Gardening

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  • Infograph: How to Store Food Right

    Gardenerd
    Christy
    10 Mar 2015 | 7:46 am
    The folks at Fix.com put together this nifty infograph on how to store food so it lasts longer in the fridge. I found a few tidbits of information that were new to me (especially the hacks at the end), so … Continue reading → The post Infograph: How to Store Food Right appeared first on Gardenerd.
  • Last Year's Resolutions Scorecard

    A Leafy Indulgence
    Swimray
    30 Dec 2014 | 7:26 pm
    This year 2014 saw the least number of posts to this blog because there were fewer new additions to the garden. How did last year's resolutions go? Let's see how your resolutions ended up, too.Post thoughts and gardening results on the blog more than once a month, even if no one reads them.Do the math: 24 posts = at least two per month. (But only one post in November, and one in December.)Start working on getting the poinsettia to bloom earlier in the fall, to be sure it blooms in time for Christmas, instead of later at New Year's.Cross this one off. The poinsettia up and died on me this…
  • How To Prune A Shrub Rose Infographic

    Shawna Coronado
    Shawna Coronado
    13 Mar 2015 | 4:25 am
    Shrub roses, especially Knockout roses, are particularly easy to grow. Below is a fantastic super easy infographic to help you figure out the pruning task.  Go forth and prune those knockouts! The post How To Prune A Shrub Rose Infographic appeared first on Shawna Coronado.
  • Food Worth Growing: ‘Golden Nugget’ Hot Pepper

    You Grow Girl
    Gayla Trail
    24 Mar 2015 | 10:30 am
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  • Clean Refrigerator Coils in 3 Easy Steps

    Shawna Coronado
    Shawna Coronado
    23 Mar 2015 | 4:31 am
    A few years ago I pulled the refrigerator out to paint the wall behind it and was shocked to see a really dirty mess. I didn’t take a photo of it at the time as it was horrifying, but I did take a similar photo of the bottom of a refrigerator (above) when I went to tour the refrigerator recycling facility for ComEd’s Smart Ideas Fridge & Freezer Recycling program. The photo above shows you what your refrigerator coils might look like in your home. Clean refrigerator coils and save energy –  it can increase air circulation and helps the coils do their job so they do not…
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    You Grow Girl

  • Food Worth Growing: ‘Golden Nugget’ Hot Pepper

    Gayla Trail
    24 Mar 2015 | 10:30 am
    We've Moved! Update your Reader Now. This feed has moved to: http://feeds.feedblitz.com/yougrowgirl Update your reader now with this changed subscription address to get your latest updates from us.
  • Recycling and Reusing Seed Starting Pots

    Gayla Trail
    17 Mar 2015 | 9:42 am
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  • In Bloom: Amaryllis ‘Chico’

    Gayla Trail
    12 Mar 2015 | 1:39 pm
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  • You Grow Girl Super Bundle Giveaway

    Gayla Trail
    6 Mar 2015 | 1:53 pm
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  • Fiskars Project Orange Thumb Community Garden Grant Recipients Announced

    Gayla Trail
    2 Mar 2015 | 11:31 am
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    Shawna Coronado

  • Clean Refrigerator Coils in 3 Easy Steps

    Shawna Coronado
    23 Mar 2015 | 4:31 am
    A few years ago I pulled the refrigerator out to paint the wall behind it and was shocked to see a really dirty mess. I didn’t take a photo of it at the time as it was horrifying, but I did take a similar photo of the bottom of a refrigerator (above) when I went to tour the refrigerator recycling facility for ComEd’s Smart Ideas Fridge & Freezer Recycling program. The photo above shows you what your refrigerator coils might look like in your home. Clean refrigerator coils and save energy –  it can increase air circulation and helps the coils do their job so they do not…
  • Flowers Everywhere at the Chicago Flower and Garden Show

    Shawna Coronado
    19 Mar 2015 | 4:20 pm
    Every year I go to the Chicago Flower and Garden Show and I love how the approach at the show has become greener and focused on educating the thousands of visitors that attend the show annually. Walking in to the show after a cold, hard winter is like walking into sunshine; the smell of the flowers and trees overwhelms the senses. There is a lot to do – participate in potting classes, walk the gardens, shop in the shopping area, listen to educational speakers on gardening and cooking, and of course simply SMELLLLL. Then smell some more. Building the gardens is an act that takes enormous…
  • How To Grow a Living Wall Kitchen Garden

    Shawna Coronado
    16 Mar 2015 | 4:34 am
    It is time to grow a living wall my friends. Grow a Living Wall; Create Vertical Gardens with Purpose, is my latest book. Below are a few tips excerpted from Grow a Living Wall that gives you a few ideas on how you can grow a huge garden in a narrow space WITH NO WEEDING REQUIRED! While interviewing a young mother in an urban inner-city area, I listened as she told me a heart-breaking story. Her son had asthma, and medications were not effective, so she tried limiting his chemical exposure by providing more organic food. The price of organic vegetables from the market was high, and she…
  • Cucumber Margarita Recipe and Sunday Funday Appetizers

    Shawna Coronado
    15 Mar 2015 | 4:34 am
    Welcome to a Sunday Funday post; a restaurant review combined with a recipe that might just give you some fantastical ideas for cooking up your own Sunday Funday. Imagine how amazing you feel as a Mom when your family announces they are going to take you out for an afternoon cocktail appetizer extravaganza? First of all – delicious cocktails – yum. And who needs to imagine – you can see the look on face in the above photo. LYFE Kitchen invited us in to sample some of their latest and greatest appetizers and cocktails. LYFE Kitchen is in Evanston, Illinois – and as you…
  • How To Prune A Shrub Rose Infographic

    Shawna Coronado
    13 Mar 2015 | 4:25 am
    Shrub roses, especially Knockout roses, are particularly easy to grow. Below is a fantastic super easy infographic to help you figure out the pruning task.  Go forth and prune those knockouts! The post How To Prune A Shrub Rose Infographic appeared first on Shawna Coronado.
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    Cold Climate Gardening

  • Adventures in Flower Arranging

    Kathy Purdy
    23 Mar 2015 | 3:46 am
    Anyone can plunk a handful of flowers into a vase and call it an arrangement, and in the past, this is what I have done. True, I had made some attempt to arrange the flowers attractively, but the results could at best be described as rustic or primitive. I wanted something a little more polished […]
  • How to Have the First Bloom on Your Block: Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day March 2015

    Kathy Purdy
    15 Mar 2015 | 3:50 pm
    It is more important to have the first bloom on your block than the first tomato. The first outdoor bloom is a potent morale booster, signifying that the back of winter has been broken. However, to have the very first flower blooming in your neighborhood is not a matter left to chance. You must employ […]
  • Rundy Needs Your Help

    Kathy Purdy
    12 Mar 2015 | 2:24 am
    We interrupt our usual garden blogging to bring your attention to a worthy cause. Several years ago, Rundy wrote some posts for this blog. His garden writing dropped off when he left home to care for his grandfather who had Alzheimers. Yes, this young man cooked, bought groceries, spoonfed when necessary, changed diapers, cleaned up […]
  • Daffodil: Book Review

    Kathy Purdy
    6 Mar 2015 | 10:51 am
    I‘ve got daffodils on my mind. Daffodils and snowdrops. As another several inches of snow fall from the sky, and the temperature once again plummets below zero (Fahrenheit), my craving for spring grows ever stronger, and every night before getting ready for bed, I go to my happy place, the springtime of the mind. One […]
  • Hear me on Heritage Network Radio

    Kathy Purdy
    1 Mar 2015 | 7:18 am
    This Monday, March 2, 2015, at 3pm, I’ll be speaking with Carmen DeVito and Alice Marcus Krieg on the latest segment of their We Dig Plants! podcast. It will stream live at 3 pm or you can listen to it later at your convenience. Hope you’ll lend me your ear and tell your friends, too! […]
 
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    A Way To Garden

  • weekend reading: the blue in bluebirds; tick research; a doll of a d.i.y. house

    margaret
    27 Mar 2015 | 5:01 am
    WHY ARE BLUEBIRDS blue? That and other stories caught my eye recently–along with the latest updates on ticks, glyphosate, and [read more…] The post weekend reading: the blue in bluebirds; tick research; a doll of a d.i.y. house appeared first on A Way To Garden.
  • birdnote q&a: the much-maligned brown-headed cowbird

    margaret
    26 Mar 2015 | 5:51 am
    ‘THAT’S A BAD BIRD,’ we may say in judgment of the brown-headed cowbird, who uses the nests (and nanny services) [read more…] The post birdnote q&a: the much-maligned brown-headed cowbird appeared first on A Way To Garden.
  • doodle by andre: portrait of a marriage

    margaret
    24 Mar 2015 | 4:08 am
    THERE AIN’T A CROCUS to be seen here yet, but up popped Andre Jordan, the Mad Doodler of South Dakota [read more…] The post doodle by andre: portrait of a marriage appeared first on A Way To Garden.
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    The Occasional Gardener

  • Green Flowers

    28 Feb 2015 | 9:37 am
    I don't often see green flowered orchids at the farmers market but I did today and two spectacular ones at that. Dendrobium Callophyllum on the right is a native of Java, Lesser Sunda Islands and the Moluccas. Hallelujah it likes  sun and I have just the spot for it. I will be moving it out of its pot (growing on charcoal) to attach to a branch to hang on the Dark Verandah. Most of the epiphytes I have, similarly set up are clustered around the shady bits so its great to have this filling one of the sunnier gaps. And fill nicely it will as it has 5 or 6 fairly lanky arched leaf…
  • False Rue

    24 Feb 2015 | 4:39 am
    As I often complain, I'm in ownership of a quite a few plants that remain unidentified as that's how plants are sold here- without any kind of label. Occasionally the seller might be knowledgeable enough to identify the plant- sometimes it even helps just to know the local name. Otherwise its a google search that might take a while to track down. Let me just say though, it is astonishing what google can do with a few keywords. I now also have about three textbooks written by local authors and make it a morning habit to flip through them, cup of coffee in hand. This is the other method that…
  • Lightning Orchids

    30 Jan 2015 | 1:03 am
    My dad called these Lightning Orchids, which I've discovered is not correct, the plant is Dendrobium Crumanatum and the common name for them is Pigeon Orchids. He said that they flowered after a lightning storm and he's not completely wrong about that. This orchid forms buds after there is a temperature drop, usually due to a thunderstorm. Nine days later long necklaces of white flowers with a yellow throat bloom gregariously with members of this species in its vicinity. The blooms are fragrant, particularly in the morning and last only a day.This ephemeral quality perfectly suits where these…
  • The Color Orange

    4 Jan 2015 | 9:12 pm
    The decision to go for a color palette with warm sunset accents in the Gravel Garden developed along a few lines. One was how well those colors look with the many succulents I have here. Another is how it pairs with all the concrete and gravel mulch and terracota that dominates the hardscape. It also makes sense that it is in the same spectrum as the berries of the Ficus Deltoides and also the ripe Citrus when it fruits. Finally, this garden's best moment is at the end of the day when the sun is just about to set providing a lovely glow to the space which reminded me of how the cottage…
  • Painterly Whites

    25 Nov 2014 | 5:59 am
    The ribs on the Caladium Lindenii pictured left, look like they're painted on. In the background of the picture on the right, what looks like green paint spattered on white paper is Diffenbachia Star Bright I think, hard to tell with so many variations that look quite similar. The papery leaves in the foreground with the broad watercolor stripes belong to variegated Arrowroot, Maranta Arundinacea, possibly my favorite of this trio.I inherited these guys from my parents garden, which along with a collection of fragrant white flowered plants, I started organizing into a 'white corner'. To…
 
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    Plant Whatever Brings You Joy

  • Fire Pits: Part Two

    Kathryn
    19 Mar 2015 | 6:44 pm
    As some of you will recall my last blog post was afire with enthusiasm for fire pits, inspired by gardening author Helen Yoest, who wrote a guest post about her own fire pit in her garden. Kindled in my new found passion was the realization my 72nd birthday was upon me, nearly, and that if I applied myself aptly I might actually combine the two, making a new fire pit the center of my birthday festivities. I began researching fire pits and made the decision to purchase one made by Landman and to purchase it locally. All that was left was to decide which design. I chose the vine pattern since I…
  • Fire Pits: Part One

    Kathryn
    19 Jan 2015 | 1:22 pm
    It is probably fitting that following a post on leaving wild corners in your garden I would be drawn to a recent post I saw on author Helen Yoest’s blog Gardening with Confidence regarding her organic creation of what she calls her Fire Garden. I found I kept thinking of her post and had the occasion to inquire about a possible guest post after she most generously reviewed my book Plant Whatever Brings You Joy! We have some things in common other than writing about our gardens. She’s a Pisces lady living in North Carolina who owns a Border Collie! As many of you know, so much of…
  • Leave Wild, Undisturbed Corners in Your Garden

    Kathryn
    31 Dec 2014 | 10:41 am
    There is an irony that Plant Whatever Brings You Joy: Blessed Wisdom from the Garden must ultimately carry a caveat, being that as a conscious gardener we learn that our immediate landscapes, the ones we play with, plant things in and recreate, are not, as we thought, blank canvases to reconstruct to our own liking. Not really. They are pieces of something, a larger something of which we are all a part. And that as loving stewards of that reality we are rather obliged to consider what came before, as in the last several millions of years, and to consider that carefully as we make our mark…
  • Winter Butternut Squash Soup!

    Kathryn
    17 Nov 2014 | 1:08 pm
    Most likely because neither my mother nor grandmother, as I recall, ever baked or in any way prepared a winter squash for our family, it’s taken me quite awhile to familiarize myself with the many varieties–and then to learn what I can do with them! I’m imagining if I set my mind to it I could write an entire book about winter squashes and their infinite possibilities. What is more likely, and what appears to be happening, is that each fall and winter, as the squashes come into their splendid season–just in time for the winter holidays, how convenient, and no accident,…
  • Another Garden Transforming a Community!

    Kathryn
    5 Nov 2014 | 6:19 pm
    Neighborhood Seed Saving Project One of the most life-affirming, inspiring movements in the world today is the Community Garden movement, particularly when it involves teaching children. And we see or hear of examples of this emerging trend throughout our country. But there is nothing as profound and wise and enlivening as bearing witness or becoming involved in a community garden that not only includes children, but also totally transforms a neighborhood, and that is precisely what Brightmoor Youth Garden in a formerly impoverished and crime ridden neighborhood in Detroit is doing! I learned…
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    May Dreams Gardens

  • A magical place

    Carol
    23 Mar 2015 | 2:31 pm
    I can think of no place more magical than a garden, where every hoe and trowel is a magic wand. The magic is there in each petal of each flower as it opens up. It's there in the unfurling of each new leaf. At times the magic seems to take place in slow motion. We wait and wait, and then in the blink of an eye, in just the second we turn our heads, it happens. Flowers are blooming everywhere
  • Welcome, Spring

    Carol
    20 Mar 2015 | 3:54 am
    Iris reticulata anxiously await Spring's arrival in the garden Spring arrives today at 6:45 pm EDT. If you want to be sure Spring comes to your garden, you absolutely must run out right now and open up your garden gate. If Spring arrives and your garden gate is closed, she may pass you by and you'll face weeks of who knows what kind of weather.  I wouldn't risk it. If Spring arrives and
  • The Forgiving Garden

    Carol
    18 Mar 2015 | 7:02 pm
    Lean in, new gardeners, I'm going to tell you a secret about gardens. Gardens, in general, are very forgiving of mistakes. And they don't demand precision in timing or perfection in plant choices, either. So if you are all uptight about possibly making a mistake in your garden, please relax. You are taking all of the fun out of gardening. I promise you your garden will forgive you for
  • Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day - March 2015

    Carol
    14 Mar 2015 | 9:05 pm
    Iris reticulata 'Katharine Hodgkin'  Welcome to Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day for March 2015. Wow.  Here in my USDA Hardiness Zone 6a garden in Central Indiana, the last few days have  left me nearly breathless as I run around the garden taking pictures of blooms in the front and in the back. In the front, a few solitary blooms of Iris reticulata 'Katharine Hodgkin' showed up yesterday.  I
  • And the lawn began to bloom

    Carol
    11 Mar 2015 | 8:32 pm
    For the joy of that first moment when I stepped out the back door and saw all the crocuses blooming in the lawn, it was worth it. It was worth spending hours planting all those crocus bulbs last fall, and the two falls before that. It was worth enduring the cold, wind, ice, and snow of winter, including the last snow just ten days ago that covered the back lawn with six inches of snow. It
 
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    Digging

  • Drive-By Gardens: Grape Kool-Aid trees in northwest Austin

    Pam/Digging
    27 Mar 2015 | 10:53 am
    Can you detect a scent of grape Kool-Aid through your screen? I wouldn’t be surprised if you could. Austin’s enjoying a banner year for the fragrant, wisteria-like blooms of our native Texas mountain laurel (Sophora secundiflora). This is the tree that helped sell me on Austin, as it was in full bloom when my husband and I first visited. In my 21 years of living here, I can’t recall the mountain laurels blooming better than they are right now. Each cascading purple flower cluster sends you right back to childhood with an intense, grapey fragrance. And few gardens could have…
  • The great unfurling

    Pam/Digging
    24 Mar 2015 | 6:35 am
    Petals unfurl seemingly overnight, new blossoms appearing each morning. Every garden stroll is a small voyage of discovery right now. This week I’m seeing masses of dainty, lilac spiderwort (Tradescantia occidentalis). A single summer snowflake (Leucojum aestivum) with flowers like dancing ladies in white ballgowns trimmed with jaunty, green dots. ‘Amethyst Flame’ iris, brought along from my former garden and blooming much better this year after being moved to a western exposure in the front garden. Texas mountain laurel (Sophora secundiflora), close enough, almost, to give…
  • First water lily is blooming but pond cleanup awaits

    Pam/Digging
    23 Mar 2015 | 9:11 am
    Despite a cool spring, an early-bird ‘Colorado’ water lily has already opened in the stock-tank pond, pale but undaunted. Future lilies will blush a deeper peachy pink as the days grow warmer. Before it decides to bloom in earnest, I really need to muck out a year’s worth of leaves and haul out and divide the water lilies. It’s a muddy, back-straining chore but satisfying to have a clean, refreshed pond again. Right now, I’ll admit, it’s not a thing of beauty! Mr. Screech Owl is giving me that look, like, What’s taking you so long? Get to it!
  • New mirrored trellises add depth to a blank wall

    Pam/Digging
    22 Mar 2015 | 3:20 am
    There’s something new in the side garden. Yes, the Texas mountain laurel (Sophora secundiflora), my favorite native ornamental tree, is blooming and wafting the sweet fragrance of grape Kool-Aid through the air. Does anything say springtime in Austin as much as that smell? But something else is new. And I’m not talking about the 3-inch layer of live oak leaves on the ground. I’ve hung five mirrored-acrylic trellises along the long brick wall at back of the garage. I’d been looking for something to liven up that boring stretch of brick and add the illusion of depth to a…
  • Gorgeous weeds and walls at the Wildflower Center

    Pam/Digging
    19 Mar 2015 | 10:57 am
    With a hat tip to Phoenix landscape architect Steve Martino, who coined the phrase “weeds and walls” to describe his design style — planting native plants for toughness and building walls for structure — here are some of the beautiful weeds and walls at Austin’s own native-plant showcase, the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center. I visited yesterday to see the early spring show, like gray globemallow (Sphaeralcea incana). Native trees are at peak bloom all over town, and the Wildflower Center was colorful with Texas redbuds (Cercis canadensis var. texensis)……
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    Blithewold Blogs

  • Sight for sore eyes

    Kristin Green
    27 Mar 2015 | 7:13 am
    Winter’s mess has me craving tidiness (I understand the whole spring cleaning thing now and have gone a little nuts clearing surfaces at home) and its palette of whites, greys, browns, and bronzy greens has made my eyeballs hungry for super-saturated rainbow colors. You too? I had both wishes fulfilled during one dark, rainy day yesterday. Betsy and I […]
  • The littlest things

    Kristin Green
    20 Mar 2015 | 8:53 am
    Pretty soon only the biggest bonanzas of blooms and armfuls of harvests will knock our socks off but right now, on the first official day of spring, it doesn’t take much to get us excited. Any evidence of the growing season, no matter how small, is huge. Especially considering there’s snow in our forecast today (ugh-gain), piles of old stuff jammed in […]
  • Thaw

    Kristin Green
    11 Mar 2015 | 11:59 am
    Suddenly it seems like it won’t be too long before we see the ground again… Fingers crossed. Is winter on its way out of your garden too?
  • Gratuitous snow

    Kristin Green
    6 Mar 2015 | 7:58 am
    I’m getting awfully tired of posting snow pictures (are you sick of seeing them?) but every time we have gotten dumped on, it has been too pretty not to get the camera out. This last snowfall came without wind (here) and stuck like cotton to every twig. lovely. But enough is enough. We’re hoping, like we did the last […]
  • Moving ahead

    Kristin Green
    27 Feb 2015 | 9:14 am
    Even though it feels like winter has stalled over New England and we might never see the ground again, we are moving ahead towards spring. Our engines are revving and we’ll be ready to hit the ground running at the first sign of thaw. We’re sowing seeds, taking cuttings, and keeping up with the insect activity in the greenhouse […]
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    A Leafy Indulgence

  • Winter Walk Off

    Swimray
    19 Mar 2015 | 8:32 pm
    With a few minutes until the deadline for a winter walk off post, it seems I am almost late for everything these days. For yet another year, I chose to walk around Old Town Alexandria where I work. There is so much detail and little things to see. I start by heading to the water. The Potomac River was the lifeblood of our early historic seaport town.This anchor is placed prominently at the intersection of two paths. There is no information displayed.The McIlhenny Seaport Center. I don't know much about this place in such a prominent location along the river. Having looked through the window a…
  • The Quincunx And The Olitory

