared first on No Soil Solutions.
  • 3 Ways To Measure pH Of Nutrient Solution

    admin
    5 Nov 2014 | 5:28 pm
    When using hydroponics to grow your garden it is very important to measure the pH level  of your nutrient solution and keep it at the proper level. Without the proper pH levels your plants will not be able to take in all the nutrients it needs from the nutrient solution. When you measure the pH level The post 3 Ways To Measure pH Of Nutrient Solution appeared first on No Soil Solutions.
  • 3 Methods Of Hand Pollination

    admin
    30 Oct 2014 | 11:04 am
    Growing your hydroponic vegetable garden inside can have its many perks. One of my favorite is not have to zig zag run away from my gardening every 5 minutes from bees during flowering. In fact the first year I set up my back porch hydroponic garden I kept wondering why there were so many bees The post 3 Methods Of Hand Pollination appeared first on No Soil Solutions.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    O'Connors Lawn Equipment

  • CYBER MONDAY

    Bridgett Davis
    30 Nov 2014 | 9:58 pm
    Cyber Monday Specials!      Toro 50″ TimeCutter Zero Turn                                                 Regular Price $3199.99   CYBER MONDAY SALE      NOW JUST $2679.99                                       DETAILS      ECHO CS590 W/ 20″ Bar and Free Case REGULAR PRICE $467.99   CYBER MONDAY SALE     NOW JUST $399.99     TODAY ONLY FREE CASE FREE SHIPPING                                        DETAILS   ECHO BEARCAT CHIPPER/SHREDDER  PURCHASE AN ECHO BEARCAT Chipper/Shredder* AND GET…
  • Black Friday Deals!

    Bridgett Davis
    25 Nov 2014 | 8:26 am
    You’ve got the Christmas list and O’Connor’s has the deals for you. Let the experts here at O’Connor’s help you find the perfect gift. 50″ TORO ZERO TURN TIMECUTTER  REGULAR PRICE  $3199.99    BLACK FRIDAY SALE PRICE JUST $2699.99   DETAILS           ECHO BEARCAT CHIPPER SHREDDER BUY A ECHO BEARCAT CHIPPER SHREDDER AND GET A FREE ECHO CHAINSAW A $199 VALUE           SHINDAIWA BACKPACK BLOWER REGULAR PRICE $349.99 BLACK FRIDAY SALE PRICE JUST $299.99 The post Black Friday Deals! appeared first on…
  • Is Your Lawn Mower Right for Your Yard?

    Mick Ross
    26 Jun 2014 | 8:27 am
    You’re under attack: although the sun may have bleached the color away, the stalks of grass in your lawn are still growing particularly high. You could enlist a neighbor kid itching to make a few bucks, or even let the grass get a little out of hand; but why not just do it yourself? Slaving away under the hot summer sun to mow your lawn may sound like the very definition of torture, but what if you lawn mower isn’t working as hard as it could? You read that right: there’s a chance your lawn mower is taking the easy way out, relaxing while you’re sweating and aching. Before you get…
  • Summer Tips for Water Conservation

    Mick Ross
    19 Jun 2014 | 12:20 pm
    With the summer in full-swing, maintaining a healthy lawn becomes a more laborious task than during any other season. Along with the usual responsibilities of mowing, edging and trimming, providing your lawn with proper nourishment becomes most important during the hot and dry summer months. Because of the increased consumption of water that occurs during the summer, several cities and even states have mandated watering restrictions to help conserve water. With these restrictions, water conservation becomes a serious issue that can potentially lead to an unhealthy lawn. But rest assured, it…
  • 2014 Toro Days is Here!

    Mick Ross
    8 May 2014 | 8:36 am
    Don’t miss one of O’Connor’s biggest annual events May 8 – 21 when we celebrate Toro Days 2014. For 2014’s event, O’Connor’s and Toro have partnered to bring customers the biggest and best Toro Days promotion ever!  The limited-time promotional event gives O’Connor’s customers the opportunity to save hundreds of dollars on select Toro lawn and garden equipment, including: Up to $300 off Toro TimeCutter riding mowers $50 off all Toro TimeMaster walk mowers Up to $45 off Toro Recycler Walk and E-cycler walk mowers $10 off select Toro portable power products Toro Days savings…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Your Hub of Garden Creativity | Garden Buildings Direct Blog

  • How To Discover More About Flowers

    Emily Chapman
    18 Dec 2014 | 5:43 am
    Why? Flowers reproduce in a very special way, and by taking a flower to pieces and explaining the different parts and their purpose you will give your children a head start in understanding the life cycle of plants. How long will this take me? As long as you want it to, but probably around 30-40 minutes. What will I need? – A plain piece of card (a postcard would be perfect) – A pencil and some colour crayons – Double-sided tape – Tweezers – A flower! How do I do it? Using the colouring crayons, ask your children to write the name and a picture of the flower that…
  • Invite Birds Into Your Garden With Delicious Homemade Food!

