Gardening

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  • Test Old Vegetable Seeds Before Buying New

    Vegetable Gardener - All featured posts
    19 Jan 2015 | 9:24 am
    Posted by WesternGardener If you want to save money on your vegetable garden this year, it pays to test your leftover vegetables seeds before investing in packets of new seeds. Use this simple germination test to find out how many new seeds you really need to buy.
  • Some color in the winter garden...

    Sharing Nature's Garden
    Diana
    17 Jan 2015 | 6:33 pm
    The sun came out today and I took a tour around my garden, basking in the warmth.  As I passed each plant, mental notes began to form. Cut this one back in a month...this one fared really well in the last freeze...oh no, I should have covered that one...and, best of all...hey -- this one is blooming!Against the backdrop of grey and brown, several bright spots dotted the landscape. If you were a bird, wouldn't you love spending the winter here? Although the roses have turned to hips, the tips of the branches remain alive with budding color. Apparently, the cold weather…
  • You Probably Had No Clue How These Everyday Foods Grow

    Growing Veggies
    Annette
    24 Jan 2015 | 6:48 am
    Peanuts, vanilla, black pepper – these foods are by no means exotic, and you probably use them regularly in the kitchen. But, can you envisage a peanut flower, a vanilla orchid or a peppercorn vine? Keep reading to learn the extraordinary beginnings of these ordinary foods. Peanuts Image credit: Jojonicdao There are several misconceptions about the peanut. Some are unaware that the peanut is a legume, and others believe peanuts grow in trees (like walnuts), or as a part of the plants root (like potatoes). The peanut is a unique plant as it flowers above ground and fruits below ground.
  • Why the Lotus Flower is So Important

    The Pond Blog
    Bill Dubert
    23 Jan 2015 | 9:23 pm
    “Padma” is the Sanskrit word for the Lotus plant, which is also called the Sacred Lotus or Indian Lotus. The Lotus Temple in Delhi is the Mother Temple of the Bahá’í faith in India and draws as many as 150,000 visitors in a day. Image copyright Jeremy Vandel. The lotus flower, Nelumbo nucifera, occupies a huge space in the minds of many pond owners and designers. Deciding whether or not to include a lotus among a pond’s flowers can be a big decision when choosing pond plants and even layouts. Many water gardeners consider their lotus flowers the pride of their pond,…
  • New Year, New You, New Greens

    Grow Up Hydrogarden
    Amanda Kuhn
    21 Jan 2015 | 1:00 am
    With a couple weeks into the New Year, it’s important to re-evaluate your goals and decide what it is that you want to achieve in 2015. Ringing in the New Year, the coined term “New Year, New You” becomes your inspiration to make the changes you wish to make in the New Year. Setting goals each year not only makes you feel like a betterRead More
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    You Grow Girl

  • NEW: Intro to Embroidery Workshop (Toronto)

    Gayla Trail
    19 Jan 2015 | 7:06 pm
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  • Seed Sowing and Planting Chart

    Gayla Trail
    19 Jan 2015 | 8:14 am
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  • Beginner Garden Help Here

    Gayla Trail
    12 Jan 2015 | 2:52 pm
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  • My Year in Gardening: 2014

    Gayla Trail
    6 Jan 2015 | 9:36 am
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  • Heirloom Vegetable Embroidery Pattern Bundle Sale

    Gayla Trail
    15 Dec 2014 | 11:01 am
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    Shawna Coronado

  • Best Crockpot Chicken Recipe

    Shawna Coronado
    26 Jan 2015 | 8:09 am
    I heard rumors that cooking an entire chicken slow cooker style was easy-to-do and might keep the chicken moist. When I finally tasted Michael Nolan’s Slow Cooker Chicken, I thought I had died and gone to heaven. This crockpot chicken recipe is INSANE it’s so good. Totally moist and it absorbs the flavors of whatever herbs you throw in the crockpot. Most importantly, the broth produced by this chicken is the best I have ever had and really rich (look at how much broth one chicken produced with no liquid added to the crockpot in the photo above). I prefer whole stems of rosemary…
  • Baptisia Australis – False Indigo is a Garden Rattlesnake

    Shawna
    19 Jan 2015 | 3:30 am
    Special note — I originally published this back in 2009, but it’s been so popular, I’ve decided to bring the post back. I love Baptisia and hope you do too – such a wonderful native plant that has gorgeous flowers for several weeks in spring! Week after week I have watched the red in the thermometer plummet. As it gets colder, most of us hurry in and out of our homes as quickly as possible. Dressed up in layers, it is not always opportune to catch visions of nature. Quite frankly, in Chicagoland sub-zero weather, I am too busy running and thinking of my freezing body…
  • Gluten-Free Vegan Recipe – French Onion Soup

    Shawna Coronado
    12 Jan 2015 | 4:12 am
    My goal — to make a lactose, gluten-free, and vegan recipe french onion soup good enough that my husbands poker playing buddies would not be able to tell the difference from traditional french onion soup. How to do this? Easy, just fix the vegan soup – don’t tell them a thing – and put it in front of them to gauge their reactions to the recipe. And guess what? THEY LOVED IT! This soup recipe is better than most traditional recipes I have tried in the past and it is easy to make. Of course, the bonus is that it is totally vegan, lactose, and gluten-free on top of all…
  • Healthy Snacks For Kids Lemon Hommus Face Recipe

    Shawna Coronado
    5 Jan 2015 | 4:19 am
    January. It’s cold, gray, and boring. The kids are demanding something exciting and I have a delicious after-school snack they will love to make – Lemon Hommus Faces. Healthy snacks are challenging – we want our kids to have good-for-them-deliciousness and actually EAT IT. This is a perfect use for winter carrots if you still have a few in the ground. Some kids love hommus and other kids hate it – this zesty lemon flavored hommus makes it taste delicious and over the top plus it’s filled with protein. Capers add to the flavor, but if you’re concerned your…
  • Mugo Pine (Pinus mugo) for Winter Garden Interest

    Shawna Coronado
    29 Dec 2014 | 4:02 am
    Need a break from all that holiday insanity? How about a glimpse of what you could plant next season for absolutely adorable winter garden interest – a Mugo Pine. While there are many varieties of the pine, the most quant in your winter garden landscape are definitely the little dwarf varieties that can be quite small. Most mugo’s have a rounded shape, but can be shaped much like a bonsai – all angles and interesting forms. When snow drops on the pine, the green colors of the needle peek through to continue showing interesting variety in the landscape. Below is a page from…
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    Cold Climate Gardening

  • Two Announcements: Vote and Listen!

    Kathy Purdy
    23 Jan 2015 | 7:23 pm
    Hello, dear readers, I have two brief announcements to share with you. Hear me on Heritage Network Radio This Monday, January 26, 2015, at 3pm, I’ll be speaking with Carmen DeVito and Alice Marcus Krieg on the latest segment of their We Dig Plants! podcast. It will stream live at 3 pm or you can […]
  • Winter Bones: Lilactree Farm Garden Notes No. 1, 2015

    Brian Bixley
    15 Jan 2015 | 9:35 pm
    What a dark fall and early winter this has been, cold too, now. Hal Borland was right when he wrote that ‘as the day lengthens, the cold strengthens.’ This morning is a brief reprieve, grey again but calm and mild, impossible to resist taking the camera into the garden.
  • Mental Health Medicine: Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day January 2015

    Kathy Purdy
    15 Jan 2015 | 4:30 pm
    It’s January, and cold climate gardeners everywhere are finding their hardy souls tested. Winter is tough on the body and on the spirit, and indoor plants are one of the many ways we keep cabin fever at bay. Plants, especially flowering plants, are not an indulgence. They are mental health medicine. The contents of my […]
  • Is There An AeroGarden In Your Future?

    Kathy Purdy
    26 Dec 2014 | 7:00 pm
    I had heard a lot about the AeroGarden, so when I was offered an opportunity to review one, I gladly accepted. The AeroGarden, for those of you not already familiar with it, is an automated hydroponic growing system meant for people who have never gardened before. I thought it would be a great way to […]
  • Amaryllis And Orchids For Garden Bloggers Bloom Day December 2014

    Kathy Purdy
    15 Dec 2014 | 3:09 am
    Thirty-seven days after I planted it, the ‘White Nymph’ amaryllis from Longfield Gardens is blooming. I was surprised to see how fast it grew. I like the pink flush on the tips of the petals, but I don’t know as I’d call this a double flower. Semi-double would be more like it. At any rate, […]
 
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    The Occasional Gardener

  • The Color Orange

    4 Jan 2015 | 9:12 pm
    The decision to go for a color palette with warm sunset accents in the Gravel Garden developed along a few lines. One was how well those colors look with the many succulents I have here. Another is how it pairs with all the concrete and gravel mulch and terracota that dominates the hardscape. It also makes sense that it is in the same spectrum as the berries of the Ficus Deltoides and also the ripe Citrus when it fruits. Finally, this garden's best moment is at the end of the day when the sun is just about to set providing a lovely glow to the space which reminded me of how the cottage…
  • Painterly Whites

    25 Nov 2014 | 5:59 am
    The ribs on the Caladium Lindenii pictured left, look like they're painted on. In the background of the picture on the right, what looks like green paint spattered on white paper is Diffenbachia Star Bright I think, hard to tell with so many variations that look quite similar. The papery leaves in the foreground with the broad watercolor stripes belong to variegated Arrowroot, Maranta Arundinacea, possibly my favorite of this trio.I inherited these guys from my parents garden, which along with a collection of fragrant white flowered plants, I started organizing into a 'white corner'. To…
  • Craftsman's Garden

    22 Nov 2014 | 7:32 am
    This was my second visit to the garden at the National Craft Center in Kuala Lumpur. I had returned primarily to take another look at the garden having been really impressed with its design on my first visit. The visit reiterated my original impressions of the garden being not only well designed but uniquely suited to the purpose of the center to celebrate Malaysian handicrafts.The garden is not large, inhabiting space between buildings at the complex with a few small artisan cottage studios at its center where artisans work and sell their wares. That in itself is instructional in garden…
  • Autumn Leaves, Sort of

    15 Oct 2014 | 12:06 am
    Now that I am living in an endless tropical summer I realize how much an ever changing temperate environment drives you forward into new cycles of activity or states of mind.  The longing for warm summer days, the thrill of fall in New York City when everyone is back from their summer sojourns, the inertia of winter and for gardeners the rush of a new growing season.I have come to the realisation however that the botanical changes that define each season from bud to flower and fruit and then bare branches is something that happens here too - just not in synchronicity. Take the…
  • The Patient Path

    15 Aug 2014 | 8:17 am
    In the last few weeks, the stone path I laid in the dark verandah has finally 'clicked'. It's taken the best part of a couple of years. It's a short path that takes you from the concrete verandah, through the border and an opening in the bamboo fence. I found most of the 'stones' in the orchard where I think many years ago some renovation had occured and these broken pieces ended up being disposed there. They are really chunks of cement and gravel but having been laying around for years in the cooler shade of the orchard, had become mossy.Having transferred and laid them, which took a…
 
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    Plant Whatever Brings You Joy

  • Fire Pits: Part One

    Kathryn
    19 Jan 2015 | 1:22 pm
    It is probably fitting that following a post on leaving wild corners in your garden I would be drawn to a recent post I saw on author Helen Yoest’s blog Gardening with Confidence regarding her organic creation of what she calls her Fire Garden. I found I kept thinking of her post and had the occasion to inquire about a possible guest post after she most generously reviewed my book Plant Whatever Brings You Joy! We have some things in common other than writing about our gardens. She’s a Pisces lady living in North Carolina who owns a Border Collie! As many of you know, so much of…
  • Leave Wild, Undisturbed Corners in Your Garden

    Kathryn
    31 Dec 2014 | 10:41 am
    There is an irony that Plant Whatever Brings You Joy: Blessed Wisdom from the Garden must ultimately carry a caveat, being that as a conscious gardener we learn that our immediate landscapes, the ones we play with, plant things in and recreate, are not, as we thought, blank canvases to reconstruct to our own liking. Not really. They are pieces of something, a larger something of which we are all a part. And that as loving stewards of that reality we are rather obliged to consider what came before, as in the last several millions of years, and to consider that carefully as we make our mark…
  • Winter Butternut Squash Soup!

    Kathryn
    17 Nov 2014 | 1:08 pm
    Most likely because neither my mother nor grandmother, as I recall, ever baked or in any way prepared a winter squash for our family, it’s taken me quite awhile to familiarize myself with the many varieties–and then to learn what I can do with them! I’m imagining if I set my mind to it I could write an entire book about winter squashes and their infinite possibilities. What is more likely, and what appears to be happening, is that each fall and winter, as the squashes come into their splendid season–just in time for the winter holidays, how convenient, and no accident,…
  • Another Garden Transforming a Community!

    Kathryn
    5 Nov 2014 | 6:19 pm
    Neighborhood Seed Saving Project One of the most life-affirming, inspiring movements in the world today is the Community Garden movement, particularly when it involves teaching children. And we see or hear of examples of this emerging trend throughout our country. But there is nothing as profound and wise and enlivening as bearing witness or becoming involved in a community garden that not only includes children, but also totally transforms a neighborhood, and that is precisely what Brightmoor Youth Garden in a formerly impoverished and crime ridden neighborhood in Detroit is doing! I learned…
  • Time for Gingersnaps!

    Kathryn
    20 Oct 2014 | 5:39 pm
    October! A favorite month and one that gets me thinking of spicy sweets with lots of cinnamon and ginger. So it was a lovely synchronicity when my dear friend Maloah mentioned her family’s old recipe for gingersnaps, which I immediately requested. What better treat to hand out out to Trick or Treaters on Halloween? As fate would have it, Maloah’s mother, Buffy Treat, included that particular cookie recipe in a cookbook she lovingly edited back in the 80’s for the Heifer Project International. “Peace begins where the hungry are fed,” says the cover of her book.
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    May Dreams Gardens

  • "In the soft, warm bosom of a decaying compost heap..."

    Carol
    23 Jan 2015 | 8:47 pm
    I almost didn't see the box tucked behind the flower pot by the front door. Who knows, it may have been there for a couple of days. But I did finally see it. Inside was my new-to-me copy of The Complete Book of Composting by J. I. Rodale and staff (Fourth Printing, 1967). Coming in at 1,000 pages plus (if you count the index), it's a hefty tome. I look forward to the secrets of
  • Five principles of vegetable gardening

    Carol
    19 Jan 2015 | 6:49 pm
    Gather round, new gardeners, for I am about to spill the beans on some principles of vegetable gardening that will help you in your own first attempts at growing a little food for yourself. Principles? I know, the word "principles" sounds highfalutin and uppity-do-da-day. But bear with and you'll see that these principles are pretty simple, pretty easy, and pretty much intended to help guide
  • Dearest Summer...

    Carol
    16 Jan 2015 | 7:58 pm
    One of Summer's delightful flowers. Dearest Summer, I feel compelled to write to you after your absence these last several months, to tell you how much I miss you and how I long for your return. I miss your music - the hum of the bees as they flew from flower to flower and the songs of the birds each morning, coaxing the sun to rise once again from the horizon.  I so enjoyed, too, the sound
  • Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day - January 2015

    Carol
    14 Jan 2015 | 9:05 pm
    Happy Garden Blogger's Bloom Day and welcome to Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day for January 2015. Here in my USDA Hardiness Zone 6a garden in central Indiana, it's wintertime. This means it's cold, it gets dark too early and mornings are slow to arrive.  We've had some colder than normal days, too, but not as cold as last January. Oh, and we haven't had as much snow, so far, as at this point
  • Kokedama - Must be willing to make a little bit of a mess...

    Carol
    10 Jan 2015 | 12:20 pm
    Kokedama with ivy I just finished cleaning up the sunroom after making my first kokedama. Kokedama is a Japanese word that translates into English as "moss balls" though all the auto-correct editors want to translate it into chokedamp. The idea is to mix a combination of peat and clay soil, generally a 70-30 ratio, so you can form the soil into a ball and it stays as a ball. Then you plant
 
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    Backyard Gardening Blog

  • Squish This, Not That: Confusion over Bugs

    Administrator
    3 Jan 2015 | 8:38 am
    Sometimes a little bit of knowledge is a bad thing. I’ve talked, multiple times, to novice gardeners, hobbyists (and, lets face it, I’m a hobbyist too, I don’t have a degree in horticulture, I am not a professional landscape architect, but I’m a garden blogger, gardening is serious business to me), laypeople, or just people […]
  • Frugal Gardening: Starting Perennials from Seed

    Administrator
    14 Dec 2014 | 7:23 am
    I think everyone loves a nice mass planting. Mixed plantings look nice too, but it is hard to beat the statement of a mass planting. A whole bed of lilies, a whole bed of hostas, a whole bed of daylilies, or cone flowers, or rudbeckias, or phlox, or whatever. Maybe not all the same exactly […]
  • Growing a Bee Friendly Garden

    Administrator
    27 Nov 2014 | 2:26 pm
    In the inland empire of California is a vast stretch of hundreds of square miles of almond trees. Every spring 1.6 million beehives, 60% of the managed beehives in the country, are trucked to California to pollinate these almond trees. It is the largest pollination event on earth, and is responsible for 80% of the […]
  • Growing William Shakespeare’s Garden

    Administrator
    16 Oct 2014 | 6:13 pm
    So there was a guy, you may have heard of him, William Shakespeare, he was sort of a big deal. He was of course an English writer and his works have been popular for almost 500 years, that is some staying power. I actually like his stuff, I’ve read Shakespeare for pleasure, I’m that sort […]
  • How to kill moles

    Administrator
    24 Sep 2014 | 6:17 am
    I hate moles, really I do. I know there are people out there that probably do not condone killing any animal, even moles, I’m not that type of person, but if you are, I can respect that, though this blog post is not for you. Personally I like animals fine, I try to encourage animal […]
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    Old Country Gardens

  • Photo's through the years

    Melanie Vassallo
    4 Jan 2015 | 1:26 pm
    Being January, there's not much I can do about gardening right now. One of my new years resolutions is to rejoin the gardening world, plant a new garden and hopefully see some gardening friends again. Over the last four years I've continued to grow some things, visit gardens and take photos. My mind though is rusty, plant names that used to trip across my tongue are hard to remember. I've been reading my old posts and going through thousands of photos to loosen things up in my brain. Thousands of photos? Absolutely! Today I added up a few photos and found that in 2008 I took 1,656 garden…
  • In a nutshell - 2014

    Melanie Vassallo
    28 Dec 2014 | 4:41 pm
    With the year coming to a close I find myself looking through the photos I've taken this past year. Although I haven't been posting, it doesn't mean I haven't been gardening. Those of you who know me will recognize that the location of my garden has changed again. This time I think I'm really home.The gardens here are quite different than anything I've worked with before. It's by far the smallest property I've worked with which actually turns out to be quite difficult. In the past I had a large empty piece of property to develop. The yards here were overgrown and quite shady. Luckily…
  • A New Blog For Me

    Melanie Vassallo
    30 Nov 2014 | 7:29 pm
    Hi there!It's been an awful long time since I've posted to this blog. As some of you know, there have been many changes to my life in the past four years. The good news is I'm in a wonderful place now and finally back on track for some writing and photography. While my gardens now are a small cottage garden and not yet ready for photos, I get to visit lots and lots of other gardens like the one photographed above, The Peconic River Herb Farm.My partner Andy and I travel quite a bit, even if sometimes its just to one of the stunning locations right here on Long Island. I've started a new…
  • Love at Sagamore Hill

    Melanie Vassallo
    14 May 2013 | 8:28 am
    In March Andy bought a brand new Harley Davidson Road Glide. It was chilly out for riding but we bundled up and went for some rides here on Long Island. Last Saturday he suggested we visit some places on the north shore, near us. The first was the Vanderbilt estate in Centerport, then we decided to visit Teddy Roosevelt's home, Sagamore Hill. The flowering trees were in all their glory and as we drove into the parking lot we drove right past a female turkey.It's courting season and soon we saw the male turkey, trying his best to gain the female's interest. I took a photo even though the…
  • In retrospect

    Melanie Vassallo
    28 Jan 2013 | 5:42 pm
    The end of January, bitter cold winds and temperatures but suddenly one notices the days getting longer. Winter still has it's icy grip on us but Spring is just around the corner.Beauty can still be found in the ice formations along the water front but brrrr, how much nicer to look at something green.I thought I'd choose a few old photos from the past to get our imaginations flowing...From the smallest frond unfurling to color in all it's glory, I love ferns!Fuzzy drumstick heads...Fat prickly fronds...Airy and delicate lady ferns...None of them are here in my new home but oh to dream that…
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    Digging

  • A new book for 2016 and a Lawn Gone! GIVEAWAY

    Pam/Digging
    25 Jan 2015 | 6:04 pm
    The frog does not drink up the pond in which he lives.I have a big announcement, my friends! I’m writing a new book, a follow-up to Lawn Gone! that’s all about how to garden with less water. Or perhaps a better way of describing it is, it’s about honoring water in your garden. No matter where you live, whether you contend with drought or are blessed with regular rain, water gives life. As we’ve all grown more conscious of the environmental impact of our gardening practices — from dusting the garden with chemicals to mowing and watering an expanse of thirsty lawn…
  • Puff balls and the virtue of laziness

    Pam/Digging
    23 Jan 2015 | 9:25 am
    I love seasonal changes, don’t you? Even winter has its own beauty, if you look closely. These tawny puffballs are the seedheads of silver ironweed (Vernonia lindheimeri var. leucophylla)… …which in summer looks like this. I think it may be more eye-catching at this time of year, when colors are more subdued and the light is low enough to get caught in the fuzzy coronas. It’s just one more reason not to be too quick with the pruners after a killing freeze. This is one time when laziness aligns perfectly with what’s best for the garden. All material © 2006-2015…
  • 82 gardening book reviews and counting

    Pam/Digging
    18 Jan 2015 | 3:38 am
    Browsing for a few good gardening books to get you through the dark days of winter? I’ve got a running list of 82 book reviews and recommendations I’ve written over the years: design books, plant books, artful gardening books, garden-craft books, native-plant books, sustainable gardening books, how-to books, children’s garden books, garden memoirs, and even a couple fiction and poetry books about gardens. That’s a lot of reading — and a lot of reviewing. And now those reviews are easier than ever for you to find and browse. I’ve compiled them alphabetically…
  • New year in green and gold: January Foliage Follow-Up

    Pam/Digging
    15 Jan 2015 | 10:05 pm
    It’s a new year in the garden, and I haven’t really been out in it for a while. An unusually long stretch of cold, gray days had me feeling like I was in Seattle, and let me tell you, it made me feel pretty gray myself. But yesterday the sun came out, the skies turned blue, and with a pleasant chill in the air it was the stuff of winter-in-Texas dreams. So let’s kick off Foliage Follow-Up for 2015! I’ll start with my ever-so-slow-growing Berkeley sedge (Carex divulsa) lawn, studded with a few lemon-lime ‘Margaritaville’ yuccas. I love this little sedge lawn…
  • Read This: Cultivating Garden Style

    Pam/Digging
    12 Jan 2015 | 6:05 am
    Cultivating Garden StyleStyle, which is about expressing yourself and your unique taste, applies as much to making gardens as to fashion or interior design. Most gardeners naturally prioritize plants when making a garden, but who doesn’t also enjoy accessorizing his or her outdoor spaces with color, furnishings, and accessories like pots, cushions and pillows, and lighting? In her new book, Cultivating Garden Style: Inspired Ideas and Practical Advice to Unleash Your Garden Personality, Rochelle Greayer, the blogger behind the well-known Studio ‘g’, has fun categorizing…
 
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    Blithewold Blogs

  • Learn something new — on fertilization

    Kristin Green
    23 Jan 2015 | 1:05 pm
    When we get busy I’m apt to forget my quest to learn something new every day. But during the winter we have the time and plenty of opportunities in the way of classes, lectures, symposiums, trade and garden shows to make a habit of it again. And it’s a treat whether I’m learning something totally […]
  • What to do when it’s January-ish

    Kristin Green
    16 Jan 2015 | 7:16 am
    So far, to me, this winter has not seemed as winter-ish as winter usually is. Of course, I’m knocking wood as I say that. Although I love the way a good layer of snow blankets the landscape (and insulates our plants), I’m grateful to not have to shovel or trudge over and through giant banks […]
  • Warming up

    Kristin Green
    9 Jan 2015 | 6:56 am
    A lot of people ask us what we do here in the winter. –A particularly legitimate question when the weather outside is as unpleasant as it has been this week as temperatures plunged and the wind whipped. We always answer, “a lot.” And luckily for Gail, Betsy, and me, most of it is inside-work. Holidays behind […]
  • A year in the gardens

    Kristin Green
    31 Dec 2014 | 7:58 am
    I can’t quite believe we’ve come to the cusp of 2015 already. This year went by in such a flash! But always, by the time I put the brakes on after Christmas it feels like I lost a few days between … oh, June maybe … and now. Looking back at and organizing my pictures from […]
  • The BIG Tree

    Kelly Sobolewski
    20 Dec 2014 | 2:24 pm
    When you enter the Mansion this holiday season, you will be amazed by the massive Christmas Tree dominating the front hall. Standing proudly at 22 feet tall, it sets the festive tone for the entire Mansion, as it does every year during the Christmas at Blithewold season. The mastermind behind the beautiful Tree is Joanne Murrman, who […]
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    Flatbush Gardener

  • FAQ: Where do you get your plants?

    Flatbush Gardener
    3 Jan 2015 | 5:15 pm
    [First in what I hope will be a series of Frequently Asked Questions, FAQs. If you have any questions for me, I invite you to leave a comment, or ping me on Twitter.] Question: Where do you get your plants? Answer (short)I specialize in gardening... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • The Sun stands still

    Flatbush Gardener
    21 Dec 2014 | 1:54 pm
    This season's solstice occurs at 11:03 UTC, 6:03 Eastern Time. It's winter in the northern hemipshere, summer in the southern. Illumination of Earth by Sun at the southern solstice. Etymology: Latin solstitium (sol "sun" + stitium, from sistere "to... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Extinct Plants of northern North America

    Flatbush Gardener
    30 Nov 2014 | 7:31 am
    Updated 2014-12-22: Added years of extinction, where known. Started section for Extinct in the Wild (IUCN Red List code EW). I'm limiting this list for two reasons: Restricting this list geographically is in keeping with my specialization in plants... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Shrubberies

    Flatbush Gardener
    8 Nov 2014 | 8:09 pm
    Update 2014-11-23: Completed Step #4 today, nearly injuring myself in the exertion. Did I mention that established grasses have deep and extensive roots?Also completed Step #5, replacing the Panicum.Added Step #9. I'd overlooked this shrub, and... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Megachile, Leaf-Cutter Bees

    Flatbush Gardener
    10 Aug 2014 | 8:26 am
    A leaf-cutter bee removes a segment from a leaf of Rhododendron viscosum, swamp azalea, in my urban backyard native plant garden and wildlife habitat (National Wildlife Federation Certified Wildlife Habitat #141,173). You can see other segments -... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
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    heirloom gardener

  • Winter Floral Arrangements

    Julia Erickson
    6 Jan 2015 | 3:50 pm
    Bringing flowers in from the garden is one of my great joys as a gardener.  Winter presents a challenge in that there is less to choose from, but the desire for greenery grows stronger.  One of my goals this winter is to create an arrangement each week from the garden.  It will not only beautify my living space, but will satisfy my desire to be in the garden at a time of year I ordinarily would not.  I share with you week 1.This small vase contains clipping of cedar clippings and yellow twig dogwood gathered from the garden with an accent of purple from Japanese…
  • NYBG: Much to Savor, and Worry About, Amid Mild Winter’s Early Blooms

    Julia Erickson
    31 Mar 2012 | 7:00 pm
    By LISA W. FODERAROPublished: February 26, 2012 At the New York Botanical Garden in the Bronx, an experimental plot was in full flower on a recent February afternoon, as the thermometer edged toward 60.“This is the earliest I’ve seen all of these things in flower,” said Todd Forrest, the garden’s vice president for horticulture and living collections. “The ground isn’t even frozen. That’s shocking.”
  • Latest buzz on bee decline: Studies blame pesticides

    Julia Erickson
    30 Mar 2012 | 6:49 pm
    Updated: Friday, March 30, 2012 1:49 PMSETH BORENSTEINAssociated PressWASHINGTON (AP) -- A common class of pesticide is causing problems for honeybees and bumblebees, important species already in trouble, two studies suggest. But the findings don't explain all the reasons behind a long-running bee decline, and other experts found one of the studies less than convincing. The new research suggests the chemicals used in the pesticide -- designed to attack the central nervous system of insects -- reduces the weight and number ofqueens in bumblebee hives. These pesticides also cause honeybees to…
  • NJ.com: Chatham Township lets farming debate go fallow for summer

    Julia Erickson
    28 Jul 2011 | 8:17 pm
  • Is family farming coming to Chatham? Let the veggies grow!