    Swimray
    10 Feb 2015 | 7:53 pm
    I added quincunx and olitory to my lexicon. Read on and you will too.2015 gardening began this weekend. I packed up and labeled my contributions for the Washington Gardener Magazine annual Seed Exchange. This one held in Virginia is scheduled on the first weekend in February. The day's program began at the registration table to pick up my goody bag of seeds and promotions. Then on to peruse the table full of garden catalogs, old magazines, and more promotions. Then down the ramp to the main attraction: the seeds.I brought some packets of my famous bombast rose poppy seeds [posted 2013.06.02],…
  • In Between

    Swimray
    24 Jan 2015 | 5:05 pm
    Here am I between two storms. A rain-sleet-snow-freezing rain "event" happened overnight and snow is predicted for tomorrow night. We are also between the seasons; at a midpoint with the light at the end of the winter tunnel. Next stop on the bus: spring.The signs are there. Some things in the garden are beginning to stir. And next Saturday is the annual Washington Gardener Magazine Seed Exchange in Virginia. Coming home afterwards with a bucket full of new seeds to try out gets the gardening juices going again. A trip around the yard found some heads poking out. No sign of the crocus…
  • Last Year's Resolutions Scorecard

    Swimray
    30 Dec 2014 | 7:26 pm
    This year 2014 saw the least number of posts to this blog because there were fewer new additions to the garden. How did last year's resolutions go? Let's see how your resolutions ended up, too.Post thoughts and gardening results on the blog more than once a month, even if no one reads them.Do the math: 24 posts = at least two per month. (But only one post in November, and one in December.)Start working on getting the poinsettia to bloom earlier in the fall, to be sure it blooms in time for Christmas, instead of later at New Year's.Cross this one off. The poinsettia up and died on me this…
  • Tending To The Tender Snacks

    Swimray
    30 Nov 2014 | 12:15 pm
    Root crops and I just don't mix well. Carrots are one of the first creatures (they are supposed to be easy) that I tried growing, year after year, without much success. They ended up dry, splitting, deformed runts. After a few years of adding sand to my garden soil more appropriate for clay pottery than gardening, the results were no better.Then, I discovered compost and organic material, and thought to try that to improve the soil density. Building upon last year's carrot success, I gave it another shot this year with the Tendersnax hybrid purchased a year or two ago. The results are truly…
 
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    A Leafy Indulgence

  • Winter Walk Off

    Swimray
    19 Mar 2015 | 8:32 pm
    With a few minutes until the deadline for a winter walk off post, it seems I am almost late for everything these days. For yet another year, I chose to walk around Old Town Alexandria where I work. There is so much detail and little things to see. I start by heading to the water. The Potomac River was the lifeblood of our early historic seaport town.This anchor is placed prominently at the intersection of two paths. There is no information displayed.The McIlhenny Seaport Center. I don't know much about this place in such a prominent location along the river. Having looked through the window a…
  • The Quincunx And The Olitory

    Swimray
    10 Feb 2015 | 7:53 pm
    I added quincunx and olitory to my lexicon. Read on and you will too.2015 gardening began this weekend. I packed up and labeled my contributions for the Washington Gardener Magazine annual Seed Exchange. This one held in Virginia is scheduled on the first weekend in February. The day's program began at the registration table to pick up my goody bag of seeds and promotions. Then on to peruse the table full of garden catalogs, old magazines, and more promotions. Then down the ramp to the main attraction: the seeds.I brought some packets of my famous bombast rose poppy seeds [posted 2013.06.02],…
  • In Between

    Swimray
    24 Jan 2015 | 5:05 pm
    Here am I between two storms. A rain-sleet-snow-freezing rain "event" happened overnight and snow is predicted for tomorrow night. We are also between the seasons; at a midpoint with the light at the end of the winter tunnel. Next stop on the bus: spring.The signs are there. Some things in the garden are beginning to stir. And next Saturday is the annual Washington Gardener Magazine Seed Exchange in Virginia. Coming home afterwards with a bucket full of new seeds to try out gets the gardening juices going again. A trip around the yard found some heads poking out. No sign of the crocus…
  • Last Year's Resolutions Scorecard

    Swimray
    30 Dec 2014 | 7:26 pm
    This year 2014 saw the least number of posts to this blog because there were fewer new additions to the garden. How did last year's resolutions go? Let's see how your resolutions ended up, too.Post thoughts and gardening results on the blog more than once a month, even if no one reads them.Do the math: 24 posts = at least two per month. (But only one post in November, and one in December.)Start working on getting the poinsettia to bloom earlier in the fall, to be sure it blooms in time for Christmas, instead of later at New Year's.Cross this one off. The poinsettia up and died on me this…
  • Tending To The Tender Snacks

    Swimray
    30 Nov 2014 | 12:15 pm
    Root crops and I just don't mix well. Carrots are one of the first creatures (they are supposed to be easy) that I tried growing, year after year, without much success. They ended up dry, splitting, deformed runts. After a few years of adding sand to my garden soil more appropriate for clay pottery than gardening, the results were no better.Then, I discovered compost and organic material, and thought to try that to improve the soil density. Building upon last year's carrot success, I gave it another shot this year with the Tendersnax hybrid purchased a year or two ago. The results are truly…
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    Bumblebee Blog

  • Lessons from Miss P

    Robin Ripley
    1 Mar 2015 | 1:39 pm
    Thank you for subscribing and visiting http://bumblebeeblog.com We lost our 18-year-old cat Miss P a couple of months ago. It was a very sad time around here. But I still think I see her shadow out of the corner of my eye from time to time. Two months later I’m pretty sure some of the pet hair I see on my coat […] The post Lessons from Miss P appeared first on Bumblebee Blog.
  • The Story of Little Man or Don’t Push Robin Too Far

    Robin Ripley
    12 Jan 2015 | 9:47 am
    Thank you for subscribing and visiting http://bumblebeeblog.com The story I’m about to tell may make you think differently about me. I feel differently about myself. It started this past spring. To fill out my coop I ordered six female chicks from My Pet Chicken—two Appenzeller Spitzhaubens and four Polish chicks. If you’ve never ordered chicks before, you may be surprised to learn […] The post The Story of Little Man or Don’t Push Robin Too Far appeared first on Bumblebee Blog.
  • The Totally Real Dangers of Rural Living

    Robin Ripley
    30 Nov 2014 | 11:15 am
    Thank you for subscribing and visiting http://bumblebeeblog.com Living here in a fairly rural part of Maryland, I see things that the average suburbanite wouldn’t encounter in a year living in a sanitized and manicured neighborhood. I can sit in my favorite chair and watch red foxes play fight in the back field. In spring, the tulip trees look like Christmas trees with […] The post The Totally Real Dangers of Rural Living appeared first on Bumblebee Blog.
  • Announcing My Big New Plan to Make a Whole Lot of Money

    Robin Ripley
    15 Oct 2014 | 10:58 am
    Thank you for subscribing and visiting http://bumblebeeblog.com Now that I have put the pack back on, so to speak, and am blogging again after my year-long blog vacation, I decided I better check in on those clever blog gurus. You know who they are. They’re the professional bloggers who tell us amateur-hour bloggers all the things we need to do to become […] The post Announcing My Big New Plan to Make a Whole Lot of Money appeared first on Bumblebee Blog.
  • What I Did on My Vacation from Blogging

    Robin Ripley
    25 Sep 2014 | 8:08 am
    Thank you for subscribing and visiting http://bumblebeeblog.com Well, hello there! Did you notice I was gone? Did you miss me? I missed you. Truly, I didn’t set out to take nearly a full year off from blogging here at Bumblebee. Sometimes, life just gets in the way. Sometimes you have to make a choice between living life or writing about it. Not […] The post What I Did on My Vacation from Blogging appeared first on Bumblebee Blog.
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    Garden Rant

  • On Lady Bird Johnson, Beauty, and Tulips v. Daffodils by Susan Harris

    Susan Harris
    27 Mar 2015 | 5:26 am
     Photo by John Taylor.  Title: Lady Bird’s Gift Another great column by John Kelly for the Washington Post – this time about Lady Bird Johnson’s “beautification” program. Lady Bird’s beautification campaign started in the spring of 1965. She was involved with a group called the Society for a More Beautiful National Capital, which, among other things, aimed to improve hundreds of little oddly shaped parcels of land that dotted the District, and to build playgrounds. By the spring of 1966, 750,000 tulips and daffodils, 50,000 mums, 220,000 annuals, 3,000 roses,…
  • Floral Design Clash at the White House: French v. Modern by Susan Harris

    Susan Harris
    26 Mar 2015 | 5:12 am
    First there was news that head White House floral designer Laura Dowling had left her job a few weeks ago, with no fanfare, and no one knew why.  There were reports that she’d actually been “escorted off the grounds”! Two days later the Washington Post’s gossip-column had an update – about a clash between Dowling’s French-schooled style and Mrs. Obama’s preference for  more modern styles. The story quoted “several sources” as saying Dowling left because her “fussy style was not in line with the first lady’s emerging modern…
  • The Other Garden by Ivette Soler

    Ivette Soler
    24 Mar 2015 | 9:12 pm
      An agave blossom festooned with pom poms thrusts itself into the sky above The Huntington Desert Garden A person’s relationship with a garden can be one of the most profound relationships we can have. Just as profound as the ones we have with our husbands, our wives, our children. A connection with a garden can be like the one we have with a lover – thrilling, exciting, intoxicating, sometimes even illicit and a bit surreptitious; a fling, or an affair. I have a relationship like that with a garden, one that isn’t mine. I have to confess that for many years, I have been…
  • Seasonal survival strategies by Elizabeth Licata

    Elizabeth Licata
    23 Mar 2015 | 5:00 am
    By now we northeasterners are aware—though not surprised—that the first few days of “spring” aren’t bringing much relief. Snow cover is still receding, temps are still minimal, and it seems incredible that within weeks we’ll be seeing daffodils and hellebores. Here’s how I get through the last dreary gasps of winter. 1. Go to the garden show and buy a shovel that can get through maple roots and ward off a zombie attack. While I’m there, I also pick up a couple bags of my favorite double lily bulbs. 2. Cut branches from flowering trees and shrubs. I’ve been finding…
  • Late Bloomers on CBS, and They’re Not Talking Asters by Susan Harris

    Susan Harris
    20 Mar 2015 | 6:26 am
    CBS Sunday Morning story this week did a story on late bloomers, which had me looking up from my newspaper expecting flowers.  Turns out, it was much more interesting, at least to this late bloomer. First up, reporter Susan Spencer introduced us to Carol Gardner who (in her 50s) started a calendar business by dressing up her bulldog.  Three bulls later, ZeldaWisdom is going strong. More late bloomers cited were Julia Child, Col. Sanders, Grandma Moses (who didn’t start painting until her late ’70s), and Martha Stewart. A happiness expert of some type was interviewed for the…
 
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    Life In Sugar Hollow

  • 9 Mar 2015 | 1:39 pm

    Tracey
    9 Mar 2015 | 1:39 pm
    We've been hit by several eleventh-hour snowstorms here in Virginia over the past few weeks. And we discovered a few things - one of which is that we have a perfect sledding hill right next to our house, and that sledding under a full moon is something everyone should do in their lifetime. Our little tri-colored terrier, Pearly, even hopped on for a ride. She knew what was good for her. Nothing shakes off cabin fever like flying down a slope into the dark and screaming your head off. Also, if snowed-in, blood oranges work nicely for a whisky sour.And, honestly, the rest of it is a blur. Lots…
  • The Winter, The Winter

    Tracey
    10 Feb 2015 | 10:26 am
    Lately, I feel as if my own voice has been reduced to a squeak. My multiple life roles can be a challenge to balance and as an introvert, I can only recharge through down-time that requires no verbal feedback from me (or additional stimuli). Writing needs time and thought and after responding to everyone else all day, I got nothing. I am okay with this, as long as I can pass out face first into the pillow at the end of the day, without anyone's feelings getting hurt. But my writing does suffer, or simply . . . . doesn't exist at all.Eeeeeeeeeeeeeep!The vast, quiet of winter landscapes is good…
  • Getting Back to Autumn

    Tracey
    13 Nov 2014 | 9:06 am
    A lot of cleanup happening in the garden these days. It is amazing, when I think that two years ago I was very pregnant with a big baby. (Sam was almost nine pounds when he was born - and me being 5' 1", you can imagine how I looked. I made everyone around me nervous, starting at about seven months.) And last autumn, I was whooped from work, adjusting to having a kindergartner and nursing that big baby.But this year, the mobility is back and it feels incredible! I have been raking and mulching leaves - to return to the beds for overwintering and a good feeding. I planted a fragrant winter…
  • My Article on Bulbs for RHome Magazine's Garden Column

    Tracey
    3 Nov 2014 | 8:10 am
    For the beginner gardener, spring-blooming bulbs are a satisfying, easy start. For the seasoned gardener with a failing memory (me), spring-blooming bulbs are a delight because every forgotten fall-planted bulb is a spring-time surprise. For any gardener, the sweetness of early life in the waning, winter garden and the welcomed injection of color within a previously bleak landscape – is the best kind of jumpstart to the approaching spring season. The first step is actually just remembering to plant bulbs at a time when gardening tends to be off of the radar – mid- to late-autumn. (I have…
  • Letting August Bring Us On Home

    Tracey
    21 Aug 2014 | 7:37 am
    All photos from our gardens, except the top photo and the last. {The last is from Hollywood Cemetery in Richmond - a landscaping feat in and of itself, overlooking the James River.} Sam and I also visited the Edgar Allan Poe Museum during that same day - and finally got to see its Enchanted Garden.The top photo is Willow Spring - in Sugar Hollow. We have hit that time of year when we are celebrating tomato and melon harvests, zinnias, cleomes, black-eyed susans and daisies. I have to say, this is the first time in a long time that I am sad to see summer go. A beach vacation to Chincoteague;…
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    Transatlantic Gardener

  • Classic tree and shrub reference goes online

    Graham Rice
    16 Mar 2015 | 5:49 am
    The five volume Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles by W. J. Bean, usually referred to simply as “Bean”, is a monumental work running to over 4,000 pages. It does what it says: it describes in detail the woody plants (including climbers) that can reasonably be expected to grow outside in Britain (mostly zone 8, some zone 9). The four A-Z volumes were last revised almost forty years ago, then a supplement appeared in 1988 (see below, click to enlarge), so it does not include recent classification and name changes and recent introductions. Otherwise, it's impressively comprehensive…
  • The Philadelphia Flower Show

    Graham Rice
    10 Mar 2015 | 8:02 am
    We were at the Philadelphia Flower Show on Friday and it was quite an eye opener. Though quite why the country’s best known flower show is held in a dark and dingy exhibition hall when there’s 2ft/60cm of snow on the ground is baffling. But both the landscapers and the individual exhibitors rose to the occasion, as they have done since 1829, with spring bulbs, orchids, tropical foliage and begonias in particular providing color. There are two main types of horticultural exhibits: displays of plants staged by landscapers and the competitions for individual plants in staged by home…
  • Viburnum dripping with berries

    Graham Rice
    1 Mar 2015 | 1:00 am
    It’s amazing what you find on a short walk round a good garden. Just ten minutes after finding the two witch hazels at the Royal Horticultural Society garden at Wisley, and before spotting the Winter weirdness in the banana border I came across this stunning viburnum. It’s an old favorite but still rarely seen – Viburnum betulifolium (left, click to enlarge). I remember seeing this at the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew decades ago and it made a lasting impression. As you can see, it’s the shining red fruits that are so eye-catching. The picture was taken about three weeks ago, in early…
  • Witch hazel mystery solved?

    Graham Rice
    21 Feb 2015 | 1:00 am
    A combination of an enjoyable winter walk at the Royal Horticultural Society garden at Wisley in Surrey and a quick check in the relevant monograph looks to have solved the mystery of the Asian witch hazel in our Pennsylvania garden. The problem is that the plant of Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Pallida’ we bought from White Flower Farm in Connecticut back in 2007 retains most of its old dry brown leaves through the winter and into flowering time – which ruins the display. And 'Pallida' is not supposed to do that. But at Wisley, on one side of the path near the lake, was H. x intermedia…
  • Developments in sweet peas

    Graham Rice
    17 Feb 2015 | 1:00 am
    A couple of interesting sweet pea developments to tell you about. First of all, the hybrid made by Keith Hammett between the familiar sweet pea, Lathyrus odoratus, and L. belinensis (click to enlarge), discovered in Turkey in 1987, has been formally named by RHS botanist Dawn Edwards – Lathyrus x hammettii. Keith worked for many years using L. belinensis with its yellow and orange flowers, to create a yellow flowered sweet pea – he started by crossing it with ‘Mrs Collier’ - and that work continues. But along the way it has, rather surprisingly, led to the development of some…
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    WashingtonGardener

  • Fenton Friday: Spring has (finally) Sprung!

    WashingtonGardener
    27 Mar 2015 | 12:59 pm
    Peas - soaked and sprouted pre-plantingEvery Friday during the growing season, I'll be giving you an update on my community garden plot at the Fenton Street Community Garden just across the street from my house. I'm plot #16. It is a 10 ft x 20 ft space and this is our 4th year in the garden. (It opened in May 2011.)It is a very late start this year. The snow melted and the ground finally started to thaw enough for me to put peas in. This year I'm planting SugarSnap Peas and also some heirloom Sweet Peas for cutting flowers. I added a third kind of pea as well  Oregon Sugar Pod II, which…
  • Grow Your Health and more...

    WashingtonGardener
    25 Mar 2015 | 11:12 am
    Here are some quick reminders about upcoming events and deadlines in local gardening:Grow Your Health Festival in NoVaOn Saturday, March 28, 2015, from 10:00 to 5:30 the Northern Virginia Whole Food Nutrition Meetup Group will host its third annual Grow Your Health Festival at W.T. Woodson High School in Fairfax, Virginia. The event will celebrate home gardening, sourcing organic and local food, and nutrition and wellness. They will show a documentary film; offer class instruction on gardening and nutrition; and host an exhibit hall for gardening services, farmers, food artisans, organic food…
  • Container Gardening Basics and Beyond

    WashingtonGardener
    20 Mar 2015 | 9:44 am
    This new container gardening class is being offered twice, so you can attend either on Thursday, April 2, 2-3:30pm OR on Saturday, April 4, 10-11:30am.Instructor: Kathy Jentz, editor/publisher, Washington Gardener Magazine. Kathy will cover the basics of growing successful container plantings, from ornamental to edible containers, as well as the different styles and fashions in container gardening.Fee: $22, FOBG: $20; registration required.Held at Brookside Gardens in Wheaton, MD.Register at:http://www.montgomeryparks.org/brookside/xperience.shtm
  • Win a GrowEase Seed Starter Kit in Washington Gardener Magazine March 2015 Reader Contest

    WashingtonGardener
    19 Mar 2015 | 12:12 pm
    For our March 2015 Washington Gardener Reader Contest, Washington Gardener Magazine is giving away a GrowEase Seed Starter Kit from Gardener’s Supply Company (prize value: $17).   They’ve solved the challenges of over- or under-watering with the no-fail self-watering feature. Simply fill the reservoir and plants get the water they need, when they need it. That’s worry-free watering! Forget flimsy, single-use look-alike seed starting kits; this heavy-duty system is reusable, again and again. It includes an extra-sturdy leak-proof reservoir, platform and planting cell tray that…
  • Washington Gardener Magazine March 2015 issue features a Cabbage-Growing Guide for the Mid-Atlantic, 10 Tips for Easy-Care Beds and Borders, and Organic Lawn Care Practices

    WashingtonGardener
    17 Mar 2015 | 2:13 pm
    Washington Gardener is the magazine for gardening enthusiasts in the Mid-Atlantic region. The March 2015 issue is being sent now as a PDF to all current subscribers. It is also now posted at: http://issuu.com/washingtongardener/docs/washingtongardenermar15This issue includes:~ Bletilla: A Hardy Orchid for our Climate ~ 10 Tips for Easy-Care Beds and Borders~  March-April Garden Tasks~ Cabbage-Growing Guide for the Mid-Atlantic~ A Visit to the Virginia House and Garden in Richmond~ Organic Lawn Care Practices~ Growing Strawberries in Containers~ Local Garden Events Listing~ Reader Contest…
 
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    A Tidewater Gardener

  • 2015 Winter Walk-Off Wrap-Up

    Les
    22 Mar 2015 | 12:13 pm
         So finally it is spring. I know in some more northerly places that just means a new mark on the calendar, and real change in the landscape may be weeks away, but around here there is every indication that the seasons are changing. Yesterday I took a much needed bike ride, and my route took me downtown to the harbor and back home again. Along the way strollers were being pushed, couples were
  • Bloom Day - Delayed Development

    Les
    15 Mar 2015 | 12:15 am
         My garden is retarded, and I only mean that in the original sense of the word. Since February's Bloom Day it has snowed three times with the last one being heavy and wet, flattening many of my emerging plants. We also had a night where temperatures dropped to the single digits (thank goodness for an insulating layer of snow), giving us a zone 7b winter instead of our designated zone 8a. For
  • Lesson Not Learned

    Les
    8 Mar 2015 | 9:52 am
         Forgive me Father for I have sinned. 2015 was supposed to be the year that I would start planting more natives in my own garden, and now I must make a painful confession. On my first trip to a nursery this year I came home with 6 new plants, and not a single one is native. If it is any consolation, three of them are not hardy in our winters and will live out their lives in containers, never
  • Summer Color III

    Les
    3 Mar 2015 | 5:16 pm
         There is still much snow on the ground here, but melting has begun, and fingers are crossed that there will be little more to fall. If that wish is granted then I might ask for soil that is not too soggy to work. When I got home today daffodils were pushing up through the snow, just as I left them two weeks ago. Maybe soon I'll be able to see little pops of yellow here and there, a few
  • Summer Color II

    Les
    25 Feb 2015 | 4:30 pm
         We had another snow last night, but apparently it was just a light appetizer. Tonight we are predicted to get the worst snowfall of the season with up to 8" of the heavy and wet variety. The schools were closed today and will not open tomorrow either. The city has already decided it will be closed too, with only emergency services in operation. I realize that we don't have it as bad as
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    clay and limestone

  • Wildflower Wednesday: Spicebush

    Gail
    24 Mar 2015 | 11:00 pm
    Lindera benzoin is one of the earliest blooming trees in my garden. I love how the sulphur yellow flowers  light up the dark corners of the woodland. It's a wonderful small understory tree and you'll find it on my list of perfect native plants that ought to be in more gardens.What makes it a perfect plant?It's easy peasy to grow. Spicebush's ideal habitat is a moist woodland with fertile, leaf covered soil in partial shade. You're more likely to see Spicebush growing in wooded bottom lands, low swamps, and also along streams in Eastern North America. But, don't let all the talk of…
  • Winter annuals for a native plant garden!