    Emily Chapman
    18 Dec 2014 | 4:06 am
    Why? By providing a delicious food source for birds, you will encourage them to visit your garden regularly – particularly during winter when their access to food is limited. It will help develop awareness of the effects seasonal changes have on other species and they will quickly come to recognise different types of bird. How long will this take me? Less than half an hour to make, then time for the bird food mixture to cool and set. What will I need? – Shredded suet (from a supermarket) – Wild bird seed mix (from pet shop or garden centre) – buy the suet and bird seed mix in…
  • How To Turn Food Into Plants!

    Emily Chapman
    18 Dec 2014 | 2:38 am
      Why? This activity will help your children understand where food comes from, and which foods can be grown in the garden. How long will this take me? Less than half an hour to set up, and then sprouting time will vary between different plants. What will I need? – Saucers or shallow plastic trays – Damp kitchen roll – Packets of dried food (from kitchen cupboards) – Vegetables (from the fridge) How do I do it? Take the saucers or plastic trays, and ask your children to place two layers of damp (not soaking) kitchen roll on the surface of them. Then allow them to…
  • Become a Seed Collector!

    Emily Chapman
    18 Dec 2014 | 2:25 am
    Why? By collecting seeds from plants and re-sowing them the next year, your children will gain an understanding of the basic lifecycle of plants. They will also have an insight into seed dispersal and learn how plants appear in different places. How long will this take me? Initially this should take around an hour, then make time every few weeks to add to your seed collection. What will I need? Small envelopes to collect the seeds (recycle old ones!) You will need a different envelope for each different type of seed Pieces of paper (recycle old letters etc., these only need to be blank on one…
  • How To Make Your Own Compost

    Emily Chapman
    18 Dec 2014 | 2:02 am
    Why? Introduce your little ones to the natural cycle of growth and decay – this will follow them through school so the sooner they learn about this the better! This will also encourage them to become recyclers, and help reduce unnecessary waste in landfill sites. How long will it take? Compost can be made all year round, and takes about 6 months to be produced from when you start. What will I need? – A compost bin with a lid – Old plant waste – Kitchen waste (raw, and no meat) – Soil – Old pet bedding (if available!) How do I do it? Help your child set up the…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    A Garden for All

  • Saving Amaryllis

    Kathy
    16 Dec 2014 | 1:00 am
    Amaryllis at Victoria’s (photo credit: Kathy Diemer) As the holiday season rolls in, so too do our showy bulbed friends, the amaryllis. Now available in a range of colors, sizes and forms, this striking flower has become the commonplace go-to plant for festive decorating themes.  Rightly so, as amaryllis creates an absolutely fabulous centerpiece. Yet, every year I purchase at least one, enjoy it ’til the last petal falls from the last stem, and then, what to do?  Usually, I stick them in the garage and compost them the following spring.  But, there is an alternative . . .
  • Winterberry Wishes

    Kathy
    9 Dec 2014 | 1:00 am
    Winterberry in local wetland (photo by: Kathy Diemer) Across the New England countryside, winterberry (Ilex verticillata) is taunting me with branches laden with jolly red berries.  Native shrubs sprinkled throughout nearby wetlands are loaded to capacity with plump, ruby pearls illuminating the otherwise dormant grasslands.  Abandoned properties and vacant lots are rampant with gorgeous specimens, their limbs bending from the weight of dazzling fruit.  Alas, they do this every year to mock me, for try as I may, I could not get a winterberry to produce a single fruit.  Not a one. That…
  • The Truth About Poinsettias

    Kathy
    2 Dec 2014 | 1:00 am
    A Kaleidoscope of vibrant Poinsettias (photo by: Kathy Diemer) Love ‘em or hate ‘em, Poinsettias are here to stay. And fortunately, they’ve come a long way (baby) toward sustaining their status as the most popular holiday plant in North America. Whether you pronounce it “Poin-set-ta” or “Poin-set-e-ah” (either way is acceptable-there’s no right or wrong here-like Pee-can or Pee-con), the plant was named after botanist Joel Poinsett, who discovered the crimson flowered shrub in 1828 while serving as U.S. ambassador to Mexico. Understanding the…
  • Seed Heads

    Kathy
    25 Nov 2014 | 1:00 am
    Rudbeckia Goldsturm Seed heads (photo credit: Kathy Diemer) For textural entertainment in the late fall garden, an orchestra of burnished seed heads creates a melodious collaboration not to be missed. It’s harmony in motion as each chocolate orb sways two and fro in the breeze, mimicking tiny dancers in a Broadway show. These erect sentries stand proudly over areas where other perennials have softly wilted into the landscape, offering their nutritious seeds to any feathered friends that stop by.  Both beneficial and beautiful, what’s not to love? Even the bees love Rudbeckia…
  • For the Birds