    Julia Erickson
    28 Jul 2011 | 7:56 pm
    There is currently a small-town political debate about whether or not Chatham will allow a family in Green Village to grow vegetables for selling via CSA, at the local farmers' market, or at a farm stand. As one neighbor on the street puts it: let the veggies grow!
 
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    Ledge and Gardens

  • Juno-Great Expectations

    Layanee DeMerchant
    26 Jan 2015 | 12:56 pm
    The garden has become a playground for white tailed deer. They sneak in after dark and scamper around nibbling the Rhododendrons. There is not just one hoof print. There are many. They must know that the hunters have left after sitting or stalking their elusive daytime presence. They obviously know that there are no longer dogs here. They are taking advantage. You can see the tips of the frayed Rhodies. They rarely touch the boxwoods or the hellebores. They love arborvitae. I am left today worrying about them just a bit as the big storm bears down on New England. Where will they spend the…
  • Merry Christmas - 2014

    Layanee DeMerchant
    24 Dec 2014 | 11:53 am
  • Blog Giveaway-Bee Happy-Gifts for the Nature Lover

    Layanee DeMerchant
    16 Dec 2014 | 10:00 pm
    Okay, there is not a bee in sight in my garden here in the northwest corner of Rhode Island but that doesn't mean I am not thinking of them along with the birds and the butterflies and the flowers they love. The butterflies are also long gone but the birds are flitting about the cotoneaster and the bird feeders. I do have many bird houses about the garden and I have mason bees. They like to drill holes in the eaves of the house and the shed to lay their eggs. I really would rather they pick somewhere else to get this task accomplished. As a gardener and a nature lover I do sometimes…
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    A Leafy Indulgence

  • In Between

    Swimray
    24 Jan 2015 | 5:05 pm
    Here am I between two storms. A rain-sleet-snow-freezing rain "event" happened overnight and snow is predicted for tomorrow night. We are also between the seasons; at a midpoint with the light at the end of the winter tunnel. Next stop on the bus: spring.The signs are there. Some things in the garden are beginning to stir. And next Saturday is the annual Washington Gardener Magazine Seed Exchange in Virginia. Coming home afterwards with a bucket full of new seeds to try out gets the gardening juices going again. A trip around the yard found some heads poking out. No sign of the crocus…
  • Last Year's Resolutions Scorecard

    Swimray
    30 Dec 2014 | 7:26 pm
    This year 2014 saw the least number of posts to this blog because there were fewer new additions to the garden. How did last year's resolutions go? Let's see how your resolutions ended up, too.Post thoughts and gardening results on the blog more than once a month, even if no one reads them.Do the math: 24 posts = at least two per month. (But only one post in November, and one in December.)Start working on getting the poinsettia to bloom earlier in the fall, to be sure it blooms in time for Christmas, instead of later at New Year's.Cross this one off. The poinsettia up and died on me this…
  • Tending To The Tender Snacks

    Swimray
    30 Nov 2014 | 12:15 pm
    Root crops and I just don't mix well. Carrots are one of the first creatures (they are supposed to be easy) that I tried growing, year after year, without much success. They ended up dry, splitting, deformed runts. After a few years of adding sand to my garden soil more appropriate for clay pottery than gardening, the results were no better.Then, I discovered compost and organic material, and thought to try that to improve the soil density. Building upon last years's carrot success, I gave it another shot this year with the Tendersnax hybrid purchased a year or two ago. The results are truly…
  • Last Gasp Before Winter

    Swimray
    3 Nov 2014 | 3:42 am
    Most of the garden has fallen asleep before winter arrives, but some defiant plants refuse to give up. Acidanthera, members of the glad, family look as lush and healthy as a summer day. They continue to flower, albeit with fewer blooms than in summer.The pineapple sage (Salvia elegans) is in its glory at this time. It waits until just before frost to throw out its red threads against its chartreuse foliage. This year the plant really took off after a severe winter that I thought would have killed it off like its neighbor the rosemary. Now, every day brings new branches tipped with new flower…
  • Vacation In Quirky Cedar Key

    Swimray
    12 Oct 2014 | 7:26 pm
    A few days before the convention were spent on the gulf coast of Florida in the small, quaint, walkable, low-key town of Cedar Key. There are no stop lights, no chain restaurants, and no chain hotels in the town that is known as 'old Florida' (before the mouse arrived.)I will spare the 'where is this place' theme from last year's trip because I doubt anyone but local residents would know the answer. As this is a gardening blog, I will try keeping to that subject with some photos I found interesting around town.Tuesday was Burger Day at AdaBlue Cafe on the outskirts of town. The gardener's…
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    A Leafy Indulgence

  • In Between

    Swimray
    24 Jan 2015 | 5:05 pm
    Here am I between two storms. A rain-sleet-snow-freezing rain "event" happened overnight and snow is predicted for tomorrow night. We are also between the seasons; at a midpoint with the light at the end of the winter tunnel. Next stop on the bus: spring.The signs are there. Some things in the garden are beginning to stir. And next Saturday is the annual Washington Gardener Magazine Seed Exchange in Virginia. Coming home afterwards with a bucket full of new seeds to try out gets the gardening juices going again. A trip around the yard found some heads poking out. No sign of the crocus…
  • Last Year's Resolutions Scorecard

    Swimray
    30 Dec 2014 | 7:26 pm
    This year 2014 saw the least number of posts to this blog because there were fewer new additions to the garden. How did last year's resolutions go? Let's see how your resolutions ended up, too.Post thoughts and gardening results on the blog more than once a month, even if no one reads them.Do the math: 24 posts = at least two per month. (But only one post in November, and one in December.)Start working on getting the poinsettia to bloom earlier in the fall, to be sure it blooms in time for Christmas, instead of later at New Year's.Cross this one off. The poinsettia up and died on me this…
  • Tending To The Tender Snacks

    Swimray
    30 Nov 2014 | 12:15 pm
    Root crops and I just don't mix well. Carrots are one of the first creatures (they are supposed to be easy) that I tried growing, year after year, without much success. They ended up dry, splitting, deformed runts. After a few years of adding sand to my garden soil more appropriate for clay pottery than gardening, the results were no better.Then, I discovered compost and organic material, and thought to try that to improve the soil density. Building upon last years's carrot success, I gave it another shot this year with the Tendersnax hybrid purchased a year or two ago. The results are truly…
  • Last Gasp Before Winter

    Swimray
    3 Nov 2014 | 3:42 am
    Most of the garden has fallen asleep before winter arrives, but some defiant plants refuse to give up. Acidanthera, members of the glad, family look as lush and healthy as a summer day. They continue to flower, albeit with fewer blooms than in summer.The pineapple sage (Salvia elegans) is in its glory at this time. It waits until just before frost to throw out its red threads against its chartreuse foliage. This year the plant really took off after a severe winter that I thought would have killed it off like its neighbor the rosemary. Now, every day brings new branches tipped with new flower…
  • Vacation In Quirky Cedar Key

    Swimray
    12 Oct 2014 | 7:26 pm
    A few days before the convention were spent on the gulf coast of Florida in the small, quaint, walkable, low-key town of Cedar Key. There are no stop lights, no chain restaurants, and no chain hotels in the town that is known as 'old Florida' (before the mouse arrived.)I will spare the 'where is this place' theme from last year's trip because I doubt anyone but local residents would know the answer. As this is a gardening blog, I will try keeping to that subject with some photos I found interesting around town.Tuesday was Burger Day at AdaBlue Cafe on the outskirts of town. The gardener's…
 
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    Bumblebee Blog

  • The Story of Little Man or Don’t Push Robin Too Far

    Robin Ripley
    12 Jan 2015 | 9:47 am
    Thank you for subscribing and visiting http://bumblebeeblog.com The story I’m about to tell may make you think differently about me. I feel differently about myself. It started this past spring. To fill out my coop I ordered six female chicks from My Pet Chicken—two Appenzeller Spitzhaubens and four Polish chicks. If you’ve never ordered chicks before, you may be surprised to learn […] The post The Story of Little Man or Don’t Push Robin Too Far appeared first on Bumblebee Blog.
  • The Totally Real Dangers of Rural Living

    Robin Ripley
    30 Nov 2014 | 11:15 am
    Thank you for subscribing and visiting http://bumblebeeblog.com Living here in a fairly rural part of Maryland, I see things that the average suburbanite wouldn’t encounter in a year living in a sanitized and manicured neighborhood. I can sit in my favorite chair and watch red foxes play fight in the back field. In spring, the tulip trees look like Christmas trees with […] The post The Totally Real Dangers of Rural Living appeared first on Bumblebee Blog.
  • Announcing My Big New Plan to Make a Whole Lot of Money

    Robin Ripley
    15 Oct 2014 | 10:58 am
    Thank you for subscribing and visiting http://bumblebeeblog.com Now that I have put the pack back on, so to speak, and am blogging again after my year-long blog vacation, I decided I better check in on those clever blog gurus. You know who they are. They’re the professional bloggers who tell us amateur-hour bloggers all the things we need to do to become […] The post Announcing My Big New Plan to Make a Whole Lot of Money appeared first on Bumblebee Blog.
  • What I Did on My Vacation from Blogging

    Robin Ripley
    25 Sep 2014 | 8:08 am
    Thank you for subscribing and visiting http://bumblebeeblog.com Well, hello there! Did you notice I was gone? Did you miss me? I missed you. Truly, I didn’t set out to take nearly a full year off from blogging here at Bumblebee. Sometimes, life just gets in the way. Sometimes you have to make a choice between living life or writing about it. Not […] The post What I Did on My Vacation from Blogging appeared first on Bumblebee Blog.
  • A Pause in the Run/Walk Through Life

    Robin Ripley
    27 Oct 2013 | 2:46 pm
    Thank you for subscribing and visiting http://bumblebeeblog.com I went out this morning for my daily run/walk. I say “run/walk.” I used to say “run.” Now I say “run/walk.” It’s really “walk.” I am still in denial about the whole knee pain situation. Anyway, I digress. I went out this morning for my daily run/walk. Most days I listen to books via Audible […] The post A Pause in the Run/Walk Through Life appeared first on Bumblebee Blog.
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    Garden Rant

  • Winter Interest Battle, Round III: Revenge of the Bulbs by Elizabeth Licata

    Elizabeth Licata
    25 Jan 2015 | 8:17 am
    This is Madame Sophie, from Old House Gardens (in my office) Over the last few posts, this discussion has partially devolved (in comments at least) into climate comparisons and other weather-related talk. Such is the nature of online conversations, but just to reiterate, I’m merely saying that for me, where I live, designing my outside garden for winter interest, as many, including Evelyn, recommend, makes little sense. That’s the myth part. Some of this year’s crop I find my own definition of winter interest in plenty of other places however, both outside and in, mainly in. Bulb…
  • Shout-out to 2 A-Way-to-Garden Podcasts by Susan Harris

    Susan Harris
    23 Jan 2015 | 5:28 am
    Here’s some winter interest for ya – catching up with gardening podcasts!  Which I don’t believe we’ve mentioned here on the Rant since 2010, so it’s high time, with this being called the Golden Age of Podcasts and all.  And did iPhone users notice that the newest version of the iOS includes an automatic podcast icon that syncs to your iTunes podcast subscriptions for easy listening? Or you can listen by searching and hitting play, with no need to fiddle with the ever-clunky iTunes itself. One of my regular podcasts for years has been Margaret Roach’s…
  • Can Winter Feed a Gardener’s Soul? by Evelyn Hadden

    Evelyn Hadden
    21 Jan 2015 | 12:28 am
    Not to beat Elizabeth’s dead horse, but I am still pondering winter interest — and not just in dazzling snow-covered landscapes that most of us couldn’t reproduce in our own yards, though I am truly delighted for those of you who live near one or have made one (see Linda’s garden for some real inspiration). The thing is, though it can be very satisfying to explore parks, well-designed gardens, and natural areas, there is something special and important about that personal connection between a gardener and his/her own garden. I still remember how much I missed my garden on those…
  • “Kiss Your Ash Good Bye” by Thomas Christopher

    Thomas Christopher
    18 Jan 2015 | 8:05 am
    That’s what the Massachusetts state forester told me – the emerald ash borer is on the loose in southern Berkshire County where my wife and I have our 130-acre woodlot and within the next couple of years this pest is expected to kill virtually all the native ashes, or roughly 5% of the forest trees, in this region. In fact, this mortality is expected to become general throughout Connecticut, too, and eventually throughout southern New England and beyond. And to my mind, it is a good argument for the creation of GMO plants. Ash infested with borers (Daniel Herms, The Ohio State University,…
  • PPA Brings out the Bawlmer Spirit in MANTS-Goers by Susan Harris

    Susan Harris
    16 Jan 2015 | 4:59 am
    Janet and I in full Bawlmer. The annual orgy of plant worship and fun times – the Perennial Plant Association symposium - is happening in Baltimore this year and the Flock is Gathering - in high Pink Flamingo and Big Hair. That was all on display this week at the big Mid-Atlantic  Nursery Trade Show, where garden diva Janet Draper piled Marge Simpson wigs and other pink and orange tackiness on passersby, and generally ginned up excitement for what she promises will be a Really Big Show.  On  Facebook she posted photos of everyone in costume with the caption “Hons.”…
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    Transatlantic Gardener

  • European premiere of our movie on Friday!

    Graham Rice
    20 Jan 2015 | 7:47 am
    I've occasionally mentioned family activities other than horticultural ones - and the next exciting event is the European premiere of our movie in Northamptonshire on Friday!Lies I Told My Little Sister is a family drama-comedy, written by my wife judy, which won many awards at North American festivals last year including Three Best Film honours, Best Actress, Best Actor, Best Supporting Actor and Best Screenplay. After the death of her oldest sister, a globe-trotting photographer is spurred by guilt onto a family trip to Cape Cod, Massachusetts, with the younger sister she used to…
  • New colors in bidens for baskets

    Graham Rice
    8 Jan 2015 | 3:28 am
    Bidens, tickseed, is not a plant that leaps to mind when we first think about annuals for baskets and other patio containers. It’s just not. A few years ago Bidens ferulifolia was touted as a useful basket plant but although its bright yellow daisies look good against the slender dark green leaves, and it develops an appealingly billowing habit, it makes such a big plant that almost everything else is overwhelmed.But things have changed, and new varieties from two different sources have ensured that we all take another look at bidens.In Britain, the Thompson & Morgan breeding program…
  • A year on the riverbank in Northamptonshire

    Graham Rice
    30 Dec 2014 | 3:58 am
    Based in Northamptonshire in the UK, Nick Penny is a musician, instrument maker and wildlife recordist. This video features twelve short views of the same scene on the River Nene between Oundle and Cotterstock, in Northamptonshire  - the changing sights and sounds of the seasons in a three-minute year. Happy New Year!
  • New Year wishes from The Transatlantic Gardener

    Graham Rice
    27 Dec 2014 | 1:00 am
    Paphiopedilum lowii image © judywhite/GardenPhotos.com
  • Books for the holidays

    Graham Rice
    16 Dec 2014 | 8:39 am
    Gardeners always like to receive books as holiday gifts. Here are a few suggestions.THREE BOOKS ON GARDENSGreat Gardens Of America by Tim Richardson (Frances Lincoln)A reduced format, paperback edition of a sumptuous book first published in 2009. With wonderful photography by Andrea Jones, it features a more extensive, and more insightful, text than many well illustrated garden books. And at a more affordable price than the original.                     The English Country House Garden by George Plumptre (Frances Lincoln)From classics such as Great Dixter and Hidcote Manor, under…
 
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    WashingtonGardener

  • Video Wednesday: Celery Stalks at Midnight

    WashingtonGardener
    21 Jan 2015 | 1:20 pm
    Our EdibleHarvest columnist, Elizabeth Olson, shared the discovery of a Big Band-era hit called "Celery Stalks at Midnight." As she had just written all about growing celery in our January 2015 issue of Washington Gardener Magazine, this tune really caught her attention!Here is also a link to the lyrics:http://artists.letssingit.com/doris-day-lyrics-celery-stalks-at-midnight-1xxclh8#axzz3PPXatpsLAnd, um, had no one read Freud and been able to solve the mystery for this girl?
  • Washington Gardener Magazine ~ January 2015 issue ~ Monkshood, Celery, and much more

    WashingtonGardener
    18 Jan 2015 | 1:46 pm
    Washington Gardener is the magazine for gardening enthusiasts in the Mid-Atlantic region.The January 2015 issue is being sent now as a PDF to all current subscribers.It is also now posted at: http://issuu.com/washingtongardener/docs/washingtongardenerjan15/0 This issue includes:~ Monkshood: Pretty Poison ~ Celery Growing Tips for the Mid-Atlantic~ January Garden Tasks~ Garden Photo Contest Rules~ A Visit to the Robinson Nature Center~ New Veronica Introduction~ Winter Bird-Feeding Tips~ Seed Exchange Details and Registration~ Local Garden Events Listing~ Wistful Winter Windowsillsand…
  • Seed Exchange 2015 Speakers Announced

    WashingtonGardener
    17 Jan 2015 | 2:47 pm
    Here are the speakers for the upcoming Washington Gardener Seed Exchanges 2015. Seed Exchange attendees trade seeds, exchange planting tips, hear expert speakers, and collect goody bags full of gardening treats. For more information on the exchanges and how to register, go here.Saturday, January 31 at Behnke Nurseries, Beltsville, MDSaving Your Vegetable SeedsSpeaker: Paul Blundell, Owner, Southern Exposure Seed ExchangeThis workshop will give an overview of the hows and whys of seed saving.  We will explore the state of seed in the world today to discover why seed saving is not only a…
  • Win Two Passes to Washington Gardener Seed Exchanges

    WashingtonGardener
    16 Jan 2015 | 2:58 pm
    For our January 2015 Washington Gardener Magazine Reader Contest, Washington Gardener is giving away two passes to either of the Washington Gardener Seed Exchanges (prize value $40).   The 10th Annual Washington Gardener Seed Exchanges, hosted by Washington Gardener Magazine, takes place on January 31, 2015 at the Behnke Nurseries in Beltsville, MD AND on February 17 2015 at Green Spring Gardens in Fairfax, VA. You have a choice on which side of the DC beltway you want to attend! Seed Exchange attendees trade seeds, exchange planting tips, hear expert speakers, and collect goody…
  • Video Wednesday: Building a Grow Closet

    WashingtonGardener
    14 Jan 2015 | 5:00 am
    Local Maryland gardener, Gary Pilarchik of The Rusted Garden vegetable gardening blog shares his basic ideas for a grow closet, grow light stations, and ways you can start growing vegetable seeds indoors in this new video.
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    A Tidewater Gardener

  • Stranahan Botanical Garden - A Troubled Paradise

    Les
    24 Jan 2015 | 8:43 am
         Have you ever traveled to place you enjoyed so much, that once home, your visit prompted you to learn more, and you were surprised by what you found? That was the case for me when I visited the Stranahan Botanical Garden in downtown Fort Lauderdale. Though the garden is planted under a canopy of mature bald cypress (Taxodium distichum), it is only about two years old, and looking at all the
  • Living Color

    Les
    19 Jan 2015 | 6:23 pm
         Right after Christmas my wife and I drove down to Fort Lauderdale to spend some time with my brother. The last time we visited it was in the summer, when the entire southeast was in the grip of an epic heatwave, but ironically it was actually cooler and more pleasant in south Florida than it was back in Virginia. On this trip we left dreary gray and cold to find what so many migrating
  • Roxborough State Park

    Les
    7 Jan 2015 | 6:22 pm
         Before we travelled to Colorado this past summer, I asked one of my co-workers, who happens to be a native, to recommend some of his favorite places to visit. Consulting with our hosts, the Sherpa Girls, we opted for Roxborough State Park just south of Denver, and it was a good choice. The park is sort of indicative of the state as a whole, in that it is a mix of prairie and mountains. You
  • Milepost 500

    Les
    3 Jan 2015 | 9:46 am
         I started blogging back in 2008, and I am finding it hard to believe that I have somehow managed to produce 500 posts. I know I have not produced 500 quality posts, but in this age of infographics, click-throughs, contact lists, tweets, virtual friends and short attention spans, 500 is not so bad. Lately I have been having trouble finding the time to be a good blogger. I know I have not
  • The Last Sunset of 2014

    Les
    31 Dec 2014 | 3:29 pm
         Time once again for another Tidewater Gardener tradition (to contradict me always saying I am not a traditionalist), the posting of the last sunset of the year. This year's shot is a little gray and murky, and though you can't tell it, a light rain is falling, but temps are near 80, and a warm breeze is blowing. This New Year's eve finds me in south Florida where there are palm trees, many
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    clay and limestone

  • Winter Interest

    Gail
    26 Jan 2015 | 6:00 am
    In the Middle South winter interest hardly ever means snow! To keep our otherwise brown gardens interesting all winter we concentrate on the hardscape, we plant evergreens, shrubs with four seasons of interest and even add colorful art pieces. We create gardens that we love and we hope others find pleasing. And we still dream of snowy days that will show off the seed heads and billowing grasses that we've left standing for the critters that live in and visit our gardens. Every once in a while our snow dreams come true! It happened this past weekend    Middle Tennessee woke up to a…
  • At the bird feeder

    Gail
    21 Jan 2015 | 7:03 am
    The Downy Woodpecker!A frequent visitor to my suet and sunflower filled feeders. It's the smallest woodpecker in North America.  Look for them climbing up and down tree trunks, hanging from flower stalks and clutching on suet feeders. and, the Eastern Gray Squirrel!It's a too frequent visitor to my backyard winter feeders. It's quite an acrobat and will go to great lengths to get to the food. Its acrobatic antics are often entertaining, but, they do gobble up seed quickly, hoarding it in caches all over the garden for scarce times. I feed the birds all winter, even though my garden has…
  • Almost Wordless Wednesday: The Tufted Titmouse

    Gail
    14 Jan 2015 | 3:16 pm
    He's a pert little fellow with a jaunty crest, dark eyes, mouse gray feathering and a touch of rust under his wings. The Tufted Titmouse is an insect (caterpillars are by far it's most important summer food) seed and berry eater and appreciates a garden that offers it tasty spider eggs, cocoons and insects hiding in the dead leaves. Fill your feeders with sunflower seeds and suet and they'll keep you entertained all winter.xoxogailPS For more about birds that visit Clay and Limestone go here and here. Gail Eichelberger is a gardener and therapist in Middle Tennessee. She loves wildflowers and…
  • Holding out against winter

    Gail
    5 Jan 2015 | 2:13 pm
    Willowleaf aster/Symphyotrichum praealtum is still holding onto its color despite 22F temperatures this morning! The Arctic freeze that is blowing into town will put an end to its color, but it reigns supreme as my longest blooming rough and tumble wildflower!If this doesn't convince you to plant it in your garden, I don't know what else I can do! xoxogailPS I've written about it many times, in fact as recently as last month, check out ~Willowleaf aster, a must for your garden! Gail Eichelberger is a gardener and therapist in Middle Tennessee. She loves wildflowers and native plants and…
  • Happy New Year My Friends.

    Gail
    31 Dec 2014 | 11:58 am
    xoxogail*from an earlier post, but my favorite of the Wordles!Gail Eichelberger is a gardener and therapist in Middle Tennessee. She loves wildflowers and native plants and thoroughly enjoys writing about the ones she grows at Clay and Limestone. She reminds all that the words and images are the property of the author and cannot be used without written permission. Subscribe in a reader
 
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    Dirt Therapy

  • Pineapple Upside-Down Cake

    Phillip Oliver
    21 Jan 2015 | 3:19 pm
    This is an old-fashioned cake that I remember my mother making. I am not sure if her recipe was the same as this one (this recipe is from Maida Heatter's Cakes, Cader Books, 1997) but it tastes just like I remember it. This cake is made in a cast-iron skillet (or you can use any frying pan or 12-inch pie plate). It is fairly easy to make and fun to put together. The hardest part is turning the heavy skillet upside down but the cake comes out easily. I would recommend placing a plate or cardboard cake circle directly over the skillet and hold it carefully when flipping it over. A helping hand…
  • Easy Peasy Fudge

    Phillip Oliver
    17 Dec 2014 | 5:11 pm
    I think this was the first time I have made fudge. This recipe is so simple and so good. I can't hardly stay out of it. You can make this without the nuts.3 cups of  semi-sweet chocolate chips1 14 oz. can sweetened condensed milk1/4 cup butter (1/2 stick), cut into small pieces1 cup chopped walnutsSpray an 8x8 inch pan with cooking spray. Cut 2 pieces of wax or parchment paper long enough to extend outside the pan. Place them in the pan criss-crossed (this will create "handles" that make it easier to remove them form the pan).Place the chocolate chips, condensed milk, and butter in a…
  • The Elk Rock Garden at Bishop’s Close

    Phillip Oliver
    10 Dec 2014 | 4:59 pm
    What a delightful treasure this was, hidden in a residential neighborhood! I had never heard of Elk Rock garden and stumbled across it on Trip Advisor. This was once a private garden owned by Scotland native Peter Kerr, who moved to Portland in the 1888. It is located in the Dunthorpe neighborhood and overlooks the Wilamette River. Kerr, along with his brother, owned and operated a grain business. They both lived in a cottage on this property until his brother married and moved. Kerr lived in the cottage until 1916 when he and his wife built a larger home. The garden was designed by John…
  • Revisiting Columbia River Gorge and Multnomah Falls

    Phillip Oliver
    9 Dec 2014 | 8:58 am
     A major highlight of any visit to Portland would have to be the spectacular Columbia River Gorge and Multnomah Falls, just east of the city. My last trip to Portland was in June of 2013, a much sunnier and warmer trip than our recent visit. To see how it looked then, take a look at my post from last year. This time, the weather was rainy, dreary and very windy. Michael opted to stay in town since he has an aversion to heights so I went along with our friends from Alabama, Paul and Cindy and our tour guide, Rick. The wind was powerful along the upper cliffs but by the time we had…
  • The Pittock Mansion

    Phillip Oliver
    5 Dec 2014 | 10:24 am
    Henry Lewis Pittock (1835-1919) was a prominent resident of Portland, Oregon, where he reestablished the struggling Oregonian and turned it into the state's preeminent newspapers. He was born in England and his family moved to the United States when Henry was four. At the age of seventeen, he and his brother headed west. According to legend, Pittock arrived in Portland in 1853, penniless and barefoot. He had worked in his father's print shop in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania as a child and soon found a job in Portland as a typesetter at the Oregon Spectator. The newspaper owner, Thomas Dryer, was…
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    Natural Gardening

  • Woodpeckers, wrens, and others

    Lisa
    25 Jan 2015 | 5:46 pm
    Our birdfeeder in the mountains is a platform feeder, which my gardening companion FILLS high with black-oil sunflower seeds each morning (which we buy in 40 lb. bags at the local feed and seed -- in this case, a Southern States store).When we're there, it's mobbed with the usual seed feeders - tufted titmice, cardinals, and the like, as well as the occasional blue jays, doves, and house finches.It's always a special treat when the red-bellied woodpeckers drop by, snagging seeds.  We saw several this weekend. A search for past posts about red-bellied woodpeckers pulled up all sorts…
  • Transitions

    Lisa
    23 Jan 2015 | 5:55 pm
    I've FINALLY got my camera (a venerable Nikon D100) and lens back after their cleaning and "spa" aka repair at the Nikon facility (in the lens' case).  It's been months, thankfully much of it filled with travel with a small Panasonic (my hubbie was the photographer), and many images to post afterwards. There's actually not too much of interest right now in the mountains.  Gloomy skies, dormant perennial beds, and vegetable beds filled with frosted veggies!I hadn't downloaded any winter break trip photos to my laptop, so am just reminded of last fall's color, looking at the…
  • Flowers, mosses, and lichens

    Lisa
    20 Jan 2015 | 5:21 pm
    There was an extraordinary diversity of mosses, lichens, and flowers in Chilean Patagonia!
  • Quetal National Park

    Lisa
    18 Jan 2015 | 5:10 pm
    This is a wonderful national park along the Carretera Austral in Chilean Patagonia. I've already posted an image of the hanging glacier (spectacular!)Along another trail, the Bosque Encantando (Enchanted Forest), the moss diversity (and that of other bryophytes) was nothing short of amazing.along the trail in the Bosque Encantadoadmiring bryophyte diversityanother hanging glacier photothe river belowmy traveling buddy
  • Carretera Austral and Quelat National Park

    Lisa
    17 Jan 2015 | 5:19 pm
    I've gotten totally out of sequence (travel-wise) with my postings, but here are some wonderful images that evoke the experience of Chilean (Northern) Patagonia along the Carretera Austral.Hanging Glacier in Quelat National ParkThe hanging glacier is a stand-out hike (in Quelat National Park).  The fiord stretching from Puyahuaipi and beyond is spectacular, too.Near the Posada QuelatA finch accustomed to handoutsboat in Puyahuapi harbor
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    Outside Clyde

  • Dung On A Sunny Day

    Christopher C. NC
    25 Jan 2015 | 3:42 pm
    The sun came out. The temperature went up. Most of the snow melted on my side of the scenic byway. It was a day not to be wasted. Once the melt had a good start I dove into my pile of finished dung. I have a roadside vegetable garden to get ready for spring. I'm not sure where or if I will be able to find any tree trimmer's wood chips. I may just end of using bagged
  • It Snowed

    Christopher C. NC
    24 Jan 2015 | 5:23 pm
    I slept in. It kept snowing until one. I was forced to organize my receipts. I might start the cipherin for my taxes the next time it snows. A little bit of snow makes all the baby trees and shrubberies I have planted stand out. It will be a significant screen when they all grow big and fill in. The two hollies are struggling though. They may never amount to much.
  • Close To The Cold Ground

    Christopher C. NC
    23 Jan 2015 | 4:58 pm
    It was a perfectly icky day. The snow maybe was a no show. It was a 34 to 40 degree rain all day long. During a brief intermission I wandered next door to check on things. That is when the wind started to gather speed. It howled for most of the afternoon. On my journey I stopped to admire the Running Cedar. This is a native evergreen ground cover in the club moss family. I have been told it will
  • High Above The Posh Estates

    Christopher C. NC
    22 Jan 2015 | 6:59 pm
    Further up the mountain, almost at the top, there is a nice view back down to the Posh Estates. Posh Estate #2 with the problem pond is the white one on the top left below the group of pines and spruce. Posh Estate #1 is the second one down from the top on the right with the green roof. The koi and goldfish in a pond there had babies that will be moved to a new home in the
  • Diane

    Christopher C. NC
    20 Jan 2015 | 7:14 pm
    There is snow in the diagnosis for the weekend. 'Diane' may have to wait a bit longer before full bloom. That is fine. There is no rush. There is anticipation. I can imagine the impact of the Witch Hazels full size and in full bloom in the winter under garden years from now. I'll just wait and garden on.
 