    Gail
    20 Mar 2015 | 8:50 am
    Two of my favorites, Entireleaf Western Daisy andBlue-eyed Maryare showing off their attractive rosette stage.  (A Passalong Plant:Blue-eyed Mary)We have a tendency to think of winter as a dormant season with plants at rest, but there really is a great deal of growing going on all winter. Just take a walk in your garden and you'll see signs of active life! Mosses, fungi and lichens are alive and thriving and the weedy winter annuals are reminding you that weeding isn't too far away! (go toThe Fascinating World of Fungi for more on them)Edible Auricularia auricula/Jelly Ear growing on…
  • Won't You Join Us For Garden Bloggers Fling In Toronto!

    Gail
    9 Mar 2015 | 5:00 am
     Westwind Farm Studio, Portland Fling Summer 2014I probably don't have to tell you that Garden Bloggers Fling is an annual event for garden bloggers that is held in different cities around the US or that we've been garden-touring and socializing every year since 2008 when 30+ garden bloggers got together in Austin, TX! Since that first Garden Blogger Fling get together, we've been to Chicago, Buffalo, Seattle, Asheville, San Francisco, Portland and this June 5, 6 & 7, 2015 we're heading north to Toronto, Canada and I hope you can join us.Lurie Garden, Chicago Fling Summer 2009 I…
  • Wildflower Wednesday: Fifth Anniversary!

    Gail
    24 Feb 2015 | 11:00 pm
     I can hardly believe that 5 years have passed since the first Wildflower Wednesday meme post. I want to thank each of you for joining me on my continuing journey to create the best wildlife garden possible.Verbesina virginica At first I wasn't sure what I wanted to do to celebrate this anniversary and then it occurred to me that I could share that first official Wildflower Wednesday post with some updated text and photos. So that's what I've done. If you like you can link back to earlier Wildflower Wednesday posts by clicking on the plant name. Panicum virgatumHere it is~a trip…
  • They called the winter storm Octavia

    Gail
    19 Feb 2015 | 7:00 am
     She's blew into town and left a frozen world in her wake. ice not snowI hoped the snow that was forecast would arrive and protect the garden from subzero temperatures that threatened. We got ice instead. It looked like snow, but, it was ice. A dangerous ice that brought the city to a halt, closed schools and downed power lines.It sparkled and beckoned me to explore, so I bundled up, grabbed my camera and ventured out.Ice coated everything. Trees, shrubs, grasses and power lines.Itea virginicaPanicum virgatumIt was stunningly beautiful. I was shocked to find perfect Hamamelis…
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    Dirt Therapy

  • The garden is waking up

    Phillip Oliver
    27 Mar 2015 | 12:12 pm
    Yoshino CherryMy last post was exactly one month ago and I was posting photos of the snow. A lot has changed in just a few weeks and it is beginning to look a lot like Spring! A cold front brought rain and colder temperatures today but the first part of the week was great. I have been pruning and mulching. Here are a few photos taken yesterday -Jacob's Ladder "Stairway to Heaven" Star Magnolia Anenome nemerosaEpimediumEpimedium Saucer Magnolia "Rustica Rubra"Camellia "Taylor's Perfection"Text and photos by Phillip Oliver, Dirt Therapy
  • Snow today, gone tomorrow

    Phillip Oliver
    27 Feb 2015 | 5:11 pm
    It was here one day and gone the next! That is okay - it was beautiful while it lasted. A reader was telling me that she had not seen her ground for two weeks because of snow. I know that it can get old. It was strange though seeing everything covered in white yesterday morning and all gone by the afternoon.I said in the previous post that I did not want to get out in it. I changed my mind and did venture out briefly to take more photos. It was a very sunny morning and so beautiful but very cold. The snow was melting fast and falling from the trees in heavy thuds. From inside the house, it…
  • Snow Day

    Phillip Oliver
    26 Feb 2015 | 7:44 am
    After weeks of near hits and misses, we finally got our snow day. And it was a significant one. We got about 3 inches but areas to the south of us got up to 10 inches. It arrived late in the day and continued through the early evening. It is beautiful. However, I guess I am just getting old but I had no desire to get out in it. In fact, all of these photos were taken from the windows inside the house! The sun is out this morning and it is falling off the trees. I suspect it will be gone by this afternoon. I still do not want to get out in it. These photos will have to suffice!Text and…
  • Icy Jewels

    Phillip Oliver
    16 Feb 2015 | 6:05 pm
    We missed the snow this week - earlier forecasters were saying that we could get as much as 2-5 inches. However, as it often happens, the snow line went much farther north so we missed out. We are getting cold rain and sleet and everything is wet. It is going to get very cold tonight and black ice will be a problem in the morning. There is also concern about the ice on trees. I would much have preferred the snow!I did get a change to get a few shots of the beautiful ice in the garden today.Text and photos by Phillip Oliver, Dirt Therapy
  • Black and White Pound Cake

    Phillip Oliver
    4 Feb 2015 | 12:00 pm
    I always find myself hesitant to make pound cakes - not only can they be expensive but they are not very kind to the waistline. When I contemplate using 10 eggs, 4 sticks of butter, 3 cups of sugar and 4 cups of flour in a cake, I wonder - is it going to be worth it? Well, the answer to that is usually yes! I have tried several Maida Heatter pound cake recipes and all of them have been exceptional. This one sounded different and unique and it turned out to be as delicious as any of her others.The unique part is the 3/4 cup of chocolate syrup that goes into the second batter. I have never used…
 
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    Natural Gardening

  • Time in the Low Country

    Lisa Wagner
    27 Mar 2015 | 7:24 pm
    The Low Country of South Carolina was naturally a place of coastal rivers, cypress swamps, and maritime forests. Historically, it included rice fields and indigo growing and plantations.A visit today to Magnolia Gardens and Middleton Place (part of a Garden Writers regional meeting) brought largely moments of appreciating the natural beauty along the Ashley River.Ashley River from the Magnolia Gardens river trailBald eagle above the Ashley RiverAn old live oak at Middleton Plantation
  • A brazen woodchuck

    Lisa Wagner
    25 Mar 2015 | 5:13 pm
    If the squirrels eating the kale weren't enough, a woodchuck appeared in the back garden yesterday chewing on buckeye leaves. They're full of nasty compounds.  Amazing.At least the squirrels don't seem to like spinach, Japanese red mustard, or parsley (at least not yet).This is quite a sub-par photo, taken through the window, and blurry, but you get the idea.  Hmrph.Eating buckeye leaves?  Really?  No wonder that they'll chew their way through cilantro, etc.   This one has just come out from its burrow, so probably hasn't discovered the small amounts of…
  • Moving forward

    Lisa Wagner
    23 Mar 2015 | 6:05 pm
    As we get ready to pass on an old house (built in 1929) and relatively new garden (we've been here 22 years) to the next owners, I'm happy and wistful.  We accepted an offer last weekend, so it's now "contract pending."My dad, not a sentimental sort, reminded me this morning via email of Robert McCloskey's words in The Time of Wonder, "a little bit sad about the place you are leaving, a little bit glad about the place you are going"  (he remembered:  happy about the place you’re going to, sad about the place you’re leaving.)  My mother often read that book to my…
  • Sassafras and dogwood

    Lisa
    19 Mar 2015 | 5:19 pm
    The flower buds of sassafras and dogwood are visibly swelling.  Sassafras flowers, both male and female, should be open any day, with the return of warm weather.Today brought chilly and rainy weather as a cold front pushed against warmer air.Flowers on our rabbit-eye blueberries are ready to open, and quince flowers are already visible.This was March 6, 2012 -- with a sassafras in full flower.
  • Bloodroot in flower

    Lisa
    16 Mar 2015 | 7:23 pm
    Coming back to the Piedmont today, I was delighted to see bloodroot in full flower.  I've made so many posts about bloodroot -- it's a favorite early spring flower.  Here's a post from last year.We planted it in various places around the garden, starting with one plant. Ants have spread the seeds and patches have popped up all over the front woodland border along the front path.  Totally rewarding.There are a number of large clumps now in the front, along with smaller plants.  Lovely.It's in flower in the South Carolina Botanical Garden, too. I took this photo late this…
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    Outside Clyde

  • Then It Snowed

    Christopher C. NC
    27 Mar 2015 | 3:42 pm
    A big box of summer blooming roots and tubers arrived that needed to be planted in my stomped through beds. There were dahlias, begonia, calla lily, gladiolas, astilbe and crocosmia. I'm still not willing to discuss what the construction worker dudes have been doing to my new beds. I think it is plain to see. Every thing but the crocosmia got planted. I have a whole new bed in mind for that and
  • Other Gardens I Tend

    Christopher C. NC
    26 Mar 2015 | 7:26 pm
    The bulbs are in full swing at Client#1's. Client #1 has two gardens I tend. This is the other one. The Magnolia stellata is in full bloom just in time for a big freeze. I haven't planted any new bulbs in this garden the last two falls. You can't tell the difference. He may have been sneaking in some new bulbs behind my back. It
  • In Gardens I Tend

    Christopher C. NC
    25 Mar 2015 | 6:00 pm
    The new fountain is full and running at the Posh Estate #2. It is my hope that the construction worker dudes are done digging trenches through this one main entry bed at the least. I know they are not done stomping through it. We won't discuss what they have been doing to all the other newly planted beds. I will be doing my best procrastination routine to delay planting the flowering perennials
  • Roadside Compliments

    Christopher C. NC
    24 Mar 2015 | 4:40 pm
    I finished work kind work early enough to stop and fetch some mulch for the roadside vegetable garden. If I do it a bit at a time when the time presents itself, it will get done sooner rather than later. While I was spreading mulch another neighbor came to a stop on the scenic byway. "You really keep this place tidied up and looking good. I appreciate that." Um, gee, well, thanks. Actually I
  • Tiny Blue Bulbs

    Christopher C. NC
    23 Mar 2015 | 7:01 pm
    Chionodoxa Anemone Puschkinia
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    Growing The Home Garden

  • Springtime in the Garden (Photos)

    22 Mar 2015 | 3:21 pm
    Spring is here and the garden is most certainly coming alive! Unfortunately some freezing temperatures are in the forecast for later in the week here in Tennessee. Here's a quick look at what you will find in my garden at the moment!Purple leaf plum and forsythia  I trimmed the forsythia back after it bloomed last year into more of a small shrub. They can get very large if you let them grow. Forsythias are an easy plant to propagate if you want more of them. Just take a cutting 4-5 inches long and place it in a pot of soil and keep moist. There is no need for rooting hormone to propagate…
  • Planting Azaleas from Monrovia

    15 Mar 2015 | 6:49 pm
    Today was a fantastic day to be outdoors, and of course for most of the time being outdoors means I'm planting something! Today I planted three azaleas into one of my gardens courtesy of Monrovia. Monrovia gave me an opportunity to try out these 'Savannah Sunset' azaleas in my garden. 'Savannah Sunset' is a part of Monrovia's Bloom N' Again collection of repeat blooming azaleas. They will bloom in the spring then produce more blooms in the fall!When planting any plant the location is very important. Azaleas generally prefer a part sun location with an acidic soil. If your soil isn't acidic…
  • Spring IS Coming

    4 Mar 2015 | 6:22 am
    Despite what the weather may lead us to believe Spring will arrive soon. Maybe it will help us believe it if we repeat that phrase: Spring will arrive soon! (Repeat as needed) It's March and during March we can expect a number of tumultuous and turbulent weather systems that will toy with our psyche. Have faith gardeners because spring and the gardening season will be here soon, but before Spring arrives there are a number of things that gardeners can to to prepare for the busiest time of the year!Yoshino Cherry in BloomPre-spring is a GREAT time to mulch. A GREAT time! Why? Because…
  • Nashville Lawn & Garden Show 2015: Wine Festival

    18 Feb 2015 | 12:14 pm
    26th Annual Nashville Lawn & Garden Show 2015Nashville Lawn & Garden Show Announces Wine FestivalWine Festival occurs on Saturday, March 7 during the 4-day Show Nashville, TN – The Nashville Lawn and Garden Show will partner with the Tennessee Farm Winegrowers Alliance to present a one-day-only Wine Festival during its traditional four-day Show at the Tennessee State Fairgrounds.  The Show will incorporate locally produced wine from more than a dozen of the state’s most celebrated wineries on Saturday, March 7.  Wine Festival wrist bands will be available inside the…
  • Layering a Viburnum, The Results!

    7 Feb 2015 | 6:34 pm
    It's not a secret that I'm a fan of plant propagation. Who wouldn't be? You get free plants! One of the easiest ways to propagate a plant is through a technique called layering. With layering you essentially pin down a branch of a shrub or tree to the soil and encourage it to form roots. The roots usually appear at a node (the spot on the branch where leaves form). Recently I transplanted a rooted viburnum that I was able to turn into 5 additional plants just by pinning down a couple low hanging branches with rocks.Often you will see people recommend making a small wound on the branch below…
 
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    Sharing Nature's Garden

  • Tropical plumeria has a sweet surprise in the greenhouse...

    Diana
    6 Mar 2015 | 3:07 pm
    If you ask me to envision myself in my happy place, you'll find me on a beach somewhere, enjoying balmy breezes with a book in one hand and an umbrella drink in the other.So when the weather warms up, I spend my time creating a similar happy place in my own garden.  Around our pool, I plant things that are lush -- some tropical, some native.  The tropicals typically live in very large ceramic pots that overwinter in the greenhouse.For many years, I've been growing plumeria, or frangipani.  I've been given some by my parents, who brought them back from Hawaii, and from friends…
  • Winter warm up -- hot colors in the garden...

    Diana
    4 Mar 2015 | 10:11 pm
    Even here in Central Texas, our winter's freezing temps and cold, damp, grey skies are hanging on.  I'm done with it.  And  I know my gardening friends to the north are exasperated by the volume of snow that continues to plague them.At the Garden Bloggers Fling in Portland last spring, I was struck by the overwhelming use of color in the gardens there.  Plants, pots, furniture, you name it, vivid colors perked up each and every garden.  With a climate filled with its share of grey days, these pops of color  their gardens not only brightened up the space, they…
  • Ice in the garden...

    Diana
    28 Feb 2015 | 5:15 am
    Baby, it's cold outside...Central Texas gardens are being slammed with ice and even snow in some parts.  I feel for our northern friends who have it so much worse than we do.  We're feeling very deprived of our "normal" warmer early spring temperatures.Iris, wisteria, and Texas Mountain laurel buds are being sabotaged. Delicate new shoots on perennials have bitten the dust. And, our evergreens will once again be slow to start their growth. Here are a few signs that it's really cold in my garden.  This Japanese aralia will recover, but isn't this one of the most pitiful…
  • Adding dimension and bones to the winter garden...

    Diana
    23 Feb 2015 | 3:48 pm
    Now is a great time to plan for NEXT winter's garden.   When the blooms and the perennials have come and gone, what's left in your garden?  With many of the plants dormant, you can truly see the bones of your landscape and assess your needs.Is there a wall of green -- several sets of medium-leafed glossy green shrubs that all blend into one another?  Does your garden lack definition?Now is the perfect time to think about what you can add to the garden this spring that will give you depth and texture and form when you look out of  your window next winter.  Below,…
  • Adding interest and dimension to the bones of the winter garden...

    Diana
    23 Feb 2015 | 3:09 pm
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    In the Garden

  • I’m so excited, I wet my plants!

    Ellen Leigh
    24 Mar 2015 | 9:24 am
    My husband and I are currently house hunting for a whole new way of life. That’s right- we’re moving out of a condo and into a house on some property, maybe a lot of acreage, maybe just a couple of acres. A new farm. Al is retiring before the end of this year, and we’ll […] The post I’m so excited, I wet my plants! appeared first on In the Garden.
  • July out at the ‘Farm’

    Ellen Leigh
    25 Jul 2011 | 12:19 pm
    I’ve been a bad girl and have failed to keep you up-dated on the progress of our ‘Farm’. Almost everything planted has done amazingly well, especially the weeds, and we have started harvesting crops already. We had a good start with the zuchini, and got a bunch of them all at once, but one plant […] The post July out at the ‘Farm’ appeared first on In the Garden.
  • Out at ‘The Farm’

    Ellen Leigh
    14 Jun 2011 | 11:01 am
    Things are coming along nicely out at ‘The Farm’. We got our plants in and our seeds planted just after Memorial Day, and spent the next several evenings making sure everything was well watered to ensure a good start. Before planting the beans, we constructed tee-pees of bamboo poles and twine for them to grow on, and […] The post Out at ‘The Farm’ appeared first on In the Garden.
  • Opening Day!

    Ellen Leigh
    2 Jun 2011 | 8:12 am
       Finally! After one of the wettest springs in my memory, the community gardens at Greenmead are finally open! We were able to check in with Brad, the head gardener there, find and mark our assigned 25 by 25 plot and plan on setting to work in it as soon as the weather and soil […] The post Opening Day! appeared first on In the Garden.
  • They grow up so fast!

    Ellen Leigh
    20 May 2011 | 12:49 pm
    It seems like just yesterday that Mr. and Mrs. Robin built their nest on the porch light and dropped 4 perfect little eggs in the bottom. In no time the little ones hatched out and started to grow as momma and daddy brought them juicy worms and other insects. Follow their progress below as they triple […] The post They grow up so fast! appeared first on In the Garden.
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    Kiss my Aster!

  • Hey Girl: Spring Clean Up Edition

    Kiss My Aster!
    14 Mar 2015 | 1:29 pm
    For the record, I only make these because you like them.If it were up to me, it'd be Ewan McGregor.I hardly know who Ryan Gosling is. Go figure!
  • Things That Are Going DOWN

    Kiss My Aster!
    10 Mar 2015 | 8:44 am
    1. All of a sudden, spring is here. The snow is melting and I should be able to actually SEE my garden by the end of the day. It hasn't been accessible in a loooooong time. It's either been too cold or required a snowsuit. I don't play that shizz.2. I've opened a vintage shop at kissmyaster.com after some soul searching. It has been a great process so far but now my house is filled with vintage crap, everywhere. I'm not embarrassed to say that Hazel's old pack n play is in the living room and filled with clothing to photograph and measure. Soon I'll have plants and planters available, I…
  • Hey Valentine!

    Kiss My Aster!
    13 Feb 2015 | 8:55 am
    I have a soft spot for Valentine's day, even though I'm far from romantic. So I made these for you. Cut, sign and distribute as needed.
  • The Beauty of The Armpit Garden

    Kiss My Aster!
    23 Jan 2015 | 11:56 am
    This house came only with a very small back garden. It’s oddly situated, tucked around the back of the house, where none of my neighbors can see it but I get great views from inside the house. Because the whole garden is tucked in a nook a) it’s my “armpit garden” b) it’s also got great protection and serves as a pretty bitchin’ microclimate. But the best part is that this garden is for no one but me. It’s mostly dark and moody- the dream garden of my inner 19 year old. Dark dahlias and way too much bronze fennel, Redbor kale is bolting all over town, towering like Godzilla,…
  • Kiss My Christmas!

    Kiss My Aster!
    22 Dec 2014 | 1:42 pm
     It's like I've been in active avoidance of the date, which is December 22nd. I set up an advent tree for Hazel so that we could both keep track of how many days were left until Christmas but I still couldn't grasp it, even with the visual. Between me and you, I even set up the tree 3 days late.I made a few wreaths, including a 24" one made from clippings from a Yew that grows outside my front door. It was easy to work with and looks fine... it just doesn't smell like an evergreen. In fact, it smells a bit like a aloe plant that's beginning to rot out.I chose a different route in…
 
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    Our Little Acre

  • Weekend Wisdom: Spring Officially Started Three Weeks Ago

    Kylee Baumle
    22 Mar 2015 | 10:59 am
    You thought spring started on Friday, didn't you? Well, you would be right, IF you're talking about spring based on the tilt of the earth on its axis. Astronomically, spring began on Friday, March 20th this year, when the earth was halfway between its extremes of tilt towards and away from the sun.This is what we've all been taught as soon as we were old enough to understand the seasons. Never mind that it doesn't always occur on the same calendar date; it's usually within a couple of days of each other no matter which year we're talking about.Some years (most years, if we're honest), that…
  • Bless Their Little Bloomin' Hearts

    Kylee Baumle
    16 Mar 2015 | 1:40 pm
    No whining about winter, but let's just say that today's predicted high of 70°, a temperature we haven't seen for 140 days, 5 hours, and 26 minutes (but who's counting?), is being ushered in with much hoopla and happy dancing.The permadrift in front of the house still lives, but those oppressive mounds of snirt that have served as a reminder that we do not live in Zone 7b and that only the strong and patient survive, have finally evaporated, melted, and otherwise disappeared. I left here on Friday morning for the Chicago Flower and Garden Show with lots and lots of snow,…
  • A Quick 4-Book Gardening Book Giveaway!

    Kylee Baumle
    12 Mar 2015 | 10:10 pm
    My publisher, St. Lynn's Press, is celebrating St. Patrick's Day a little early by giving away four titles from their illustrious repertoire of books. They've made it easy to enter:Green is good. St. Paddy would agree. How are you 'greening up' the planet'?Want a chance to win one of our books by Billy Goodnick, Jan Johnsen, Kylee Baumle, Jenny Peterson and the Editors at SLP for St. Patrick's Day? Simply visit our page and leave a comment about how you are 'going green' on this status. That's how we'll know you'd like to win one of the books.Deadline to comment: Midnight, EDT, Friday,…
  • It's Tree Tappin' Time!