    Kathy
    18 Nov 2014 | 1:00 am
    Cedar Waxwing enjoying winterberry and juniper berries (photo by: Kathy Diemer) No matter the animal, I love to feed them. Just look at my chubby horses, plump kitties and rubenesque dogs. And there’s no exception when it comes to my avian friends, either.  Although there are mixed messages about feeding during the summer months, I never miss a day year-round. But along with seeds, our native birds also need protein and fat to thrive. By planting berry producing trees and shrubs, we can provide additional sustenance for our feathered friends through the long winter months. I consulted…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Modern Homesteader

  • How to check your farm fresh eggs

    Modern Homesteader
    30 Nov 2014 | 10:30 am
    Hey folks, back off of my mini vacation! I hope you all enjoyed your Thanksgiving! I wanted to drop a quick video for you all on an easy way to check to see if you farm fresh eggs are still good. Check it out.
  • Homesteaders Hop #4

    Modern Homesteader
    21 Nov 2014 | 6:00 am
      Come on over to the Homestead, choose your rocking chair…a glass of tea and sit a spell! This is a Blog Hop Y’all and there are plenty of posts to keep your attention…entertain you, educate you or make you smile…all day long. Stay as long as you like; and vote for your favorite! If […]
  • Homesteaders Hop #3

    Modern Homesteader
    14 Nov 2014 | 6:00 am
      Come on over to the Homestead, choose your rocking chair…a glass of tea and sit a spell! This is a Blog Hop Y’all and there are plenty of posts to keep your attention…entertain you, educate you or make you smile…all day long. Stay as long as you like; and vote for your favorite! If […]
  • From the Homestead: November Update

    Modern Homesteader
    10 Nov 2014 | 6:00 am
    Well it has been a bit since I have updated you on my homestead, things are beginning to slow down now that winter is upon us. So let’s get to it shall we? Chicken Coop: Since I recently moved an unused shed from over on the orchard that was left by the previous homeowners, I […]
  • My Personal Challenge

    Modern Homesteader
    7 Nov 2014 | 10:00 am
    Since July 2014, I have had a personal challenge issued to myself… Let me first give you a little back story to fill you in. History: Growing up I was a average child and I had more than my fair share of ear infections, sinus infections, colds and flus but I was a happy child until […]
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    DIY Backyard Gardening

  • What’s New: Gardening Infographics

    Chellet
    12 Dec 2014 | 7:17 am
    We have a new main menu (with sub-pages) on the DIY Backyard Gardening blog that’s dedicated to curated gardening infographics. Like other types of infographics, these were created by their original owners to provide informative illustrations on specific topics. My aim is to provide additional information that’s easier to read (especially for those who are busy and do not have the luxury of reading long posts) and share with your fellow gardener-friends. This menu is  a work in progress as I will continue to search and share gardening infographics that will best fit our goals as…
  • Updating This Backyard Gardening Blog

    Chellet
    29 Nov 2014 | 8:55 am
    Dear readers of DIY Backyard Gardening Adventures. My sincerest apologies if you’ll find the blog a little different, but quite familiar in terms of the theme. I’ve used this theme before, but opted to use another one due to cleaner look and feel. However, this DIY backyard gardening blog has a static header page menu which is not ideal for the amount of sub-pages available – making reader’s navigation experience not too pleasant. That’s why we are going to use the prior theme for this reason. Thank you for your understanding. The post Updating This Backyard…
  • Practical Gardening Tips

    Chellet
    25 Nov 2014 | 6:05 am
    Here’s a presentation I’ve created on SlideShare on practical gardening tips. These are quite basic and easy to understand especially for beginner gardeners. Practical Gardening Tips via SlideShare I hope you’ll find it useful and helpful for your front and/or backyard garden. Update: Guys, please click on the image to head over to SlideShare. Embedding the slide presentation here slows down the upload time of the site. Thank you! The post Practical Gardening Tips appeared first on DIY Backyard Gardening.
  • Backyard Gardening Project: How to Make a DIY Bird Feeder

    Chellet
    27 Oct 2014 | 9:22 am
    I’ve created a how-to guide on making a bird feeder a week ago and I hope you’ve tried it at home, too. It’s really easy and cheap. And you’ll be feeding wild birds (and even sneaky mice if you’re from the Philippines) in no time. Here’s what mine looks like: DIY bird feeder for our backyard garden visitors Not pretty, I know. But it’s functional and costs nothing. Just a few minutes and a little creativity. Try it and tell us when you’re done. Enjoy!     The post Backyard Gardening Project: How to Make a DIY Bird Feeder appeared first…
  • The October 2014 UPLB Garden Show – Part 1

    Chellet
    20 Oct 2014 | 1:49 pm
    It’s been two weeks since me and my sis went to second leg of the bi-annual LBHS / UPLB Garden Show. Went to the college town of Los Banos, Laguna on the 10th and met with my sister within the campus, at the show’s venue. However, it was too darn late to take good pictures, so we went back the following morning which was just the second day of the show. bromeliads, ferns, aglaonemas, colocasias. and a cute kid It’s kind of disappointing to find very minimal exhibits that revolve around this moth’s theme: Fruit-bearing trees.  I’m not sure if there were more…
Log in