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    Growing The Home Garden

  • Building a Garden Gate

    19 Jan 2015 | 6:58 am
    There are few structures in the garden more prominent than a gate. A good garden gate can invite a person into the garden, protect the garden from intruders, and becomes a feature to draw the eye. This weekend I put together a gate for my vegetable garden fence (which is still under construction). I managed to complete the majority of work on the gate over the weekend but I still have some odds and ends before I would call it a finished project.All materials for this project were supplied by Lowe's and the Creative Ideas Network of Bloggers!The material list:Deck Screws: 1 1/4" and 2"4 - PT…
  • Timing Is The Root of a Good Garden

    30 Dec 2014 | 7:31 am
    January 2015 is almost here and with it will come time to plan out your 2015 garden. We all know that for a plant to grow well it needs a strong root system. The same can be said for the garden as a whole. A garden's roots are stronger with a good plan and the root of a good garden plan is timing.Timing a garden is probably the most important factor in a garden plan that determines success. To time things correctly there area two things you need to know:The last frost date in spring for your area. How long seeds take before they can be set outside to grow.The last frost date is THE date…
  • Have a Merry Christmas!

    24 Dec 2014 | 9:58 am
    Have Merry Christmas!And a Happy New Year!Subscribe to read more from The Home Garden Originally written by Dave @ The Home Garden Not to be reproduced or re-blogged without permission. No feed scraping is permitted. All Rights Reserved. Copyright 2007-2015
  • Seeds and Where to Find Them

    10 Dec 2014 | 6:42 am
    By now you may have received your first seed catalog(s) in the mail. It's a fun time of the year for gardeners. We get to sift through the pages, read the descriptions designed to entice us, and dream of what we will plant next year. When the weather is cold and dreary the catalogs give us something bright and hopeful to look forward to!Which seed catalog is the best one? That really depends on the gardener and what they are looking to grow. Seed companies exist with many different combinations of products from vegetables and herbs to flowering and ornamental plants. Most companies offer a…
  • Making a Hoop House for Winter Vegetable Growing

    8 Dec 2014 | 6:48 am
    Many gardeners take the winter season off from gardening. They work hard from early spring through late far then take a little break but you don't have to stop growing vegetables in your garden just because the weather has changed. One way to continue growing vegetables in cold weather is to construct a hoop house. A hoop house is simply an unheated greenhouse type structure that will help keep the temperatures several degrees warmer. In areas with mild winters a hoop house can allow you to continue growing all the way through the winter. Hoop houses can be made of many different types of…
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    Sharing Nature's Garden

  • Some color in the winter garden...

    Diana
    17 Jan 2015 | 6:33 pm
    The sun came out today and I took a tour around my garden, basking in the warmth.  As I passed each plant, mental notes began to form. Cut this one back in a month...this one fared really well in the last freeze...oh no, I should have covered that one...and, best of all...hey -- this one is blooming!Against the backdrop of grey and brown, several bright spots dotted the landscape. If you were a bird, wouldn't you love spending the winter here? Although the roses have turned to hips, the tips of the branches remain alive with budding color. Apparently, the cold weather…
  • Mellow and not so mellow yellow in my garden....

    Diana
    27 Oct 2014 | 11:40 am
    If you asked me about my favorite colors in the garden, I'd say: purple, lavender, blue, orange, yellow...and trail off about then.  I posted this a few months ago and forgot about it -- here are the names of all the yellow fellows in my garden:ThryallisLantana HorridaLantana New GoldZexmeniaLantana confettiCuban buttercupCandlestick treeJerusalem sageSt. John's wortBright edge yuccaSantolinaDaffodilsCalylophusDamianitaEsperanzaLemon MallowIrisHymenoxisGopher plantI wouldn't even put yellow in my top 3.  And yet, as I look around my garden, it's yellow that I see everywhere. …
  • Hill country garden charm in the heart of San Antonio...

    Diana
    26 Oct 2014 | 8:04 am
    The last stop on our visit to San Antonio gardens was another xeric garden, filled with drought-tolerant plants, both soft and sculptural. You can come along on the first two gardens of tour with me to see Melody's and Heather's gardens here.Then we toured the garden of Shirley, who blogs at  Rock, Oak, Deer.  I 'd seen Shirley's garden through her camera lens many times, yet when we arrived, I was surprised to find that she wasn't gardening in the country, but in a suburban neighborhood.  Her style and plant choices created an oasis that made the rest of the world seem far…
  • Another beautiful San Antonio garden to share...

    Diana
    24 Oct 2014 | 9:02 pm
    The second stop on our recent visit to San Antonio was Heather's garden from Xeric style.  Her style is certainly xeric, yet with many soft grasses, draping perennials and ground cover, it has a delicate feel. You can see my post about the first garden here. Purple fountain grass frames a collection of other grasses and yuccas.The sun was blazing hot that day, so taking photos was a real  challenge.  These yuccas were enveloped in a blanket of pretty purple trailing lantana, but it's hard to see that here.In this his view of the front of the house you can see that her…
  • A little garden trip down the road...

    Diana
    23 Oct 2014 | 5:58 am
    Last week I went on a jaunt to visit some of our blogging friends in San Antonio. They've come to Austin periodically, so it was time to venture south to see them. Our first stop was Melody's beautiful and spacious garden. After a treat of delicious mini muffins and ginger cookies baked by her lovely daughter, we stepped into her sanctuary. The first view is a wonderful pool, surrounded by pots and plants that gave it a rustic, more natural look. To deal with foraging deer, this fence guards Melody's vegetables, herbs and some perennial favorites.Garden art like this gazing ball catches your…
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    Kiss my Aster!

  • The Beauty of The Armpit Garden

    Kiss My Aster!
    23 Jan 2015 | 11:56 am
    This house came only with a very small back garden. It’s oddly situated, tucked around the back of the house, where none of my neighbors can see it but I get great views from inside the house. Because the whole garden is tucked in a nook a) it’s my “armpit garden” b) it’s also got great protection and serves as a pretty bitchin’ microclimate. But the best part is that this garden is for no one but me. It’s mostly dark and moody- the dream garden of my inner 19 year old. Dark dahlias and way too much bronze fennel, Redbor kale is bolting all over town, towering like Godzilla,…
  • Kiss My Christmas!

    Kiss My Aster!
    22 Dec 2014 | 1:42 pm
     It's like I've been in active avoidance of the date, which is December 22nd. I set up an advent tree for Hazel so that we could both keep track of how many days were left until Christmas but I still couldn't grasp it, even with the visual. Between me and you, I even set up the tree 3 days late.I made a few wreaths, including a 24" one made from clippings from a Yew that grows outside my front door. It was easy to work with and looks fine... it just doesn't smell like an evergreen. In fact, it smells a bit like a aloe plant that's beginning to rot out.I chose a different route in…
  • A Little Bit Potting, A Little Bit Party: Reuse THIS!

    Kiss My Aster!
    3 Dec 2014 | 1:42 pm
    I've tried a lot of potting benches and I've also tried to be the kind of person that doesn't need a potting bench. I mean, what a luxury piece of furniture! Are potting benches in the same league as bidets? I really do like them. Potting benches, not bidets.So I really needed one and after looking around I realized there wasn't anything I wanted, specifically.And then Dan found this:It's a really old concrete laundry sink he found on Craigslist for nothing. I think he hurt himself in many ways getting it to me. I have a slice of old crappy melamine that covers the top, this is my work…
  • Dug up my Dahlias Today

    Kiss My Aster!
    10 Nov 2014 | 12:25 pm
    I don't know about this batch of dahlias. I don't have a good place to store them (my garage is too cold, Ryan, but thanks for the offer!) and they are so cheap to just BUY new ones every spring. PLUS I get to choose new ones instead of the same ol' Dahlias I've known since, like, forever.Hrrrmmph. They are dug and drying and... we'll see. Maybe I can find a good spot for them.Also, this happened and I'm too lazy to type it again.
  • Celluloid Heroes: Vintage Cupcake Toppers for Your Terrariums

    Kiss My Aster!
    5 Nov 2014 | 11:10 am
    Now that the weather is turning evil, I want to blog about junk you can get for next-to-nothing that can be used in your garden. I want to do this regularly, like, weekly. But let's not rush into anything. The first thing I'll drivel on about is kicking up a terrarium a notch using vintage cupcake toppers.Some of my hoardIt's that time of year where I become interested in terrariums, again. And for me, a terrarium can't just be plants. Nope, it's gotta have some sort of crap decor in there, too, to make it interesting. I do terrariums just like I do gardens, so bring on the weensy…
 
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    Our Little Acre

  • Wordless Wednesday: How Long Can a Dead Lemon Cypress Look Alive?

    Kylee Baumle
    20 Jan 2015 | 9:01 pm
    Yes, really.
  • There Are Marigolds and Then There Are Pot Marigolds

    Kylee Baumle
    11 Jan 2015 | 12:37 pm
    These are not your grandma's marigolds. But wait, she probably grew these too! While I love the traditional marigolds and have never had a single year of gardening that didn't include them of one sort or another, there's another "marigold" that I adore even more. The pot marigold.Calendula officinalis 'Flashback'Calendula is commonly known as "pot marigold," and while it's classified as a short-lived perennial and sometimes a hardy annual, in my Zone 5b it's definitely an annual. I've never had a single plant survive winter here. They're pretty good at self-seeding though, so there's…
  • It's Houseplant Appreciation Day! (+ a book giveaway)

    Kylee Baumle
    10 Jan 2015 | 12:18 pm
    Yes, it's pretty, but...It's the middle of winter and I guarantee you I'm not doing any gardening out there in the frozen tundra right now. I know the entire eastern half of the country is shivering, but with all due respect to those of you in the south that think you've got it bad, I invite you to spend a few days with me. It will be two more months before I can even begin to think about what I might do in the gardens outside. But I've got more than enough green going on right here in the house. Those who know me know that I live in a jungle during the cold months of the year. I haven't…
  • Got Snow? Ames True Temper Telescoping Roof Rake to the Rescue!

    Kylee Baumle
    9 Jan 2015 | 10:34 am
    Ever since I've had my conservatory, when winter comes, snow on the roof skylights has been a problem. Because the quality of winter light is lower, that light is even more important for my plants housed inside, in spite of most of them being somewhat dormant at the 50°F we keep it in there.Snow on the roof, the sun can't melt it...Snow is a good insulator, butit blocks the light.Anything that blocks light isn't a good thing, so when Ames Tools invited me to try some of their tools, I immediately chose their telescoping roof rake - part of their True Temper line - as one of them.I received…
  • A Memorable 1st Visit to the Foellinger-Freimann Botanical Conservatory (Ft. Wayne, IN)

    Kylee Baumle
    4 Jan 2015 | 8:30 pm
    The weeping spruce trees on the east side of the conservatory always look like they're celebrating something.Each winter, just as the gray, cold days start to wear on me, I start wanting to pay our local botanical conservatory in Ft. Wayne, Ind., a visit. For many of the past years, we made it a family affair, inviting our girls and their spouses to join us for a couple of hours of lush, tropical goodness. It's a way to spend some family time and forget about the weather.About a month ago, we joined younger daughter Jenna and oldest grandchild Hannah at the conservatory for a bit of Christmas…
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    Our Twenty Minute Kitchen Garden

  • Belated Easter Chocolate Stout (13)

    20 Minute Jim
    26 Jan 2015 | 11:26 am
    ———— Posted on April 23, 2012 by halzpal I *thought* I’d get a chance to brew on Easter weekend, though in retrospect I can’t imagine why. I even planned to be cute about it and whip up a clone of the Rogue Chocolate Stout. Get it? Chocolate Easter Bunnies? There’s a secret about this batch […] The post Belated Easter Chocolate Stout (13) appeared first on Our Twenty Minute Kitchen Garden. Related posts: “Father and Son Stout” – A Family Brew Day "...In case anyone is following along at home, this is... My First Rocket Stove: 3 Ways It…
  • Why Green Home Brewing

    20 Minute Jim
    26 Jan 2015 | 9:09 am
    Posted on June 7, 2011 by halzpal Green home brewing? I have brewed beer since the very early 1990’s and I love the hobby dearly, but a couple years back, I nearly gave it up. The soaring price of propane nearly drove me away. This series of posts is the direct result of my decision […] The post Why Green Home Brewing appeared first on Our Twenty Minute Kitchen Garden. Related posts: “Father and Son Stout” – A Family Brew Day "...In case anyone is following along at home, this is... Food Gatherers welcomes harvest donations, including green tomatoes! As the…
  • Dead Robin Rocket Baltic Porter (12C)

    20 Minute Jim
    26 Jan 2015 | 9:07 am
    Posted on June 24, 2012 by halzpal It’s officially summer so I trimmed the spirea bushes around the front porch, in hopes of clearing a little most working space to renovate our grand old outdoor sitting space later in July. When I saw those heaps of brush, I thought the same thing you probably did: […] The post Dead Robin Rocket Baltic Porter (12C) appeared first on Our Twenty Minute Kitchen Garden. Related posts: Belated Easter Chocolate Stout (13) ———— Posted on April 23, 2012 by halzpal I *thought*... My First Rocket Stove: 3 Ways It Rocks + 3 Ways It…
  • Ice Distillation — A New Use for Old Beer

    20 Minute Jim
    26 Jan 2015 | 9:05 am
    The cold weather equivalent of “Make Hay While the Sun Shines” might very well be “Make Ice While the Winter Rages” and this is a sentiment a buddy of mine takes to his brew-house. When it’s cold, especially the Polar Vortex kind of cold we’ve been enjoying recently, he makes “Ice Beer,” or more specifically, […] The post Ice Distillation — A New Use for Old Beer appeared first on Our Twenty Minute Kitchen Garden. Related posts: Beer Cupcakes ...I was inspired by the recent appearance of a delicious... Hops ...Hops are a truly amazing plant......
  • My First Rocket Stove: 3 Ways It Rocks + 3 Ways It Stinks

    20 Minute Jim
    22 Jan 2015 | 7:05 am
    First posted on April 5, 2012 by halzpal When I first heard of a “Rocket Stove” my first thought was “I wonder if I could brew on that?” There are models designed especially to cook five gallons which seemed close enough to a soda-keg sized batch of beer. I built one last winter and here’s […] The post My First Rocket Stove: 3 Ways It Rocks + 3 Ways It Stinks appeared first on Our Twenty Minute Kitchen Garden. Related posts: Dead Robin Rocket Baltic Porter (12C) Posted on June 24, 2012 by halzpal It’s officially summer... Belated Easter Chocolate Stout (13)…
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    The Gardens of Petersonville

  • Pruning

    Sheila
    19 Jan 2015 | 12:51 pm
    I think next to getting people to really understand the importance of the role the soil plays in gardening, pruning is the most difficult skill for a gardener to master. There really is no pruning 101 in my opinion, because each case is a little bit different depending on the plant, the position of the plant, the climate, and even the taste of the gardener. Of course different types of plants have different pruning requirements. If you prune a shrub that blooms in the spring heavily in the late winter, you will remove all the dormant buds and you won't get any flowers that year. On the other…
  • Finding Inspiration

    Sheila
    8 Jan 2015 | 3:57 pm
    After Christmas my DH and I got away for a few days at a spa in the hills in the San Diego area. Although it was colder than usual (ahem) we did spend a lot of time outdoors and the grounds were just lovely with an exceptionally beautiful landscape of mostly California natives with some Mediterranean plants covering acres and acres of the grounds. I was so impressed with it that I was inspired to come home and look for ways to incorporate more natives in my own landscaping plan, although I do already have a lot now, I can always add more. I do think it is not as easy as it sounds to…
  • Getting Back to the Garden

    Sheila
    6 Jan 2015 | 3:49 pm
     It has been a while since I have been able to spend any time in the garden, let alone write about the garden, but today was a beautiful day with the temperature of about 80 degrees and I finished my "must do" list and headed over to the nursery to see what was going on there. I had just written a post for the UCCE Master Gardener blog about fertilizing citrus this month along the coast and I decided that I had better follow up on the dose I gave last summer that resulted in a bumper crop of grapefruit and lemons. I have a feeling my garden helper is a bit frugal with the organic…
  • Refreshing a Winter Focal Point

    Sheila
    21 Nov 2014 | 8:25 am
    October 2014 Somehow it has worked out that most of our entertaining at the SJC house takes place in the winter months. Dozens of relatives come from all over the country to visit and dare I say hundreds of friends stop by some time between Halloween and Valentines Day. Needless to say, they are certainly missing the prime time in the gardens which I would have to say is spring, followed by summer and then fall. November 2014By the time winter rolls around most of the prettiest scenes are tired and taking a rest. Roses are either spindly or cut back, most iris are sleeping and of course…
  • Getting Busy

    Sheila
    20 Nov 2014 | 10:21 am
    I have been very busy recently and happily I can say that some of that activity has been in the garden! After almost a year of a bum knee and a really sore shoulder I am feeling better and getting out and getting my hands dirty this past month. Of course the up coming holidays are the main focus and sprucing everything up for the big Thanksgiving family reunion is a priority followed by the Christmas holiday events, but there are still just a lot of fall chores that I am happy to be able to undertake this year. I've planted some bulbs, cut back some shrubs, and added some fall annuals. We…
 
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    Blog the blogging nurseryman- The Golden Gecko Garden Center

  • 31 Dec 2014 | 8:07 am

    trey pitsenberger
    31 Dec 2014 | 8:07 am
  • Blueberries in your garden

    Trey Pitsenberger
    2 Dec 2014 | 12:11 pm
    It seems blueberries have become one of the most popular home fruits to grow. Especially here in California where blueberry culture was difficult in the past. New varieties, many of which are known as "Southern Highbush", have enabled Californian's to grow fantastic fruit.  These Southern Highbush types we're bred for heat resistance, unlike the blueberries know as Northern Lowbush. Northern Lowbush we're the only types available to us in the day, and getting them to produce was difficult. The Southern Highbush have changed all that.We sell 5 varieties of blueberries. All have been…
  • 2000 year old seed grows "one of a kind" tree

    Trey Pitsenberger
    5 Nov 2014 | 10:55 am
    During excavations of  Herod the Great's fortified mountaintop palace at Masada in Israel, archaeologists uncovered a cache of seeds stowed away in a clay jar about 2,000 years ago. Botanical researcher Elaine Solowey received one of them for an experimental planting in 2005. "Solowey planted a seed in a pot at Kibbutz Ketura in January, immediately after receiving them. Since then, it has sprouted into a seedling, produced its first blossom in 2011, and now flourishes as a young date palm. It has been nick-named 'Methuselah', after the oldest person who ever lived, according…
  • The natives are restless

    trey pitsenberger
    24 Sep 2014 | 3:00 am
    In this case the natives are insects native to Africa, who have decided that California is the place they ought to be. The Bagrada Bug arrived in Southern California just 6 years ago and already had decides to move north. The experts were hoping the colder winters might kill them off, but they decided to hide in the top layers of soil during winter. Come spring they emerge to eat stuff like "cabbage, kale, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts and broccoli, but they don't appear to be picky eaters. They have been known to feed on a wide variety of garden vegetables in California, including green…
  • Becoming indispensable

    trey pitsenberger
    28 Aug 2014 | 1:02 am
    One of the nicest comments to hear from customers is, "we want you to be here for us". They sometimes preface it with, "we shop here because...we want you to be here for us". While it may not keep you in business, or cause you to become profitable, it is an important first step. The goal is to find out why you are indispensible to them. Let everything else fall to the wayside. Becoming indispensable to your customers means you provide them with products, or a feeling, that causes them to go out of their way to maintain. There are cheaper places to shop. There might be more convenient places…
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    Terra Nova Ecological Landscaping blog

  • Spin City: Passion for pedal-powered permaculture

    ken
    16 Jan 2015 | 1:29 pm
    Ken Foster rides one of Terra Nova Ecological Landscaping’s rigs to a job site in Santa Cruz. (Shmuel Thaler — Santa Cruz Sentinel) By Karen Kefauver, Spinn City POSTED: 01/15/15, 10:23 PM PST  If you’re headed south along the coast next Tuesday, there’s a chance you’ll spot Ken Foster bicycling from Santa Cruz to Monterey County on Highway 1. He’ll be traveling at a leisurely pace, soaking in the scenery and pedaling his recumbent bike. Foster, 57, estimates the ride will take between five and seven hours depending on if he “dawdles.” During the approximately…
  • Permaculture With Terra Nova -Two day intensive

    ken
    10 Jan 2015 | 1:23 pm
    Learn about Permaculture How the design principles can inspire true environmental stewardship and urban sustainability or simply to create an amazing productive garden Dates: May 2 – May 3, 2015 Time: 9:00 am to 5:00 pm each day Place: Monterey Bay Marine Sanctuary Exploration Center 35 Pacific Ave. Santa Cruz, CA. Ken Foster instructor / facilitator Some recent work by Terra Nova Cost: $175 Shared Pot-luck lunch •    Early bird discount 15% off up to Feb. 28th •    Limited to 20 seats •    Refund policy 90% refund Jan. – Feb. •    50% refund Mar.– April 10th…
  • Our ‘Tread Lightly’ Indiegogo campaign has completed.

    ken
    17 Dec 2014 | 9:59 am
    Was our ‘Tread Lightly’ Indiegogo campaign a wild success?… No, not exactly. Was it a success? …Yes it was! Thank you! Now that the ‘Tread Lightly’ campaign is over my honest reflection is that Crowdfunding is a bit of an enigma with tons of exciting potential. An alluring mystery. I have had a lot of advice on how a campaign aught to be run. It was clear I was making some missteps even early on. And there was a learning curve like you wouldn’t believe. We set the start date and then reset that date when it was clear we needed more preparation time. The night of the…
  • Today is the last day of our Indiegogo ‘Tread Lightly’ campaign, your last chance to donate to the cause!

    ken
    16 Dec 2014 | 10:33 am
    Our Tread Lightly Indiegogo campaign that started Oct. 17th is over at the end if the day today, Dec. 16.  We have raised $2,000.00 so far. *OUR NEW GOAL is at least $2,000 – To Outfit Two Bike Gardeners for the Road* Terra Nova is a low-tech business operating a high-tech funding campaign, and it’s a learning curve (yikes!). Clearly $50k was way too high of a goal. However, we have authentically redefined a more modest success for the last 3 weeks of the campaign. We hope you will support us. Our new goal is to raise atleast $2,000  to purchase two custom-made bike trailers, two good…
  • BEFORE AND AFTER

    ken
    19 Nov 2014 | 1:12 pm
    TRANSFORMED LANDSCAPES 2014        
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    HAWAII GARDENING

  • 13 Jan 2015 | 10:30 pm

    Janice
    13 Jan 2015 | 10:30 pm
    Meanwhile, Back at the Compost PileThis blog is currently on HIATUS. Posts, links and comments are not being updated. But you can check out the older posts if you like.
  • Don't Know Jack about Exotic Fruits?

    Janice
    20 Dec 2012 | 6:59 pm
    Does this jackfruit at my friend's organic fruit farm look really miffed? Do you think it may be because it's been almost two years since my last post? Sorry!So what in the world have I been up to, you may ask. Well, among the many adventures I had during this blog's hiatus I had the wonderful opportunity to learn more about Hawaii's fruitopia, that is, the luscious world of exotic fruits and the fascinating people promoting Island sustainability. This was when I was on an assignment for Hana Hou! magazine, Hawaiian Airline's in-flight publication. Actually, I think what Mr. Jackfruit is…
  • Artichoke Lei

    Janice
    4 Mar 2011 | 3:17 pm
    I grew up next to the beach on Oahu, and occasionally living in the chilly uplands gets a little wearisome especially toward the end of February when snow can still dust Mauna Kea and I’m huddled around the fireplace for yet another night. However, I have found there is one advantage to living in the damp, cooler climes of Hawaii’s higher elevations: Growing artichokes! Yes indeed, it’s possible to grow choke (pardon my Hilo pidgin) artichokes in Hawaii if you have the right conditions, as in what Volcano offers.Artichoke likes cool, misty weather, lots of space (about six feet apart),…
  • At Your Convenience

    Janice
    27 Oct 2010 | 7:08 pm
    Right outside my kitchen I keep herbs and greens handy. I have mizuna, bok choy and tatsoi in window boxes so I can drop them into hot ramen or add last to stir fries. There's container celery to flavor soups and salads, "Red Sails" lettuce for sandwiches and salads. Two kinds of mint: spearmint for mojitos and peppermint for, well, whatever. Of course, there's the ever-perservering aloe plant, loyally braving the Volcano cold so that I'll have it ready for those occasional burns when I'm a klutz around the Wedgewood stove, and for sunburn when the beach fries my brain and I bask too long in…
  • Rain!

    Janice
    1 Oct 2010 | 1:10 am
    We've been having a terrible drought here. But tonight just before sunset we got a shower! My thirsty plants on the lanai, in the garden and the rainforest are so grateful. Ahhhh....
 