    Kylee Baumle
    4 Mar 2015 | 10:34 am
    The maple tree buds will be swelling soon.There are certain things that signal the end of winter and in a year that we didn't think could possibly be as bad as the last (but was), we're celebrating each one as it occurs. It's officially the beginning of the end.Strangely enough, this was a winter that just five months ago, I was dreading in the worst way. Just the thought of what was to come threatened to be my undoing, but here we are on the down side and I'm none the worse for wear! Yay!This past week brought the Ft. Wayne Home and Garden Show, the first of such shows for me for the year…
  • Longwood Gardens: Shades of Gray

    Kylee Baumle
    16 Feb 2015 | 6:05 pm
    It would just be too tacky to make a play on "that movie" that premiered over the weekend, so I won't do that. But I have to show how much better Mother Nature does it anyway.In my last blog post, I shared some photos of last spring's visit to Longwood Gardens.The conservatory there is a world all in itself, with each partof it worthy of an essay highlighting its features. It was the lovely shades of gray in its Silver Garden that especially caught my eye this visit.Take a look:So many of these plants exhibiting gorgeous shades of gray/silver/blue look as if they would be feathery soft to…
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    The Gardens of Petersonville

  • Spring Bulbs

    Sheila
    27 Mar 2015 | 11:34 am
     There is all kinds of color in the gardens these days. Some wonderful and carefully planned. Others random and serendipitous. Like this beautiful red amaryllis bulb that was just kind of stuck in the ground and is now showing off year after year. However this year it is surrounded by a bed of yellow kalanchoe that my garden helper added in to cover the bare ground. Red and Yellow? Not my first choice in garden colors combinations, but it is healthy and happy and a bit out of the way so who am I to critique?  And then going from the biggest boldest bulbs to the tiniest, little…
  • Buddha in the Garden

    Sheila
    13 Mar 2015 | 7:38 pm
     Sitting quietly, way on the back of the gravel garden, is Buddha. Most of the winter he is surrounded by white azaleas. The rest of the year, by various cool shades of green succulents and tropical plants. It is hard to see in this picture, but there is a perfect umbrella of duranta over his head. Duranta, if you are not familiar is a flowering shrub that has arching sprays of blue flowers (at least this one does). I always seem to miss it in bloom back here. Buddha's hands form a perfect cup to hold enough water from the sprinklers to keep blooms fresh for a few days and I try to…
  • Climbing Wild Roses

    Sheila
    10 Mar 2015 | 1:48 pm
    The first of my climbing wild roses are blooming on the front arbor. They are the earliest of the spring roses to bloom and are finished by the time everything else wakes up. You can see they are all tangled up with the wisteria which is just starting to bloom. Unfortunately the best view is from the bedroom balcony looking down on them. This is the curse of an overzealous garden helper that keeps everything trimmed neat and tidy. Somehow I haven't been able to convey the beauty of the juxtaposition of control and free form to him and as soon as he sees me trim one thing he takes over and…
  • Crazy-Busy Season

    Sheila
    9 Mar 2015 | 4:04 pm
     I met someone who told me they didn't plant spring bulbs because they didn't like the messy foliage they had to put up with after the flowers faded. I must admit, there are a couple weeks when this is what it looks like in a few flower beds that the daffodils live in and I know that there are some fastidious gardeners that are very tidy and braid or bundle the dying foliage up while it is gathering the all important nutrients for next year's blooms, but I never get around to that. Besides, there is so much else going on in the garden to look at this time of year you can hardly notice a…
  • Winter Blooming Succulents

    Sheila
    8 Mar 2015 | 9:53 am
     I don't know where the time goes, but it looks like spring is upon us based on the roses starting to bud and the wisteria that is showing color. I have been wrapped up in various house projects that have kept me busy but I need to take a minute to reflect on some late winter blooming succulents that are unique to our climate. The long goose neck blooms like the one above are showing up all over the place in the winter in Southern California and to visitors they do look like quite a curiosity. They are the blooms of the Agave attenuata, a very common plant in our landscapes. It takes…
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    Terra Nova Ecological Landscaping blog

  • Broom vs leaf blower challenge.

    ken
    11 Mar 2015 | 9:21 am
    Terra Nova Ecological Landscaping offers a broom vs leaf blower challenge. Terra Nova challenges any other landscape company to clean the exact same area of hardscape with the exact same amount of leaf debris. Terra Nova will use a broom and our challenger will use a leaf blower. To be judged by a neutral third party for time, thoroughness, noise and air pollution level. The media will be invited. We will take on one challenger with a gas leaf blower and one with an electric leaf blower. The Challenge Conditions: Each participant will be judged by a neutral third party on the following…
  • Spin City: Passion for pedal-powered permaculture

    ken
    16 Jan 2015 | 1:29 pm
    Ken Foster rides one of Terra Nova Ecological Landscaping’s rigs to a job site in Santa Cruz. (Shmuel Thaler — Santa Cruz Sentinel) By Karen Kefauver, Spinn City POSTED: 01/15/15, 10:23 PM PST  If you’re headed south along the coast next Tuesday, there’s a chance you’ll spot Ken Foster bicycling from Santa Cruz to Monterey County on Highway 1. He’ll be traveling at a leisurely pace, soaking in the scenery and pedaling his recumbent bike. Foster, 57, estimates the ride will take between five and seven hours depending on if he “dawdles.” During the approximately…
  • Permaculture With Terra Nova -Two day intensive

    ken
    10 Jan 2015 | 1:23 pm
    Learn about Permaculture How the design principles can inspire true environmental stewardship and urban sustainability or simply to create an amazing productive garden Dates: May 2 – May 3, 2015 Time: 9:00 am to 5:00 pm each day Place: Monterey Bay Marine Sanctuary Exploration Center 35 Pacific Ave. Santa Cruz, CA. Ken Foster instructor / facilitator Some recent work by Terra Nova Cost: $175 Shared Pot-luck lunch •    Early bird discount 15% off up to Feb. 28th •    Limited to 20 seats •    Refund policy 90% refund Jan. – Feb. •    50% refund Mar.– April 10th…
  • Our ‘Tread Lightly’ Indiegogo campaign has completed.

    ken
    17 Dec 2014 | 9:59 am
    Was our ‘Tread Lightly’ Indiegogo campaign a wild success?… No, not exactly. Was it a success? …Yes it was! Thank you! Now that the ‘Tread Lightly’ campaign is over my honest reflection is that Crowdfunding is a bit of an enigma with tons of exciting potential. An alluring mystery. I have had a lot of advice on how a campaign aught to be run. It was clear I was making some missteps even early on. And there was a learning curve like you wouldn’t believe. We set the start date and then reset that date when it was clear we needed more preparation time. The night of the…
  • Today is the last day of our Indiegogo ‘Tread Lightly’ campaign, your last chance to donate to the cause!

    ken
    16 Dec 2014 | 10:33 am
    Our Tread Lightly Indiegogo campaign that started Oct. 17th is over at the end if the day today, Dec. 16.  We have raised $2,000.00 so far. *OUR NEW GOAL is at least $2,000 – To Outfit Two Bike Gardeners for the Road* Terra Nova is a low-tech business operating a high-tech funding campaign, and it’s a learning curve (yikes!). Clearly $50k was way too high of a goal. However, we have authentically redefined a more modest success for the last 3 weeks of the campaign. We hope you will support us. Our new goal is to raise atleast $2,000  to purchase two custom-made bike trailers, two good…
 
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    oclandscape.com

  • From the Drawing Board: Petaluma Victorian

    Michael O'Connell
    20 Mar 2015 | 8:33 pm
    We are working on design development for this corner home in West Petaluma. It is prominently situated on a corner lot, meaning the design incorporates a lot of new fencing. At one side we have detailed large shrubs that would create a green fence and expand the size of the back yard. In the back yard a new patio, lawn and connecting walkways have been detailed for new living spaces. Site plan for large corner lot in Petaluma Related posts: From the Drawing Board- Petaluma Planting Plan This project in Petaluma situated on a large corner lot... From the Drawing Board- Petaluma Layout and…
  • From the Drawing Board- 4 Spring Projects

    Michael O'Connell
    6 Mar 2015 | 2:19 pm
    The spring seems to be coming early this year with all of the warm weather this winter. Here are some images from four different design projects in different stages of conceptual development. -Novato Concept- Back yard patio and synthetic turf installation -San Anselmo Concept- Back yard patios, walkways and garden area -Cotati Concept- Back yard terracing, vegetable garden, steps, and paths -Tiburon Project- Hardscape layout and retaining wall plan     Related posts: From the Drawing Board- Sonoma Concept Plan This project near the main square in Sonoma focuses on... From the…
  • Breaking down our estimates- project cost and line items

    Michael O'Connell
    4 Mar 2015 | 3:47 pm
    Creating a good estimate is a time consuming process. We consult on scores of projects every year, issue a lot of free estimates, and try to create a proposal that is complete and also responsive to client and project. Our estimates are line item based, we think of them as similar to a menu at a restaurant. We outline the scope in terms of a wide array of options and detailing, and then refine the estimate depending on budget and client needs. We find line item estimates work better than lump sum estimates, especially at an initial phase.  They take into account elements like a patio that…
  • Work in Progress- Cotati Concrete

    Michael O'Connell
    17 Feb 2015 | 4:28 pm
    For this ranch house in Cotati we are working on new concrete patios and walkways in the front and back yards. These new walkways create a new sense of entry to the front of the house and modernize the landscape. Related posts: Work in Progress- Greenbrae Project We are getting ready to pour a concrete slab for... Current Project- Commerical Concrete and Wall Installation We are working on a project in San Rafael for... Common Mistakes: Don’t Paint that Concrete! A continuing entry in our Common Landscape Mistakes series: It...
  • Turned Earth Turns 500!

    Michael O'Connell
    28 Jan 2015 | 10:50 pm
    When I started this blog in 2005 little did I think I would still be writing it 10 years later. But here we are. The rate of posts may have slowed down since the beginning, but we just logged our 500th post to the blog. I find blogging is a great way to share our work in a more informal forum with more frequent updates than our main website. That and you can read my occasionally coherent thoughts and musings. If you want to read every post since 2005 you can visit the live archive listing page. Enjoy and thanks for reading. -Michael O’Connell Related posts: Turned Earth Turns 100! I…
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    Skippy's Vegetable Garden

  • spring, not too far away?

    kathy
    27 Mar 2015 | 7:39 am
    I hear redwing blackbirds for the first time today. And my garden has a bunch of bluebirds in it, foraging in it since it's the only cleared area around (I also have a feeder with mealworms down there for them). It's a misty warm day after a lot of rain last night. I'm seeing rocks pop up that I had forgotten were there. It's like a new world. There's still snow all over, but it's down to maybe 6 inches. And the pond is still frozen (actually there's an ice fisherman out there now). Maybe spring is gradually approaching?
  • today's sowing

    kathy
    26 Mar 2015 | 2:56 pm
    Beets, LutzBeets, MerlinBeets, ChioggiaBeets, BlankomaTomato (paste), CordovaTomato (paste), San MarzanoTomato (paste), San Marzano Gigante 3Tomato (paste), Stump of the WorldTomato (paste), OpalkaTomato (paste), NovaTomato (paste), Polish LinguisaTomato (paste), Heinz 2653
  • more garden calendars

    kathy
    26 Mar 2015 | 8:33 am
    We are working on several new garden calendar apps. I listed them at our new site: skippysgarden.com
  • snow blowing the garden

    kathy
    22 Mar 2015 | 8:20 pm
    My husband and I removed a good foot of snow from the garden today. Husband pulled the snow blower down there and made fast work of it. I just want to see some soil!! I hope this will help.
  • today's planting

    kathy
    22 Mar 2015 | 5:12 pm
    Varieties planted:Basil, Eleonora (Downy Mildew resistant)Basil, SuperboBasil, Dolce FrescaBroccoli, Diplomat (a few plants, a second planting)Chives, New Bolt Chives, Garlic GeishaOregano, CleopatraPepper, (jalepeno) Emerald FirePepper,Flaming FlarePepper, Pretty N Sweet Pepper, Ancho 211 Pepper, Bell ACEPepper, Thai HotTomato, Mountain Merit, for our community garden (LB resistant)Tomato, Polish LinguisaTomato, Carbone FlowersDianthus, Jolt PinkMarigold, DurangoMarigold, Boy-O-BoySalvia, Summer Jewel White Notes: - My celeriac that I had given up on are all sprouting today. Yippee!-…
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    Home Garden Companion

  • Brand New Post On The New Site

    Ilona Erwin
    21 Mar 2015 | 8:00 am
    Here we are… the first post in a new season. It inspires me. The first inspiration is to update my garden as well. For years I have renovated, and renovation is always somehow lacking. I want to return to some of the joy that comes from creating something new. My idea is to redo some of the gardens in a ways that identifies and places focal points inside the garden rooms, and indeed make more of a room from some of the gardens. The entire place needs sprucing up, and I think adding more design and worrying less about weeds is the direction I want to take. This, of course, is secondary…
  • Here Is Hope For A Beautiful Spring

    Ilona Erwin
    10 Mar 2015 | 2:23 pm
    From a previous year It turned the corner here in the Central Ohio area. Patches of snow are all that are left after the warming temperatures and rains. I will have to post some of my older, but still beautiful, spring photos in celebration. Outside it is a bit dreary and I need to pick up the remainder of the hot tub canvas cover, etc. I will, as soon as I am done working on what seems to be mushrooming work both on the computer and inside the house. That is where we get that old saying: “When it rains, it pours”. Everything is building up and can just wait so long before it…
  • It Is Still Freezing, Cold, And Snowing

    Ilona Erwin
    3 Mar 2015 | 10:29 pm
    Yes, playing with Picmonkey. What else on the rainy/snowy/frozen days we are having? Housework, you say? What is that? Yes, the weather again. We are still in the throes of winter. Throes I say! Everyone says they are tired of it, but we really don’t have any say in the weather, do we? It will affect how soon we will be able to plant out our seeds and new plants. The ground will stay frozen for longer than we are used to in this part of the country. That is my prediction. Vegetable plants like peppers, and most especially tomatoes, need warm soil to thrive. This will be one year to not…
  • Everyone Talks About The Weather

    Ilona Erwin
    25 Feb 2015 | 6:39 pm
    I ventured out between the pine and the spirea Wherever I go (the few times I can venture out), everyone is talking about the weather, how cold it is, how tired they are of it, etc, etc. Depending on just how cold it is I either find lots to do on my computer, or I have an excuse to sit and watch a favorite show with a hot cup of something. Watched plenty of the British detective shows I like so well – I’ve watched most all of them. All of “Vikings”, caught up with “Grimm”, “Walking Dead” …  I won’t bore you with the long list of…
  • Late Winter Is Time To Prune

    Ilona Erwin
    17 Feb 2015 | 10:58 am
    Visualizing how to cut tree branches If we get a break in the weather (which we will, eventually), it will be ideal time to get the pruning tools out and clean up winter damage, trim out fruit trees, and cut back many clematis vines. Those that bloom on new wood are prime candidates for pruning, although those which are scrubby looking, like quince bushes or other shrubs benefit from some pruning. I know we are supposed to wait until after bloom on many of our shrubs, but I have had some problems with some of them, and when a tree or shrub is dormant is one of the best times to prune, no…
 
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    Bananas.org

  • Hello

    vanman
    27 Mar 2015 | 10:02 pm
    Just finishing up a greenhouse. Already have some mangos, longan, pineapple, citrus and avocado. I wanted to give bananas a try. I remember trying a small banana in Saipan when I was in graduated school (traveling there). It was delicious. I have no idea what it was (didn't care at the time). I've bought a dwarf red and an ice cream. Thanks for letting me in. Van:waving:
  • Got a VC, put in a pot or in the ground?

    nph
    27 Mar 2015 | 8:42 pm
    I bought a VC back in November when I visited the wonderful place Going Bananas in Florida. I planted it in a pot when I got home and even indoors too close to a window it withered to my surprised. Then I moved it to my warmest room on the second floor and it came back and now has 3 leaves. Here is my question, I live in Texas and expect a growing season until mid November. If I put it in the ground will it have enough time to grow and flower, it is now 1 foot in a pot indoors and I am taking it out this weekend. Either for planting outside or stay in a pot for now. This is not a TC it has a…
  • guaranteed spider mite cure

    Jamie p
    27 Mar 2015 | 7:06 pm
    I have found the perfect cure for spider mites all though it is a little expensive. I have a greenhouse that I keep my plant collection in (aka Banana house) and I thought I was going to have to give up the Hobbie. Spider mites almost did me in. I fought them with everything to no avail . One day I discovered Biobest insectory, there I was able to purchase predator mites that specifically only eat spidermites!!! In 2 weeks the infestation was gone and I mean GONE!!!! It general works for about 2 to 3 years , but I'm glad it works and no pesticides needed. A box of 40,000 will cost you ( with…
  • Patupi & Veinte Cohol

    PR-Giants
    27 Mar 2015 | 5:03 pm
    Quote: Originally Posted by PR-Giants (Post 257721) Harvested 42 days after blooming. A vigorous and fast growing plant that produces 30 lb bunches. Excellent flavor and texture with an incredible tropical aroma. I would recommend the Patupi over the Veinte Cohol, it's a much easier plant to grow. If anyone is interested in growing these two cultivars side by side, let me know. Musa Patupi - Bananas Wiki
  • Ensete Glaucum does survive crawlspace.

    siege2050
    27 Mar 2015 | 3:55 pm
    For anybody curious about it and wanting to try it (Found info on Ensete Maurelii but not Glaucum when I searched), Ensete Glaucum at 4 feet of stem easily survived the crawlspace this winter for me. :woohoonaner:
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    North Coast Gardening

  • Kindle Gardening Books for $4 or Less

    Genevieve
    15 Mar 2015 | 3:40 pm
    After reading The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying up: the Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing by Marie Kondo, I’ve been even more enthused to simultaneously save money and space by reading digitally. Digital gardening books look fantastic on an iPad, or you can always read them on your computer screen, especially reference books which are easiest to search on a laptop or desktop. I dislike paying close to the cost of a paper book for a digital copy (given the limitations on reselling, gifting, and loaning), so when books from major publishers go on a steep discount, I jump on it.
  • Repairing and Preventing Snow Damage in the Landscape

    Linda
    8 Mar 2015 | 3:52 pm
    Split bark, broken branches, and winter burned foliage – it’s enough to make any gardener long to take refuge in a warmer climate. However, a little knowledge can go a long way towards preventing and repairing storm damage. By treating your plants properly in summer and fall, you can help plants harden off and become immune to much of the damage. And once the cold weather has had its way with your landscaping, there are things you can do to repair any problems. What snow damage looks like in the landscape Snow and freezing temperatures can cause your trees, shrubs and plants all kinds…
  • DIY Bird Seed Blends for Feeding Wild Birds (and a Guide to the Best Seeds)

    Linda
    19 Feb 2015 | 9:10 pm
    Feeding wild birds is a rewarding pastime and a wonderful way to identify different birds in your area, which is good information to have if you are planning to use native plants in your garden to attract specific species. It’s also a great way to share a love of wildlife with children who may be too young use binoculars or to properly enjoy birds in nature. However, if you’ve ever purchased seeds at the supermarket or hardware store, you’re probably aware that the blends they sell contain a lot of filler seeds which birds turn their beaks up at. This junky birdseed ends up all over the…
  • Landscape Designer’s Tools of the Trade: Best Measuring Tools

    Genevieve
    9 Feb 2015 | 2:01 pm
    We’re coming up on that time of the year when most of us are doing more armchair gardening and garden planning than actual outside, in-the-dirt gardening, and one of the biggest challenges people encounter when they start measuring or plotting out their garden to create an overall plan is that their tools are woefully inadequate and make the job feel much more intimidating than it has to be. When your rusty measuring tape only goes to 25 feet, but your yard extends out quite a ways, it can be tough to even know where to begin. Today, I want to share a few of the professional tools of the…
  • Buying Bee-Friendly Plants: Neonicotinoid-Free Nurseries, Growers, and Seed Sources

    Genevieve
    3 Feb 2015 | 3:59 pm
    Recently I’ve heard from a number of wildlife gardeners who say they are no longer buying plants from regular retail nurseries because there is no way of telling whether or not the pollinator-attracting plants they are purchasing have been treated with neonicotinoid pesticides. Neonicotinoids (imidacloprid, etc) are a class of pesticide which many studies indicate contribute strongly to colony collapse disorder in honeybees, and can also kill other bees. However, the pesticide isn’t all bad. Neonicotinoids are often used because the application process is so safe in comparison to…
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    High Altitude Gardening

  • The Winter That Wasn't

    15 Mar 2015 | 12:16 pm
    Did you know? Those cute little Primrose plants sold in supermarkets, this time of year, are actually zone 3 perennials? Yeppers. Oftentimes the first little flowers to grace my garden, come springtime. (Keep them alive, indoors, by keeping them very cold. Sunny windows are too hot.)It's been a busy winter! Or, should I say the longest 'autumn' on record?Up here, on top the mountain, in ski country, we typically batten down the hatches mid-November. In preparation for a long, quiet winter reading great books, in front of a crackling fire.John's Trail Ride Selfie :) Riding horses, in March, in…
  • Wordless Wednesday: The Gorgeous Boys

    13 Feb 2015 | 8:54 am
    Every February, these big dudes pay us a visit. And, they're no dummies. They're hanging out inside the Park City city limits ~ where they can rest in my backyard ~ safe and sound...For more {slightly} Wordless Wednesday participants, click here!Follow @Kate_HAGardens
  • The Lazy Girl's Artisan Bread

    4 Feb 2015 | 11:31 am
    Prepare to be dazzled.While the East Coast digs out from yet another epic snowstorm, here I sit in my {grumble grumble} Western ski resort with the windows wide open, peering out on a muddy brown landscape. Ran errands without a jacket earlier this morning. It's all adding up to be a very non-wintery winter. Kind of disappointing because I love winter. And, the whole idea of hunkering down, indoors, with a good book, a great movie or marvelous aromas wafting from the kitchen. Just something about a cold, snowy day that inspires a yummy homemade bread.One of my East Coast, fortunate…
  • Wordless Wednesday: The Mouse Hunter

    21 Jan 2015 | 10:39 am
    For more Wordless Wednesday participants, click here!Follow @Kate_HAGardens
  • Pesky Pests

    14 Jan 2015 | 3:07 pm
    'Twas a winter wonderland out on my deck this morning! :))  Probably looks frigid but it was 30 degrees ~ warm enough for this snow lover to stand there with the door wide open, enjoying a cup o' my famous cowgirl coffee. (More accurately, that cowgirl coffee is infamous. I'm a devout lover of French Roast and the blend is too strong for most anyone but me.)I was delighted to see the snow. The epic cold, followed by unnaturally warm days, was really messing with my mood.It is January, after all. My snowshoes are begging for attention.And, so are my windowsill flowers. I gave everyone a…
 
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    Ewa in the Garden

  • Could you help ID this small amazing tree

    24 Mar 2015 | 12:00 am
    This little tree was found by me in December in southern part of Portugal. Do you know maybe what it is? It is so lovely... flowers resemble those of Hydrangea's... if this could help...
  • Ewa in the Garden on Facebook

    20 Mar 2015 | 4:00 am
    Dear Readers and Friends, decided finally to open own page on Facebook. You don't know how great it would be to see you over there as well. Just click here to hop over and let's stay in touch in the place where you naturally gather anyway. It doesn't mean Ewa in the Garden will be publishing less, it only means I want to see you in other places. This is like with dating - you don't want to meet
  • Three Men At Work Correct My Mistake

    14 Mar 2015 | 1:22 am
    Three Men At Wotk rescued the maple tree. The heroes of the day. Today one of the first trees ever bought and planted by myself in my garden changed hands/gardens. It was also one of those early mistakes that had to be corrected as soon as possible. I mean earlier than today. This Norway maple (Acer platanoides) Royal Red planted in wrong place. It haven't had enough space to grow and spread  the
  • Dracaenas roots. Is this normal?