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    Turned Earth

  • Two Small Stone Projects

    Michael O'Connell
    20 Jan 2015 | 4:19 pm
    Winter’s slower pace provides more schedule flexibility to fit in smaller projects. These two projects, one in Mill Valley and the other in Corte Madera had two things in common- small spaces and new Indian Sandstone. In Corte Madera we installed a new Navajo Brown Indian Sandstone patio. This created a more elegant and usable space, with screening achieved with Bamboo in concrete pots. In Mill Valley, we installed new Navajo Dusk Indian Sandstone over an existing concrete path, making an attractive new entry. “Our project was a rather small one involving our front entry,…
  • 2014 Project Highlights

    Michael O'Connell
    7 Jan 2015 | 8:29 pm
    While we previously highlighted work in progress construction photos on our last best of 2014 post, here are some finished project photos from our landscapes completed in 2014.     Related posts: 2014- The Year in Construction This past year brought some interesting commercial and residential projects to... New Project- Tiburon We are excited to be working with Caletti Construction on... More Examples of our Blog We seem to be finding our way into several postings...
  • 2014- The Year in Construction

    Michael O'Connell
    1 Jan 2015 | 3:15 pm
    This past year brought some interesting commercial and residential projects to O’Connell Landscape. We worked on a variety of jobs large and small in Marin and Sonoma Counties. See the gallery below for examples of our construction work in progress from 2014.       Related posts: It’s a Bloom Year There has been quite a show this spring as fruit... Kentfield Estate Project We are working on a large home renovation in Kent... Petaluma Front Yard Makeover This project in Petaluma was in need of some help,...
  • The Drought’s Over in Marin

    Michael O'Connell
    24 Dec 2014 | 3:33 pm
    With all this wonderful rain in the month of December, MMWD’s reservoirs are spilling. While the media is quick to point out that the drought is not over, one thing is clear, for this year at least there will be no water restrictions or drought in Marin, which gets 75% of its water from reservoir storage at Mt. Tam and Nicasio. In Sonoma County things are also looking good with Lake Mendocino and Lake Sonoma at about 80%. Links: MMWD Water Watch Sonoma County Water Agency Reservoir Levels Related posts: MMWD’s Long Term Water Plan There was an editorial in the Marin IJ from…
  • Completed Project- Sonoma

    Michael O'Connell
    2 Nov 2014 | 7:42 pm
    This project in Sonoma was a complete make over of a front and back yard for a residence a few blocks from the Sonoma Square. The design focused on the back yard, with a new patio, seat wall and shade arbor framing paver garden paths. In the front yard a new matching bluestone walkway, concrete driveway, and privacy fence changed the look of the home from the street. O’Connell Landscape just completed a landscape project for our front and back yards.  The design, quality of workmanship, plant selection and his crew exceeded our expectations.  His attention to detail is reflected in…
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    Skippy's Vegetable Garden

  • the eve of the big snow storm?...

    kathy
    26 Jan 2015 | 2:51 pm
    All day today I've been hearing the words "historic", "epic", "snow-mageddon", "a top 5 storm". We are predicted to get 2-3 feet of snow with 50 mph winds all night and all day tomorrow. Other words I hear are "hunker down", "school closures", "state-of-emergency", "power outages expected". Wow. Well, I think we're prepared. We have a generator and plenty of food (and beverages) in the house. The gardens will be happy with the snow cover. The chickens are snug. Their small coop is solid wood, their big run has a new glass roof and we lowered the tarps that protect the sides. I filled their…
  • new seed trays to try out

    kathy
    25 Jan 2015 | 5:52 pm
    Here are the new seed cells I'm going to try this year. I'm still deciding what to plant in which. 'Til now, I've only used the bottom right trays, which have 48 cells per 10-20 tray. The new trays I'll try have 24, 128 and 200 cells per 10-20 tray. I got my seedlings shelves out and stacked the trays on them. They're ready and waiting. I'll look for some soil mix. I think I have some out in the shed leftover from last year. I'm working on setting up a convenient watering method as Pam commented these smaller cells will dry out fast. Below are some old photos I took at a nearby greenhouse a…
  • my last clove of garlic

    kathy
    25 Jan 2015 | 5:26 pm
    I planted 75 cloves of garlic last fall. It gave me a pretty good harvest. There were a few more rotted coves than usual, but my main wish is that I had more heads. I've had years when my harvest lasts til April. I was jealous to read a blog where the gardener planted 500 cloves of garlic!! Wow. This fall again I planted 75 cloves. I'll have to think about a way to plant more next fall. I would need to use a second bed. Just over 100 cloves would be nice. I used to plant 100 cloves, but they were smaller and I planted them closer together. I have a real nice seed stock from Territorial now,…
  • new computer - new seed cells

    kathy
    24 Jan 2015 | 12:22 pm
    I have a new computer. I'm inside on a snowy day, working on setting it up. Its a fantastic touch screen, high-res Dell running Windows 8.1. (I had a hard time deciding Mac vs PC, but have run PC's for the past 20 years and didn't want to make the switch - learning windows 8 was enough - a one day effort with on-line videos. So I will have the "worker drone" image and not the "creative" image computer. Oh well.) The challenge for me now is to get the new computer running - so I'm not always relying on the old one and playing with the cool new features of the new one. So, I'm going to try to…
  • chicken coop with a glass covered run

    kathy
    19 Jan 2015 | 5:47 pm
    I think this is the reason my chickens are laying nearly an egg a day in the coldest and darkest days of winter. Its my husband's invention and creation. During our house renovation, we needed up with two unneeded large panes of glass. A wood frame was designed to fit these panes. The panes and heavy and weren't easy to hoist up onto the frame. I love the result! Can't say I'm hearing any complains from the hens. In this last picture, snow has covered the roof. We clear this with a big ice scraper and the hens get their sunlight back. And we get out eggs. If need be, we'd lower the blue tarp…
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    Ilona's Garden Journal

  • The Requirements of Age: Updating

    Ilona Erwin
    17 Jan 2015 | 8:40 am
    The photo I add when I have nothing else to add (placeholder photo?)This is an old blog, as blogs go.I find it has been in dire need of updating, as I try to replace missing photos for the related links feature. Many of the older links had no pictures, an early complaint of some of my readers, and this has proven to be a great liability in modern blogging practice.So updating has been my main blog occupation lately.It is no surprise to many that have been online for awhile, that many blogs have simply gone missing, too. Promising writers and photographers simply closed up shop, which left me…
  • New Year, New Look, New Plans

    Ilona Erwin
    6 Jan 2015 | 6:03 am
    What's Ahead Christmas Roses More Video in 2015 The blog has a new look. In keeping with the changes of the internet,i.e. more mobile users, I attempt to create a more functional design. You may notice the emphasis on including a video gallery. That is the direction I hope to go this year- always choosing the most challenging option possible, I guess.The important thing for me is to not worry about how amateur I look in the process of the learning curve, but producing something useful and helpful to other gardeners.Why would I want to make more videos? Probably because I like to…
  • 2014 Garden Retrospective

    Ilona Erwin
    3 Jan 2015 | 12:09 am
    American Meadows had sent me some seeds. They bloomed well, but I didn't get many pictures of them. I was neglectful of the garden, while visiting family for almost 2 months.In many ways, the garden season of 2014 was challenging. The losses were probably the result of cumulative stresses, but I am sure that the very hard winter contributed to the vulnerability and subsequent losses. I hope my Hinoki cypress survives another year, but it lost its top portion to disease. I lost an Arborvitae to the worst bagworm infestation I have ever seen. Nothing I did stemmed the ultimate…
  • Rural Landscape

    Ilona Erwin
    12 Dec 2014 | 7:54 am
    Shepherds from my nativity setI've been in the middle of my Christmas devotions on my Advent blog. While writing about the shepherds watching their flocks (from the Christmas story), I thought about the fact that while sheep were once a common sight in fields around here, there has not been a flock in recent years, now that I think about it. I know that agriculture business changes quite a bit and sheep raising in Ohio was once big business, before it all moved out West. Then some years ago there seemed to be a resurgence of flocks, so that they were a common, if not ubiquitous…
  • Winter Arrived Early

    Ilona Erwin
    25 Nov 2014 | 2:30 am
    Blustery Day, Past Year's LossesToday is briefly warmer and blustery with high winds and rain, but it is more like a January thaw than the beige autumn Indian summer that we might normally expect. I don't know that there is a clear sense of "normal" in our gardens anymore. Still, the patterns of the seasons are not so far off that they would be unrecognizable.Ignore those weeds.... I do The winds have blown the dawdling leaves off the trees, so I asked my helpers (grown children) to rake up the yard again. The Red Oak still is loathe to let go of his leaves. Despite the fact that…
 
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    Bananas.org

  • Dwarf Gros Michel Wanted

    Yushatak
    26 Jan 2015 | 10:31 am
    I'd like to buy a tc (a seedling from tissue culture if I understand) or pup of one of the dwarf Gros Michel varieties (Coco and Highgate, from my reading). I've never owned or grown any food, so don't mistake my knowledge of terms for knowledge about what I'm doing, heh. I've always loved "banana-flavored" things and when I found out that this was the flavor of another variety of bananas no longer sold here in the US I figured maybe I'd get a plant of my own. I live in a 7a USDA zone, so I figured I'd grow it in the house and maybe buy and transfer it to a greenhouse if it seems…
  • Gmo mosquitoes

    sunfish
    25 Jan 2015 | 1:51 pm
    Florida Keys: Millions of genetically modified mosquitoes could be released to help combat viral diseases - Sun Sentinel :woohoonaner:
  • hi i'm new and here's my pics. please help me identify this south african banana

    Steyner
    25 Jan 2015 | 6:42 am
    hi guys, first timer here and need some help identifying my new baby please. I stumbled onto this site as i am trying to identify which species of banana was sold to me at the local nursery. Im based in j'burg south africa and generally bananas are cultivated in the much more northern regions of the country and the lowveld, so up here on the highveld of gauteng the nursery staff has no clue. they hardly speak english and only know one species: banana yes yes banana (wish i could do the zulu accent for you) In fact i was lucky to find one as i had spent days driving around town visiting all…
  • banana plant in south africa - need identifying please

    Steyner
    25 Jan 2015 | 2:10 am
    hi guys, first timer here and need some help identifying my new baby please. I stumbled onto this site as i am trying to identify which species of banana was sold to me at the local nursery. Im based in j'burg south africa and generally bananas are cultivated in the much more northern regions of the country and the lowveld, so up here on the highveld of gauteng the nursery staff has no clue. they hardly speak english and only know one species: banana yes yes banana (wish i could do the zulu accent for you) In fact i was lucky to find one as i had spent days driving around town visiting all…
  • How Long to Ripen

    gwp1616
    24 Jan 2015 | 7:00 pm
    I cut down a bunch of bananas about 3 weeks ago because of the cold. They were basically fully mature in size, but were completely green. I have been hanging the bunch in my indoor laundry room the entire time. So far, they are still hard and totally green. How long should it take to begin turning yellow and softening? I wasn't sure if I should start separating the hands to help. Please help me, Thanks
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    North Coast Gardening

  • Attracting Birds in Winter: Creating a Year-Round Habitat Garden

    Genevieve
    21 Jan 2015 | 4:15 pm
    When attracting birds to the garden, we often think of setting out some bird feeders and maybe a bird bath. But like us, wild birds need a variety of things to thrive, and especially in inclement weather. As we lose many of our natural lands to development, supporting local and migrating birds through all of the seasons becomes ever more important. Today, we talk with Kim Eierman about how gardeners can attract and help out wild birds in winter. Eierman is an incredibly knowledgeable writer (catch her over at her blog, EcoBeneficial and speaker who teaches at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden, The…
  • Pruning Ornamental Grasses: The Ultimate Guide

    Genevieve
    12 Jan 2015 | 7:04 pm
    Though most gardeners feel some level of confidence when it comes to pruning perennials and even woody shrubs and trees, when it comes to pruning ornamental grasses, even the serious gardener can feel some confusion. Each type of grass has different requirements, which makes it hard because there’s not one rule of thumb which fits all. While some varieties look shaggy and sad if not whacked to the ground each January, for other types of grass this treatment sounds the death knell. Not to worry. I’ve got you covered with a list of the ornamental grass varieties that are grown most…
  • 2015 Gardening Trend Predictions

    Genevieve
    2 Jan 2015 | 5:18 pm
    Drumroll please! As we jump into a new year, it’s a North Coast Gardening tradition to take a wild and sometimes partially-accurate stab at guessing the hottest trends in the upcoming year, if only so that we can all look back at the end of said year and have a laugh. Fun, right? Let’s jump right in! Cocktail gardening without the buzz Photo credit Amy Stewart. Maybe it’s just the crowd I run in, but I think I honestly spend more time looking at cute cocktail recipes and planning to grow cocktail garnishes than I do actually drinking cocktails, and unfortunately my friends are similarly…
  • Beguiling Bergenias: 5 Varieties for Dry Shade

    Linda
    9 Dec 2014 | 11:54 am
    While many gardeners find shade challenging enough, add in dry soil and deer, and the list of plants which will perform gets shorter and shorter. Yet Bergenia, an unassuming perennial with leathery evergreen leaves, does admirably under all of these conditions. Though you may have grown Bergenia in the past and been unimpressed by its tendency to sprawl, new varieties are smaller and form petite clumps which stay full and attractive year-round. One of the things I particularly love about Bergenia is that the large, rounded leaves are a strong textural contrast to so many of the finer-leaved…
  • Amazon Deals: The Drunken Botanist and Sunset Magazine

    Genevieve
    1 Dec 2014 | 8:26 pm
    This is just a quick post to let you guys know that I discovered two great deals on Amazon today. Amy Stewart’s latest on sale Fans of Amy Stewart will be thrilled to know that the digital version of The Drunken Botanist is on sale for only $1.99. Yes people, for the princely sum of two dollars you too can have all the stories, history, and quirky facts about the plants which make up your favorite alcoholic beverages, right in the palm of your hands on your smart phone, Kindle, or tablet. Wicked Plants is also on sale. $5 magazine steals I also found some $5 magazine deals. The plant…
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    High Altitude Gardening

  • Wordless Wednesday: The Mouse Hunter

    21 Jan 2015 | 10:39 am
    For more Wordless Wednesday participants, click here!Follow @Kate_HAGardens
  • Pesky Pests

    14 Jan 2015 | 3:07 pm
    'Twas a winter wonderland out on my deck this morning! :))  Probably looks frigid but it was 30 degrees ~ warm enough for this snow lover to stand there with the door wide open, enjoying a cup o' my famous cowgirl coffee. (More accurately, that cowgirl coffee is infamous. I'm a devout lover of French Roast and the blend is too strong for most anyone but me.)I was delighted to see the snow. The epic cold, followed by unnaturally warm days, was really messing with my mood.It is January, after all. My snowshoes are begging for attention.And, so are my windowsill flowers. I gave everyone a…
  • Balmy.

    8 Jan 2015 | 12:35 pm
    This impressive fellow was keeping an eye on me while I visited the horses. One of the things I'll always miss about living in the country.'Tis a balmy 48 degrees! One week after it was 10 below zero. Windows are open, breeze blowing in. I hear the drip, drip of icicles melting away after 7 short days of real winter.Sable has the best view of local ski resorts, but she doesn't seem to care. Way more interested in a cookie.As the weather warmed, I scurried over to the stables to take the coats off the horses. They were super friendly and kind of sassy ~ kicking up their heels and running in…
  • Funny Side of the Street

    1 Jan 2015 | 2:37 pm
    This is what it looks like out my window when it is 6 degrees below zero.New Year's Day. A New Year! A blank slate! Anything can happen. And, it probably will.I like watching birds out my window. Though I'm not too savvy on the subject. This is the red one.'Twas an excruciating long year and I have high hopes for a better 2015. I kicked it off okay. By kicking the cigarettes down the toilet around 7 p.m. last night. Surprised? Everyone is. NO ONE knew.We all have our dirty little secrets. Some of us keep those secrets pretty close to the vest.So far, I’m not having any difficulty ~ though…
  • Jingle Jangle

    13 Dec 2014 | 11:48 am
    I wish there was a fragrance app I could add to this blog! The sweet perfume of Paper Whites fill the air. It's intoxicating. Paper WhitesThey're just about the easiest (and fastest) indoor bulb to grow ~ but they can be a little dickens. Some sprout incredibly fast. Others, quite slow. The only guarantee is how delighted you'll be once they bloom.It's sort of the same situation with Amaryllis ~ some fast, some slow ~ and I could jinx the entire holiday season by saying this...But, I think I timed it right this year! This big, beautiful bud should be fully open by December 25th.Update on the…
 
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    Ewa in the Garden

  • 20 Best Post in 2014 You Don't Want to Miss... aha?

    10 Jan 2015 | 7:52 am
    While going already up and forward to 2015, but also looking backwards at what 2014 has brought, I just made a list of best posts of Ewa In The Garden in 2014. Just in case if you have missed any them, you can now go through the list and choose which one to check.  They got most hits this year and when I mean the number of hits it counts in tens of thousands for each post.  Catch up now
  • Merry Christmas from Portugal

    23 Dec 2014 | 10:30 am
  • Plants that bloom in winter: ALOE ARBORESCENS

    22 Dec 2014 | 1:51 pm
    What can I say to express it? Enormous, fascinating, breathtaking flowering you can experience?  And that would be not enough to say how magical moment you enter  while bumping suddenly on the sea of flowering aloe!   This very modestly looking plant, so popular as indoor plants in colder climates, can’t be suspected of producing so spectacular inflorescence (the entire stem with
  • Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day - December Flowers in Algarve, Portugal

    17 Dec 2014 | 11:37 pm
    I am truly happy to share with you today the December flowers of Algarve, Portugal. Winter here is the season I would call Spring to my standards. 17-19C/65F in the day, 7C/45F at night. That's what I am used to when the Spring is warm in my country (Poland). Yep. Warm. Sometimes its colder in the Summer :( Climate is a great unjustice...  Algarve looks so different than in the Summer.
  • 3 Gardening Books for Christmas [REVIEWED]

    12 Dec 2014 | 11:32 pm
    Are you are looking for the garden related book for Christmas for yourself or someone else? I realized that I have reviewed 3 great gardening books here at Ewa in the Garden, so maybe this could be the moment to start to build up a list of books which could be a great gift idea. I linked each book to the full review page and also to the Amazon page. Enjoy! 1. Sissinghurst: Vita
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    Your Small Kitchen Garden

  • Vegetable Seed and Corona Tools Giveaway 2015!

    Daniel Gasteiger
    25 Jan 2015 | 11:11 pm
    The Quickest Way to Enter The quickest way to enter the giveaway: Leave a comment on this blog post that shares an entertaining gardening experience. Send an email that includes a mailing address and the email address you used on the comment form. Click this link to send the email. Read the rest of the post for instructions on how to increase your chances of winning the tools and receiving free seeds. This giveaway ends on Friday, February 15 at midnight. This year’s seed giveaway once again features the chili-pepper-shaped paste tomatoes descended from two fruits given to me by an area…
  • Happy Birthday, Bren!

    Daniel Gasteiger
    3 Dec 2014 | 3:03 pm
    The part of our visit that most resembled a formal tour began with the flower bed in front of Bren’s house. It was instantly apparent Bren’s garden plan preserves habitat for felis catus, the domestic cat. If you spend any time online and you’re serious about gardening, you’re likely to have heard of Brenda Haas. The curator of #gardenchat, Bren is a garden photographer and a social media guru. I got to visit Brenda at her home earlier this year and I wrote about the experience in a post titled Visit in Brenda Haas’s Garden. There you’ll find information about #gardenchat and how…
  • Crazy Squash Story

    Daniel Gasteiger
    19 Nov 2014 | 8:37 pm
    You could describe a neck pumpkin as a megagigantic butternut squash. This one is about 30 inches from stem to blossom end. At harvest it weighed 19 pounds. In central Pennsylvania, people favor neck pumpkins (also known as Pennsylvania Dutch Crookneck Squash) for pumpkin pie. This same squash appears (ripe) in two other photos in this post. I had some fun with squash this year. Actually, I had a series of fortunate unlikely accidents. Each one was minor and seemingly unimportant, but when I think it through, the accidents together make a story worth sharing. I present the accidents in the…
  • Bloom Day After Freeze

    Daniel Gasteiger
    15 Nov 2014 | 8:59 pm
    My pea plants have been in bloom for four weeks, but cool autumn temperatures have slowed growth. I’d bet many blossoms are all of four weeks old and still looking fresh. The few pods that remain from blooms that have dropped petals haven’t even hinted at thickening. I might have harvested them to eat as snow peas, but I couldn’t spot even half a dozen on 28 foot-rows of plants. A two-night deep freeze has finished off the pea plants. Just last night we experienced a deep freeze—down to about 24F degrees. It was cold enough to wipe out almost all the annuals I grow in my kitchen…
  • Wordless Wednesday at Autumn’s End

    Daniel Gasteiger
    5 Nov 2014 | 8:58 pm
     
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    A Gardener in Progress

  • I'm still here!

    Catherine@AGardenerinProgress
    1 Jan 2015 | 7:59 pm
    Every so often I get an email or a message on Facebook wondering if everything is okay.  It's nice to know people still check here!  I'm still here and things have been good.  Blogging seems to have dropped to the bottom of my list of things I have time for.Since I last posted in March I was very busy trying to finish my first years worth of volunteer hours for the Master Gardener program.  So, I have spent many hours helping at the Bothell Children's Garden both working in the garden and helping with the preschool program, helping with the Bothell High Culinary Arts…
  • March sun!

    Catherine@AGardenerinProgress
    13 Mar 2014 | 5:05 pm
     After record breaking rain in February and the first part of March (in the first week we got more than double the monthly average), we have finally had a break in the rain and clouds and have seen the sun!  Everything seems to be better when the sun comes out, at least that's how I feel, especially after so much rain.One good thing about the ground being wet was that the weeds and other plants I wanted to dig up came out very easily!The fish are much more active now.  Lots of bulbs poking up.Golden Mock Orange leaves are so pretty when the sun shines through them.Hellebore…
  • Even more neglected!

    Catherine@AGardenerinProgress
    28 Jan 2014 | 2:39 pm
    Well I thought after my last post that it had been awhile between posts, but I think it was even longer in between this time.  This last summer, fall and winter have been pretty tough and quite busy making the blog absolutely last on the list of things to be able to do.  I had mentioned in some recent posts that my Dad had been sick with melanoma and sadly he passed away in September.  That was and has been very hard for my mom and sisters and the rest of our family.Sweet Pea started high school (high school here starts in 10th grade) and the Littlest Gardener is now in first…
  • Neglected

    Catherine@AGardenerinProgress
    19 Aug 2013 | 2:08 pm
    Neglected, that's how a lot of things have gotten over this summer.  My garden being one and my blog has been getting more and more neglected too.Family things going on, as well as kid activities have given me very little time to be out and take care of the garden.  What free time I've had has been spent on watering.  It has been an unusually dry and warm summer.  I'm not complaining and neither are the tomatoes though!I thought I would give the blog a little attention today with some of what the garden looks like right now.  Luckily weeds are smaller than the plants,…
  • Mid -March and the signs of spring keep on coming.

    Catherine@AGardenerinProgress
    14 Mar 2013 | 12:26 pm
    We've enjoyed the few sunny days we've had, as well as the ones that are at least dry enough to go out to the garden and do a few little jobs here and there.  Plants seem to be sprouting everywhere.  As usual in spring there are some "missing" plants.  I'm always disappointed when plants I really like don't return.  I'm not sure what I could really blame them not coming back on.  It wasn't really that cold, the rain seemed about normal and we only had one day of snow.  But the upside is room for new plants!The little Violas that I planted in fall are all sending…
 
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    Veggie Gardener: Organic Vegetable Gardening Tips

  • The Unloved but Delicious Black Heirloom Tomato

    Veggie Gardener
    26 Jan 2015 | 2:13 am
    Ok they aren’t really black in most cases, but more a shade of dark purple to, in extreme cases, chocolate, but these wonderful heirloom varieties often date back hundreds of years and range from such rich beefsteak tomatoes as the Purple Cherokee to the berry sized Black Cherry. Popular varieties Many of these are Russian/Ukrainian […]
  • 5 Indoor Garden Plants to Help get you Through Winter

    Veggie Gardener
    19 Jan 2015 | 1:31 am
    As the winds blow snow piles up and ice accumulates, we find ourselves looking out of the fogged up window into our grey garden and sigh. However, the savvy gardener without a greenhouse keeps in mind these cold days and moves to set up a small indoor grow for when Jack Frost comes. Here are […]
  • Seven Delicious Fall Vegetables, Besides Pumpkins (with Recipes)

    Lauren M
    8 Oct 2014 | 1:47 pm
    I love fall and the variety of vegetables that are now readily at my disposable. Unlike the light and airy offerings of summer, fall veggies tend to be savory comfort foods that help take your mind off the cold setting in outside, and the gardens that will soon be freezing over. Unfortunately, with our culture’s […]
  • Tips for Fall Garden Preparation

    Chris
    2 Oct 2014 | 6:34 am
    As the summer season comes to a close, it’s time take stock of the condition of your garden. If you have decided to plant a second season harvest, there is a good chance you have already removed the debris from your summer plants. But, if you have yet to plant your fall crops or are […]
  • Zucchini Three Ways

    Lauren M
    25 Sep 2014 | 7:22 am
    Garden tomatoes get a lot of attention, and even though their plants tend to produce in abundance, the other vegetable that is taking up a considerable amount of room in my kitchen is zucchini. Zucchini is one of the most versatile vegetables you can grow. Because of its mild taste, chefs have been known to […]
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    Miss Rumphius' Rules

  • Garden Travel: Back and Forth

    Susan aka Miss. R
    17 Jan 2015 | 4:59 am
    Next week I’m travelling again. This time on a search for garden antiques and vintage in the markets in Paris and parts of Belgium. I am continuing on to Rome for a few days of play after that. For the first time in many, many years, I won’t be taking my laptop with me.  I’ve traded the bulk and weight for my camera stuff and a tablet, so please follow my Instagram account for what I see and off the cuff inspiration. I’ve also been waiting a while to post about a visit to Vizcaya when I was in Miami in November so here it is.  I was enchanted.  For a landscape…
  • A Year beyond Miss R…

    Susan aka Miss. R
    27 Dec 2014 | 3:53 am
    When I become this inconsistent, something is going on.  What has it been?  Life and work. Yes, Miss R has been part of that mix, but 2014 has been an odd year. It’s been an awakening of sorts. I love to write, but there are things that are more important to me than that.  I’ve rediscovered my three happiest places –at the drawing board, indulging my gypsy feet, and my newest obsession, photography. I made a yearlong commitment to be the President of APLD and I wrote some interesting (I hope) stories for Garden Design magazine. I organized a European Objects and Oranments…
  • Garden Travel: Architectural Swoon in Miami Beach

    Susan aka Miss. R
    12 Nov 2014 | 3:39 am
    It’s no secret that I’ve been exploring Art Deco forms as inspiration for garden designs. I’ve always been drawn to the geometry and order, even when I started my career as a jewelry designer. Many of the preeminent decorative styles of the early 20th century have this type of order – Bauhaus, DeStijl, Viennese Secessionist (Josef Hoffman’s work is another swoon), Art Moderne and Art Deco and they still draw me in. When the opportunity to visit Miami Beach after the APLD Landscape Design Conference in Orlando last week I jumped at the chance.  There was much…
  • Garden Design Details: Stone at Skylands

    Susan aka Miss. R
    22 Oct 2014 | 4:18 am
    I hadn’t visited Skylands for about ten years, and never in the fall.  I went hoping to see the last of the fall foliage and instead found stonework that was interesting in its scope and full of ideas. Formerly an estate developed in the 1920s, it is now the New Jersey Botanical Garden and its stone American Tudor mansion  is better known than the gardens as a popular site for weddings. The stonework at Skylands is incredible and impressive…even if much of it is in need of repair.  There is both formal and rustic stonework and sometimes dressed stone is juxtaposed with…
  • Garden Design Details: Fall Beyond Foliage

    Susan aka Miss. R
    14 Oct 2014 | 5:08 am
    I had some rare time in between landscape design projects and clients last week and as I’ve been meaning to take my new camera lens out for a spin, I stopped by Frelinghuysen Arboretum in Morristown to search out some of the details of the season.  The focus of this public park is plants…not necessarily design although it has its designer-y moments.  I go here when I need a plant fix.  I send my landscape design students here to photograph and learn about plants just as I did years ago when I was learning. Grasses, asters, Japanese anemones and Monkshood were at their peak…
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    Journal

  • A Purple Autumn Perennial That Pops: Vernonia Lettermannii

    Allan
    4 Jan 2015 | 11:44 am
    Photo credit:The University of Tennessee, Institute of Agriculture A client gave me a mandate to enhance her flowerbed whenever I find a reliable perennial that blooms in purple. To please her, I scour my suppliers’ catalogues every spring looking for purple blooming plants. Then I test grow them for a few seasons to determine how they perform. Most are disappointing.  A few become messy or invasive. Some are short-lived plants lasting one or two seasons while others are unable to survive climate conditions in my growing zone. Happily, this year I discovered that the recently…
  • I Didn't Charge for My Gardening Advice.

    Allan
    21 Sep 2013 | 12:42 pm
    My financial adviser Billy called me the other day and asked if I would offer garden design advice to one of his neighbors. The wife is undergoing chemotherapy and has determined that a revamp of her tired-looking garden would be an ideal project to put back some balance into her life. Their garden truly needs a major overhaul and I was pleased to offer suggestions; I even recommended the name of a handy man that can do it economically. The husband is on board with the project and eager to make it happen. When I first heard the family name of these neighbors, I smiled. Their two children had…
  • Beauty of Moscow Is a Bittersweet Lilac Delight

    Allan
    1 Jul 2013 | 1:40 pm
    image:- portersnurseries.comIt should be no surprise to other passionate plant collectors that when syringa “Beauty of Moscow” a.k.a. Krasavitsa Moskvy, was introduced, I was compelled to buy one for myself. In truth, I didn’t need another lilac shrub. There were already too many growing in my garden. However, the hype accompanying this new plant was strong and, like many other gardeners who can hardly wait for the next wowing plant to become available, I succumbed to the charms of the publicity, without waiting for other gardeners’ feedback. As is often the case in my…
  • Spring Flowering Itoh Peonies, Better Than Ever.

    Allan
    11 Jun 2013 | 6:28 pm
    Itoh Peony, Kopper KettleIf The Disney Studios could have created a flower worthy of fairy-tale magic, it might have been an Itoh peony. Its surreal vivid color, perfectly contoured plant shape, and synthetic looking, sensuous and smooth petal-texture all belong on the storyboard of the most imaginative artist. Its powerful visual impact defies descriptive language while the camera only taunts the viewer as did stripper Miss Gypsy Rose Lee who revealed little while stimulating the imagination. Like many items that are too good to be true, the visceral experience that defines the Itoh peony…
  • Planning to Grow Eggplant?

    Allan
    31 May 2013 | 5:56 pm
    Image:- http://www.edenbrothers.com/store/eggplant_seeds_black_beauty.htmlAfter moving into my current home and garden over twenty years ago, I began to experiment growing fruits, vegetables, and herbs. I had little success because the fauna that visited my back yard feasted on the emerging foliage of most edible plant seedlings and always made sure to take a bite out of all produce that thrived. Eventual, I gave up trying to grow food and confined my gardening to perennials. However, if I could, I would have cultivated the fleshy, plump, oval-shaped, purple-black eggplant - Solanum melongena…
 
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    Garden Therapy

  • The Ultimate Seed Starting Guide

    Stephanie
    23 Jan 2015 | 11:15 am
    If you are hoping to sow seeds early in the season, and start your garden truly from scratch, then I have put together a guide covering the many essential posts from the Garden Therapy Seed Starting Series. You will find all that you need here to start a vegetable, herb, or flower garden from seed. From the basics for beginners to helpful tips and tricks for seasoned gardeners, you will be able to start your garden inside or out, with DIY containers or using my very favourite equipment, all naturally and without harmful chemicals. Seed Starting 101 Of course, the best place to start is at…
  • Pampering Peppermint Foot Scrub

    Stephanie
    20 Jan 2015 | 4:37 am
    What do achy, dry, rough feet need? A little pampering straight from the garden! This peppermint sugar scrub is made for feet. Exfoliating sugar and dried herbs will scrub away rough skin, coconut oil will soften cracks, and soothing peppermint essential oil will help to ease pain. Sugar scrubs are all the rage. You will find endless recipes for them just by scrolling pages of social media. What’s the appeal, you ask? First, they are simple to make, and you can usually find the ingredients you need around the house. This makes them a fabulous way to get started if you want to learn how…
  • Gluten Free Carrot Cupcakes + Whipped Lemon Coconut Cream

    Guest Blogger
    18 Jan 2015 | 5:55 am
    These gluten-free, dairy-free, nut-free, vegan recipe for carrot cupcakes is so delicious you will want to gobble up the whole batch. Oh, and they even come with a recipe for frosting that is too yummy for words! Don’t worry though, these are so healthy that you can snack away without the guilt.  You can feel good about these cupcakes because recipe comes to us from the healthy cooking guru and author of The Complete Coconut Cookbook: 200 Gluten-free, Grain-free and Nut-free Vegan Recipes Using Coconut Flour, Oil, Sugar and More, Camilla V Saulsbury. It’s time to eat cupcakes for…
  • Use This Raw Energy Shaker to Boost Nutrition at Every Meal

    Stephanie
    15 Jan 2015 | 5:44 am
    Hemp heart, chia seeds, buckwheat groats, and unhulled sesame seeds —a raw seed mix that will add a power punch of nutrition to your meals. Even better, this healthy treat is added to just about any meal, and can be brought along with you in this handy dandy shaker made out of a mason jar. Chia seeds. Acai. Goji berries. Kale. Blueberries. Hemp. Superfood. We’ve heard the term but what does it all mean? We are told we need to eat superfoods for optimal health, and they are all certainly part of my grocery list each week, but on a daily basis, I like to give my meals an extra little…
  • How to Grow Healthy Sunflower Sprouts in 2 Weeks

    Stephanie
    12 Jan 2015 | 11:16 am
    Sunflower micro greens are deliciously nutty with the flavour of raw sunflower seeds but with the texture of spinach. They are easy to grow in just about any container you can find around the house like clear plastic salad mix boxes. This post is a detailed set of instructions on how to grow deliciously, tasty sunflower microgreens that are healthy and (more importantly) safe to eat. Equipment: makeshift mini greenhouse or a store bought version like this one organic black oil sunflower seeds clean seedling mix potting soil small salad spinner Directions: No fancy equipment need for this…
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    Urban Organic Gardener

  • Gotham Greens Rooftop Farming | Built in Brooklyn

    UOG
    16 Jan 2015 | 9:30 am
    Gotham Greens is a startup in Gowanus focused on creating sustainable rooftop farming solutions by adding working greenhouses to office buildings throughout the 5 boroughs. Anthony talks to the Co-Founders and Chief Agricultural Officer about why they decided to found the company in Brooklyn.
  • Compass Green: Mobile Greenhouse visits Frontier Co-op | Real Food Media [VIDEO]

    UOG
    26 Dec 2014 | 7:55 pm
    A roving mobile greenhouse teaches children about where their food comes from. “Compass Green is a school garden on wheels. It is a fully functional mobile greenhouse built in the back of an 18-foot box truck that grows vegetables, grains and herbs and is powered by waste vegetable oil. The project teaches practical farming tools and raise awareness on sustainability through presentations, workshops, greenhouse tours at schools and events across the country.” -Organic Connections Compass Green: Mobile Greenhouse visits Frontier Co-op | Real Food Media Contest Film Library from…
  • Minnesotans Don’t Care About the Snow! Still growing strong.

    UOG
    19 Dec 2014 | 10:13 am
    StarTribune article and images from December 17 by Kim Palmer Season-extending structures are helping some Minnesota gardeners defy winter. Even in late November, Dawn Pape’s newest garden was a welcome sight for winter-weary eyes. In her Shoreview yard, under a blanket of snow, is a polycarbonate-topped, 2- by 8-foot box — or “cold frame.” Brush aside the show, lift the lid, and inside was an improbable vision: healthy spinach, kale, salad greens and other veggies growing in the frigid ground. “It’s so uplifting to see green when it’s kind of bleak outside,” said Pape, a…
  • Why Cant All Supermarkets Grow Food On The Roof Like This One Did?

    UOG
    3 Dec 2014 | 11:40 am
    Two London supermarkets are supporting the production of safe, healthy food by sourcing food locally, or growing it themselves. Jennifer Glasse reports from the British capital about the latest efforts in food sustainability, a term often associated with the developing world.
  • COMING SOON! Urban Organic Gardener’s MONTHLY SEED CLUB

    UOG
    25 Nov 2014 | 8:51 am
    Join the Urban Organic Gardener’s (UOG) SEED CLUB and get exclusive access to new and exotic seed varieties delivered to your door. Click here to fill out the online registration form.
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    Ecosystem Gardening

  • New Years in Nature

    Carole Sevilla Brown
    3 Jan 2015 | 4:05 am
    I really like to begin each new year the way I want the rest of the year to happen. So I always make sure I have cash in my pockets, make my wildlife garden resolutions (plans for what I want to add this year), and head outdoors to welcome the start of the New Year in nature. This year we packed up our Plott Hounds and headed to our favorite local nature patch, the John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge. Just last week I was lamenting how few ducks were at one of my favorite winter duck watching spots, the Cambridge, MD waterfront. There were fewer winter ducks than we expected because this…
  • River Health and Your Ecosystem Garden

    Carole Sevilla Brown
    30 Dec 2014 | 12:51 pm
    A birding adventure at the Cambridge Waterfront of the Choptank River on the eastern shore of Maryland to see the wintering ducks. Cambridge Waterfront You can tell a lot about the health of a river, lake, or ocean by the presence or absence of birds and other wildlife. If the river is healthy, you’ll see lots of ducks feeding there. Eagles, Osprey, and other birds of prey will fish there. And lots of other wildlife will make a home there, becoming part of the web of life of that body of water. Cambridge Waterfront View I learned quite a bit about river health when I was in grad school…
  • The Wild Turkey So Much More Than Thanksgiving Dinner

    Carole Sevilla Brown
    24 Nov 2014 | 2:55 pm
    Wild Turkey Male Tail The Wild Turkey is a very different creature than its factory farmed cousin. You can see them in forested areas with interspersed clearings, and even attract them to your wildlife garden. It’s the time of year when we’re in search of the perfect turkey to grace our Thanksgiving Day table. A time when family and friends gather round to celebrate all that we are grateful for. These birds with overplump breasts who are raised in cramped conditions at factory farms can barely fly because they’ve been bred to have giant breasts so they will quickly fly from…
  • Water Taxi Ecotour

    Carole Sevilla Brown
    14 Aug 2014 | 12:02 pm
    Snowy Egret Marine ecosystem tour with Cape Water Taxi in Indian River Bay, Delaware. Thanks to my dear friends Linda and Donna who invited us to spend a long weekend with them at their home in Lewes, Delaware–a retreat they fondly call the Redneck Riviera. We got to celebrate Linda’s birthday by joining her on The Cape Water Taxi ecotour through Indian River Bay in southern Delaware: Schedule a 90-minute tour with us and find out where the Fiddler Crab got its name, if the Glossy Ibis is really glossy or where the term “crazy as a loon” came from. You will have an opportunity…
  • Late Summer Birds At An Urban Oasis

    Carole Sevilla Brown
    5 Aug 2014 | 7:05 pm
    Birds of late summer at the urban oasis of John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge near the Philadelphia, PA airport 6:30 am alarm clock on a drizzly Sunday morning. Sounds like a great reason to stay in bed, snug as a bug under the covers. But this morning I have a wonderful reason to drag my buns out of bed. It’s time to see what birds can be found on this August morning at my local wildlife refuge near the Philadelphia airport. John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge is a welcome natural respite from the concrete jungle that is the city of Philadelphia, providing habitat for many birds and a…
 
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    The Garden Plot

  • Crown Bees Signs with Garden Media Group for 2015

    Garden Media Group
    13 Jan 2015 | 1:31 pm
    Garden Media Group is buzzing with excitement as it announces its newest client for 2015, Crown Bees. The gentle bee company partners with Garden Media in an effort to raise awareness about the importance of mason bees to the world’s food supply.  This spring, Garden Media will oversee Crown Bees’ dynamic crowdfunding effort to raise awareness about how native bees can supplement the work of our troubled honey bees and solve a key threat to our planet’s food sustainability. “No question Garden Media has the experience we need to create support for our mission,” says Dave…
  • Celebrate Houseplant Appreciation Day with these 5 tips from Costa Farms!

    Garden Media Group
    9 Jan 2015 | 7:09 am
    Celebrate Houseplant Appreciation Day with Costa Farms on January 10th by recognizing all of the amazing benefits houseplants provide. They’re decorative, boost well-being and purify indoor air. “Now that the holidays are over, it’s time to show your houseplants a little TLC,” says Justin Hancock, garden expert at Costa Farms. “Thank a plant today for bringing beauty into your home and office, making you feel good and naturally cleansing the very air you breathe inside.” Here are 5 simple tips to celebrate the day: 1. Recognize Green HeroesMany houseplants clean the air every…
  • Christmas Cactus or Poinsettias?

    Garden Media Group
    16 Dec 2014 | 7:59 am
    First introduced to the United States in 1825 by Joel Roberts Poinsett, the first Ambassador from the United States to Mexico, the poinsettia has played a starring role in Christmas celebrations ever since.The poinsettia's main attraction is not its flowers, but its leaves. The flowers of the plant are the yellow clustered buds in the center. The colored leafy parts are actually bracts or modified leaves that turn color when the plant flowers. When buying a poinsettia, make sure it has buds, preferably not yet open.Red is the most popular color, accounting for roughly three-quarters of all…
  • Add Living Decorations to this Year’s Holiday Theme

    Garden Media Group
    10 Nov 2014 | 7:21 am
    Put a spin on traditional seasonal design with blooming decorations. Amaryllis is one of the few flowers that bloom during the coldest winter months and adds a splash of much needed color around the home.From stripes and solids to pinks and white, the multiple colors and styles of amaryllis bulbs coordinate with any holiday décor.Longfield Gardens’ select amaryllis come in a variety of colors, shapes and styles this year. From the bold ‘Red Pearl,’ whose deep crimson, velvety petals are overlaid with burgundy and maroon, to ‘Apple Blossom,’ which adds a soft touch with its snow…
  • Create a Supernatural Halloween with Spooky Plants from Costa Farms

    kmdubow
    31 Oct 2014 | 5:07 am
    Add a supernatural touch to your Halloween festivities. Decorate this season with spooky indoor plants that have creepy names, devilish shapes and weird colors. While everything else this season goes bump in the night, these ‘living decorations’ add a fun, eerie twist to traditional Halloween décor. These spooky plants all have great names and fun stories that give children, party guests and trick-or- treaters something fun to talk about. Plus they are easy to grow year round.African Mask. The dark, shield-shaped foliage of an African Mask is an eerie…
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    The Yarden

  • “Let Mommy get the feel of it…” (Kitchen Inspiration)

    LaManda Joy
    22 Jan 2015 | 2:11 pm
    My first memories are of garden and kitchen with Father ... The post “Let Mommy get the feel of it…” (Kitchen Inspiration) appeared first on The Yarden.
  • My new book!

    LaManda Joy
    4 Dec 2014 | 3:28 pm
    I wanted to call this post “be careful what you ... The post My new book! appeared first on The Yarden.
  • Grow2Give

    LaManda Joy
    30 Nov 2014 | 3:01 pm
    This post first appeared on We Can Grow It. I’m proud ... The post Grow2Give appeared first on The Yarden.
  • Community Garden Universe

    LaManda Joy
    25 Jun 2014 | 8:40 am
    Peterson Garden Project is one bright star in a big ... The post Community Garden Universe appeared first on The Yarden.
  • Food Gardening Advice To Go

    LaManda Joy
    8 Jun 2014 | 9:02 am
    The Garden Minute provides basic food garden instruction that you can watch on your smart phone or on your computer. The post Food Gardening Advice To Go appeared first on The Yarden.
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    Gardener's Journal » Gardener's Journal

  • Coleus: an Old Favorite in New Clothing

    gscadmin
    26 Jan 2015 | 5:24 am
    Redhead is a new variety that tolerates sun.   Sedona   Each year, the National Gardening Bureau selects one annual to receive special recognition, and 2015 has been designated Year of the Coleus. I’m pleased to see this plant some attention. It’s a sturdy performer that doesn’t demand much from the gardener. Coleus was popular among gardeners in the early 1900s, who created showy beds that spawned the term “carpet bedding.” Today, coleus comes in more colors, forms and textures, making them ideal for pots and planters. Look for compact, rounded types,…
  • The Orchid Challenge Begins with Hope and a Plan

    gscadmin
    19 Jan 2015 | 5:44 am
    Like pumpkins on Nov. 1, out-of-bloom orchids are often available at great prices. I’m not going to call it a resolution, even though it’s January. Let’s just say that I’ll give it my best shot. I was at the garden center, and I saw a table full of out-of-bloom orchids marked down 50 percent. I couldn’t resist, so I picked up three with the intent to get them to bloom again. Because moth orchids (phalaenopsis) are known for being good rebloomers, I picked two of those, including one that’s miniature (just 3″ tall), growing in a pot the size of a…
  • Grow Pumpkins in a Pot — Will it Work? Yes.

    gscadmin
    12 Jan 2015 | 5:25 am
    Pumpkins growing in the Jumbo Potato Grow Bags. To keep cucumber beetles out, she seedlings are covered with garden fabric at transplanting time. With their long-ranging vines, pumpkins can take a lot of space. Are they off the list for small-space gardeners? Maybe not. Last summer, I tried to grow them in Jumbo Potato Grow Bags, which are made of thick, porous fabric. I chose three small varieties: Kakai Hulless, Black Futsu and Jack Be Little — all from High Mowing Seeds, At harvest time, I was happy with the results, but I learned some lessons, too. First lesson: Watch the water. I…
  • Seeds to Try in 2015: a Blanket Recommendation

    Gardener's Supply
    7 Jan 2015 | 3:42 am
    Red Shades gaillardia is another All-America Selection Last summer I tried growing a few new varieties of flowers that are especially attractive to butterflies, bees and hummingbirds. Because I wanted to get started gardening early, I chose varieties I could start from seed indoors. Here is my list of top performers: My biggest success was with two types of blanket flowers (Gaillardia aristata) from Swallowtail Garden Seeds: Mesa Yellow and Red Shades. Both varieties bloomed right up until frost. Best of all, they are perennial in my zone. It’s unusual to get perennials to bloom from…
  • New for 2015: Kale on a Stick?

    gscadmin
    30 Dec 2014 | 11:42 am
    Kalettes grow like Brussels sprouts So, this Brussels sprout walks into a bar and meets a kale. The result: Kalettes! A natural cross between Brussels sprouts and kale, Kalettes™ grow on a tall stalk, just like Brussels sprouts. Instead of tiny cabbages, the plant forms open 2″ rosettes that resemble green and purple flowers. Johnny’s Selected Seeds started offering Kalettes seed last fall, and three varieties are featured in their 2015 catalog. Although the harvest timeframe is similar to Brussels sprouts, Kalettes take a bit longer to mature, ranging from 110 to 138 days,…
 
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    Annie's Gardening Corner

  • #Repurpose

    23 Jan 2015 | 8:35 am
    'When all else fails to astound you, find your beauty indoors." ~ Bilowz Associates Inc.There’s a repurpose for everything, including yesterday’s image posted on Twitter and our Facebook page. Speaking of finding a new purpose for all things, our compost bins are at a 'winter overload'. A January thaw may be wishful thinking (only a week + and counting until Groundhog Day) so here’s hoping coffee grinds, peels and egg shells can squeak in to what little space is left for a few more winter weeks. One upside has been no paths to shovel to get to the bins. The weekend weather forecast…
  • Is Bark Overrated?

    21 Jan 2015 | 7:57 am
    A fellow garden chum, @jmarkowski0 tweeted on January 8th that ‘winter interest in the #garden is overrated. No matter how hard I try.’  Cute and somewhat true, it’s always a search and struggle to find the interest in our January gardens. The day John wrote this tweet, my guess it was probably zero or below. As much as bark may be overrated, it’s the best of the garden features especially in the snow. Maybe the lack of fluff and powder this year makes a ‘winter #garden overrated’ so until then John, enjoy the bark, less the snow. Maybe it’s the paw prints missing from…
  • Ham Up Your Garden Come Spring

    20 Jan 2015 | 7:39 am
    Ham up your garden come spring with this beautiful native shrub - witch hazelDuring these winter months one might be anticipating how to ‘ham it up’ in the landscape come spring 2015. Need some tips on what to add? If the above image caught your fancy, then witch hazel (Hamamelis sp.) should be at the top of your ‘must add’ one of these shrubs come spring. Need five reasons why? Take a peek.Early bloomingStunning fall color Great understory plant (has structure of an ornamental tree but is a large shrub)Easy to plant groundcovers and perennials underneath, which is a bigger bonus than…
  • Before this holiday weekend

    16 Jan 2015 | 7:06 am
    "You can't fly if your wings are holding the baggage of yesterday. Let go. Fly." ~ Steve MaraboliCatching a hawk in flight yesterday was a first. It seemed like an appropriate image to share with this Steve Maraboli quote. “You can’t fly if your wings are holding the baggage of yesterday. Let go. Fly.” But before you take off for your long weekend, here’s the baggage from this week's posts. Hope you’ll take another peek or catch up on ones you might have missed. Then you can fly off to enjoy your winter weekend. Before the big game on Sunday, make sure you get outdoors! #GoPats.
  • The Beauty of a Vista

    15 Jan 2015 | 8:55 am
    El Capitan on our March 2008 tripThe big news yesterday in the world of vistas - two climbers made history at Yosemite National Park. It’s all over the news but what inspires these two men to conquer a feat so difficult? As Kevin Jorgeson, one of the climbers stated in the midst of this endurance test, "Momentum is a powerful force. When it's on your side, everything feels a bit easier. When it's not on your side, it feels like wading through mud," he wrote of his week-long attempt to get past the particularly difficult section. "It took everything in my power to stay positive and resolved…
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    Serenity in the Garden

  • 10 Great Garden Photos of 2014 - Serenity in the Garden

    Jan Johnsen
    24 Jan 2015 | 7:47 am
    Allium 'Millenium' by Laura McKillopWhat makes a great garden photo? Anything that delights you.But if I had to put my finger on it - salient aspects would be the quality of the light and the richness of color. And composition figures prominently. That said, here are some memorable photographs that have been featured in this year's 'Serenity in the Garden' blog posts.My criteria? Whatever grabbed my eye as I perused the photos..moongate by Richard HartlageAndy Goldsworthy Spire, San FranciscoCornellBlue Moon Bridge by Virginia Small Meadow flowersBaptisia Purple…
  • Red Bridge in Snow - Garden Photo of the Day

    Jan Johnsen
    22 Jan 2015 | 5:04 am
    Red bridge in snow - a garden's beauty in winter.
  • Trompe l’oeil for 21st Century Landscapes

    Jan Johnsen
    20 Jan 2015 | 5:54 am
    Michael Krondl - waterworks in Katonah, NYOne day in 2007 I was driving along a road in my area when I saw a long wall of falling water that wasn't there before. The water was gushing over the wall but I saw no evidence of any water beyond that . Hmmm.....Photo by Jan JohnsenI had to stop the car and take a picture. Then I had to walk up there and see what was going on....It was an art installation using photo-derived imagery of a waterfall. A digital print on vinyl  - trompe l’oeil for the 21st century!  The artist is the talented and inventive Michael…
  • Henri Matisse - Quote of the Day

    Jan Johnsen
    18 Jan 2015 | 10:02 am
    "What I dream of is an art of balance, of purity and serenity..." - To the end of his days, the French artist, Henri Matisse created visual art in any way he could....His works continue to attract the admiration of many around the world.  Purity and serenity win out every time.
  • 'Illumination Flame' Foxglove - Super Star

    Jan Johnsen
    16 Jan 2015 | 4:05 am
     'Illumination Flame Foxglove - Digitalis (Digiplexis 'Illumination Flame')Grand Prize Winner of the 2014 American Garden Award.This half hardy perennial (USDA zone 8- 10) is taking the hort. world by storm. Charles Valin crossed the common garden foxglove, Digitalis purpurea, with its Canary Island perennial cousin, Isoplexis canariensis to create this stunning, 2'-3' tall beauty. Digiplexis is its name.It blooms continuously from Spring thru Fall and, even though sterile, attracts butterflies and bees. Magnificent, huge, non-stop, 3' tall bloom spikes hold large, rich pink and…
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    MySecretGarden

  • Hampton Court Gardens - 131 Pictures

    23 Jan 2015 | 6:38 am
       1  Hampton Court Gardens were the final gardening stop in our May trip to Europe last year. It's important to finish a trip on a very high positive note, isn't it?  Hampton Court with its clipped trees as perfect exclamation marks was a wonderful choice for this mission.  Located just 18 kilometers from downtown London, Hampton Court is easy to reach by train. Our short trip on
  • My Shade Garden Tragedy and Revival

    12 Jan 2015 | 12:41 pm
    Summer 2013: Soon after the garden tour in which my garden was featured, something happened that changed my mood from cheerful and optimistic to gloomy and depressed. Returning from somewhere and approaching my house, I noticed something strange and different on the south side of it. It didn't look the same way it used to look. Sky! I saw sky where a huge alder tree's crown  used to be.
  • Happy Holidays!

    21 Dec 2014 | 8:58 am
    Happy Holidays to you - Merry Christmas, Happy Kwanzaa, Happy Hanukkah, Happy Diwali   Merry and Happy Whatever you celebrate! These are some mementos from my Holiday Season: Hunter Family Farm Great Solstice to all of us! After today, the nights will get shorter and the days will get longer! New gardening
  • Lakewold Gardens Beautiful Tables Showcase: Winter Tables

    12 Dec 2014 | 5:42 am
    These are several tables from the Lakewold Gardens Beautiful Tables Showcase-2014 decorated for winter that can help us to get into the holiday spirit.  Celebrating Under the Snowflakes and Stars Novice - Seasonal/Holiday Designer:Wendy Simmons *  A Winter's Night Dinner in the Woods Novice - Seasonal/Holiday Designer: Neve Norton
  • First Snow in My Garden, Zone 8a

    2 Dec 2014 | 12:52 pm
    I'm glad we had this light snow before the latest hard freeze killed a lot of foliage and some late blooms. It laid graciously on the stems, trunks, leaves and buds, thereby transforming the garden into a winter wonderland. New this season were some splashes of color juxtaposed on otherwise  green-black -white tapestry. 1 2 Mediterranean palm, Clematis montana,  Escalonia 3 4
 
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    Veg Plotting

  • Hoary Morning

    VP
    26 Jan 2015 | 12:30 am
    You may have noticed my sidebar says I'm looking forward to some magical hoar frost.I'm pleased to say it arrived.If you're not reading this on vegplotting.blogspot.com, Blotanical or your own web reader such as Bloglovin' or Feedly, then the website you're using is a blogpost feed scraper. Why not go straight to the source instead? That's vegplotting.blogspot.com
  • Puzzle Corner: What's in a Name? Part 2

    VP
    23 Jan 2015 | 12:30 am
    Here's part 2 of my Latin quiz, which covers the letters N to Z. Can you match the meanings with their correct Latin names? There are some culinary examples this time to sit alongside last week's floral and shrubby ones. Latin Name Meaning nemorosus with a distinct band of a different colour officinalis from the Turkish for turban pleniflorus common quamash growing in woods rigescens from Tokyo sativus curly grape Tulipa used in medicine uva-crispa double flowers vulgare with yellow fruit wherryi rather stiff xanthocarpus from the native American for sweet yedoensis sown, planted, cultivated…
  • Wordless Wednesday: Groovy Grass

    VP
    21 Jan 2015 | 12:30 am
    Picture courtesy of Charlotte at The Galloping Gardener who had her camera to hand when I didn't :)If you're not reading this on vegplotting.blogspot.com, Blotanical or your own web reader such as Bloglovin' or Feedly, then the website you're using is a blogpost feed scraper. Why not go straight to the source instead? That's vegplotting.blogspot.com
  • Book Review: Secret Gardens of the Cotswolds

    VP
    19 Jan 2015 | 12:30 am
    This isn't a conventional book review as I have to declare an interest. Victoria - one of the authors - is a very good friend of mine, so I've witnessed snippets of this book's birth for nearly 2 years. Not only that, she's generously mentioned me in her Acknowledgements - squeeeeeeee!When Victoria told me about her commission and the title, I giggled as I thought there are very few gardens in the Cotswolds which are secret. Indeed it's one of the most well-known areas in the world gardens-wise.The next time we met up I presented her with another book about Cotswold gardens. "Please make sure…
  • Puzzle Corner: What's in a Name? The Answers

    VP
    16 Jan 2015 | 12:30 am
    How did you get on last week? Here are the answers with some examples from my garden. The items marked * are shown above. Latin Name MeaningExample aquifolius pointed leavesIlex aquifolium* balearicus from a group of islands in the Mediterranean sea (The Balearics)Clematis cirrhosa var. balearica* cirrhosus with tendrilsAs above dioicus having male and female organs on separate plantsCarex dioica Echinops/Echinacea from the Greek word for hedgehogEchinacea purpurea floridus flowering abundantlyMiscanthus floridus Galanthus from the Greek for milk and flowerGalanthus nivalis* hirsuta…
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    GrowBlog

  • Grow Better Plants With Home-made Organic Potting Mixes

    22 Jan 2015 | 4:13 pm
    Bagged potting soil (compost) is so convenient isn't it? Cut open a bag, chuck a few handfuls into a pot, bung in your plants, and that's it. Most plants will grow well in it without a problem, but if you've ever bought a bag of stale potting soil (loam-based potting soils are especially prone to going 'off'), or if you've been less than satisfied with a crop's performance using commercial brands, it's worth having a go at making your own.
  • Which Seeds to Start First? Five Easy Answers

    15 Jan 2015 | 2:03 pm
    It is perfectly natural for gardeners to feel an itch to plant as spring is coming on, even with many weeks of winter still ahead. The soil in my garden will probably stay frozen until March, but indoors, under lights, things start getting lively in mid-January. After reviewing my garden records for the last seven years, I can report consistent success with five great veggie garden plants when started indoors in midwinter: leaf lettuce, sweet alyssum, bulb onions, seed-sown shallots, and kale. Each plant requires a little special handling, but this is always time well spent.
  • How To Grow Your Own Wine

    9 Jan 2015 | 3:59 pm
    With 2015 now well underway the hangover from the turn-of-the-year celebrations has finally dissipated! Raising a toast to the start of another year got me thinking – wouldn’t it be great if I could do so with a glass of home-grown fizz? Even in my leaden-skied part of the world it’s perfectly possible to grow a few grapevines that would be more than capable of producing a bottle or two of Chateau Vanheems. The end results may not win any prizes, but it will be a labour of love that will taste all the better for it.
  • Vernalization of Winter Vegetables for Seed Saving

    1 Jan 2015 | 3:48 pm
    Last week during a period of mild weather, I wandered the garden and took stock of what's still alive after several snows and hard freezes. The carrots I'd bermed up with extra soil were still perfect, and I found a few turnips and parsnips that had escaped damage from deer. The parsley growing in a glass-topped cold frame looks great, and the winter onions under a row cover tunnel could not be happier.
  • The Advantages of Growing Green Beans

    28 Dec 2014 | 2:29 am
    If you're leafing through the latest seed catalogues looking at all the different types and varieties of bean on offer, you may be having difficulty choosing which will meet your needs and suit your garden conditions. We have several excellent articles on GrowVeg.com about beans, for instance extolling the virtues of Beans for Drying, Yard-Long Beans and Broad Beans – but for me, the staple bean in my garden is the dwarf French bean, aka dwarf green beans or bush beans.
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    The Enduring Gardener

  • Three Gardens from the Chelsea Flower Show 2015 Preview

    The Enduring Gardener
    23 Jan 2015 | 10:37 pm
    In my earlier post about Sir Paul Smith, I wrote about the role of green as the anchor that holds everything in place in a garden – so it’s unsurprising that the greenness was what I noticed as I looked at some of the drawings of this year’s Chelsea gardens. No doubt, when we get to Chelsea our eyes will seek out the excitement, and the actual gardens will be further enlivened by shape, texture and the play of light, but it is useful to see the contribution that green makes to each of the gardens and bear it in mind for the planting in our own garden. Jo Thompson’s Sylvan Retreat will…
  • Sir Paul Smith finds inspiration at the Chelsea Flower Show

    The Enduring Gardener
    21 Jan 2015 | 9:34 am
    Last week I somewhat reluctantly took the train to London for a second day in a row to attend the late afternoon RHS press briefing for Chelsea 2015.  Don’t get me wrong – I was interested – it was the prospect of a two hour journey home on a crowded commuter train that put me off. I’M SO GLAD I WENT. Not only did we hear about the many tasty gardens that designers will be serving up this year, we also got to listen to Sir Paul Smith talking about how his annual visit to Chelsea is an important source of inspiration in his work.  He was fascinating and described his working…
  • Picking Limes in January

    The Enduring Gardener
    14 Jan 2015 | 9:47 am
    In the Garden The snowdrops are beginning to open In the Greenhouse Iris reticulata ‘Beatrix Stanley’ is looking quite lovely In the Kitchen I’m picking limes!  
  • Christmas Tree Slayer/Sleigher?