    6 Mar 2015 | 11:08 pm
    No wonder dracaenas were called female dragon (from greek). Look what a surprise and how strong that plant is. Recently I had noticed that the pot is standing somehow not straight. I took a closer look and see what I have discovered. This amazingly strong and persistent root is trying to conquer the world! I need to learn from it… I assure you , I was watering and feeding it well. Why does it
  • Growing ginger lily in cold climate

    26 Feb 2015 | 7:53 am
    Let’s see how we grow and propagate ginger lily (Hedychium) here in Poland, Europe, where temperature can drop in the winter down to  -30C/-22F and in the summer can get up to 36C/97F. We can grow ginger lily outdoors, but for the winter it has to go indoor, no way it could stay outside for the winter.. This particular ginger lily is growing all year round in the winter garden/
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    Your Small Kitchen Garden

  • First Crocus, 2015… and Figs

    Daniel Gasteiger
    24 Mar 2015 | 4:27 pm
    Perhaps as hardy as the other crocuses in my yard, this one sneaked under my fig tree lean-to and managed to get a head start on spring. This is an awkward “first crocus of spring” post. The photo dates back to March 9, but the crocus plant it shows cheated. Overwintering Figs In late fall of 2014, I had two young fig trees I’d bought at the end of a garden center’s retail season. These had been in containers on my screened porch and I wanted them in the ground before temperatures plummeted… but I didn’t want them to freeze back to the soil if we had another polar vortex like the…
  • Unlikely Starters in my Kitchen Garden

    Daniel Gasteiger
    20 Mar 2015 | 12:24 am
    It’s still cold enough in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania for ice to form on the water in my “rain garden.” I use quotes because I dug a hole several years ago and it has been wet only in spring thaws and heavy storms—it’s dry most of the year. Haven’t yet decided what to plant in it. Being a garden writer has changed me. Before I posted my first blog entry, I’d plant almost exclusively things intended for my stomach. I’d joke (and I still joke) that if the plant doesn’t come with a recipe, I won’t waste energy growing it. There were exceptions. For example, I came across zinnia…
  • 2015 Seed Giveaway: Grand Prize Winner

    Daniel Gasteiger
    25 Feb 2015 | 9:24 pm
    My (nearly) annual seed giveaway closed on February 15. Seeds are almost in the mail! Here’s where things stand: I’ve laid out seeds to fill 50 envelopes for winners of this year’s seed giveaway. My wife and I selected the grand prize winner! I contacted people who nearly almost kind of entered the giveaway but might have missed a critical step (no mailing address received here). I designed, printed, and applied new seed envelope labels – more than 160 envelopes. I’ve packed 80 seed envelopes with 80 still awaiting attention. I wrote (am writing) this post to let…
  • Amazing Green Sausage Heirloom Tomatoes

    Daniel Gasteiger
    5 Feb 2015 | 12:01 am
    For at least four months after harvest, these tomatoes got moved around in our dining room until I noticed they’d started to wrinkle. These are Green Sausage tomatoes—an heirloom paste tomato that remains green when it ripens. It also, apparently, creates a hermetic barrier between its innards and the rest of the universe. In late January, I ate a fresh homegrown heirloom tomato harvested from my outdoor garden. This is remarkable because by early October of last year, those of my tomato plants that hadn’t been killed by blight had been frozen by an early frost. Green Sausage, the…
  • Don’t Freeze Ya Freesias

    Daniel Gasteiger
    31 Jan 2015 | 2:28 am
    The coldest days of winter and a typical central Pennsylvania snow reaffirm the area’s USDA hardiness zone rating. Freesias would not survive this winter outdoors. Freesias! I took a flier last spring and bought a package of freesia bulbs on closeout. I’ve never grown freesias. I couldn’t have identified them had someone led me to a freesia patch to harvest a few for a bouquet. Knowing so little about them, I planted twelve freesia bulbs according to instructions on the package: buried many inches deep in a 12-inch container. In a few weeks, exactly two plants emerged. Eventually…
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    Veggie Gardener: Organic Vegetable Gardening Tips

  • Medicinal Plants: Better Health from the Veggie Garden

    Veggie Gardener
    28 Mar 2015 | 3:29 am
    Injuries and illnesses happen despite our best efforts. When these things befall us, we often turn to modern medicine to fix that which ails us. Although the medical treatments that are commonplace in the world today are successful, there was a time when we did not have such innovation to rely on for health and […]
  • 5 Tips to Enhance Tomato Health, Growth, and Taste

    Veggie Gardener
    22 Mar 2015 | 6:33 pm
    Tomatoes are universally popular in gardens everywhere. Whether you are new to gardening or very experienced, chances are tomatoes are on the list of things you wish to grow. If you purchase a pack of seeds, you can simply read the instructions for basic planting information. While this is useful, it is a mere glimpse […]
  • Out of Garden Space? Burlap Sacks Can Help!

    Veggie Gardener
    15 Mar 2015 | 8:25 pm
    There are a lot of different ways to grow a veggie garden in a small or limited amount of space. Where it can get tricky, however, is with larger plants such as tomatoes. In many cases, pots or other containers can fall in the realm of too much or not enough. A good universal option, […]
  • Natural Pest Control: The Ladybug

    Veggie Gardener
    8 Mar 2015 | 4:24 am
    Pests can be quite a problem, inhibiting your efforts at raising a successful garden. In this day and age as we become more aware of the negative effects of pesticides and the dangerous chemicals they contain, it makes sense to turn away from such perils and embrace other means of keeping our gardens pest free. […]
  • Drying and Storing Seeds from 5 Common Garden Vegetables

    Veggie Gardener
    28 Feb 2015 | 10:41 pm
    As each planting season arrives, you are faced with the choice of which veggies to grow. Once this decision is made, the next step is to acquire seeds for planting. This can be done by shopping at local farm and garden stores or online ordering, but it gets even better than that: you can instead […]
 
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    Miss Rumphius' Rules

  • Garden Visit: Filoli

    Susan aka Miss. R
    24 Mar 2015 | 11:43 am
    My visit last week to one of the great American gardens, Filoli, in northern California, was a revelation in many ways.  I have wanted to visit since I first saw pictures of it years ago. The garden was designed in the early 20th century by its original homeowners with a team of architects, artists, and horticulturists. There is no known master plan yet it has survived largely in tact which is a rarity for American estate gardens of this size and scope. Sometimes my travels are guided by my desire to experience specific places firsthand. My trip to Marrakesh and Majorelle was one of…
  • Green Gardens

    Susan aka Miss. R
    27 Feb 2015 | 4:34 am
    Green is a thing. Right now it’s a missing thing. It’s what I miss most during winter and what makes me smile first in the spring–those small green shoots pushing up through frigid earth. I’ve been thinking about making flowerless gardens. Gardens that are mostly green. Gardens that rely  on scale and texture and subtlety of hue and maybe some skilled pruning. In New Jersey, where I practice landscape design, this may prove to be more difficult than it is in warmer climates where there are bolder choices and plants with immense architectural leaves. Many of the…
  • My Award Winning Garden Design

    Susan aka Miss. R
    16 Feb 2015 | 6:51 am
    Last fall, I entered a garden I designed in New Jersey in 2015 APLD International Landscape Design Awards in the Planting Design category. It was awarded the highest honor, a Gold Award. To be honest, I knew the value of the design, but since it is the antithesis of current planting trends, I was really pleased. Current trends in planting design seem to require ornamental grasses and meadow-like qualities. This garden has neither, but that doesn’t make it unsustainable or unfriendly to all  but deer. The garden’s underlying structure of boxwood hedging and pyramids gives it…
  • Design vs. A Sense of Place

    Susan aka Miss. R
    11 Feb 2015 | 3:29 am
    I’m not an architecture critic.  I am someone who loves great architecture both contemporary and historic. In my work as a landscape designer part of my focus is to create landscapes and gardens that surround the attendant architecture in such a way that the design partnership between them is timeless and seamless.  As a designer this may seem counter intuitive, but I believe that the best design has a sense of place and that my hand in that should be less, rather than more, visible. Last week I visited Frank Gehry’s new building for the Fondation Louis Vuitton in Paris.  It…
  • Garden Travel: Back and Forth

    Susan aka Miss. R
    17 Jan 2015 | 4:59 am
    Next week I’m travelling again. This time on a search for garden antiques and vintage in the markets in Paris and parts of Belgium. I am continuing on to Rome for a few days of play after that. For the first time in many, many years, I won’t be taking my laptop with me.  I’ve traded the bulk and weight for my camera stuff and a tablet, so please follow my Instagram account for what I see and off the cuff inspiration. I’ve also been waiting a while to post about a visit to Vizcaya when I was in Miami in November so here it is.  I was enchanted.  For a landscape…
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    Journal

  • Lespedeza Gibraltar Is A Waterfall Flowering Perennial

    Allan
    18 Mar 2015 | 9:53 am
    Extreme close up of a Lespedeza floret in my garden. With normal viewing, it isn't as attractive as it appears above.Whenever I receive a catalogue from an online nursery, my first action is to search for perennials I’ve never seen before. I pay attention to those that are considered hardy in USDA Zone 4 [Canada Zone 5]. I delve into details to select only flowering plants with a long bloom period. Finally, for those that appear to have potential, I evaluate for attractiveness and for colors that work well in the English-style flowerbed. Photos used in the above-mentioned publications…
  • Fran Sorin's Inspirational Garden Guide Has Been Reissued.

    Allan
    22 Feb 2015 | 10:05 pm
    Digging Deep: Unearthing Your Creative Roots Through Gardening,  Fran Sorin,   Braided Worlds Publishing.              There is one book in my library that I can never part with: Fran Sorin’s Digging Deep. When it was published ten years ago, it validated the personal creativity I discovered when I first began to garden. On its pages, I also found a lifetime mentor in the author’s warm, inspiring voice and I return to her words whenever I need to refresh my creativity. Recently, the book was republished in a revised tenth anniversary…
  • The Flower Garden Style of Piet Oudolf

    Allan
    1 Feb 2015 | 10:24 am
    Image copyrighted by Scott Weber. Used with permission Scott Weber, of Portland, Oregon, has been designing and planting flowerbeds around his property for several years. Above and below are two of the many stunning photos he shares with readers on his blog Rhone Street Gardens. The images of his mini meadow-like plantings always take my breath away no matter how frequently he posts. Scott once mentioned that Piet Oudolf inspires the spirit and design of his garden. Image copyrighted by Scott Weber. Used with permission. For over one hundred years, the English flower garden remained the…
  • A Purple Autumn Perennial That Pops: Vernonia Lettermannii

    Allan
    4 Jan 2015 | 11:44 am
    Photo credit:The University of Tennessee, Institute of Agriculture A client gave me a mandate to enhance her flowerbed whenever I find a reliable perennial that blooms in purple. To please her, I scour my suppliers’ catalogues every spring looking for purple blooming plants. Then I test grow them for a few seasons to determine how they perform. Most are disappointing.  A few become messy or invasive. Some are short-lived plants lasting one or two seasons while others are unable to survive climate conditions in my growing zone. Happily, this year I discovered that the recently…
  • I Didn't Charge for My Gardening Advice.

    Allan
    21 Sep 2013 | 12:42 pm
    My financial adviser Billy called me the other day and asked if I would offer garden design advice to one of his neighbors. The wife is undergoing chemotherapy and has determined that a revamp of her tired-looking garden would be an ideal project to put back some balance into her life. Their garden truly needs a major overhaul and I was pleased to offer suggestions; I even recommended the name of a handy man that can do it economically. The husband is on board with the project and eager to make it happen. When I first heard the family name of these neighbors, I smiled. Their two children had…
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    Garden Therapy

  • Liven Up Your Home with Indoor Vertical Wall Planters

    Stephanie
    25 Mar 2015 | 2:06 pm
    Small-space dwellers take note: there are plenty of new and unique ways to bring plants into your home! From wall frames to upside-down pots to even magnetic containers for your fridge, indoor gardening has turned over a whole new leaf. Remember Part 1 of the ByNature studio tour where I shared my photos of the coolest moss art creations? This is Part ... The post Liven Up Your Home with Indoor Vertical Wall Planters appeared first on Garden Therapy.
  • Herbal Anti-Flea Dog Shampoo Recipe

    Stephanie
    24 Mar 2015 | 11:55 am
    This dog shampoo not only leaves your puppy with a herb-fresh scent, but those herbs also work to deter fleas. The recipe comes to us from the herb garden, making it powerful yet gentle on your furry friend’s skin. The addition of herbs and essential oils also helps with muscle pain and skin healing. I remember living with a roommate who had a ... The post Herbal Anti-Flea Dog Shampoo Recipe appeared first on Garden Therapy.
  • Healing Himalayan Pink Salt Scrub

    Stephanie
    19 Mar 2015 | 11:35 am
    This Himalayan pink salt scrub is a powerful detoxifier packed with healing minerals for your whole body. With rose petals and essential oils added, this scrub becomes a home spa treatment that heals, soothes, and revitalizes the skin. There are many benefits to using Himalayan pink salt as a culinary ingredient, as it is full of 80+ minerals and elements ... The post Healing Himalayan Pink Salt Scrub appeared first on Garden Therapy.
  • Painted Jar Planters + Shamrocks

    Stephanie
    17 Mar 2015 | 10:58 am
    St. Patrick’s Day typically reminds folks of leprechauns, green beer, Ireland, and shamrocks: the symbol seen on green-felt fedoras. But I’m a plant nerd so I think about the shamrock from a botanical point (and I try not to remember those nights drinking green beer). The symbol of Ireland is the three-leaf old white clover, Trifolium repens, which is common in North ... The post Painted Jar Planters + Shamrocks appeared first on Garden Therapy.
  • Living Wall Cactus Garden

    Stephanie
    12 Mar 2015 | 6:00 am
    Please excuse me while I gush. I’m such a huge fan of the work that Shawna Coronado does as a writer, speaker, and eco-activist. She really IS making a difference every day. Some days it’s through front yard food gardens, others it’s by showing us how to make a meal with just $10. Today, Shawna is joining us to show ... The post Living Wall Cactus Garden appeared first on Garden Therapy.
 
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    Urban Organic Gardener

  • 5 Container Gardening Tips for Beginners (+ Giveaway!)

    UOG
    17 Mar 2015 | 3:05 pm
    Julie from homereadyhome.com just published a great article highlighting important Container Gardening Tips (for Beginners).  Click here to view the original post: http://homereadyhome.com/5-container-gardening-tips-for-beginners/ Here’s a quick preview of what she has has to say about container gardening: 1. Don’t “grow” overboard. “Container gardening requires a time commitment. You’ll need to be more hands-on (ie. watering and fertilizing) with plants in pots than plants in the ground. Your container garden will require daily attention so you want to make sure you…
  • It’s here! 🍅 Join Urban Organic Gardener’s Monthly Seed Club

    UOG
    27 Feb 2015 | 8:24 pm
    The Urban Organic Gardener’s Monthly Seed Club is here and we’re ready to start shipping seeds. With Spring season right around the corner now is the best time to join.  We’ll automatically send you the best seeds to plant – at the right time of the year – specific to where you live. Sign up now for  $10 and receive a custom collection of NON-GMO Heirloom seeds every month.  Start by answering a few questions about your garden:  Click here to get started Easy as 1 – 2 – 3       Frequently Asked Questions Q: What is it? A: Members…
  • 66 Things You Can Grow In Containers

    UOG
    22 Feb 2015 | 7:40 pm
    Bet you didn’t know you could grow all these different plants in containers!  Give it a try.  You might just be surprised!  
  • How to Source Non-GMO Seeds

    UOG
    10 Feb 2015 | 9:49 pm
    Source: NaturallyLoriel.com Naturally Loriel recently published a blog post on a very important topic:  How to Source Non-GMO Seeds. She says, “You begin to learn which food companies deserve your support and try to find a local farmer’s market in your area. You realize it’s so important to meet and shake the hands of the farmer that produces your food. Unfortunately though, you’re not as lucky as Lauren is, and the farmer’s markets in your area royally suck. The only other logical solution is to grow your own food.” Click here to read the original blog post:…
  • Top 5 Featured Urban Organic Garden Photos on Instagram

    UOG
    29 Jan 2015 | 10:08 am
    Follow Urban Organic Gardener on Instagram:  www.instagram.com/urbanorganicgardener - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - - - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - - - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – -…
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    The Garden Plot

  • New Vibrant Garden Plants & Products for Spring 2015

    Garden Media Group
    25 Mar 2015 | 9:38 am
    Warm weather and blooming foliage are on the horizon. In anticipation, Garden Media Group has released its much awaited 2015 Garden Superstars for Spring. Making an appearance on this year’s list are breathtaking patio plantings, chemical-free lawn care products and a new spin on a traditional garden flower.Much of the winter is spent wishing for warmth and color. Now, it’s time to grow! These low maintenance and durable plants and products leave a lasting impression with their easy outdoor style and vibrant appeal.Garden Superstars will inspire and influence gardening and…
  • Crown Bees Launches Crowdfunding Campaign to Help Save the Bees

    Garden Media Group
    18 Mar 2015 | 5:30 am
    Social networks aren’t just for people anymore. Today, March 18, Crown Bees is launching its solution-driven Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign to build a network of native Bee Boosterswho support and raise native bees that can later be shared with local farmers.“Since one out of every three bites of food we eat depends on bees, we need more native bees to help take the stress off of honey bees,” says Dave Hunter, CEO of Crown Bees, a supplier of gentle, solitary bees such as mason bees and leafcutter bees as well as American-made bee houses and supplies. “Together, native bees and honey…
  • Crown Bees is building a network of Bee Boosters

    Garden Media Group
    27 Jan 2015 | 11:19 am
    Bees are responsible for one out of three bites of food we eat — and Crown Bees works to safeguard the planet’s future food supply by increasing the population of native bees in North America.   Although the plight of the honey bee has been well publicized, many people are unaware that there are more than 4,000 other species of bees. These native bees can work side-by-side with honey bees to pollinate home gardens as well as major food crops such as cherries and almonds. Crown Bees is on a mission to increase public awareness about native bees and to build a network of “Bee…
  • Crown Bees Signs with Garden Media Group for 2015

    Garden Media Group
    13 Jan 2015 | 1:31 pm
    Garden Media Group is buzzing with excitement as it announces its newest client for 2015, Crown Bees. The gentle bee company partners with Garden Media in an effort to raise awareness about the importance of mason bees to the world’s food supply.  This spring, Garden Media will oversee Crown Bees’ dynamic crowdfunding effort to raise awareness about how native bees can supplement the work of our troubled honey bees and solve a key threat to our planet’s food sustainability. “No question Garden Media has the experience we need to create support for our mission,” says Dave…
  • Celebrate Houseplant Appreciation Day with these 5 tips from Costa Farms!

    Garden Media Group
    9 Jan 2015 | 7:09 am
    Celebrate Houseplant Appreciation Day with Costa Farms on January 10th by recognizing all of the amazing benefits houseplants provide. They’re decorative, boost well-being and purify indoor air. “Now that the holidays are over, it’s time to show your houseplants a little TLC,” says Justin Hancock, garden expert at Costa Farms. “Thank a plant today for bringing beauty into your home and office, making you feel good and naturally cleansing the very air you breathe inside.” Here are 5 simple tips to celebrate the day: 1. Recognize Green HeroesMany houseplants clean the air every…
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    The Yarden

  • Memories of Victory

    LaManda Joy
    11 Mar 2015 | 8:00 am
    When I’m on the speaking circuit and talking about Peterson ... The post Memories of Victory appeared first on The Yarden.
  • “Let Mommy get the feel of it…” (Kitchen Inspiration)

    LaManda Joy
    22 Jan 2015 | 2:11 pm
    My first memories are of garden and kitchen with Father ... The post “Let Mommy get the feel of it…” (Kitchen Inspiration) appeared first on The Yarden.
  • My new book!