    The Enduring Gardener
    6 Jan 2015 | 11:35 pm
    Our tree was fading fast from glossy green to grey green – it was time for it to go. The decorations and the lights were packed away and the tree was carried outdoors where it was swiftly reduced to a pile of branches and its central stem thanks to the Christmas Tree Slayer/Sleigher (I didn’t save the sleeve and can’t remember the spelling) loppers sent to me by the good folk at Burgon & Ball. Investigating their website, I think this was a clever bit of seasonal repackaging of their Mini Bypass Lopper, but whatever it is called it worked a treat. TIP: I keep some of the individual…
  • Great Gardening Weather

    The Enduring Gardener
    3 Jan 2015 | 11:20 pm
    The crisp bright days over the holidays have ensured that I have been in the garden whenever possible and it feels good to be on top of tasks such as tying in climbing roses, removing old leaves from the hellebores and cutting back collapsed perennials.  Most of the time I’m happy to just listen to the sounds around me, but like many podcast enthusiasts I’m currently absorbed in ‘Serial’ from This American Life, so it has been my companion for the past few days. I don’t have ears of the right shape for earphones and headphones get in the way, but a pouch hung round my neck and…
 
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    Urban Gardens

  • Five Tabletop Edible Gardens to Make You Swoon

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    17 Jan 2015 | 3:11 pm
    Brown thumbs beware, you may be in for an identity crisis. Growing indoor gardens has never been easier. With the advancements in the technology and design for hydroponic and aquaponic gardening systems, we can take our pick of edible … Read More...The post Five Tabletop Edible Gardens to Make You Swoon appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Project Orange Thumb Seeds Community Gardens

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    14 Jan 2015 | 11:24 pm
    Community gardens offer an opportunity to grow food collectively–great for those without their own land, and especially vital in areas where fresh produce may not be plentiful. But more importantly: community gardens improve the quality of people’s lives. Beyond Sowing and Growing While they promote sustainable living … Read More...The post Project Orange Thumb Seeds Community Gardens appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Killer High Heels That Plant Seeds

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    7 Jan 2015 | 11:25 pm
    Imagine gardening in high heels. Sexy and dangerous, totally impractical, right? While at the Brooklyn Museum’s exhibition, Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe, I spotted among the studded and bejeweled platforms, stilettos, wedges–and creations that could only be described as works of … Read More...The post Killer High Heels That Plant Seeds appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • A Novel Idea: Undercover Planter Goes Incognito

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    3 Jan 2015 | 7:42 pm
    The Life of Plants is proof that you can’t tell a book by its cover. Flip it open to reveal the soil from which sprouts a living, breathing, narrative. Designer Yasuko Furukawa’s planter/flower pot thrives incognito, at home among the other books in your library. Indeed a book … Read More...The post A Novel Idea: Undercover Planter Goes Incognito appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Best of 2014: Urban Gardens Top 10 Favorite Posts

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    29 Dec 2014 | 9:41 pm
    With the snap of the finger and the blink of an eye, another year comes to an end. What were a few of your favorite things? These ten blog posts apparently. Here’s a glimpse of what your Urban Gardens community loved … Read More...The post Best of 2014: Urban Gardens Top 10 Favorite Posts appeared first on Urban Gardens.
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    Growing Veggies

  • You Probably Had No Clue How These Everyday Foods Grow

    Annette
    24 Jan 2015 | 6:48 am
    Peanuts, vanilla, black pepper – these foods are by no means exotic, and you probably use them regularly in the kitchen. But, can you envisage a peanut flower, a vanilla orchid or a peppercorn vine? Keep reading to learn the extraordinary beginnings of these ordinary foods. Peanuts Image credit: Jojonicdao There are several misconceptions about the peanut. Some are unaware that the peanut is a legume, and others believe peanuts grow in trees (like walnuts), or as a part of the plants root (like potatoes). The peanut is a unique plant as it flowers above ground and fruits below ground.
  • Boost your Immune System with Broccoli

    Annette
    28 Sep 2013 | 6:36 am
    Broccoli is one of the best vegetables you can eat to promote good health, and help prevent many often devastating health problems including hypertension, diabetes, cancer, osteoarthritis and allergies. And the good news for people who struggle to grow broccoli in their own kitchen gardens (because it does have a tendency to bolt before the heads have formed) is that fresh broccoli sprouts are considerably more potent than the heads. Broccoli sprouts The Research Researchers at the University of East Anglia have found that including lots of broccoli in your diet can help slow down the…
  • Three Vegetables that Fight Cancer

    Annette
    30 Aug 2013 | 3:22 am
    Cancer is a killer, which is why it stands to reason we should be embracing every possible way to beat it. Millions of people die from cancer and cancer-related diseases every year; many more spend years fighting it. Artichoke, celery and parsley salad But the good news is that some vegetables can help you fight cancer and protect yourself from its potential onslaught. Three of the best are parsley, celery and artichokes. Prevention and Treatment of Cancer According to research, the key is something called apigenin, a common plant flavone (a colourless crystalline compound) found in lots of…
  • Trend-setting Vegetables

    Annette
    1 Aug 2013 | 3:59 am
    Portobello mushroom stuffed with yellow onion, red pepper, spinach and cheese. It’s not just fashion, hairstyles and interior design that have changing trends, even vegetables can be trend setters. The online Canadian foodie magazine, bon apptit traced vegetable trends over a period of more than four decades, and published there top ten list of trend-setting vegetables this week. Top Ten Trend-Setting Vegetables Avocado Pears were the greatest trend setters in 1969; they even inspired a decade of avo-green appliances. Beets made their culinary mark in 1982, and have stayed majorly trendy…
  • The Life of a Vegetable Continues After Harvest

    Annette
    30 Jun 2013 | 9:43 am
    Small red and large green cabbages A recent scientific study published in Current Biology reveals that vegetables continue to “live” for some time after they have been harvested, showing that the life of a vegetable does not end when it is picked. Two of the benefits of this for cabbages and other brassicas are that: anti-cancer properties form after the brassica has been picked; and its ability to resist pests is enhanced. More simply stated, vegetables may continue to respond to the environment even when they have been removed from the plant. It does though depend on how they are…
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    Lead up the Garden Path

  • Foliage for January.

    Pauline
    22 Jan 2015 | 3:16 am
    Foliage Day has come round very quickly this month, or so it seems. There is lots of foliage that is looking decidedly tatty, I really must get round to cutting it down, and there are a few plants that shine out because their foliage is still looking fresh and new, even though they have been with us for some time. Just outside the back door is a pot with some variegated ivy in it, it always seems to look nice even though it must lose some old leaves sometime. Cyclamen hederifolium is making a super weed proof carpet under one of the rhododendrons in the woodland, this is such a lovely sight…
  • January treasures for GBBD.

    Pauline
    16 Jan 2015 | 12:03 am
    At the moment, the sun is shining, the sky is a brilliant blue, the wind is blowing and everywhere is very wet from torrential rain overnight. We have escaped the awful weather of the last few days, when other places are covered in snow still. We had a bit of sleet and a few hailstones yesterday but that was as bad as it got. The sun tempted me out to see what is flowering for GBBD in January. Starting in the front garden I found – Winter Jasmine, that has been flowering since the beginning of December. The white variety of the common primrose is always the first to flower, the yellow…
  • Away from home.

    Pauline
    12 Jan 2015 | 7:01 am
    Having just returned home from a few days near London with our son and dil, which followed a few days in Bristol over Christmas with our daughter and family, I need to catch up with the garden, the house and all your posts! On our last trip away we went for a walk in a public walled garden in Sunbury-on-Thames. First glance round showed a very neat, tidy garden, very  formal, looking as if it was waiting for something to happen. There were lots of urns planted up with winter planting, and when I looked closer, I began to see all sorts braving the cold wind that was blowing the day we…
  • New Year’s Day flowers.

    Pauline
    2 Jan 2015 | 1:41 am
    I just thought I would have a quick whizz around the garden and see if anything was flowering on the first day of the year. In the front, by the door, is where my first snowdrop should be.  G. Mrs Macnamara is being a bit slow this time, she is there but doesn’t want to open. I think maybe it is far too shady for her and I really ought to move her so that she has more light. Just a couple of degrees warmer and I think she would open. In the woodland is G. Little John, almost opening, I can’t remember if this one is supposed to be early or not. Of course you have already see the…
  • Looking back over 2014.

    Pauline
    31 Dec 2014 | 9:09 am
    Looking back over the photos for all of 2014 has shown me that the garden continues to flower even though there are times when I haven’t felt like looking after it. I have had such a lot of help from the under gardener, I couldn’t have done any of it without him. January is the month when the  snowdrops start flowering, one or two have opened before New Year, but most of the others start in January. The year started with gales which brought lots of branches down in the woodland and one night the top of one of our oaks was snapped off. There is always a silver lining though, this…
 
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    leavesnbloom

  • If you were a ladybird where would You spend the winter?

    Rosie Nixon
    18 Jan 2015 | 1:19 pm
    Winter has finally made it's presence felt in the garden.  It's the time of year when you realise that wellie boots are not the best item of footwear to wear while out in the garden. There's nothing worse than numb cold toes to entice you back indoors to the heat! At the weekend I wrapped myself up in lots of warm layers.  I put on 3 pairs of thick socks - in wellie boots much too big for me.  Two pairs of trousers, a hat with ear muffs, gloves, snood and coat.  l was well prepared this time for the bitter cold as I knew that the Jelena witchhazel and a few hellebores would…
  • Best Ladybird / Ladybug Nature Macros from 2014

    Rosie Nixon
    28 Dec 2014 | 11:30 am
    It's that time of year when I look back on all of my photos from 2014 and try to pick a few of my favourites.   2014 was the year of the 7 spot ladybird  Coccinella 7-punctata / Coccinella septempunctata.   I'd never seen quite so many of these little beetles before in the garden.   When I was pruning the Potentilla fruticosa hedge after the winter I found quite a few nestled together on the lower branches. Though the majority of them seemed to have hibernated during the winter in the Picea glauca var albertiana 'Conica'.  That dwarf conifer is over half a metre in…
  • Autumn at Branklyn Garden 2014

    Rosie Nixon
    21 Dec 2014 | 3:12 pm
    Where have I been for the last 6 months or so? Sabbatical's from blogging are highly recommended. You get the time to do a few courses and discover new things. There's the freedom of not being tied to a publishing routine and inevitably you can at least keep up to date with your inbox. I'm now officially back to writing again and I'm really looking forward to sharing my photos again. I picked not so good a time to start back didn't I ...when there's not so much happening in the garden.  It's a phased return!  Wouldn't it be great if we could tell the…
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    Garden Walk Garden Talk

  • Cardinals in Hawaii?

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    25 Jan 2015 | 8:50 am
    I am off again on a trip to a sunny location, leaving the snow and Northern Cardinals behind, but rumor has it… I will be seeing those birds on these tropical islands. I am leaving today to warm the spirit, … Continue reading →
  • How Many Garden Bloggers Really Like Looking At Gardens?

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    23 Jan 2015 | 4:00 pm
    This is a legitimate question too. Seriously! GWGT is known for showing gardens from varied places and in many styles. There have been 800 posts to prove that quite a few gardens are showcased on GWGT. Today’s post is 801. … Continue reading →
  • A Bad Year to be a Mouse or Vole – Snowy Owls Are Here

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    21 Jan 2015 | 4:00 am
    Raptors are everywhere this year and Snowy Owls have been visiting again like last year’s irruption. Reducing the rodent population is good for gardeners though. Today, I am at our GardenFest meeting, planning for the event to be held in … Continue reading →
  • The Nikon D750 in Crop Mode

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    18 Jan 2015 | 4:00 am
    Crop or Full-Frame? Since I got a new camera I thought to tell you something about it. It is the Nikon D750, a full-frame camera. I have been shooting bald eagles lately to test it out. These two images show … Continue reading →
  • Thursday Thoughts – Nature Gives Freely

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    14 Jan 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature has purpose each and every season, each and every day. It seems to effortlessly accomplish its purpose without struggle or despair, unencumbered from the burden of emotions. It is efficient without waste, and all of this is done in … Continue reading →
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    Gardenerd

  • Gardens of Pompeii

    Christy
    14 Jan 2015 | 6:42 am
    I had the privilege of visiting the California Science Center to see the Pompeii exhibit over the holidays, where I saw ancient ruins preserved in ash from the massive eruption of the Vesuvius in AD 79. Having been to Pompeii … Continue reading → The post Gardens of Pompeii appeared first on Gardenerd.
  • Chill Hours: Choosing the Right Fruit Tree

    Christy
    13 Jan 2015 | 8:39 am
    A question came in to Ask Gardenerd this week about fruit trees: “What peaches grow best and are most flavorful in Mar Vista? Also what types of plums/pluots? I live in west Mar Vista, CA. Thanks for your help and … Continue reading → The post Chill Hours: Choosing the Right Fruit Tree appeared first on Gardenerd.
  • Recipe: Crisp Fried Eggplant with Parsley Sauce

    Christy
    7 Jan 2015 | 6:59 am
    If you’re been reading this blog for awhile, you’ll have noticed by now that Rose Elliot is one of my favorite cookbook authors. She excels at combining minimal ingredients for maximum flavor. With its promise of “30 minutes or less,” … Continue reading → The post Recipe: Crisp Fried Eggplant with Parsley Sauce appeared first on Gardenerd.
  • New Year’s Garden Resolutions 2015

    Christy
    6 Jan 2015 | 9:00 am
    Happy New Year, fellow Gardenerds! 2015 is here, the days are growing longer each day, and seed catalogs have arrived. We’ve been poring over them during breakfast, marking off new heirloom discoveries to try this year. This exploration leads to … Continue reading → The post New Year’s Garden Resolutions 2015 appeared first on Gardenerd.
  • Giveaway: Sprouting Seeds for Greens All Winter

    Christy
    10 Dec 2014 | 6:08 am
    It’s holiday time, which means thoughtful gifts and good cheer with loved ones. It also means, for many people, a winter without fresh greens in the garden. Thankfully, we can sprout seeds indoors for snipping into salads, soups and more … Continue reading → The post Giveaway: Sprouting Seeds for Greens All Winter appeared first on Gardenerd.
 
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    Beautiful Wildlife Garden

  • Beer and Butterflies, Hops and Commas

    Judy Burris
    25 Jan 2015 | 10:44 pm
    This is the time of year I think most of us gardening folk are itching to get back out there tending to our plants and critters.  I’ve been taking inventory of my seeds, shopping around for new bee boxes and bird houses and mentally designing new flower beds.  Since my brother and I spend so […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Florida Winter Birds

    Loret T. Setters
    23 Jan 2015 | 11:24 am
    I’ve had two recent avian visitors that for me are a real treat.  You see migrating birds aren’t exclusively a phenomenon of northern climes.  Florida also has migratory visitors, some merely passing through and some that stay a few months but don’t breed here. If you prepare a Florida winter wildlife garden to their liking, […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • The Undisclosed Location

    Kathy Vilim
    22 Jan 2015 | 5:01 am
    I love January in Southern California’s Santa Monica Mountains. Recent rain has brought new life to the drought-stricken soil, and new spring green seedlings are sprouting up everywhere. Trails are still wet one week after our 1-day rainstorm.  After waiting all year for rain, native plants waste no time in asserting themselves. This month, the air […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Dead Wood is Not Dead Weight

    Carole Sevilla Brown
    21 Jan 2015 | 4:30 am
    Dead wood from trees provides abundant habitat for wildlife in your garden. We talk often of the value of native trees in your wildlife garden. Trees provide all manner of ecosystem services, and provide food and shelter for many different kinds of wildlife. In fact, native trees support vastly larger numbers of different species of […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Arbor Day? Yes! And It’s All About Florida Trees!

    Loret T. Setters
    16 Jan 2015 | 8:57 am
    Florida weather puts us ahead of the April National Arbor Day planting curve.  The third Friday of January is officially designated as Florida Arbor Day (in Louisiana too!).   Tis our dry season, so I suppose we plant now to get the roots reaching deep for water before rainy season hits and makes it easy.  This […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
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    Vegetable Gardener - All featured posts

  • Test Old Vegetable Seeds Before Buying New

    19 Jan 2015 | 9:24 am
    Posted by WesternGardener If you want to save money on your vegetable garden this year, it pays to test your leftover vegetables seeds before investing in packets of new seeds. Use this simple germination test to find out how many new seeds you really need to buy.
  • Garden-pedia Gives Simple Answers to Tough Gardening Questions

    14 Jan 2015 | 7:17 am
    Posted by WesternGardener What happens when two experienced horticulturists write a gardening dictionary? Vegetable gardeners get a handy, easy-to-read, entertaining guide to more than 300 useful gardening terms.
  • Countertop Grow-Your-Own

    8 Jan 2015 | 12:49 pm
    Posted by cookinwithherbs Okay so it is freezing outside--instead of getting the gardening blues--try growing a few simple healthy and nutritious foods right on your kitchen countertop... I've got sprouts sprouting and veggies fermenting! It is easy and fun to do these simple projects.
  • Seed Library Membership Has its Benefits

    6 Jan 2015 | 1:10 pm
    Posted by WesternGardener I just renewed my membership with the Hudson Valley Seed Library because of this year’s Community Seed offering. As a long-time vegetable gardener and satisfied library patron, I couldn’t resist the opportunity to be part of the Breed Your Own Zucchini program.
  • Gardener's Wish List Fulfilled!

    1 Jan 2015 | 8:53 pm
    Posted by cookinwithherbs This gardener must have been very good last year because she received an abundance of presents this holiday season. Here are a few items, which most gardeners will appreciate!
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    Tsubo-en Zen-garden diary

  • Pilgrimage: Ofuda (御札 charm, talisman), a shrine or a temple seal

    Karesansui
    2 Jan 2015 | 12:12 pm
    A popular custom is to buy a blank booklet at the beginning of the pilgrimage and have a calligraphy named 'Ofuda', painted in it, at each of the temples (1). It is believed that one after one's death, when one can show this booklet to the deity at the gate of heaven, one obtains permission to enter heaven immediately regardless of one's sins. This is how we knew that the Japanese on their pilgrimage along temples and shrines have a booklet in which they, at every temple, ask a priest or monk to (after a small [ . . . ]
  • A forced recess: Infective or bacterial Endocarditis

    Karesansui
    23 Dec 2014 | 2:40 am
    The garden has seen one of its poorest years ever. Initially. At the end of the year all looks good again. During the first half year of 2014 my wife had to do the maintenance on here own. During the second half of the year I gradually gained control again. Not only about the garden bud also about my life. Just after my 60-sixt birthday in September 2013 and my early retirement, thinks went terrible wrong with my health. Too tired, little appetite, an irritating cough and even a faint. A round Christmas I got [ . . . ]
  • Buxus disease, Box Blight? Cylindrocladium Buxicola, continued

    Karesansui
    17 Sep 2013 | 5:56 am
    In Buxus disease, Box Blight? Problem with box topiary I wrote about a new, at the time the latest, buxus problem in our garden. Now, about three years later, we know that this is a problem that is here to stay and will not easily go away. In 2002, the cause of a new box blight disease was confirmed to be a new fungal species called Cylindrocladium buxicola. Box blight caused by Cylindrocladium buxicolais (also Pseudonaviculatum Volutella buxi) is now widespread throughout The Netherlands and Europe. In The Netherlands it was [ . . . ]
  • Resurrection of our Wisteria sinensis

    Karesansui
    29 May 2013 | 7:05 am
    In Frost damage 2011/2012, final damage report I wrote about the frost-damage in our garden during the winter 2011/2012 and the subsequent growth and our attempts to give it a second life. This frost damage was particularly sat with regard to our garden pride, the solitary Wisteria sinensis. Now the second season after the disaster, we have a very late spring. Temperatures have been far too low, lots of rain and little sun shine. Now in the last week of may, we can make up the next damage report. The conclusion is that it survived. [ . . . ]
  • Book review: Niwaki by Jake Hobson

    Karesansui
    10 May 2013 | 6:24 am
    Niwaki: Pruning, Training and Shaping Trees the Japanese Way by Jake Hobson, English language and published by Timber Press. In [12] you find a book reference to “Niwaki”, (niwa ki) clipped and pruned garden trees, a book that we should have had right from the beginning. Unfortunately at was not available at the time (1997/1998) we designed and started building the garden. Nonetheless, although late it is never too late for this kind of expert information. What we did use as a reference for trees initially, is a book on bonsai [13]. Most trees, shapes and…
 
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    Miss Rumphius' Rules

  • Garden Travel: Back and Forth

    Susan aka Miss. R
    17 Jan 2015 | 4:59 am
    Next week I’m travelling again. This time on a search for garden antiques and vintage in the markets in Paris and parts of Belgium. I am continuing on to Rome for a few days of play after that. For the first time in many, many years, I won’t be taking my laptop with me.  I’ve traded the bulk and weight for my camera stuff and a tablet, so please follow my Instagram account for what I see and off the cuff inspiration. I’ve also been waiting a while to post about a visit to Vizcaya when I was in Miami in November so here it is.  I was enchanted.  For a landscape…
  • A Year beyond Miss R…

    Susan aka Miss. R
    27 Dec 2014 | 3:53 am
    When I become this inconsistent, something is going on.  What has it been?  Life and work. Yes, Miss R has been part of that mix, but 2014 has been an odd year. It’s been an awakening of sorts. I love to write, but there are things that are more important to me than that.  I’ve rediscovered my three happiest places –at the drawing board, indulging my gypsy feet, and my newest obsession, photography. I made a yearlong commitment to be the President of APLD and I wrote some interesting (I hope) stories for Garden Design magazine. I organized a European Objects and Oranments…
  • Garden Travel: Architectural Swoon in Miami Beach

    Susan aka Miss. R
    12 Nov 2014 | 3:39 am
    It’s no secret that I’ve been exploring Art Deco forms as inspiration for garden designs. I’ve always been drawn to the geometry and order, even when I started my career as a jewelry designer. Many of the preeminent decorative styles of the early 20th century have this type of order – Bauhaus, DeStijl, Viennese Secessionist (Josef Hoffman’s work is another swoon), Art Moderne and Art Deco and they still draw me in. When the opportunity to visit Miami Beach after the APLD Landscape Design Conference in Orlando last week I jumped at the chance.  There was much…
  • Garden Design Details: Stone at Skylands

    Susan aka Miss. R
    22 Oct 2014 | 4:18 am
    I hadn’t visited Skylands for about ten years, and never in the fall.  I went hoping to see the last of the fall foliage and instead found stonework that was interesting in its scope and full of ideas. Formerly an estate developed in the 1920s, it is now the New Jersey Botanical Garden and its stone American Tudor mansion  is better known than the gardens as a popular site for weddings. The stonework at Skylands is incredible and impressive…even if much of it is in need of repair.  There is both formal and rustic stonework and sometimes dressed stone is juxtaposed with…
  • Garden Design Details: Fall Beyond Foliage

    Susan aka Miss. R
    14 Oct 2014 | 5:08 am
    I had some rare time in between landscape design projects and clients last week and as I’ve been meaning to take my new camera lens out for a spin, I stopped by Frelinghuysen Arboretum in Morristown to search out some of the details of the season.  The focus of this public park is plants…not necessarily design although it has its designer-y moments.  I go here when I need a plant fix.  I send my landscape design students here to photograph and learn about plants just as I did years ago when I was learning. Grasses, asters, Japanese anemones and Monkshood were at their peak…
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    The Gardening Blog

  • Bountiful fruit

    Barbara
    25 Jan 2015 | 3:00 pm
    Wow!! I have joy in my heart! We are enjoying the bountiful harvest of fruit from our garden!! One day we will have apples as well!! Quinces galore and a fig tree that needs a scarecrow!! His name is el-sha-fig! Happy Gardening xxx  
  • Heat of the Day

    Barbara
    20 Jan 2015 | 12:27 pm
    The summer gets really hot here and last year I had too many of my tender lettuces and new seedlings wilt from the unrelenting heat of the day! So this year I got my thinking cap on and designed a shade that was easy to make and easy to use! And Voila!! I used shade cloth, velcro, tie straps and electrical PVC conduit piping. I use PVC glue to put the whole [...]
  • December 2014 Diaries

    Barbara
    20 Jan 2015 | 11:54 am
    So much happens in life! When I look at my To-Do list, my heart skips a beat! How can the time fly so quickly??? 2014 has gone! December is a memory and in-between life happening, my garden just keeps on going!! I have the pleasure of spending alot of time there now because I make the time. Growing vegetables has become a real passion and we love eating from the garden. I [...]
  • November gifts from my Garden

    Barbara
    1 Dec 2014 | 2:36 pm
    I am so glad to be in the dirt again! So much has happened these past months and to be back in the garden to see what gifts it brings makes my heart so glad!! My favourite is the summer tomatoes!! Nothing tastes like a sun-ripened red garden tomato!! My salads are jumping for joy! I am harvesting the most delicious varieties of lettuce and to add to this, great summer sweet [...]
  • Garden revival

    Barbara
    18 Sep 2014 | 11:57 am
    You know that feeling when you go away on a holiday and come back to your home – it feels like you are a stranger! It takes awhile to become familiar again with your garden. That’s how I felt! I felt as if I had been away or hibernating – I had to spend at least a day just greeting everything that was actively growing or peeping out of the soil. So [...]
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    Native Plants and Wildlife Gardens

  • Let’s Bring It Home!

    Suzanne Dingwell
    22 Jan 2015 | 9:10 pm
    “Things are happening fast. It’s exciting, but we have to think quickly about how to act,” This remark, made by Larry Weaner, President of New Directions for American Landscapes, resonated soundly with the audience at the 2015 NDAL Symposium. Land, and species both animal and vegetable, are disappearing rapidly in direct correlation to one another. […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Natives for Your Yard

    Jacqueline Soule
    21 Jan 2015 | 4:34 am
    Happy New Year to all our readers! Maybe it seems late to offer this greeting, but it leads to the topic of my blog today. Many folks celebrate the new year with alcohol, late night parties and ample noise. In our family we celebrate the new year with quiet and a visit with nature. A traditional […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Water in the Winter Wildlife Garden

    Pat Sutton
    18 Jan 2015 | 5:00 am
    Wildlife needs are pretty basic: food, cover, and water. Posts at Native Plants and Wildlife Gardens often address FOOD in the way of native nectar plants and native berry-producing plants. I’ve had fun addressing COVER: how you can help birds and other wildlife avoid becoming a predator’s next meal and Red Cedar, my favorite native evergreen for cover. […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Don’t Pull the Trigger. You’re Not Roundup Ready.

    Jennifer Baker
    16 Jan 2015 | 3:00 pm
    As a native landscaper, clients hire me to control invasive species, which often requires the use of pesticides. Since my business falls under the “for hire” category, Wisconsin law requires that I’m certified every five years and that I pay a yearly licensing fee. Even if I don’t apply pesticides for hire on any given year, […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • In The Garden, I May Not See You, But I Know You’re There

    Loret T. Setters
    13 Jan 2015 | 11:03 am
    Sometimes you know there are critters in your garden, but you don’t necessarily get to see their flying, furry or feathery self.  How can you tell?  Well, they leave signs. Signs can be something as simple as a sound.  Many birds are secretive and some, like owls are nocturnal and not everyone gets to observe […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
 
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    The Pond Blog

  • Why the Lotus Flower is So Important

    Bill Dubert
    23 Jan 2015 | 9:23 pm
    “Padma” is the Sanskrit word for the Lotus plant, which is also called the Sacred Lotus or Indian Lotus. The Lotus Temple in Delhi is the Mother Temple of the Bahá’í faith in India and draws as many as 150,000 visitors in a day. Image copyright Jeremy Vandel. The lotus flower, Nelumbo nucifera, occupies a huge space in the minds of many pond owners and designers. Deciding whether or not to include a lotus among a pond’s flowers can be a big decision when choosing pond plants and even layouts. Many water gardeners consider their lotus flowers the pride of their pond,…
  • Where do Bullfrogs Go in Winter?

    Bill Dubert
    18 Sep 2014 | 6:36 pm
    The American Bullfrog and his various amphibious friends are some of the great unexpected pleasures of pond ownership. The question many pond owners find themselves wondering, though, is where they go in winter, and how they survive the freezing cold. Frogs are true cold-blooded animals, unable to internally unable to regulate their body temperature. Generally, when they’re cold they seek out sunlight, and when they’re hot they seek out shade or water. But what do they do in winter, when it’s far too cold for the sun to keep their temperature up, even below freezing? Well,…
  • Is My Koi Pregnant?

    Bill Dubert
    28 May 2014 | 9:38 pm
    Well, this time of year, it’s definitely possible. Spring is when koi generally spawn. I’ve written before about how to determine the sex of your koi as well as how to get your koi to spawn, but how do you decide if your koi have decided to get spawny without your intervention? Well, first off, it’s worth noting that a koi that appears pregnant is not, one way or the other, pregnant in the same way that a human would be. They don’t give live birth, and the eggs are fertilized outside of the body, so there really aren’t baby koi in your fish either way. However,…
  • Pond Snails: Good for Your Pond?

    Bill Dubert
    8 May 2014 | 12:04 pm
    Pond snails can be a beautiful addition to your pond’s ecosystem. Pond snails can be a fun & interesting addition to your pond’s ecosystem. In very large ponds, snails can even be necessary to create a balanced, natural ecosystem. I’m very fond of snails, certainly. However, I do think that how much snails improve the health and clarity of the average pond has been blown out of proportion. The wisdom is generally that pond snails eat algae and some organic debris. They’re the little scavenging janitors of your pond. In a well-kept pond, though, I disagree with this…
  • The Importance of Choosing the Right Pond Net

    Bill Dubert
    8 Apr 2014 | 6:32 pm
    I have a terrible confession to make. I’m not proud, but here it goes: I’ve been using the wrong pond net. For years. For more than a decade. Just completely wrong. My pond is directly beneath a beautiful oak tree, and I’ve been using a net that isn’t fine enough to stop acorns. Why have I been committing this travesty upon my pond? Because the nets with bigger holes are cheaper. Or, at least I thought they were. This year I found out just how wrong I’ve been on that score.  The Cost of the Wrong Net In my case, the net was wrong because it didn’t hold…
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    Nigel Gnome grows a vegetable

  • Endless summer

    Nigel Gnome
    25 Jan 2015 | 11:23 pm
    The weather has been perfect for what seems like weeks. Keeping things watered is a bit of a mission especially when feeling guilty about the water usage, it's expensive!Disaster on the larger chilli plant, it just started to wilt, I watered it and then watered it some more.It wilted even more, they can be susceptible to overwatering. :( There is a waterfall of sweet 100 tomatoes and a good supply of nice heavy roma toms, they will be made into sauce any day.cascade of sweet 100 tomatoesQuick pickplums are happening, now they are manyFirst zucchini, one plant makes very pale ones
  • 2015 like it or not

    Nigel Gnome
    5 Jan 2015 | 11:04 pm
    2015 doesn't really feel like the future, the jet packs and instantaneous travel are missing, same with decent batteries, c'mon guys. We do have some sort of global consciousness as long as you stick to cats and coffee.In the meantime my tomatoes are doing just fineToo many :)Sweet 100 tomatoes The roma tomatoes looking goodTub tomatoes starting to colour upA set of bean seeds popping up over 4 days, amazing growth, just planted them in the garden this eveningpop up dayDay 2Day 4
  • Post Christmas post

    Nigel Gnome
    26 Dec 2014 | 8:28 pm
    A very pleasant Christmas it was as well.Tomatoes have been had and now the plants are starting to get to good size.sweet 100 tomatoesTying the top of the sweet 100The plums a re pinking upPulled all the garlic, not bad, not good
  • Black beans

    Nigel Gnome
    30 Nov 2014 | 11:06 pm
    A strange looking bunch, hard not to think of evil witch brews for young children. dwarf purple beansThey tasted OK, and we lived to tell the tale, a bit underwhelming though, other than the look.Sweet 100 tomatoes are starting to colour upSweet 100 tomatoesPlucked out some of the red onions and have left them out to dry the skins for a for a day or two, there are still quite a few smaller ones for later.Red onion harvest Pretty borage flowers, they seem to show pink and then go to bluepretty prickly borage
  • Tomato update

    Nigel Gnome
    26 Nov 2014 | 11:30 pm
    There have been some lovely summery feeling days, a couple at 27C even. The birch seeds have started falling, there are strongish winds. Have had to water the garden a bit, it's quite dry.The tomato plants are thriving and I have made a couple of new plants from strong laterals removed from the non grafted ones. The sweet 100 is going mad...sweet 100 going madThe roma tomato is starting to show some colourRoma tomatoes ripeningThe garlic, chillies, black beans and the toms have all had weekly Thrive flowering and fruiting soluble fertilizer applied to the root area. Black beans look…
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    Flowerona

  • Florist Wildabout’s designs at the Seven Decadent Sins showcase event

    Rona
    25 Jan 2015 | 4:01 pm
    I hope you had a lovely weekend. It’s funny…you never can tell 100% what’s really going to pique people’s interest. The image that I posted yesterday on Instagram from my Flowerona Links blog post proved to be very, very popular! Take a look here. On to today, and I’m delighted to feature images of Wildabout’s floral designs from a showcase event called Seven Decadent Sins, which I attended recently at the Royal Opera House in London. The first of the three designs is called Lust. Hundreds of beautiful red roses, anemones and ranunculus, together with…
  • Flowerona Links: With headdresses, snowdrops & a wildflower cafe…

    Rona
    24 Jan 2015 | 4:01 pm
    It’s time for this week’s round-up of floral inspiration! General Breath-taking florals by Frida & Sophia Floral Design Wonderful images of sweet peas via Floret Tips for keeping indoor plants alive Beautiful blooms by Sweet Woodruff in this review of 2014 How to create snowdrop heaven in your garden Weddings The biggest wedding flower trends of 2015 by Paula Pryke Beach wedding inspiration in a soft, muted palette Gorgeous pale peach & white blooms at this Cotswolds garden wedding Wonderful florals at this Australian wedding Stunning winter wedding inspiration in…
  • Flowerona Reflects Video : 24/1/15

    Rona
    23 Jan 2015 | 4:01 pm
    In this week’s Flowerona Reflects video, I share my recommendations for floristry books, if you’re just starting out. I hope you enjoy watching the video and don’t forget, if you’d like to subscribe to my YouTube channel, please click here and then click on Subscribe. I hope you have a lovely Saturday and I’ll see you tomorrow with Flowerona Links! P.S. Don’t forget, if you receive my blog posts by email and would like to view the video, you need to go to my YouTube channel.
  • Business advice from Paul Smith, Jo Malone & Richard Moross

    Rona
    22 Jan 2015 | 4:01 pm
    In my Flowerona newsletter, which I sent out on Tuesday, I mentioned that today I would be featuring useful hints and tips from entrepreneurs. A little bit of a different blog post for Florist Friday, you may be thinking? Well, you can never stop learning…it’s always useful to benefit from others’ experiences. And as this month, I’ve been really inspired by some people at the top of their game, I thought you may also find their advice useful. Sir Paul Smith I attended the RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2015 Press Conference and there was a very inspirational presentation by…
  • Wedding Wednesday : On Trend – Bridal bouquets with trailing ribbons

    Rona
    20 Jan 2015 | 4:01 pm
    I was recently asked to contribute to a Wedding Trends article on my predictions for the next twelve months, with regards to wedding flowers. And one of the trends that I highlighted was the growing popularity of bridal bouquets with trailing ribbons. So, today I thought I’d share some beautiful examples with you. Ribbons of varying widths and colours are being used to adorn bouquets. Some brides are opting for multiple strands of the same ribbon, whilst others have a variety of different types in complementary colours. Aren’t all the designs just so stunning? If you’re a…
 
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    Your Easy Garden

  • Easy-to-make berry lip balm

    Guest Bloggers
    26 Jan 2015 | 9:01 am
    Berry tinted lip balm is easy to make and is a perfect winter project! The dreary, cold January weather makes it a perfect time for creative, garden inspired indoor activities.  Our latest endeavor has been to create the perfect lip balm. However, this process has not been without its failures . . . We’ve made a crayon-tinted lip balm, but I won’t even bother giving you the recipe, since it came out unpleasantly waxy. We created a lavender lip balm, but the result was a bit too perfumey. Our teenager-approved, absolute best. all natural lip balm recipe is one that actually uses fresh…
  • Making Garden Projects Happen

    Elizabeth DeFriest
    16 Jan 2015 | 1:41 pm
    If you have a daunting Big Garden Project, this is how to make it happen. Like anything that seems overwhelming – study assignment, special project at work, a garage clean-out – the trick is to break it down. It then looks very ordinary and do-able, and before you know it, a few weekend have passed and it’s done. My Big Garden Project – a rose garden – started with these (see above) absolutely gorgeous roses. We’d driven out to the country to have lunch with a friend on her farm. Picture a table under the trees, looking out over a picket fence across rolling pastures. And…
  • Tough Plants are the Best

    Anthony Tesselaar
    16 Jan 2015 | 1:19 pm
    With a fresh year full of gardening ahead of us, I thought I’d leap in with a piece of gardening advice that pretty much sorts all problems. And here it is up front (so you don’t have to read any further). Fill your garden with plants that can look after themselves. Yes, it’s that simple. If a plant is not flowering, it’s foliage is yellowing, it’s covered in bugs, has gone limp or just looks dreadful, it’s obviously being asked to grow outside its comfort zone. It’s also much easier to swap the plant than to modify the environment you’re attempting to grow it in. (Cruel as…
  • Easy Bird Feeding Projects for Kids

    Guest Bloggers
    9 Jan 2015 | 10:47 am
    Kids will love making these simple nature-inspired bird feeding projects! Now that the holiday season is wrapping up (yes, pun intended), it is a good time to reconnect with yourself and the important things in your life. Night Tree by Eve Bunting is a great book to read together with children! For me, this means connecting with nature and my family. As a way to celebrate all that nature provides, we decided to make a family nature tree. This was inspired by one of our favorite books, Night Tree by Eve Bunting, about a family who creates a beautiful outdoor holiday tree with edible ornaments…
  • Favorite Gardening Quotes for the New Year

    judieyeg
    31 Dec 2014 | 11:57 am
    Many of readers send us their favorite gardening quotes and we thought everyone would enjoy seeing them put to pictures as we dream about our 2015 gardens!  Happy New Year!!         Do you have a favorite gardening quote or saying?  If so, please send it along as a comment on this post and watch for it in future Gardening Quotes posts!    
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    The Mini Garden Guru - Your Miniature Garden Source

  • The Great Annual Miniature Garden Contest, 2015

    Janit Calvo
    21 Jan 2015 | 1:21 pm
    The Great Annual Miniature Garden Contest, 2015 Yay! It’s back! Step right up, folks and prepared to be amazed! Lol! It’s time to announce the start of the Annual Miniature Garden Contest. We switched it around last year and are hosting it now, so dig through your photos and enter today! But why-o-why did you […]
  • An Open Letter for Miniature Gardeners and Fairy Gardeners: A Heart to Heart

    Janit Calvo
    12 Jan 2015 | 3:36 pm
    An Open Letter for Miniature Gardeners & Fairy Gardeners: A Heart to Heart A new year always brings reflection and renewal. After much thought and discussion, Steve and I have decided to make some changes to how we connect with you, our dear and fellow miniature gardeners. We would like to introduce the new Miniature […]
  • Miniature Gardening with Air Plants

    Janit Calvo
    6 Jan 2015 | 2:05 pm
    Miniature Gardening with Air Plants Well, Timber Press has done it again. I’m not sure how many of their books I have to put down because I get too inspired, and have to go make or plant something. When I curled up with the new Air Plants book, I read to page 101 before I […]
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    Organic Gardening Tips - Smiling Gardener

  • Where To Grow Your Garden On This Planet

    23 Jan 2015 | 9:58 pm
    Let’s say you’re the type of person for whom establishing a big, organic, food-producing permaculture garden is a major goal. And fortunately, you’ve just come into a windfall - a huge sum of money. You can finally buy or build that house you’ve been dreaming of and then get to work on planting your organic garden. The question today is: where should you build it?
  • Who Is Your Garden For - You Or Your Neighbors?

    16 Jan 2015 | 9:58 pm
    I spent too much of my life caring about what other people thought of me. Especially people who didn’t really seem to care too much about what I thought of them. I still care too much sometimes. But I try every day to make decisions based on what I want and what will be best for the people I love, rather than what looks good to the rest of the world.
  • How To Make Effective Microorganisms - Step By Step

    9 Jan 2015 | 9:34 pm
    Last night, when deciding what to write about for today, I looked around my apartment, saw my probiotic fermenting away on the shelf, immediately took this photo, and proceeded to write this step by step process for making effective microorganisms. In gardening, there’s a lot of talk about chemistry - the fertilizer, NPK, carbon, etc. All important stuff, but I like to spend just as much time on the biology - the microorganisms, insects, animals (and of course plants). It’s especially the microorganisms that really rule our world, our bodies (we contain 10 times as many microbes as we do…
  • Why Grow A Garden? My Top 3 Reasons

    2 Jan 2015 | 9:58 pm
    ‘Why’ always comes first because it’s the most important question for pretty much everything we do in life. Asking why helps us figure out if the thing we’re thinking of doing is something we really want to do. If we decide it is, knowing our ‘why’ helps tremendously when it comes to figuring out the who, what, when, where and how. When you know your purpose for doing something, it makes every decision easier from then on because you can choose the direction that’s in line with that purpose. So why grow a garden? Maybe for you it’s:
  • Planting Trees In The Fall (Plus Some Other Fun Stuff)

    5 Sep 2014 | 9:58 pm
    Planting trees in the fall is one of my favorite things to do, so today I'm giving you 9 videos from my online gardening course on how to plant a tree (these videos are from 1 of the 4 'modules' from month 8 of the Academy). Yes, there are a lot of videos on this page. Here are the most important organic fertilizers and inoculants I mention at some point in these videos because I always use them when planting trees: Liquid sea mineralsLiquid seaweed Mycorrhizal Fungi Effective Microorganisms/SCD Probiotics
 
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    Sow and So

  • O is for Oporice – Word Up!

    Bridget Elahcene
    23 Jan 2015 | 12:20 am
    Oporice \əˈpɒrɪˌsiː\ Oporice is a medicine prepared from autumnal fruits, particularly quinces and pomegranates  mixed with wine.  Formerly used in the treatment of dysentery and diseases of the stomach. QUINCES
  • Gardening in January

    Laila Noort
    19 Jan 2015 | 11:13 am
    January is one of those months that gardening is almost impossible here in the Belgian Ardennes. It’s either snowing with temperatures below zero, raining …or both at the same time. The soil is frozen solid or so muddy it is best not to enter the garden at all. Mice Even though we have had frost, it has not been severe and for a second year in a row we see the mice population growing. They make paths in the grass and little holes. These paths and holes have multiplied in a few months time. The worst part of it is that the mice have found an eldorado in the polytunnel… Fresh…
  • N is for Nog – Word Up!

    Bridget Elahcene
    16 Jan 2015 | 5:30 am
    Nog \nɒg\ The stump or snag left on a tree after a portion of it has been removed.
  • Looking Forward to Spring – Wordless Wednesday

    Laila Noort
    14 Jan 2015 | 1:33 am
  • M for Mycology – Word Up!

    Bridget Elahcene
    9 Jan 2015 | 10:45 pm
    Mycology \mʌɪˈkɒlədʒi\ Mycology is the study of fungi.
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    Color Your World Blog

  • What is composting and how does it work

    Paul Guzman
    24 Jan 2015 | 12:29 pm
    So what the heck is compost anyway?  Good question…and I’ll try my best to answer that question on this post. Compost is decomposing matter that turns into nutrients that all plants need in order for them to maintain healthy growth.  This matter is what all plants need to survive. You can use chemically made fertilizers … Continue reading What is composting and how does it work The post What is composting and how does it work appeared first on Color Your World Blog.
  • How to start a container garden

    Paul Guzman
    18 Dec 2014 | 6:25 am
    Planning Your Container Garden  The first thing you need to decide when planning a container garden is whether you’d prefer to grow your plants indoors or outdoors.  A lot of people think container gardening is only for indoor growing and patios, but containers can actually be useful for any garden situation. Containers are great for … Continue reading How to start a container garden The post How to start a container garden appeared first on Color Your World Blog.
  • Getting your plants ready for winter

    Paul Guzman
    29 Oct 2014 | 6:16 am
     Here in the Southwestern part of the U.S. the summer and fall seasons are long.  As we know fall in this part of the country produces some of the best eye pleasing color for all to enjoy.  Getting your plants ready for winter should be done every year. The fall colors in the Southwest are … Continue reading Getting your plants ready for winter The post Getting your plants ready for winter appeared first on Color Your World Blog.
  • How to start seeds indoors

    Paul Guzman
    20 Oct 2014 | 9:18 am
    Article by: by By Diane Linsley Check out Diane’s outstanding website at: Dianeseeds.com- Diane’s Flower Seeds Heirloom flowers, rare perennials, daylilies and Starting Indoor Seeds This is a lot easier than it sounds. Even inexperienced gardeners can start seeds with just a bare minimum of equipment. There are as many ways to start seeds as … Continue reading How to start seeds indoors The post How to start seeds indoors appeared first on Color Your World Blog.
  • Is fall a good to plant trees, shrubs and other plants

    Gary Guzman
    29 Sep 2014 | 3:02 pm
    Photo by danperry.com Is fall a good to plant trees, shrubs and other plants? Of course it is.  The recent rains in and around the southwest have made this an even more optimistic time to plant. The cooler nights, the windless days, the warm moist soil, the mild day time temperatures, make this one of the best times … Continue reading Is fall a good to plant trees, shrubs and other plants The post Is fall a good to plant trees, shrubs and other plants appeared first on Color Your World Blog.
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    Chicken Waterer

  • Chicken Feed Infographic

    ChickenWaterer
    25 Jan 2015 | 12:56 pm
    For more information about chicken feed, check out our article: Chicks To Chickens. How to Choose Their Feed. BriteTap chicken waterer. Clean water made simple! Visit us at ChickenWaterer.com.
  • Chicks to Chickens: How To Choose Their Feed

    ChickenWaterer
    23 Jan 2015 | 6:10 pm
    Type of Chicken Feed ExplainedA chicken's dietary needs changes over time and is also dependent on whether the chicken is a meat breed or egg an egg layer.Starter FeedBaby chicks (age 0-6 weeks) need a lots of protein in their diet. So called "starter" feeds are formulated to give rapidly growing chicks the protein they need to develop muscles and feathers. Typically, starter feeds are 20% protein and those starter feeds formulated specifically for meat birds will have protein levels as high as 24%.Baby chicks need feeds high in protein to grow.To make it easy for baby chicks to eat, the feed…
  • Update on Bird Flu In California

    ChickenWaterer
    23 Jan 2015 | 6:33 am
    UC Davis poultry expert calls for backyard flock owners to isolate birds: VideoFor more information on what to do to protect your flock, check out our post from earlier this week. Posting BriteTap chicken waterer. Clean water made simple! Visit us at ChickenWaterer.com.
  • Chickens In The Snow

    ChickenWaterer
    23 Jan 2015 | 6:12 am
    A very cute video of chickens walking single file through deep snow. BriteTap chicken waterer. Clean water made simple! Visit us at ChickenWaterer.com.
  • Five Tips For Protecting Your Chickens From Bird Flu

    ChickenWaterer
    18 Jan 2015 | 7:17 pm
    Bird flu is a viral disease found in bird populations that can be spread to domestic poultry. Some strains of the virus can be passed to humans and there have been human fatalities reported in China and other countries. In the U.S., the strains of bird flu that have been detected so far are not a threat to human health. However, the disease is a threat to chickens and other domestic poultry species.The H5N1 Bird Flu is dangerous to humans andhas killed several hundred people in AsiaWaterfowl are known to carry bird flu and migrating populations can pass the disease to backyard and…
 
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    The Foodie Gardener™

  • Organic Vegetable Seed Sources

    Shirley Bovshow
    20 Jan 2015 | 2:26 am
    Foodie Gardener Shirley Bovshow shares her tip for organic heirloom vegetable seed sources with Sophie Uliano of “Gorgeously Green.” An organic vegetable garden begins with organic seeds!  
  • Seeds 101: 4 Pre-Germination Techniques Before Planting Seeds

    Shirley Bovshow
    16 Jan 2015 | 3:12 pm
    Growing vegetable plants from seed can save you lots of money IF your seed sowing is successful. Do you really want to sow seeds in the ground or in a container with no “game plan,” while you pray that your seeds will germinate? I’m not down for that. I did that for years and I’m okay rolling the dice for some vegetables like beets and carrots, but for some of those coveted tomato, pepper and gourmet herbs, I want to stack the dice in my favor!   Understanding the fundamentals of what causes a seed to germinate and begin its life as a plant can shift the control…
  • Foodie Gardener Community Garden Progress!

    Shirley Bovshow
    16 Dec 2014 | 9:42 am
    The fence for the Foodie Gardener Community Garden to benefit the “News From Heaven” outreach ministry is up! Next step is building the raised garden beds and planting the crops. Thank you to American Soil in Simi Valley, California, who will be providing our nutrient-dense soil!
  • Grow Mint Indoors: Spearmint and Peppermint

    Shirley Bovshow
    10 Dec 2014 | 11:20 am
    Spearmint and peppermint are staples in a  foodie gardener’s herb garden and natural medicine cabinet. Tabouli, tzatziki, kebab (can you tell I like Mediterranean food?), mojitos, peppermint hot chocolate, and other delectable food and drinks rely on mint for their signature taste. Peppermint tea can soothe a stomach ache like nothing else.   Fortunately, mint is easy to grow indoors, year-round, with proper care.   Take a look at the questions and answers below based on my “Mint 101: Grow Spearmint and Peppermint Indoors”  segment on the Home & Family Show…
  • Easy Hydroponic Planter: Grow Lettuce in Repurposed Coffee Container!

    Shirley Bovshow
    16 Oct 2014 | 2:08 am
    If you consider yourself more of a “foodie” and less of a “gardener” because you don’t like the idea of getting your nails dirty, read on! You can grow lettuce, greens and herbs year-round in a hydroponic planter made from a repurposed coffee container.   Before you start questioning how difficult it must be to make a hydroponic planter, stop! I want to share with you instructions for creating a specific low-tech hydroponic planter that uses no electrical pumps or air stones to circulate the water. I’m referring to the Kratky Method of the…
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    Urban Gardens

  • Five Tabletop Edible Gardens to Make You Swoon

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    17 Jan 2015 | 3:11 pm
    Brown thumbs beware, you may be in for an identity crisis. Growing indoor gardens has never been easier. With the advancements in the technology and design for hydroponic and aquaponic gardening systems, we can take our pick of edible … Read More...The post Five Tabletop Edible Gardens to Make You Swoon appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Project Orange Thumb Seeds Community Gardens

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    14 Jan 2015 | 11:24 pm
    Community gardens offer an opportunity to grow food collectively–great for those without their own land, and especially vital in areas where fresh produce may not be plentiful. But more importantly: community gardens improve the quality of people’s lives. Beyond Sowing and Growing While they promote sustainable living … Read More...The post Project Orange Thumb Seeds Community Gardens appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Killer High Heels That Plant Seeds

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    7 Jan 2015 | 11:25 pm
    Imagine gardening in high heels. Sexy and dangerous, totally impractical, right? While at the Brooklyn Museum’s exhibition, Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe, I spotted among the studded and bejeweled platforms, stilettos, wedges–and creations that could only be described as works of … Read More...The post Killer High Heels That Plant Seeds appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • A Novel Idea: Undercover Planter Goes Incognito

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    3 Jan 2015 | 7:42 pm
    The Life of Plants is proof that you can’t tell a book by its cover. Flip it open to reveal the soil from which sprouts a living, breathing, narrative. Designer Yasuko Furukawa’s planter/flower pot thrives incognito, at home among the other books in your library. Indeed a book … Read More...The post A Novel Idea: Undercover Planter Goes Incognito appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Best of 2014: Urban Gardens Top 10 Favorite Posts

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    29 Dec 2014 | 9:41 pm
    With the snap of the finger and the blink of an eye, another year comes to an end. What were a few of your favorite things? These ten blog posts apparently. Here’s a glimpse of what your Urban Gardens community loved … Read More...The post Best of 2014: Urban Gardens Top 10 Favorite Posts appeared first on Urban Gardens.
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    Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden

  • A Very Special Thank You to Braden & Charlie

    Jonah Holland
    26 Jan 2015 | 3:05 am
    by Jonah Holland,  Public Relations & Marketing Coordinator, Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden   Braden Dolbec and Nicki the Garden’s Youth program developer. Behavior coach Jimmy is in the background with Charlie Dolbec. Braden Dolbec reading the thank you note with Nicki pointing to the words and brother Charlie smiling, and looking on. Last week I had the pleasure of meeting brothers Braden and Charlie Dolbec, young adults  who come to the Garden as part of the Garden’s Vocational Program to gain workforce development skills and job training. Braden and Charlie work…
  • Fieldtrip! Seeking Creatures, Flying Like Birds & Pretty Treasures Like Leaves

    Jonah Holland
    24 Jan 2015 | 6:37 am
    by Jonah Holland, PR & Marketing Coordinator, Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Kristin Mullen leading encouraging the children to “pet” the lambs ear. I had an amazing time in the Garden last month with these fine young folks from Richmond Public Schools’ Chimborazo Elementary School‘s 3-year-old Head Start  class. We read a story about animals and then looked for birds and other creatures in the Garden with our “binoculars.”  As we explored the garden we decorated our binoculars with leaves and other treasures.  The Garden provides this educational…
  • And the Winner of the Dominion GardenFest of Lights Instagram Contest is…..

    Jonah Holland
    19 Jan 2015 | 5:43 am
    by Jonah Holland,  Public Relations & Marketing Coordinator, Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden From the Instagram post: This is the first year we went to Garden Fest at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden, Needless to say Noelle loved all the lights. This will become our Christmas tradition. Post by @t_page Congratulations to Toni Page who is our Grand Prize #GardenFest Instagram contest winner with this photo of her daughter Noelle enjoying Dominion GardenFest of Lights.  We were thrilled with the participation in this year’s  Instagram contest!  We had over 1,600 entries, nearly 900…
  • Volunteers Who Give, and Give…..