    LaManda Joy
    4 Dec 2014 | 3:28 pm
    I wanted to call this post “be careful what you ... The post My new book! appeared first on The Yarden.
  • Grow2Give

    LaManda Joy
    30 Nov 2014 | 3:01 pm
    This post first appeared on We Can Grow It. I’m proud ... The post Grow2Give appeared first on The Yarden.
  • Community Garden Universe

    LaManda Joy
    25 Jun 2014 | 8:40 am
    Peterson Garden Project is one bright star in a big ... The post Community Garden Universe appeared first on The Yarden.
 
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    Gardener's Journal

  • When it’s Time for ‘Potting Up’

    gscadmin
    25 Mar 2015 | 12:26 pm
    Artichoke seedlings that have been growing in long Rootrainers are well-rooted and ready for potting up. With such a well-developed root system, this tomato seedling should be potted up so it can grow further in a larger pot. If you start plants from seed, eventually you’ll have to master the technique of potting up. It’s what you do when a seedling gets too big for the pot or cell it’s growing in. Usually it’s too early to plant outdoors, and the seedling still needs a few more weeks of coddling indoors. Not all seedlings require potting up, but many do. A good…
  • Geranium Seedlings Bring Spring into our Call Center

    gscadmin
    6 Mar 2015 | 5:03 am
    A seedling that has been “potted up” into a 4″ pot. From now (late February) until late-May, the seedling will grow slowly in the same pot.   Valerie waters the geranium seedlings, which are set up under lights, just outside our call center. Winter can be a difficult time for gardeners. Sure, there are seed catalogs to get us through January, but February arrives, and it’s still winter. Is it too early to start seeds? Not at all, especially if you aspire to grow plants that have a long lead time, such as artichokes or onions. Valerie Ryan, who works in our call…
  • The 5 Best Tomatoes for Pots and Planters

    gscadmin
    2 Mar 2015 | 6:16 am
    Related: Watch: Growing Tomatoes from Seed to Harvest Whether you grow on a patio, porch, rooftop or fire escape, it’s essential to choose the right tomato varieties when growing in containers. Look for determinate or semi-determinate varieties, which have a more concentrated fruit set and a compact habit. It’s also best to look for varieties that start producing early — so you can get the most out of your containers. Make sure your containers are big enough — 3 to 5 gallons is the minimum — and that they have drainage holes and good-quality potting soil. Also keep in mind…
  • ‘Bunch-Type’ Sweet Potatoes Fit Compact Gardens

    gscadmin
    19 Feb 2015 | 8:09 am
    If you grow sweet potatoes in containers, consider the “bunch” varieties from Steele Plant Company: Vardaman and Porto Rico. And if you’ve never grown sweet potatoes before, try a few of these in your garden this year. I talked to Ken Sanders at Steele Plant, and he says the bunch types will do well in large containers, such as a washtub or a whisky barrel. I bet they’ll also thrive in the Jumbo Potato Grow Bag. Unlike traditional sweet potatoes, the bunch types don’t have long vines; plants remain compact. Porto Rico (also called Puerto Rico and Porto Rica)…
  • Planting Season in the Cubicle Farm

    gscadmin
    9 Feb 2015 | 5:29 am
    Just-sown corn seeds, which look just like popcorn. To sow, sprinkle them on the soil surface and push them down to ensure good seed-to-soil contact. My file drawer: I used biodegradable take-out trays as planters, Germinating Mix for the soil and set them atop the reservoirs of a couple GrowEase Seed Starters. I’m growing corn in my file cabinet. Actually, I’m growing something called “corn shoots.” In seven to 10 days, they’ll be ready for harvest, and I hear they’re delicious. Why the file cabinet? These shoots taste best when they grow in darkness, so…
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    This Grandmother's Garden

  • Spring is Here!

    Carolyn ♥
    20 Mar 2015 | 7:23 am
    The warmth of the Radiant Sun has enticed my redbuds to POP! Proudly proclaiming to all the little birds Spring is here!  You can now move in... please?(Redbuds have never popped this early in my gardens... all my world is loving this Sunshine!)All content created by Carolyn Bush | Copyright © 2010 - 2015 All Rights Reserved  This Grandmother's Garden | Highland, Utah, USA All content created by Carolyn Bush | Copyright © 2010 - 2014 All Rights Reserved | This Grandmother's Garden | Highland, Utah, USA
  • I'm STILL Here

    Carolyn ♥
    17 Mar 2015 | 5:05 am
    I'm STILL HereLovin' where life is taking meone step at a time.and yes, Life is STILL Good.I've been away from this blog far too long...time to pick up the cameraand share what's happening in This Grandmother's GardenWon't you please join me as my sleepy gardens begin to awake?Our first QUAIL sighting was yesterday...wonder how many babies we'll have this year!Off I go to visit my blogging friends...how I've missed you!All content created by Carolyn Bush | Copyright © 2010 - 2015 All Rights ReservedThis Grandmother's Garden | Highland, Utah, USA All content created by Carolyn Bush…
  • Sometimes You Just Need a Little Break...

    Carolyn ♥
    6 Jun 2014 | 8:02 am
    LIFE IS GOODSo much is happening in my gardens! I've been so busy busy...30 days since my last post... Don't give up on me... new post is coming soon!(Besides... I've missed visiting all of you!)All content created by Carolyn Bush | Copyright © 2010 - 2014 All Rights Reserved This Grandmother's Garden | Highland, Utah, USA All content created by Carolyn Bush | Copyright © 2010 - 2014 All Rights Reserved | This Grandmother's Garden | Highland, Utah, USA
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    Annie's Gardening Corner

  • Number One Early Blooming Woodland Shrub

    26 Mar 2015 | 7:30 am
    The Why of Witch Hazel At this time of year, especially in the cold zones, looking for colorful life can be difficult at best. That’s why we’ll do a #ThrowbackThursday post from last February on ‘The Why of Witch Hazel.’ There’s a list of characteristics to peruse, making this woodland shrub an all-time favorite. Take a #ThrowbackThursday peek back down memory lane. Just an FYI - with New England's harsh winter, there's a couple week lag time so keep your eyes peeled. Witch Hazel can be found in bloom right now. Need more than 'The Why of Witch Hazel' to catch your attention? Here…
  • Mid-week Spring Climb

    25 Mar 2015 | 7:55 am
    Mid-week spring climb - check out #bostondesignweek If it feels like spring is still holding off in New England, here's something to help with that 'first week of spring' climb and final push up the hill. Everyone can use some fresh design thoughts for inspiration. Here's a perfect solution and it's taking place in Boston -  the first ever #bostondesignweek. There's still lots of great talks and events to attend. Plus it's a great mid-week design push up the hill. Click here to see what might interest you. Get out of your box and think DESIGN. And if you still need a little extra push up…
  • Weekend Tidbits

    23 Mar 2015 | 7:41 am
    Do you know where this state park is in Massachusetts? Hint – it has an amazing showcase of Rhododendrons and Azaleas mid-spring.What a first weekend of spring. What started with snowflakes, then a melt and warm-up, now back to the deep freeze - ugh! But hopefully you were able to get out in nature, do a bit of pruning or clean-up in the garden, or just enjoy the first awakenings of this season we love the most. A few noteworthy tidbits or #DYK (Did you know) to prompt outdoor thinking: Be on the lookout for White pine blister rust – there is a mutated fungus infecting white pine forests…
  • Entertaining in Fresh Air

    20 Mar 2015 | 5:12 am
    Happy spring – it finally arrives this evening at 6:46 PM. Though some of us may not be able to run through the garden with shorts and sneaks, are your outdoor entertaining spaces ready for spring? Are you ready for spring and outdoor entertaining? One of the best things about shedding the long winter season is being able to entertain outdoors and take in that fresh air. Where will you be spending your spring, summer and fall mornings, afternoons, and evenings? If you want it to be outdoors entertaining with family and friends, get your landscape design plans in place. Here are a few…
  • Hours Until Spring

    19 Mar 2015 | 5:55 am
    As John Muir once stated, “Spring work is going on with joyful enthusiasm.” On this #ThrowbackThursday, enjoy the last minutes of winter to welcome what will be! Eventually we shall see the beauty of spring. Counting down the final hours until March 20th! © All Images – Property of Bilowz Associates Inc. If you like this blog, check in for your daily share's worth of garden inspiration, landscape architecture and design tips; always original, not cookie cutter and copied. Just like our design work, we strive for unique! We invite you to contact Bilowz Associates, Inc., or to browse our…
 
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    Serenity in the Garden

  • 'Firetail' Knotweed - Pow!

    Jan Johnsen
    25 Mar 2015 | 4:57 am
    courtesy GAPPHOTOSWant to know what is beloved by James Van Sweden and Piet Oudolf and was a 2010 Royal Horticultural Society Plant of Merit? Hardiness USDA zones 5 to 9.The 'Firetail' Knotweed or Persicaria amplexicaulis speciosa ‘Firetail’ - It is 3' - 4 ft tall.photo by Chris GhyselenThis non-invasive Himalayan perennial adds a “nice red spark” to the late summer garden (from July through Frost). It forms a bushy mound of foliage topped by brightly colored “tails” of tiny crimson flowers. Underplant it with early-spring-blooming…
  • An Eye for Color - International Color Day

    Jan Johnsen
    22 Mar 2015 | 6:29 am
    Yesterday was International Color Day.International Color Day (started in 2008) promotes activities related to color and its perception. These can be arts exhibitions, contests on color and light design and workshops on the use of color.The choice of the date was based on the spring equinox. They figured this was the best date because night and day are approximately equally long and this signifies the balance of light and darkness as expressed in all cultures.source: Andy Basile - Insight My favorite color celebration is in India. It is called Holi. This is a spring…
  • Go outside – happiness is maximized at 57°F

    Jan Johnsen
    20 Mar 2015 | 6:50 pm
    We humans should spend more time outdoors than indoors. A UK study from the University of Sussex found that being outdoors makes people happier:'Being outdoors, near the sea, on a warm, sunny weekend afternoon is the perfect spot for most. In fact, participants were found to be substantially happier outdoors in all natural environments than they were in urban environments.'In the book about happiness, The Happiness Advantage, Shawn Achor notes that " one study found that spending 20 minutes outside in good weather not only boosted positive mood, but broadened thinking and…
  • We Updated Our Website! Garden Photo of the Day

    Jan Johnsen
    15 Mar 2015 | 8:42 am
    We just updated our landscape design - build firm's website, www.johnsenlandscapes.comGo here for the updated Johnsen Landscapes & Pools Gallery Page. 
  • Hosta plantaginea 'Aphrodite' - August Lily

    Jan Johnsen
    14 Mar 2015 | 4:52 am
    Hosta 'Aphrodite' by Jan JohnsenI took this photo at The Mount in Lenox, Massachusetts. It is the lovely 'Aphrodite' hosta (Hosta plantaginea 'Aphrodite).It has pure white,  intensely fragrant flowers that open in late summer on 2 ft stems. It is so gracious along a sheltered path as shown here.  Great for a fragrance garden.Hosta plantaginea likes a moist location but can tolerate dry shade. Long lived. Moon garden, anyone?
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    MySecretGarden

  • Northwest Flower & Garden Show - Four More Display Gardens

    25 Mar 2015 | 6:07 am
    Slowly, but surely, I'm continuing to show my pictures from the 2015 Northwest Flower&Garden Show (NWFGS). Following are the pictures of four more display gardens with comments from their NWFGS description. Giovanni’s Grotto "The romance of Italy, both its people and environs, is captured here in this grotto hideaway. It has the feel of an outdoor room with its sitting area
  • My Garden (zone 8) - First Part of March

    19 Mar 2015 | 6:52 am
    In spring, I'm always excited to see that my plants have spread. Sometimes, it's good excitement - who doesn't like free plants? In other cases, excitement is followed by a question - am I playing with  fire? A few observations about some fast spreaders in my garden.    Petasites palmatus 'Golden Palms' , Northwest native This is the case when you should trust the label! "Spreads
  • Northwest Flower & Garden Show - 2015. Several Gardens, Several Pictures

    11 Mar 2015 | 7:06 am
    Knotty & Nice…Here’s to WE time Gold Medal The Garden description from the NWFGS :  "For a couple seeking to connect, play, relax and set time aside to be with each other—“we time”—this garden caters to both the masculine and feminine senses; calling in the energy of both. The ‘Knotty’ reference to this part of the vignette is both the trees and plantings which are various forms of
  • February and March Garden. Wordless Saturday

    7 Mar 2015 | 6:30 am
     Columbine  Silene dioica 'Clifford Moor'  Euphorbia Tasmanian Tiger  Euphorbia amygdaloides 'Ruby Glow'  Tree Peony  Labrador Violet Japanese Aralia and  Schisandra chinensis   Daphne o. 'Marginata'  Trillium kurabayashii 'Giant Red'  Peony Coral Charm  
  • Northwest Flower & Garden Show - 2015: West Seattle Nursery Display Garden

    22 Feb 2015 | 7:03 am
    The name of this display garden was 'Birds Do It... Bees Do It...' As a person who had an uncle-beekeeper and spent many happy childhood days among beehives, I was naturally partial to this garden. Back in those times, there was nothing more exciting for me than to find myself during a morning in a forest where dozens of beehives stood. It was a magic place with no industry within hundreds of
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    Veg Plotting

  • Of Yellow Books and Garden Walks

    VP
    27 Mar 2015 | 1:30 am
    On Wednesday I had the privilege of attending this year's launch of the Yellow Book. It was great to meet so many people involved with this organisation, to hear how last year's funds will be distributed, and learn what's new for 2015 and beyond.The launch marks the starting gun firing for this year's garden visiting season, with nearly 4,000 gardens opening for the NGS from now until around the end of October. I'm particularly looking forward to visiting Karen and seeing how she gets on with her openings this year.I shocked myself last September when I found myself thinking a trip to Le…
  • How Advertising Works in Chippenham #36

    VP
    25 Mar 2015 | 1:30 am
    Decide to ramp up your party's campaign for the forthcoming General ElectionDesign a snazzy leaflet outlining your plans for the Chippenham ConstituencyArrange delivery to every household in said ConstituencyWait for a blogger with a camera to notice the accompanying photos are of Bradford on AvonEt Voila!To be fair Bradford's part of the Chippenham Constituency too, but my inner imp was intrigued by two parties choosing to show an image from a much smaller town than the main one. It might turn out to be the only thing they can agree on ;)For balance, I was going to wait and see what the…
  • Painting Paradise: The Art of the Garden

    VP
    23 Mar 2015 | 1:30 am
    A look at the the Baroque style - characterised by increased formality and a greater use of water in garden designOn Friday when most of the nation was craning its collective neck to see the partial solar eclipse, I instead found myself in the poshest of rooms without windows.I was at a Bloggers Breakfast kindly set up by the Royal Collection Trust to preview their latest exhibition, Painting Paradise: The Art of the Garden. This is at the Queen's Gallery, Buckingham Palace from now, until Sunday 11th October 2015.My visit turned out to be a real treat, from the coffee served by a member of…
  • Let's Visit a Real Garden or Two

    VP
    20 Mar 2015 | 1:30 am
    The entrance to The Bicycle Garden - thanks to Susan Tomlinson for letting me use her photo :) I'm showing you Susan's garden today because we've been having quite a conversation after her post earlier this week on Rules for visiting a private garden. By private she means ones like hers and mine.Her gist is that visitors should be nice, be kind. I agree because I easily give myself 10 times the amount of criticism compared to anything a visitor might care to give. Susan's bravely illustrated her post with a picture of her garden's entrance, the kind of scene which might lead to the sort…
  • Wordless Wednesday: Totally Topiary

    VP
    18 Mar 2015 | 1:30 am
    If you're not reading this on vegplotting.blogspot.com, Blotanical or your own web reader such as Bloglovin' or Feedly, then the website you're using is a blogpost feed scraper. Why not go straight to the source instead? That's vegplotting.blogspot.com
 
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    GrowBlog

  • Warming Soil for Spring Planting (and Frogs)

    27 Mar 2015 | 12:44 pm
    Back when I was a new gardener, I would rush to plant cool-season veggies as soon as it felt like spring outside, mostly because all the books said I could plant peas, potatoes, onions and cabbage "as soon as the soil could be worked in spring."
  • Forcing Strawberries for an Earlier Crop

    19 Mar 2015 | 5:41 pm
    While I have nothing against preserves, the best fruit has to be ultra-fresh, eaten within minutes or even seconds of picking, while still warm from a sunny garden. And for me, strawberries are one of the most mouth-watering garden treats of all.
  • Tomatoes for Canning and Cucumbers for Pickling

    12 Mar 2015 | 12:48 pm
    I can think of few better ways to invest in summer than to grow cucumbers for , or raise a crop of canning tomatoes to put by in jars, accented with aromatic basil and oregano. It sounds romantic, but growing any crop for pickling or canning purposes – be it beets, snap beans, cucumbers or tomatoes – is a serious proposition that should be planned with the end in mind.
  • How to Grow Romanesco Cauliflowers

    5 Mar 2015 | 11:26 am
    Some vegetables are born showoffs. It may be because they're loud (super-sized pumpkins), blousy (curly kale) or just plain beautiful. The Romanesco cauliflower fits into the latter category and, to the uninitiated, the precision of its intricate, geometric heads, or curds, really does earn it admiration.
  • How to Grow and Cook the Tastiest Fingerling Potatoes

    26 Feb 2015 | 11:04 am
    In the Andean Mountains of Peru and Ecuador where potatoes were born, it is not unusual for family farmers to plant a dozen different kinds of potato in one field. As shown in this beautiful photo essay from , many of the varieties valued by Peruvian farmers are what we would call fingerling potatoes – small elongated tubers with a bit of a curl. People have been growing fingerling potatoes for around 8,000 years, so they have stood the test of time, and I think I know why. Sturdy fingerling potatoes always make a crop, and they are wonderful to eat. And, because they are expensive to buy,…
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    The Enduring Gardener

  • King John’s Nursery & Garden

    The Enduring Gardener
    26 Mar 2015 | 5:31 am
    I’ve just been for my first outing with the East Sussex group of the Cottage Garden Society. The nursery and garden are tucked down a lane near Etchingam in deeply rural countryside and has been on my list to visit for some time. It was a jolly event (including tea and cake) despite the lack of sun and a chilly wind. It’s always interesting to see the bones of a garden before all the prettiness kicks in. There are some wonderful gnarly old apples trees smothered in mosses and lichens and wreathed with the stems of climbing roses which look fabulous in late spring when the blossom is out…
  • An Exercise in Barricade Building

    The Enduring Gardener
    23 Mar 2015 | 12:21 am
    I’ve just prepared my bean trench and sown broad beans and peas – all quite straightforward and enjoyable. I then spent double the time erecting barricades to keep the foxes at bay. I used to find that twiggy branches laid across the soil was all that was needed to deter cats, but foxes will just view them as playthings to drag round the garden, especially once the cubs arrive. So hurdles and fences all round the edge and netting over the top to stop them jumping in. Fingers crossed the badgers stay away or further reinforcing will be necessary.
  • The Magnolias are Magnificent

    The Enduring Gardener
    21 Mar 2015 | 12:10 am
    Word has it that the wonderful magnolias at Borde Hill Garden, near Haywards Heath are at their magnificent best right now. Their glades of these mature trees hint at how they must have looked in their native habitat when the famous plant hunters of the late 19th and early 20th century collected magnolia seed for the garden’s then owner, Colonel Robert Stephenson Clarke. The family still lives at Borde Hill and has continued to care for the original trees, many of which are now classed as ‘champion trees’ i.e. the largest of their kind in the British Isles. They are well worth a visit.
  • Most Optimistic of Seasons

    The Enduring Gardener
    19 Mar 2015 | 12:17 am
    These few weeks before the weeds really get going and the slugs and snails start to munch everything in sight is such an optimistic time. Each year I find myself thinking that I’ve really got it all sorted this year and the garden is going to be particularly flower-filled and productive. Then, just when the weather is at its most balmy, I will walk out one morning to find that the weeds have staged an overnight invasion and that the slugs and snails have discovered a salad bar of deliciousness in my cold frames, leaving me with bare stems and shredded leaves. I’m trying to deal with the…
  • All the Fun of the Fair

    The Enduring Gardener
    16 Mar 2015 | 12:04 pm
    This Friday (20th March) I will be joining herb expert Jekka McVicar and garden designer Lucy Summers at the Country Living Fair in Islington for two Q&A sessions on ‘Growing the Good Life’ and ‘Gardening for Well-Being’. It should be fun and there’s more horticultural interest too, with Lucy’s ‘Country Living’ garden at the heart of the show and the launch of a new cut-flower clematis called ‘Amazing London’. I’m not sure about the name, but name aside, clematis are becoming increasingly popular as cut flowers with C. durandii the variety most often used. They do…
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    Urban Gardens

  • Mobile Garden “Thrones” Reign in Paris

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    27 Mar 2015 | 1:24 pm
    Perched atop rolling mobile gardens adorned with plants, insect hotels, branches, shells and more, a group of spirited young women and girls–Princesses of the Earth and Climate–paraded recently down Paris’s rue du Chemin Vert (which happens to translate to … Read More...The post Mobile Garden “Thrones” Reign in Paris appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Spotted at Ambiente: The Rise of Balloon-Inspired Designs

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    14 Mar 2015 | 1:28 pm
    Art in the City’s 16 inch balloon dog figurines. On my recent trip to the Ambiente design fair, I spotted some balloon-inspired designs–furniture and objects which brought back fond memories of those iconic balloon sculptures of my childhood. Looks like the range of these products is expanding in … Read More...The post Spotted at Ambiente: The Rise of Balloon-Inspired Designs appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Glam Up the Garden: Fashion-Forward Garden Hoses

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    5 Mar 2015 | 9:49 pm
    Never before have garden hoses been this glamorous.  Swedish company, Garden Glory, brings high style into the garden with their colorful fashion-forward garden hoses that hang out on whimsical antler-shaped wall mounts. Put them in your garden and you’ll soon be asking, “do these hoses make my … Read More...The post Glam Up the Garden: Fashion-Forward Garden Hoses appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Going Whole Log at Ambiente 2015 in Frankfurt

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    2 Mar 2015 | 10:55 pm
    Distilling down the top trends and themes from an international design fair the size of 60 football fields (that’s 1300 tennis courts) is not a simple endeavor. Nonetheless, as I trekked in Frankfurt mid-February through the massive designfest otherwise known as Ambiente,… Read More...The post Going Whole Log at Ambiente 2015 in Frankfurt appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Fiskars Announces Project Orange Thumb Community Garden Grant Recipients

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    2 Mar 2015 | 3:17 pm
    Now in its 13th year, Fiskars Project Orange Thumbawards cash and garden tools to community groups across North America and Canada. I was honored to accept their invitation to be on their editorial board where I helped … Read More...The post Fiskars Announces Project Orange Thumb Community Garden Grant Recipients appeared first on Urban Gardens.
 
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    Busch Gardens in Virginia Blog

  • Lettuce Wraps Recipe from our Food & Wine Festival

    Kevin Crossett
    7 Mar 2015 | 8:20 am
    Whether you prefer chicken, pork, beef or tofu, these lettuce wraps are for you. Make them for yourself, or come and try them at the 2015 Food & Wine Festival.
  • Happy New Year - Celebrating the Year of the Sheep at Busch Gardens

    Emily Bea
    23 Feb 2015 | 8:54 am
    Happy New Year to All! You may wonder why I am wishing you all a Happy New Year, well last Thursday marked the beginning of the Chinese New Year.  As we say good bye to the year of the horse, we usher in the year of the Sheep (goat or ram).  This spring festival dates back more than 2000 years.  It is said that all of the animals were asked to meet on New Year’s Day to celebrate and only 12 animals arrived for the celebration.  To reward all of the animals that did show up, a year was named after each animal.     Grazing is a favorite activity for the…
  • Tastes of the Big Easy, Far East Coming to Busch Gardens Food & Wine Festival

    Emily Bea
    16 Feb 2015 | 9:05 am
    A taste of New Orleans is coming to Busch Gardens’ third annual Food & Wine Festival. The French Quarter is one of two new themed kiosks debuting at this year’s festival. The menu is still being developed, but Busch Gardens Executive Chef Justin Watson said it will consist of Cajun- and Creole-inspired recipes—think Gumbo—that will bring the flavors of the Big Easy right here to Virginia. Watson is also introducing guests to Eastern Asia cuisine, the second all-new menu debuting at this year’s festival, which opens May 22 and runs Fridays, Saturdays and…
  • Happy Valentine's Day to Our Fans

    Emily Bea
    13 Feb 2015 | 1:45 pm
    On Valentine’s Day we celebrate love in all its glorious forms. It’s a day that we tell the people in our lives just how much they mean to us. So today, we’d like to profess our admiration, our devotion, our gratitude to you, our fans.  Busch Gardens would be nothing but a collection of pathways and tangled metal structures if weren’t for one thing: people.  It is people, the team members who work here and the guests who spend their days here, which fill this empty space and bring it to life. It’s the screams as Griffon tips, waits…..drops.
  • New Busch Gardens Show is a Barrel of Fun

    Emily Bea
    9 Feb 2015 | 8:43 am
    Busch Gardens Williamsburg is “rolling” out a new show this spring in honor of the park’s 40th anniversary.  Roll Out The Barrel follows a fictional German town as its residents celebrate their 40th annual town beer brewing festival. “In the same way that Celtic Fyre celebrates beloved Irish traditions, Roll Out The Barrel celebrates German traditions that have been part of the Busch Gardens experience for four decades,” said Scott Gasparich, Busch Gardens vice president of entertainment. Roll Out The Barrel incorporates the best elements of the park’s…
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    A Charlotte Garden

  • While we wait …

    Daricia McKnight
    6 Mar 2015 | 8:06 am
    I hope today is the last blast of winter around here, but while we all wait for warmer temperatures and time in our gardens, we can take a look at The Herb Lover's Spa Book, and maybe use the time indoors to make something special for ourselves or someone else.This little book by Sue Goetz is subtitled, "Create a Luxury Spa Experience at Home with Fragrant Herbs from Your Yard." It might inspire you to plant more herbs this spring in addition to giving you something to make right now.The simplicity of the recipes is a plus. Few call for more than three or four ingredients, or as many steps.
  • You're thinking about Spring, aren't you?

    Daricia McKnight
    7 Feb 2015 | 8:36 am
    The New Southern Living Garden BookOxmoor House, 768 pages, $34.95Of course you are! It's so exciting when the days lengthen and we get a few warmish days in January and February. Gardening in the South definitely has its rewards, and an early Spring is one of them. While you're outside this weekend in the nearly 70 degree temperatures that are predicted (and we know the meteorologists are always right), think about where you might want to add some new plants to your garden.To help you with that plant list, I have a recommendation: The New Southern Living Garden Book. There are more than…
  • Summer Wrap-Up: Portland, Day 3, Part 1

    Daricia McKnight
    23 Sep 2014 | 10:22 am
    Portland Japanese GardenThe Japanese Garden in Portland is more than five acres of peace and tranquility. Pondering my lack of photos from there, I think I was just too absorbed in the experience to remember to get my camera out. The waterfall above might have been my favorite view (it's a cell shot). Trails meandered up the hill and through the woods. Water and the sounds it makes were a soothing backdrop…completely enchanting.Some of us were fortunate enough to tour the garden with the garden curator, Sadafumi Uchiyama, who kept us enthralled with Japanese garden and design philosophy.One…
  • Summer Wrap-Up: Portland, Day 2, Part 2

    Daricia McKnight
    16 Sep 2014 | 4:53 pm
    After lunch at Joy Creek Nursery (Day 2, Part 1), our group of Flinging garden bloggers headed to Old Germantown Gardens, the two acre property of Bruce Wakefield and Jerry Grossnickle. As soon as I took one look down this inviting slope, deja vu hit.But then as quickly, a flash of recall—I turned to Bruce and asked him if his garden had ever been on the HGTV program, "A Gardener's Diary."*His look of total disbelief reminded me just what a garden nerd I am! I had recorded and saved several of those shows and watched them over and over—and in fact, yes, theirs was one of them!Bruce and…
  • Happy Bloom Day!

    Daricia McKnight
    15 Sep 2014 | 5:13 pm
    Yellow Wood Sage (Salvia koyame)If you look into my garden from next door or across the street, you will see a lot of green but maybe nothing blooming. It's been an unusual year, starting with a very slow spring—cool and wet. Everything grew very tall and then flopped until I tied it up or cut it back. Then it got hot and dry and everything bloomed out early, or else the deer pruned all the flowers off.Even so, there is more than might appear, and if you take a stroll through, these are some of the blooms still hanging on.Yellow wood sage is blooming and spreading and I couldn't be more…
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    How to Grow Great Potatoes

  • Colourful Potato Varieties

    Annette Welsford
    11 Mar 2015 | 6:42 am
    Image credit: Classic Film Colourful potato varieties are a fun way to explore the many flavours and textures of potatoes. They look great in place of traditional potatoes, and are packed with nutrients. These specialty varieties may be hard to find, so you may have to grow your own. Purple Peruvian The purple Peruvian is a fingerling potato with deep violet skin and opaque purple flesh. Purple potatoes are generally dry and starchy, with a deep earthy, almost nutty flavour. Purple potatoes are rich in antioxidants, and have therefore become a popular alternative to traditional potatoes. The…
  • Potato Growing Success Story in the UK

    Annette Welsford
    2 Nov 2014 | 10:18 pm
    Rhys Jaggar, London We were delighted to receive a wonderful email from one of our valued customers who purchased our book How to Grow Great Potatoes, an avid potato grower who lives in the UK. He has had great success this growing season and kindly shared his experiences with us. Potato Growing with Rhys Jaggar Rhys Jaggar lives in London, near Heathrow airport, and here’s his potato growing results from this summer. Kestrel Potatoesgrown in polypots “The beginning of the growing season saw lots of moisture deep in the soil due to the wet winter that had just passed. This was very…
  • The Health Benefits of Potatoes are Greater than you Might Think

    Annette Welsford
    29 Nov 2013 | 4:00 am
    The lowly Irish potato is a highly nutritious vegetable that is more than just a delicious accompaniment to a meal. In fact the health benefits of potatoes are so great, you could describe them as “underground health superstars”. One medium-sized baked or boiled potato will provide close to half the daily Vitamin C requirement needed by your body. All plants that support underground storage of nutrients in a modified plant structure (usually the thickened underground part of a stem of rhizone) contain a substantial amount of starch, which provides energy, as well as vitamins and minerals,…
  • Controversial Quest to Protect Potatoes in Ireland from Blight

    Annette Welsford
    2 Aug 2012 | 8:56 am
    Potatoes come in all shapes, colors and sizes. But what will GM potatoes look like? Once the basic diet of the Irish, potatoes are once again the centre of attention in Ireland, with a decision by the country’s environmental protection agency to approve a trial of genetically modified potato crops. According to scientists, the motivation is to improve resistance of potatoes to blight. Various strains of this fungal disease have continued to plague potato crops since it caused the nationwide Irish famine that ultimately caused the death of more than a million people in the mid-1800s. The…
  • The Real Cause of the Great Irish Famine

    Annette Welsford
    4 Jul 2012 | 5:45 am
    Commonly referred to as The Great Hunger, Ireland’s horrific famine of the 1840s ranks as one of the very worst tragedies in the history of mankind. Famine Memorial in Dublin features ultra-thin statues by Rowan Gillespie It is a well-known fact that the massive failure of Ireland’s potato crops from 1845 to 1849 was caused by a fungus (Phytophthora infestans) that generated blight. At the time, potatoes were the staple crop for the people of Ireland, and with no back-up crop, as many as 1.5-million people died of starvation. Many more fled the country in search of food. But why were the…
 
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    Appalachian Feet

  • How to Build a Permaculture Garden Class, Part 1 & 2

    Eliza Lord
    10 Mar 2015 | 11:20 am
    This Saturday Eliza is going to be showing a small group of people how to install a permaculture garden by actually doing it — the best way to learn! If you prefer to learn hands-on, this class is going to cover a myriad of permaculture techniques and design elements. Even better is that in the process, we’ll be putting in a community garden that will benefit Greenville’s West End Village surrounding its location at The Wheel on Pendleton Street. Space is limited and tickets have been selling rapidly this week. The class is split into 2 parts but is best taken together as a…
  • SC Organic Growing Conference Placeholder

    Eliza Lord
    5 Mar 2015 | 11:01 pm
    I taught two classes at last Saturday’s SC Organic Growing Conference — one on farmscaping and the other on southern passalong plants for permaculturists. I promised everyone to put the handouts online, which is still on my todo list. Being me, I got sidetracked reading some new studies and expanding my farmscaping spreadsheet so the official blog post with the handout will likely go up next week. In the meantime, here’s some links to relevant blog posts I’ve written with similar information:…
  • How to Attend Hands-On Classes in Gardens, Kitchens, Forests, and Even a Late 1800’s Cabin

    Eliza Lord
    11 Feb 2015 | 9:16 pm
    It’s here. The garden classes are in gardens, the cooking classes are in kitchens, the nature study is in forests, the raspberries taste like raspberries, and the snozzberries taste like snozzberries! Photo Caption: My daughter and I inside the Hagood Mill cabin where I’ll be teaching sometimes. I worked for weeks on the lesson plans for these hands-on classes, workshops, and tours and am so excited to finally roll them out. Click here for my entire 2015 schedule. One of my favorite things about this year’s new classes is that some of them are going to be held inside of this…
  • Update: Public Permaculture Demo Garden Progress

    Eliza Lord
    9 Feb 2015 | 4:41 pm
    When I founded the SC Upstate Permaculture Society I had no idea we’d be this popular, but we’re up to 644 members with multiple people joining each week. If you live in upstate South Carolina (or nearby) we welcome you to join us. Last October we broke ground on a huge new garden that is already stacking functions by being outreach to the community, an educational opportunity for school children, a seed & plant bank for SCUPS members, a wildlife corridor (especially for the endangered Monarch butterfly), a form of erosion control, a place for SCUPS members to practice…
  • News: Eliza on TV, Upcoming Events, and Our Favorite “How To” Articles

    Eliza Lord
    12 Dec 2014 | 1:34 pm
    Eliza was on TV Wednesday doing a foraging recipe demonstration (involving a failed attempt to use a hammer) and talking about a couple things happening this weekend with Grow Journey and the Swamp Rabbit Cafe & Grocery’s Holiday Flea Market on Saturday from 11am – 3pm.  If you’d like to see Eliza’s segment during Wednesday’s Studio 62 on the CW channel, here’s the video (may not load immediately): The holiday flea is free to attend and there will be local vendors from all over the upstate. Eliza and Nathaniel will be at the Grow Journey booth selling…
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    Lead up the Garden Path

  • Sango Kaku has woken up.

    Pauline
    28 Mar 2015 | 12:19 am
    How could I have missed the beautiful new foliage on Acer Sango Kaku in the woodland, when it was Foliage Day on March 22nd! The foliage is light green in the summer and butter yellow in the autumn, but when it first comes out it is a mixture of colours which from a distance look coral, matching the new stems. In the morning sunlight, it just glowed against the dark foliage of the Bay tree behind it. The nearer you get, the better the leaves look. The colours in the leaves can be seen clearly now, they start out green but change to pink near the tips. The pink stems are such a beautiful…
  • Spring has Sprung – it’s official!

    Pauline
    22 Mar 2015 | 12:37 am
    My garden is telling me that spring is definitely with us.  The birds are singing, choosing their mates, nest building with all the bits that I haven’t got round to tidying and sporting their wonderfully coloured plumage. There is frogspawn in the pond at last, it is so late this year, and at last there is new growth on most of the trees and shrubs – just in time for Garden Bloggers Foliage Day with Christina. This is the gravel garden at the back, looking across the lawn to the archway into the woodland. All the foliage you can see is with us all winter, making sure that the…
  • Spring has arrived. GBBD. March.

    Pauline
    15 Mar 2015 | 12:17 am
    Spring has certainly arrived in the garden here, it is washing over the garden and changing the colour from white to yellow. Early snowdrops are now almost finished and the colour white that was everywhere a few days ago is gradually changing to the yellow of the first narcissus and primroses. In the border by the archway into the woodland are Narcissus Tete a Tete, Hellebores, Cyclamen coum, pulmonaria and snowdrops. Looking into the woodland from the archway, the colour has definitely changed from white to yellow. And yes, the rusty pheasant fools me, I just hope it fools the real pheasant!
  • Happy Hippeastrum.

    Pauline
    11 Mar 2015 | 12:45 am
    It is years and years since I have grown a Hippeastrum or is it an Amaryllis. According to my big Bulb book by Anna Pavord, they are definitely Hippeastrum. When I last grew them,  I didn’t know the first thing about gardening or plants, no wonder they died, poor things! This time I must try to do better. The first one was a pure white one called H. Matterhorn, which showed up so well against the wood burner. Soon five flowers were open and the second stem with more buds wasn’t far behind. Eventually it had 9 beautifully large flowers on 2 stems, they looked a bit squashed for a…
  • Oh no!

    Pauline
    8 Mar 2015 | 4:32 am
    When I came down for breakfast this morning, I couldn’t believe it…….. …….he has brought a friend!!! He obviously doesn’t consider the second pheasant a threat to his territory as they haven’t been fighting, they just seem very friendly! Does this mean I have to double the barricades?!
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    leavesnbloom

  • Dress your Garden with a Little Black

    Rosie Nixon
    6 Mar 2015 | 12:43 pm
    Why not dress your garden with a little black this year? All of us ladies have a timeless little black dress in our wardrobe; it's versatile and perfect for so many occasions; there's always a style to flatter no matter what our shape and size.  It's just the same with almost black foliage and flowering plants.  They're useful in the garden; they add a touch of glamour; and there are many to choose from no matter what the size of your garden. The late Christopher Lloyd called it 'sophisticated black'. Read more »
  • Ladybirds in Winter

    Rosie Nixon
    3 Feb 2015 | 11:45 am
    It's the 21st January.  Snow blankets the garden like a thick white woollen shroud.  The thermometer reads -6.8°C and daylight has finally arrived.  It's time to layer up and get out into the winter garden.  With every step you take there's a distinct crunch.   The air feels thick, raw and piercing.  It chills to your very bones.  You inhale and the lining of your nose starts to sting. You exhale and your breathe lingers in the air like fog.  Thickly gloved hands clumsily try to adjust the legs on the tripod.  It's no use ...the gloves have to come off as I…
  • If you were a ladybird where would You spend the winter?

    Rosie Nixon
    18 Jan 2015 | 1:19 pm
    Winter has finally made it's presence felt in the garden.   It's the time of year when you realise that wellie boots are not the best item of footwear to wear while out in the garden.  There's nothing worse than numb cold toes to entice you back indoors to the heat! At the weekend I wrapped myself up in lots of warm layers.  I put on 3 pairs of thick socks - in wellie boots much too big for me.  Two pairs of trousers, a hat with ear muffs, gloves, snood and coat.   l was well prepared this time for the bitter cold as I knew that the Jelena witchhazel and a few hellebores…
 
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    Garden Walk Garden Talk

  • Gardening With Allium

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    25 Mar 2015 | 4:00 am
    One of my favorite bulbs is Allium. Squirrels, chipmunks and deer detest it, and that is a huge plus. It naturalizes where so many more Allium fill the gardens. Each year, I look forward to them blooming. What you should … Continue reading →
  • What is the Bird that Says Spring is on the Way?

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    22 Mar 2015 | 4:00 am
    Now that Spring has finally arrived, we can all be happy to say a warm hello. Our area will still have snow and temperatures in the teens, but the birds are singing and brightening spirits. Many folks think robins are … Continue reading →
  • Public Gardens Matter

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    19 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    No matter what your feelings or reasons are on visiting public parks or botanical gardens, they accomplish many things in cities. Some are for recreation and exercise and others just the visual beauty for the visitors. But they do so … Continue reading →
  • Urban Gardens Matter

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    17 Mar 2015 | 4:00 am
    What we do with our personal gardens, what we plant and how we maintain them, really matters. What if over 400 people of one community greatly mattered? I illustrated when one person and her expansive gardens matter on the last … Continue reading →
  • When Gardens Matter

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    15 Mar 2015 | 4:00 am
    They make a difference… If I had to pick a place that says a garden in the best way, it might just be this place. The garden owner takes care of her property in the most organic and sustainable way … Continue reading →
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    Gardenerd

  • Urban Soil Summit Review – Part 2

    Christy
    25 Mar 2015 | 7:39 am
    It’s time for more details from the Urban Soil Summit, following Part 1 of our review of the event. Day 2 was just as mind-blowing as Day 1, but the focus was on ideas that could be labeled as fringe … Continue reading → The post Urban Soil Summit Review – Part 2 appeared first on Gardenerd.
  • Experimental Spring: New Basils and More

    Christy
    24 Mar 2015 | 7:27 am
    Gardeners get bored, so we keep trying new varieties to keep things interesting. This spring at Gardenerd HQ, we’re trying out several new seeds for 2015.  We planted seeds a week or so ago, and now those seeds are sprouting … Continue reading → The post Experimental Spring: New Basils and More appeared first on Gardenerd.
  • Tomatomania is Here!