    Jonah Holland
    17 Jan 2015 | 3:36 am
    Volunteer Gary McNutt taking down Dominion GardenFest of Lights decorations in the Robins Room. We’d like to announce Gary McNutt as the January Volunteer of the Month. Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden has over 600 volunteers and each month we take time out to recognize one. The Volunteer of the Month gets the honor of parking in a special space in our parking lot, a gift certificate to the Garden Shop, and gratitude from all of the staff here at the Garden. Stopping to recognize their hard work and say thanks is the very least we could do. Dean Dietrich, horticulturist, works with…
  • Heart Felt Classes

    PhyllisLaslett
    16 Jan 2015 | 3:21 am
    by Judy Thomas, botanical artist, fiber artist, Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden  class instructor  A needle-felted bouquet, including romantic red roses for your Valentine! I love working with fabric and fibers, and especially wool.  Why wool?  It is a natural fiber and has a great deal of versatility. You might have heard about felting, it’s becoming a popular craft.  Felting, both wet and dry (or needle felting) uses the ability that wool has for its fibers to “lock” together.   What does that mean?  Well, wool can make a type of fabric, called felt, without…
 
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    Grow Up Hydrogarden

  • New Year, New You, New Greens

    Amanda Kuhn
    21 Jan 2015 | 1:00 am
    With a couple weeks into the New Year, it’s important to re-evaluate your goals and decide what it is that you want to achieve in 2015. Ringing in the New Year, the coined term “New Year, New You” becomes your inspiration to make the changes you wish to make in the New Year. Setting goals each year not only makes you feel like a betterRead More
  • Traditional vs Hydroponic Gardening

    Erika Raia
    14 Jan 2015 | 1:00 am
    Hydroponics is the sustainable gardening craze that is growing nationwide and can be spotted on rooftops, greenhouses, hospitals, urban communities, classrooms, apartment patios, food banks and even commercial farms. And, lucky for us, as more people have delved into hydroponic gardening to grow their own veggies, fruits and herbs, the methods and means surrounding it have become more efficient, effective and easier to set upRead More
  • Primary Lesson: Plant Parts & Parts

    Erika Raia
    7 Jan 2015 | 12:00 am
    In this lesson: Plant Parts & Parts students will learn how their Grow Up Hydrogarden supports all of a plant’s parts and parts and how plants use water to thrive. A lot like the Earth’s natural water cycle, Grow Up Hydrogarden’s pump circulates water and nutrients to nourish plants. Water trickles down from the top of the pipe through all 5 gardening pots below. FromRead More
  • Recipe: Stuffed Peppers with Sweet Potato Hash

    Erika Raia
    30 Dec 2014 | 1:00 am
    When most people think of vitamin C, they think of oranges not bell peppers. According to World’s Healthiest Foods one cup of red bell peppers provides 291% of the daily value. One cup also has 105% DV of vitamin A and 12% DV of vitamin B6. Vitamins A and C are two great antioxidants that help the body neutralize free radicals. The B6 and folic acid inRead More
  • Creating Food Sustainable Systems

    Erika Raia
    23 Dec 2014 | 1:00 am
    9.1 million people are living in food insecure households, in every county across the United States, and the numbers are growing.  We are committed to helping non-profit organizations create sustainable food systems in their communities that allow equal access to healthy foods and promote individuals to grow, eat and live better.   Do you or do you know an organization that promotes:  Healthy Eating ActiveRead More
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    Made with love and garlic

  • Planting garlic on the shortest day of the year

    Catherine: Made with love and garlic
    5 Jan 2015 | 4:32 pm
    Dahlia checking the garlic bulbs pre-plantingGarlic takes a good long time to mature and so traditionally it would be planted on the shortest day to give it enough time to grow big and strong in time for harvest on the longest day of the year. And so it was that on the 21st of December 2014 I managed to find some time to get my bulbs in the ground and so resurrected both my ambition to grow as much of our food as possible and also this blog. The clue is in the name of the blog really: I'm addicted to garlic. When I opened the box containing my planting bulbs, my mouth actually started to…
  • The poor neglected garden

    Catherine: Made with love and garlic
    4 Aug 2014 | 5:39 am
    Dear readers. I write to apologise for my absence. Normal service will resume within a couple of weeks but I've been otherwise distracted for the last couple of week. Well, the last four anyway. Four weeks ago today our first child, a little boy, was born and it turns out that looking after a baby is considerably harder than I thought it'd be. So my poor garden is going to rack and ruin through neglect (though Mr Garlic is heroically watering it every night) but I'll be back soon! In the meantime, I leave you with this, a picture of our overgrown jungle!
  • Keeping on top of the raspberries (or alongside them at least...)

    Catherine: Made with love and garlic
    5 Jul 2014 | 2:50 am
    The number of things that I have really not been that efficient at in the garden continues to increase. It didn't occur to me, when planting my rows of raspberries in my raised sleeper beds, to string up a proper wire frame. This has resulted in having to tie new lines, made of string, across the canes I'm using as a makeshift support every week or as (the plants are shooting up at mad speeds and there are small, underripe fruits hanging in tantalizing bunches from most of the branches - I think it's possible I'll get a good crop this year even though the canes are in their first year!). Next…
  • It's all a bit of a squash in here

    Catherine: Made with love and garlic
    4 Jul 2014 | 4:09 am
    Oh, puns. They prompted Caligula to roast a comedian alive and Bierce to sneer at them as a “form of wit to which wise men stoop and fools aspire.” But my love of them, established early at the knee of my maternal grandfather, lives on. Puns and cracker jokes. I just can't get enough, and they spill over into all areas of my life, like when I made up herb-related puns for the herb centrepieces I grew for a friend's wedding. Still, dear readers, I'm sure you'll forgive me? Because the squash in the garden really are going crazy.One of the things I've already learned this year is that less…
  • What a difference some weeds make

    Catherine: Made with love and garlic
    3 Jul 2014 | 3:21 am
    Before weedingI wish that I had a massive garden. Well, a smallholding really. That's the eventual dream, to be able to potter out of our house and see our cows and sheep grazing our fields in the distance, to wander about lovely large veggie patches next to the house whilst the chickens burble away at me demanding corn. I would use a razor hoe to grab weeds when I see them and all would be in perfect harmony. Weeds creeping under the fenceBack to reality and my tiny London patio garden which has started to look really shabby around the edges. The problem? My neighbour rents his house out by…
 
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    O'Connors Lawn Equipment

  • TORO Introduces The TimeCutter SW Series Zero Turn TRACTORS…put the wheel back in your hands!

    Bridgett Davis
    16 Jan 2015 | 2:09 pm
    Toro has added a New TimeCutter Zero Turn Tractor Series to the line up for 2015! For years consumers have had to choose between zero turn mowers and lawn tractors. Both have a lot to offer. Lawn tractors offer strength and stability with little learning curve, while zero turn mowers have unequaled maneuverability and time savings.  Now you can have your lawn tractor and your zero-turn mower too. No longer will you have to choose between easy controls and time savings. Toro’s state-of-the-art TimeCutter® SW lawn mowers give you both. You get stability on the side of hills with…
  • Is Your Lawn Mower Right for Your Yard?

    Mick Ross
    26 Jun 2014 | 8:27 am
    You’re under attack: although the sun may have bleached the color away, the stalks of grass in your lawn are still growing particularly high. You could enlist a neighbor kid itching to make a few bucks, or even let the grass get a little out of hand; but why not just do it yourself? Slaving away under the hot summer sun to mow your lawn may sound like the very definition of torture, but what if you lawn mower isn’t working as hard as it could? You read that right: there’s a chance your lawn mower is taking the easy way out, relaxing while you’re sweating and aching. Before you get…
  • Summer Tips for Water Conservation

    Mick Ross
    19 Jun 2014 | 12:20 pm
    With the summer in full-swing, maintaining a healthy lawn becomes a more laborious task than during any other season. Along with the usual responsibilities of mowing, edging and trimming, providing your lawn with proper nourishment becomes most important during the hot and dry summer months. Because of the increased consumption of water that occurs during the summer, several cities and even states have mandated watering restrictions to help conserve water. With these restrictions, water conservation becomes a serious issue that can potentially lead to an unhealthy lawn. But rest assured, it…
  • 2014 Toro Days is Here!

    Mick Ross
    8 May 2014 | 8:36 am
    Don’t miss one of O’Connor’s biggest annual events May 8 – 21 when we celebrate Toro Days 2014. For 2014’s event, O’Connor’s and Toro have partnered to bring customers the biggest and best Toro Days promotion ever!  The limited-time promotional event gives O’Connor’s customers the opportunity to save hundreds of dollars on select Toro lawn and garden equipment, including: Up to $300 off Toro TimeCutter riding mowers $50 off all Toro TimeMaster walk mowers Up to $45 off Toro Recycler Walk and E-cycler walk mowers $10 off select Toro portable power products Toro Days savings…
  • O’Connor’s Launches A NEW Website!

    Bridgett Davis
    7 Mar 2014 | 10:43 am
    In accordance with our long-standing tradition of outstanding customer service we are happy to roll out our new website, designed with you the customer in mind. It is our sincere desire to make your online experience smooth, informative and enjoyable. Our new site will not only allow us to provide product information and pricing in a user friendly manner, but we can now easily provide tips and additional information that you our customers have previously only had access to in person, or by telephone. We look forward to serving you!   CHECK OUT ON WEBSITE GRAND OPENING SPECIALS! SNAPPER…
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    A Garden for All

  • Designing for Winter Interest

    Kathy
    20 Jan 2015 | 1:00 am
    Roadside Garden in Summer (photo credit: Kathy Diemer) Whether novice or experienced, we all strive for gardens that look good no matter the season.  And that is indeed a challenge.  What can we do to maintain some structure and color when the temperatures hover in the single digits and all signs of plant life are but a pleasant memory? The answer is incorporating evergreens and deciduous shrubs into your landscape. ‘Hameln’ and ‘Zebrinus’ (background) in Winter (photo credit: Kathy Diemer) When I first started my gardens, I went to the nursery and loaded up on every…
  • Decorating with Greens

    Kathy
    13 Jan 2015 | 1:00 am
    Greens and Pine cones in Wire basket (photo credit: Kathy Diemer) With at least ten weeks to go before any signs of life erupt from the gardens, I find myself searching for things to add a little pizzazz to my home’s exterior and entryways.  And with a little ingenuity and a pinch of creativity, you would be surprised to see what interesting tidbits are there for the taking, just outside your door. It’s easy to put those (frost safe) summer containers to good use, simply by filling them with items blowing around in your yard.  I found dried hydrangea flower heads, strangely…
  • Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme . . .

    Kathy
    6 Jan 2015 | 1:00 am
    Tricolor Sage (photo credit: Kathy Diemer) are fabulous herbs, all.  However, by November the parsley is history and rosemary is stored safely inside, leaving sage and thyme to endure whatever Old Man Winter dishes out. During the milder winters, my sage remains evergreen and the thyme doesn’t brown until February.  Every year is a toss up, but whatever happens, these two herbs remain dependably attractive for much longer than the most durable perennials.  They smell great, feel great and add a much needed touch of texture that foraging critters shun.  What could be better during…
  • Meet the Twigs

    Kathy
    30 Dec 2014 | 1:00 am
    Cornus alba ‘Elegantissima’ with garden mates (photo credit: Kathy Diemer) If this little twiggy went to market, it would come home with lots of easygoing cornus brethren to make your acquaintance.  Because many are native, twig dogwoods (cornus cvs.) tolerate a variety of conditions, making them extremely versatile for garden plantings. They love moister soils and lots of sun, but will accept dry spells and partial shade without much ado in zones 3-8. During the spring and summer months these gems fill out with lush green or variegated leaves (cornus alba…
  • Rose Hips

    Kathy
    23 Dec 2014 | 1:00 am
    Antique Climbing Rose (photo by: Kathy Diemer) When visiting a garden surrounded with exquisite rose blossoms, we seldom think about the health benefits to be gained from such a beautiful plant.  Yet, when the blooms fade, precious vitamin enriched pearls form in their place.  These showy reddish-orange orbs not only add ornamental value to the fall/winter garden, they are also chock full of healthy benefits, if you choose to partake.  Rose hips, said to contain substantial concentrations of vitamin C and bioflavonoid, are popular worldwide for a variety of uses such as: boosting the…
 
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    Tree Service Portland - Northwest Arbor-Culture » Blog

  • Can Trees Prevent Flooding?

    Jon Nash
    2 Jan 2015 | 11:37 am
    Trees have a ton of benefits: clean air, beauty, fruit, and shade, to name a few. But did you know they can also prevent flooding? It’s true! “The typical medium-sized tree can intercept as much as 2,380 gallons of rainfall per year,” the USDA says. To understand how, let’s look at why flooding happens. Without trees, rain runs off soil and into rivers and streams, raising the water level. Trees help keep soil in place, and their roots soak up water. (This is called reducing erosion and anchoring topsoil.) Source: Greening.in Even trees’ leaves help prevent flooding. When raindrops…
  • What Is Tree Grafting?

    Jon Nash
    29 Dec 2014 | 10:47 am
    Tree grafting is kind of the tree equivalent of an organ transplant. It’s attaching a small, budding branch (called the “cultivar”) from one healthy tree onto the trunk (technically the “stock” or “rootstock”) of a different tree. Tree grafting usually happens in winter while the tree is dormant. That way it has time to heal and absorb its new branch. Sometimes tree grafting is as simple as one branch replacing another. But sometimes a cultivar is added in addition to existing branches. Sometimes two small branches are attached to an existing one. In that case, the branch that…
  • What Is Tree Topping, and Should You Do It?

    Jon Nash
    17 Dec 2014 | 3:13 pm
      Photo: Hugh Conlon What is Tree Topping? Tree topping is sometimes done to mature trees. It’s when people cut branches down to stubs or to lateral branches not big enough to sustain the remaining branch. “Rounding over,” “hat-racking,” “tipping,” “heading,” “stubbing” or “dehorning,” are all other names for topping. Why Do People Top Trees? Some homeowners top a tree when it grows too tall for their liking. They are under the false impression that topping reduces the hazard of falling branches during a storm. It actually has the opposite effect. People also…
  • A Guide to Common Types of Christmas Trees

    Jon Nash
    14 Nov 2014 | 12:05 pm
    Source: eaghra The Christmas tree is, by and large, the focal point of holiday celebrations. Bundling up in hats and scarves and trudging off to pick out the perfect Christmas tree to take home and decorate is a long-standing holiday tradition for many families. The Advantages of a Real Christmas Tree No doubt one of the main reasons to get a real tree is because it infuses your home with the enchanted scent of Christmas. But there are other good reasons to get a real tree rather than an artificial one. Evergreen trees are 100% biodegradable and can be recycled once the season is over to…
  • What Are the Best Indoor Trees?

    Jon Nash
    31 Oct 2014 | 1:46 pm
    Bring the outdoors in with potted indoor trees! Besides brightening up a room decoratively, there are several benefits to indoor trees. They improve health, well-being, and indoor air quality. Studies show that indoor plants have even been known to help sharpen your focus. Here are the top 6 indoor trees. Pet owners, note that most of these are toxic to dogs and cats, but read to the end for one that’s animal-safe! 1.  Meyer Lemon Tree Lemon trees have sweet-smelling, beautiful blooms and delicious lemons almost year-round. They are always either blooming or flowering. Meyer lemons are…
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    Floyd Family Homestead

  • Project: Chicken House Update

    Modern Homesteader
    25 Jan 2015 | 2:28 pm
    Hey Homesteaders, I posted a video on my Youtube Channel not too long ago when I just started this project. For those who have not seen it let me catch you up to date a little bit. Last year we had a shed that was left on the homestead from the previous owners that we […]
  • Countdown Deal!!

    Modern Homesteader
    10 Jan 2015 | 8:00 am
    Folks, With the New Year comes great new opportunities!! For the next Two Days: January 10th, 2015 8:00 AM PST through January 12th, 2015 12:00 AM PST I am offering a huge discount on my very popular Poverty Jelly Book (Kindle Version Only!) Poverty Jelly: Delicious jellies for the Home, from the Home (Volume 1) […]
  • Homestead Resolutions

    Modern Homesteader
    5 Jan 2015 | 6:00 pm
    As a homesteader, I am no different than anyone else in the human world, whereas every year I go through and make a New Year’s resolution to do this or to do that to better my life and my situation. Well for 2015 it is no different, sure I can say the same old stuff […]
  • How to check your farm fresh eggs

    Modern Homesteader
    30 Nov 2014 | 10:30 am
    Hey folks, back off of my mini vacation! I hope you all enjoyed your Thanksgiving! I wanted to drop a quick video for you all on an easy way to check to see if you farm fresh eggs are still good. Check it out.
  • Homesteaders Hop #4

    Modern Homesteader
    21 Nov 2014 | 6:00 am
      Come on over to the Homestead, choose your rocking chair…a glass of tea and sit a spell! This is a Blog Hop Y’all and there are plenty of posts to keep your attention…entertain you, educate you or make you smile…all day long. Stay as long as you like; and vote for your favorite! If […]
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    DIY Backyard Gardening » DIY Backyard Gardening

  • Frogs in the Garden – Front and Backyard

    Chellet
    18 Jan 2015 | 8:00 am
    Wildlife such as tiny reptiles, butterflies, and bugs are indeed attracted into many home gardens. Whether we live in the urban area or in a forested valley, they find our gardens and stay there for a while. My theory as to why these frogs are here in the neighborhood is that the rainy months may have […] The post Frogs in the Garden – Front and Backyard appeared first on DIY Backyard Gardening.
  • Holiday Greetings 2014

    Chellet
    23 Dec 2014 | 8:01 am
    Holiday Greetings from DIY Backyard Gardening… Thank you for visiting my backyard gardening blog since its inception in 2012. It’s been an enjoyable experience to share what I’ve learned as a semi-green thumbed gardener. Also, many thanks to the generous contributors who’ve provided us with additional information about gardening and other useful, relevant resources. I hope you all […] The post Holiday Greetings 2014 appeared first on DIY Backyard Gardening.
  • What’s New: Gardening Infographics

    Chellet
    12 Dec 2014 | 7:17 am
     We have a new main menu (with sub-pages) on the DIY Backyard Gardening blog that’s dedicated to curated gardening infographics. Like other types of infographics, these were created by their original owners to provide informative illustrations on specific topics. My aim is to provide additional information that’s easier to read (especially for those who are busy […] The post What’s New: Gardening Infographics appeared first on DIY Backyard Gardening.
  • Updating This Backyard Gardening Blog

    Chellet
    29 Nov 2014 | 8:55 am
    Dear readers of DIY Backyard Gardening Adventures. My sincerest apologies if you’ll find the blog a little different, but quite familiar in terms of the theme. I’ve used this theme before, but opted to use another one due to cleaner look and feel. However, this DIY backyard gardening blog has a static header page menu […] The post Updating This Backyard Gardening Blog appeared first on DIY Backyard Gardening.
  • Practical Gardening Tips

    Chellet
    25 Nov 2014 | 6:05 am
    Here’s a presentation I’ve created on SlideShare on practical gardening tips. These are quite basic and easy to understand especially for beginner gardeners. I hope you’ll find it useful and helpful for your front and/or backyard garden. Update: Guys, please click on the image to head over to SlideShare. Embedding the slide presentation here slows […] The post Practical Gardening Tips appeared first on DIY Backyard Gardening.
 
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    Mill Race Garden Centre Blog

  • 10 New Year's Resolutions For Your Garden in 2015

    19 Jan 2015 | 9:10 am
    This year, why not show your garden some love? Make a resolution now to ensure that your garden is the best it can be, and you can look forward to showing it off during a few fabulous garden parties during the summer! Investing in your garden is always rewarding, and a little time spent digging, weeding and pruning will result in a gorgeous garden that you can be proud of. Even if nothing at all grows, you’ll at the very least have benefited from some exercise! So, what are you waiting for? Here are 10 New Year's resolutions for your garden in 2015! 1. Become a gardener We know that we’re…
  • 9 Vegetables and Herbs to Grow in Winter

    29 Dec 2014 | 2:33 am
    Winter may seem like a time in the garden when everything is hibernating and nothing grows, but that’s not strictly true. There are several vegetables and herbs that you can grow during the winter, keeping your kitchen stocked with goodies and your fingers green… 1. Broccoli How to plant: Leave 45cm between each plant when placing in the soil; if you have grown from seed outside, thin the plants so that they are 30cm apart. Watering: During dry spells, water at week and a half / fortnightly intervals. Sow: June or July if you want an early spring crop. Harvest: When the spears are formed,…
  • How to Create Your Own German Style Winter Beer Garden

    11 Dec 2014 | 8:35 am
    If you’ve ever visited a German style beer garden in the colder months, chances are you’ve fallen in love with the place. There’s something truly warming about such a place, and we don’t think it’s just the effects of the alcoholic beverages. The traditional, rustic style of the German beer garden is something that many of us want to recreate at home, particularly because it offers a great excuse to throw a beer themed garden party! Here’s our guide to all you need to consider when creating your German style winter beer garden in your own back yard. The ideal beer garden seating…
  • 8 Easy Indoor House Plants That are Hard to Kill

    14 Nov 2014 | 8:26 am
    House plants offer so much to our living spaces. Not only do they look beautiful and add interest to our décor, but they can also clear the air and generally make our homes more pleasant to be in. However, for many of us taking care of house plants can result in their sad demise, despite our best efforts. Luckily, there are plants out there that can withstand a great deal – and can survive despite being left in the care of the most unlucky or inexperienced gardeners. Read on to find out more… 1. Aloe Vera The sap of this tough little succulent has wonderful medicinal properties, so not…
  • What do Wild Birds Eat?

    7 Nov 2014 | 6:57 am
    This post was contributed by Alexandra Campbell from the www.themiddlesizedgarden.co.uk Find out the answers to your top 8 questions about helping wild birds survive I’ve always had a vision of our middle-sized garden as a bit of a bird sanctuary. We bought our house from dedicated bird-watchers, who left us their bird feeders, plus advice to feed them cheap loaves of white bread, as well as seed mixes. Within a few years, headlines were screaming ‘bread is bad for birds’.  Can anyone ever get anything right? So, as winter pokes its first chilly fingers into the garden, I’ve hunted…
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    Organic Lesson

  • Six Innovative Gardening Gadgets from CES 2015

    gardenhero
    24 Jan 2015 | 2:48 pm
    The Consumer Electronics Show (CES) isn’t just about showcasing the latest iPhones and TVs. We take a look at six awesome gardening devices that were showcased in CES 2015. The theme of these six devices has a lot in common with cloud technology. How can gardeners conserve water using real-time data? How can gardeners provide the most optimal growing conditions for their plants? Let these innovative gadgets answer those questions for you. Want to publish this infographic on your own blog or site? Feel free to use the embed code below. Source: Organic Lesson Gardening, particularly urban…
  • Day 17: Growing Garlic Chives Indoors – Baby Sprouts

    gardenhero
    16 Jan 2015 | 5:01 pm
    Apologies for the lack of update these past few days. I have been extremely busy so it wasn’t until today when I was able to find some time to post about the latest updates. Today, I have some good and bad news. Starting with the bad news, my cilantro project pretty much ended before it began. After transplanting the cilantro soils to potted soil, I saw no sign of life for almost a week. I am guessing the cilantro seeds got too bruised while it was getting transplanted. You really do have to be careful when you are dealing with seed germination! The good news is that there are plenty of…
  • Day 10: Growing Cilantro Indoors – Transplanting Seeds

    gardenhero
    6 Jan 2015 | 7:43 pm
    Hello fellow gardeners. Hope you have all been well. It’s been about four days since my last Cilantro report. On day 6, I reported that one of my seeds germinated. Unfortunately, that seed ended up dying after I mistakenly touched it. A day or two later, I was fortunate enough to see two other Cilantro seeds germinate. I have no clue if this is the right time to transplant the seed over but I decided to give it a shot. Here is a quick shot of the two seeds that have germinated. The one in the middle has yet to see any progress but I decided to put it into the pot along with the other…
  • Making Your Own Organic Compost: An Infographic Guide

    gardenhero
    3 Jan 2015 | 4:04 pm
    You may be asking yourself, “why would you make your own compost when it would be so much easier to simply buy pre-made ones from the store?” One good reason for this is due to there being no guarantee that compost bought from shops are made of high-quality materials. When you make your own organic compost, you at least have the benefit of knowing what was used. Compost is beneficial for plants for a number of reasons. First, it can stabilize the physical structure of the soil, which means you are less likely to deal with problems such as soil erosion. Compost can also help with…
  • Day 6: Growing Cilantro Indoors – Seed Has Germinated

    gardenhero
    2 Jan 2015 | 8:55 am
    After an excruciating wait, I am happy to announce that one of my Cilantro seeds has finally germinated! Unfortunately, I made a huge mistake in touching the seed and it fell apart slightly as a result of that. Hopefully, that won’t affect its growth. Guys, if there is one lesson I learned today, never touch your seeds and when it reaches the time to transplant them to proper soil, do so with great care. Seeds, especially Cilantro, are very fragile. Unsurprisingly, this particular seed was in a position that had the most exposure from the grow light. I moved around the germinating boxes…
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    Great Garden Supply: New Products

  • Ergonomic Pro Garden Digging Fork

    26 Jan 2015 | 7:53 am
    Radius Garden Ergonomic Pro Garden Digging Fork The PRO Digging Fork is an ideal tool for turning and cultivating soil as well as for moving mulch, sod, and yard debris. Radius PRO Stainless tools fe..Price: $48.99
  • Ergonomic Pro Garden Shovel

    26 Jan 2015 | 7:53 am
    Radius Garden Ergonomic Pro Garden Shovel The PRO Shovel is a high performance, all-purpose digging tool with a round-point sharpened stainless steel blade, designed for easy digging and greater..Price: $48.99
  • Ergonomic Pro Garden Transplanter

    26 Jan 2015 | 5:51 am
    Radius Garden Ergonomic Pro™ Transplanter The Pro™ Transplanter is an all-in-one tool that performs all functions of transplanter, drain spade, digging spade, and standard shovel. Radius Pro™ Stainle..Price: $48.99
  • Ergnomic Scooper Trowel

    26 Jan 2015 | 5:51 am
    Radius Garden Ergonomic Scooper Trowel Traditional garden tools force you to use your hands and wrists in a way that can cause injuries. The patented Natural Radius Grip maximizes yo..Price: $17.99
  • Radius Garden Ergonomic Cultivator

    26 Jan 2015 | 4:59 am
    Radius Garden Ergonomic Cultivator Traditional garden tools force you to use your hands and wrists in a way that can cause injuries. The patented Natural Radius Grip maximizes your power and comfort while minimizing hand and wrist stress. The curve of the grip matches t..Price: $11.99
 
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    How To Start A Garden

  • How To Start A Garden With Space Constraints

    GreenThumb
    25 Jan 2015 | 6:55 am
    How To Start A Garden With Space Constraints So much can be stated about gardening. It is a way to communicate nature, to breathe life into the earth, and so on. However, there are a variety of crucial indicate keep in mind when gardening in order to ensure a positive, trouble-free experience. This short article sets out a few of those points in an uncomplicated way.To keep cats, snakes, and other animals out of your garden, use moth spheres. Just spread a couple of insect spheres at the edges of your garden.To make birds keep away from the produce you’re growing in your garden, tie…
  • How To Start an Organic Garden

    GreenThumb
    21 Jan 2015 | 7:14 pm
    The Best Ways to Succeed With Organic Gardening If you are worried about hazardous chemicals in your yard, Organic gardening is the perfect method to grow a garden. Utilizing natural methods to preserve your garden produces much healthier plants. If you are growing a veggie garden, Organic horticulture is even more vital. Check out the following post for some concepts on the best ways no how to start an organic garden from your friends at To Start A Garden.   The very best method to weed your natural garden is the old-fashioned method, pulling the weeds out by hand. Despite the fact…
  • Flower Bed Ideas

    GreenThumb
    19 Jan 2015 | 7:36 pm
    Practical Concepts For Designing A Flower Garden There is something that flower gardens share – beautiful blooming plants. What sets one flower garden apart from another is the structure and design surrounding the flowers. The most appealing flower gardens have actually been prepared thoroughly and developed specifically. In order to design a lovely flower garden, you have to prepare ahead of time and select plants that will compliment one another.  The following article will provide you with some helpful flower bed ideas to get your garden really started! Prior to completing your…
  • Organic Gardening Tips

    GreenThumb
    19 Jan 2015 | 6:58 pm
    Ideas To Help You Prosper With Organic Gardening These days the demand for fresh organic fruit and vegetables is on the rise. The need for products and treatment brings about some extremely ingenious organic gardening techniques. Now is your chance to locate something that helps your natural garden. Here are some pointers that you could make use of to get you started. A fantastic idea that could aid your organic gardening is to begin keeping a gardening journal. Noting all of the changes that take place as well as when they happen, can be great info to have. A horticulture journal can assist…
  • How to Start a Garden

    GreenThumb
    19 Jan 2015 | 3:47 pm
    Starting your first garden is not hard as long as you put in the time and effort at the beginning to plan for success; learn everything that you need to about how to start a garden right here at ToStartAGarden.com. Starting a garden may be a daunting task. Planning can take some time and patience but it will pay off in spades during harvest season. There are many decisions to be made when starting and we at ToStartAGarden.com are here to help guide you through the process. Below are some helpful starting points that can answer your questions about how to start a garden.   Choose Your…
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