    Christy
    11 Mar 2015 | 7:22 am
    Scott Daigre began his tomato passion at Hortus Nursery back in the day, when gardeners would flock to Hortus’s annual Tomatomania seedling sale. Once Hortus closed its doors, Scott took on the task of continuing the tradition, offering heirloom and … Continue reading → The post Tomatomania is Here! appeared first on Gardenerd.
  • Infograph: How to Store Food Right

    Christy
    10 Mar 2015 | 7:46 am
    The folks at Fix.com put together this nifty infograph on how to store food so it lasts longer in the fridge. I found a few tidbits of information that were new to me (especially the hacks at the end), so … Continue reading → The post Infograph: How to Store Food Right appeared first on Gardenerd.
  • Five Steps to a Beautiful Flagstone Ground Cover

    Christy
    4 Mar 2015 | 6:50 am
    Today we have a guest post from Dane O’Leary, a full-time freelance writer, lifestyles and design blogger for daneoleary.com, scientist, and humanitarian. His writing has been published in a variety of independent web and print publications. He has degrees in … Continue reading → The post Five Steps to a Beautiful Flagstone Ground Cover appeared first on Gardenerd.
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    Veggie Gardening Tips

  • A Look Back at the Fall Vegetable Garden

    Kenny Point
    9 Mar 2015 | 5:47 pm
    This winter has seen nothing but one wave after another of cold, ice, and snow, to the point that I haven’t been able to actually see the garden at all over the past couple months. That’s not entirely bad as the consistent snow cover provided insulation and will help protect over wintering plants from the bitter cold and biting winds. The coming week’s weather forecasts and rising temperatures provide hope for the reappearance of both Spring and the garden. In the meantime I thought I’d post some pics from the fall season and the last time that I could actually enjoy…
  • More Ideas for Cultivating Mushrooms in the Home and Garden

    Kenny Point
    9 Oct 2014 | 9:24 am
    The fall season is a perfect time to explore the fascinating world of backyard mushroom cultivation. I’ll start by sharing some of the delicious edible fungi that is currently springing up right outside in and around my garden. Then I’ll share some info on mushrooms picked up at the recent Mother Earth News Fair, and close with ideas for easily growing shrooms right inside your home. My oyster and shiitake logs are stacked up and have been fruiting for weeks even if their production does seem to be rather limited compared to recent years. Maybe that’s due to the dry weather and…
  • The Mother Earth News Fair Returns to Pennsylvania

    Kenny Point
    1 Oct 2014 | 7:26 am
    The 2014 Mother Earth News Fair that took place in Seven Springs, PA a couple weekends ago was a great event and I walked away with many new ideas and techniques to try out in the garden and to share with you here on the Veggie Gardening Tips website! Normally the downside of a fall gardening event is that you’re inspired to grow and enthused about gardening at precisely the time that nature is telling you that it’s time to shut things down for the winter. This Mother Earth News Fair was different because I walked away with so many things that I am excited about and can apply right…
  • A Weekend at the Herb and Garden Faire

    Kenny Point
    13 May 2014 | 5:02 am
    The 27th Annual Herb & Garden Faire took place over the weekend at the Landis Valley Village and Farm Museum in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. The two day event included plant sales, gardening lectures, arts and crafts, music, delicious foods, and garden themed displays. What started out as a small plant has grown over the years into what may be the largest event of this type in the northeast. There’s always an impressive lineup of nurseries, herb growers, and plant lovers offering an array of rare, heirloom, and unusual, plants for sale. From vegetables to fruits, and herbs to flowers,…
  • Taking Stock of the Garden’s Winter Losses

    Kenny Point
    9 May 2014 | 3:21 pm
    This past winter was harsher than what we’ve grown accustomed to, with colder temps, more snowfall, and longer periods of sustained freezes. Even after spring arrived we have continued to receive colder than normal lows and lingering threats of potential frost. I’m still assessing the damage left behind by winter, but so far it has not been pretty with some unexpected losses in areas that have easily survived past winters. My guess is that it wasn’t the low temperatures that created the havoc, but rather the long stretches where temps fell below freezing and then remained there for…
 
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    Beautiful Wildlife Garden

  • Skink Wars and More on These Sleek Lizards

    Loret T. Setters
    27 Mar 2015 | 5:02 pm
    I was on the patio late one afternoon and the trashcan was rocking.  I glanced over since you never know what creature of nature will be visiting my place.  I figured that maybe a black racer or water snake had slithered underneath the wheels setting the rocking in motion. Then I heard thrashing and a […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Spring Garden Care

    Jesse Elwert
    26 Mar 2015 | 7:48 am
      Spring Garden Care People who care about attracting wildlife to their gardens usually learn over time about best practices for fall cleanup and especially the fact that it’s really beneficial for our birds if we refrain from relentlessly cutting perennials to the ground before winter. But what then happens in the spring for garden care?   Here in […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Downy Woodpeckers

    Brenda Clements Jones
    24 Mar 2015 | 4:35 am
    A welcome visitor to my garden, throughout the entire year: the Downy Woodpecker, Picoides pubescens. They are small woodpeckers. In fact, they are the smallest woodpecker native to North America. The Downy is generally about 6 3/4 inches long. The picture, above, is a female. She is dressed entirely in black and white, while the […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Spring has sprung at Cincinnati Nature Center

    Judy Burris
    23 Mar 2015 | 11:30 am
    My family spent the day hiking the trails at the Cincinnati Nature Center in Milford, Ohio this past Saturday.  It was a beautiful, perfect day to get some fresh air and snap photos of all the new life popping up in the woods and at the ponds. The amphibians have already been busy laying masses […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Bluebird Babies Shepherd in Spring 2015

    Loret T. Setters
    20 Mar 2015 | 12:34 pm
    Big doings at my Central Florida home today.  First day of spring and what could be more rewarding than having the first brood of Eastern Bluebirds (Sialia sialis) hatch?  NOTHING! I saw mom and dad doing a bit of back and fourth to the nest box early this morning. Such activity is a sure sign […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
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    Vegetable Gardener - All featured posts

  • Plant Green Beans Up a Teepee Trellis

    27 Mar 2015 | 8:38 pm
    Posted by ChrisMcLaughlin Plant pole beans, garden peas, nasturtiums, black-eyed Susan vines, sweet peas, miniature pumpkins, scarlet runner beans, or birdhouse gourds at the base of bamboo poles to create a teepee trellis.
  • New Vegetable Grafting Mirrors Old Solanum Experiments

    23 Mar 2015 | 3:05 pm
    Posted by WesternGardener What do you get when you cross a tomato with a potato plant? If you answered the new Ketchup ‘n’ Fries plant from Territorial Seed Company, you’re right.
  • How to Grow Micro Greens Indoors--Part Two

    17 Mar 2015 | 11:15 am
    Posted by WesternGardener If you planted your micro greens with me last week, your sprouts should have already popped up with their seed leaves called cotyledons.
  • How to Grow Micro Greens Indoors

    11 Mar 2015 | 6:00 am
    Posted by WesternGardener Would you like to join me in a delicious indoor gardening project? Let’s grow a container of fresh and tasty micro greens indoors. Plant along with me and you’ll be enjoying fresh greens in about two weeks.
  • Springtime: on the road again

    9 Mar 2015 | 1:59 pm
    Posted by cookinwithherbs Well I departed from the frigid temps in Maryland with over 12-inches of snow on the ground to head south to begin another series of springtime herbal events. While still chilly here in Arkansas, the snow has melted, the precipitation is rain with temps in the 50s and the daffodils are up three or four inches and budded, though not yet open. The first night I arrived the peepers were peepin’ around the pond and in the ditches—a sure sign of spring. Read on to find out upcoming events...
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    Miss Rumphius' Rules

  • Garden Visit: Filoli

    Susan aka Miss. R
    24 Mar 2015 | 11:43 am
    My visit last week to one of the great American gardens, Filoli, in northern California, was a revelation in many ways.  I have wanted to visit since I first saw pictures of it years ago. The garden was designed in the early 20th century by its original homeowners with a team of architects, artists, and horticulturists. There is no known master plan yet it has survived largely in tact which is a rarity for American estate gardens of this size and scope. Sometimes my travels are guided by my desire to experience specific places firsthand. My trip to Marrakesh and Majorelle was one of…
  • Green Gardens

    Susan aka Miss. R
    27 Feb 2015 | 4:34 am
    Green is a thing. Right now it’s a missing thing. It’s what I miss most during winter and what makes me smile first in the spring–those small green shoots pushing up through frigid earth. I’ve been thinking about making flowerless gardens. Gardens that are mostly green. Gardens that rely  on scale and texture and subtlety of hue and maybe some skilled pruning. In New Jersey, where I practice landscape design, this may prove to be more difficult than it is in warmer climates where there are bolder choices and plants with immense architectural leaves. Many of the…
  • My Award Winning Garden Design

    Susan aka Miss. R
    16 Feb 2015 | 6:51 am
    Last fall, I entered a garden I designed in New Jersey in 2015 APLD International Landscape Design Awards in the Planting Design category. It was awarded the highest honor, a Gold Award. To be honest, I knew the value of the design, but since it is the antithesis of current planting trends, I was really pleased. Current trends in planting design seem to require ornamental grasses and meadow-like qualities. This garden has neither, but that doesn’t make it unsustainable or unfriendly to all  but deer. The garden’s underlying structure of boxwood hedging and pyramids gives it…
  • Design vs. A Sense of Place

    Susan aka Miss. R
    11 Feb 2015 | 3:29 am
    I’m not an architecture critic.  I am someone who loves great architecture both contemporary and historic. In my work as a landscape designer part of my focus is to create landscapes and gardens that surround the attendant architecture in such a way that the design partnership between them is timeless and seamless.  As a designer this may seem counter intuitive, but I believe that the best design has a sense of place and that my hand in that should be less, rather than more, visible. Last week I visited Frank Gehry’s new building for the Fondation Louis Vuitton in Paris.  It…
  • Garden Travel: Back and Forth

    Susan aka Miss. R
    17 Jan 2015 | 4:59 am
    Next week I’m travelling again. This time on a search for garden antiques and vintage in the markets in Paris and parts of Belgium. I am continuing on to Rome for a few days of play after that. For the first time in many, many years, I won’t be taking my laptop with me.  I’ve traded the bulk and weight for my camera stuff and a tablet, so please follow my Instagram account for what I see and off the cuff inspiration. I’ve also been waiting a while to post about a visit to Vizcaya when I was in Miami in November so here it is.  I was enchanted.  For a landscape…
 
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    Native Plants and Wildlife Gardens

  • Flowers Of The Field and Rights-Of-Way

    Kevin Songer
    28 Mar 2015 | 3:02 am
    Last month we began a short series of posts examining complexity and importance of small, roadside and common field wildflowers. Most of my wildflower sightings occur along the pedestrian corridor between the house we live in here in Palm Coast, Florida and our neighborhood grocery store, Publix or our local post office. Of course I still miss […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Like Monarch Butterflies, Some Bees are Plant Specialists

    Heather Holm
    24 Mar 2015 | 6:10 am
    Someone asked me recently about creating a butterfly garden and what plants they should include. This person was looking for a list of larval host plants (caterpillar food) so they could include these plants in their garden plans along with nectar plants. This is the right approach when designing a garden for butterflies, ensuring that you are […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Invitations: Sharing Nature With Our Children

    Suzanne Dingwell
    22 Mar 2015 | 10:48 pm
    “Invitations: Changing as Teachers and Learners” was the title of a book I once read in pursuit of a Masters in Early Childhood Education. In this age of Anthropocene all who have influence in the lives of children have their own obligation to provide invitations – invitations to get outside and discover the beauty, the […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Brittlebush for the Landscape

    Jacqueline Soule
    20 Mar 2015 | 4:18 am
    Brittlebush (Encelia farinosa) is one of the most common and conspicuous wildflowers in the Sonoran Desert; seasonally providing a golden yellow cloak for the desert floor. Up close, the wood is brittle, hence the name. I have written about brittlebush before, and no doubt I will again since it is such a charming native plant. […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Milkweed and Monarch Concerns – 2015

    Pat Sutton
    18 Mar 2015 | 1:42 pm
    The final fall generation of Monarchs empties out of southern Canada and the United States east of the Rockies and migrates to the mountains of Mexico. This overwintering population is estimated each December. December 2014’s estimate was 57 million Monarchs in Mexico’s mountain top roost sites. Sounds like a lot of Monarchs, doesn’t it? But […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
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    Big Blog Of Gardening

  • Grow Bigger, Better Carrots: Soil Prep, Planting & Harvesting

    Todd Heft
    16 Mar 2015 | 7:09 am
    Big Blog Of Gardening The key to growing carrots succesfully in your garden is in the soil preparation, especially if you live in areas with rocky or clay soil. Continue reading → Grow Bigger, Better Carrots: Soil Prep, Planting & Harvesting
  • 10 Of The World’s Weirdest Flowers

    Guest Author
    9 Mar 2015 | 10:33 am
    Big Blog Of Gardening From the Monkey Face Orchid to the Corpse Lily, here are ten of the weirdest flowers in the world. Continue reading → 10 Of The World’s Weirdest Flowers
  • Birds: A Gardener’s Best Pest Control

    Todd Heft
    8 Feb 2015 | 2:36 pm
    Big Blog Of Gardening As we've moved away from our agrarian roots, we seem to have lost sight of the fact that birds are helpers, not pests, for gardeners. Continue reading → Birds: A Gardener’s Best Pest Control
  • Garden Design: Incorporating a pond into your landscape

    Guest Author
    2 Feb 2015 | 6:32 am
    Big Blog Of Gardening With some careful planning you can easily incorporate a pond into your outdoor space, no matter how small or large your landscape. Continue reading → Garden Design: Incorporating a pond into your landscape
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    The Pond Blog

  • Save up to $100 off of Aquascape products today at Loch Ness Water Gardens!

    Bill Dubert
    26 Mar 2015 | 2:56 pm
    Need a new pump? A new pond vacuum? Stocking up on water treatment supplies? Now’s the time with one of the best deals you’ll see all year. From now until May 31, 2015, Aquascape is offering a fantastic mail-in rebate worth up to $50 off of their products. Now, that’s a great deal, but it gets better: Combine it with our Spring Savings coupon deal, also worth up to $50 off exclusively at Loch Ness Water Gardens, and you can save up to $100 off of a purchase of any combination of Aquascape products! Here are the details: From March 15th – May 31, 2015, Aquascape is…
  • Tips for your Spring Pond To-Do List

    Bill Dubert
    20 Mar 2015 | 1:41 pm
    Well, Spring is officially here after what has been, for much of the US, a particularly nasty winter. That means that it’s time to pull off the cover net, clean up around the pond, squirt various liquids into your water, etc. You know the drill. Here are a few quick tips to make things go more smoothly this year. Make an actual to-do list This is one of those tips that took me a long time to figure out, but has since been absolutely invaluable. Sitting down with a pen and pad to make out a physical list that you can check off is incredibly useful for a few reasons. First of all,…
  • 5 Things You Need to be Ready for Spring

    Bill Dubert
    24 Feb 2015 | 8:28 pm
    Spring is coming at us fast, and I can’t wait for it to get here (and not only because my kayak paddle is in the corner, mocking me). One thing that I’m NOT looking forward to, though, is the inevitable scramble to get those last-minute items that I forgot to have ready ahead of time, before the pond warms up. Since I was already making a list for myself, I figured that I’d point out a few items for my readers that will be necessary sooner than you think, all of which I’ve forgotten at some point in the past. 1. Pond Vacuum I’ve talked before about the importance…
  • Why the Lotus Flower is So Important

    Bill Dubert
    23 Jan 2015 | 9:23 pm
    “Padma” is the Sanskrit word for the Lotus plant, which is also called the Sacred Lotus or Indian Lotus. The Lotus Temple in Delhi is the Mother Temple of the Bahá’í faith in India and draws as many as 150,000 visitors in a day. Image copyright Jeremy Vandel. The lotus flower, Nelumbo nucifera, occupies a huge space in the minds of many pond owners and designers. Deciding whether or not to include a lotus among a pond’s flowers can be a big decision when choosing pond plants and even layouts. Many water gardeners consider their lotus flowers the pride of their pond,…
  • Where do Bullfrogs Go in Winter?

    Bill Dubert
    18 Sep 2014 | 6:36 pm
    The American Bullfrog and his various amphibious friends are some of the great unexpected pleasures of pond ownership. The question many pond owners find themselves wondering, though, is where they go in winter, and how they survive the freezing cold. Frogs are true cold-blooded animals, unable to internally unable to regulate their body temperature. Generally, when they’re cold they seek out sunlight, and when they’re hot they seek out shade or water. But what do they do in winter, when it’s far too cold for the sun to keep their temperature up, even below freezing? Well,…
 
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    Nigel Gnome grows a vegetable

  • Mad March

    Nigel Gnome
    15 Mar 2015 | 10:28 pm
    Cyclone Pam is supposed to be thrashing us at the moment, but luckily so far there has only been a bit of rain and some huge swell at the Heads. Hopefully that will be it. I did take down the back yard shade sails in case they were going to be blown away. Pruned all the young inward growing plum branches to keep the tree open. New zucchini seedlings are growing well and all the seeds planted recently have come up. The limes look good.Lovely limesPulled the last of the carrots to make way for winter plantings, not a bad lotHup Holland Took a panorama from the roof as I was up there getting the…
  • Garden reconfigure

    Nigel Gnome
    8 Mar 2015 | 10:32 pm
    March is upon us and the changes in the light direction and the shortening of days is becoming apparent. The sun is nice to sit in at the end of the day as it slants through the back garden. Quite different this year as the large titoki tree that graced the font garden has now gone, it blocked a lot of the late evening light. Lots of seed planting for the coming season, beetroot, tender stems broccoli, parsley, a couple more zucchini, more rocket and fennel, and lots of corianderThe vege garden path as been rethought, made wider and also made more potential growing space, a win all…
  • The end of the road for three tomato plants

    Nigel Gnome
    5 Feb 2015 | 6:35 pm
    Waitangi Day! Lovely having a Friday off. :)The tomato plants began looking sickly and quickly went yellow. I suspected it may have been from spraying with Neem oil but that may be coincidental. All the plants got blight but we did get quite a few tomatoes in the end. The Romas were probably the best. I have pulled them all out and harvested as many of the tomatoes that will still ripen.Final harvest of the romas and the sweet 100's I planted the sweet 100 on September 22 last year, so they have been going for four months. There is still a small tub tomato doing well and a lateral baby…
  • The end of the road for Mr Chilli

    Nigel Gnome
    26 Jan 2015 | 10:56 pm
    Gone, but not forgotten, a small pile of peppers survive to heat up another day. The garden looks much better without the sad thing the plant had become.Rescued chilliesThe plums are looking lovely with their soft grey bloomFortune plums ready to drop
  • Endless summer

    Nigel Gnome
    25 Jan 2015 | 11:23 pm
    The weather has been perfect for what seems like weeks. Keeping things watered is a bit of a mission especially when feeling guilty about the water usage, it's expensive!Disaster on the larger chilli plant, it just started to wilt, I watered it and then watered it some more.It wilted even more, they can be susceptible to overwatering. :( There is a waterfall of sweet 100 tomatoes and a good supply of nice heavy roma toms, they will be made into sauce any day.cascade of sweet 100 tomatoesQuick pickplums are happening, now they are manyFirst zucchini, one plant makes very pale ones
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    Flowerona

  • Flowerona Reflects Video : 28/03/15

    Rona
    27 Mar 2015 | 5:01 pm
    This week’s Flowerona Reflects video features footage of our Branding for Florists workshop, which took place in London on Wednesday. I hope you enjoy watching the video and don’t forget, if you’d like to subscribe to my YouTube channel, please click here and then click on Subscribe. I hope you have a lovely Saturday and I’ll see you tomorrow with Flowerona Links! P.S. If you receive this blog post via email and would like to view the video, simply go to www.flowerona.com
  • Florist Friday : Interview with Sarah Richardson of Leafy Couture

    Rona
    26 Mar 2015 | 5:01 pm
    What an incredible week it’s been! On Wednesday, we held our very first Branding for Florists workshop and we were blown away by the wonderful feedback from the delegates! Thank you so much to everyone who attended. I’ll be featuring footage in my Flowerona Reflects video on Saturday and photos shortly. Back to today, Florist Friday, and I’m delighted to feature an interview with Sarah Richardson of Leafy Couture. Could you tell us what prompted you to become a florist? I was looking for a creative outlet after studying Sociology at Newcastle University. I grew up in a very…
  • Wedding Wednesday : On Trend – Oversized Bridal Bouquets

    Rona
    24 Mar 2015 | 5:01 pm
    For brides-to-be looking for a real WOW factor for their big day, oversized bouquets are a sure way to impress! It’s a trend that started in the States and it’s been hitting British shores. So, today, I thought I’d share a few of my favourite designs with you… Sometimes referred to as statement bouquets, the sheer abundance of overflowing flowers and foliage creates such visual impact! There’s usually no symmetry to the placement of the stems. And one of the key things which really stands out for me is that instead of the traditional round shape of some bridal…
  • Flowerona Links : With dahlias, tents & a yacht club…

    Rona
    21 Mar 2015 | 5:01 pm
    I hope you’re having a lovely weekend. Here’s this week’s round-up of floral inspiration… General Beautiful floral images in this blog post by Tinge Buying flowers at New Covent Garden Flower Market via Liberty London Girl The secrets of flower arranging – tips from McQueens The Farmer & the Florist Interview – Fiveforks Farm via Floret Dahlia Grow Along : Part 2 via Green & Gorgeous Weddings Spring pastel wedding inspiration Intimate tent wedding with white & green florals Elegant Santa Barbara gold-infused wedding Ethereal wedding with…
  • Flowerona Reflects Video : 21/03/15

    Rona
    20 Mar 2015 | 5:01 pm
    This week’s Flowerona Reflects video features footage of florist Wild at Heart’s concession at Liberty and an incredible floral installation by Rebecca Louise Law. I hope you enjoy watching the video and don’t forget, if you’d like to subscribe to my YouTube channel, please click here and then click on Subscribe. I hope you have a lovely Saturday and I’ll see you tomorrow with Flowerona Links! P.S. Don’t forget, if you receive this blog post via email and would like to view the video, simply go to www.flowerona.com.
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    Your Easy Garden

  • Spring Into the Garden

    Phillip Townshend
    25 Mar 2015 | 11:05 am
    It is days like this that I recognize and really appreciate the benefits of my work which has me travelling between 2 of my favorite seasons – Spring and Autumn – enjoying  the best that a garden can offer. Whilst in the northern hemisphere spring is only just starting, some regions and warmer climes like Florida are already enjoying beautiful weather and beginning to see their gardens at their best.  Here in the southern hemisphere we are enjoying a very pleasant start to Autumn. Even in Australia you’ll find a wonderful array of autumn colors.   Brilliant Autumn garden…
  • Springtime Garden Quotes

    judieyeg
    15 Mar 2015 | 1:01 pm
    Here are more of our favorite garden quotes – just in time for spring (at least in some parts of the world!) Enjoy!           If you have a favorite gardening or nature quote or saying, we’d love to hear it.  Please send it along by “leaving a reply” below!    
  • Eco Garden Trends from Europe

    Phillip Townshend
    9 Mar 2015 | 1:17 pm
    Drought tolerant gardens don’t have to be boring! What’s hot in gardening?   Well, here’s my annual report on what I saw at IPM Essen (the World’s largest horticultural trade show) and what the key trends influencing the industry are this year. Horticulture has always considered itself to be “the green industry” but this year, more than ever, the major trend at the show was all about Eco gardening and Eco-friendly products. It was all about looking after the environment and minimising our impact. Traditionally, anything to do with Eco gardening has usually been dominated by…
  • Gardening with Kids: Starting Seeds in Toilet Paper Rolls

    Guest Bloggers
    3 Mar 2015 | 12:26 pm
    Starting seeds is inexpensive, easy, and good for the earth when you use a resource you already have and it’s a great way to get kids involved in gardening! Give those toilet paper and paper towel rolls a new life as an eco-friendly seed starter. Start envisioning the blooms, fruits, herbs, and vegetables that will nourish your body and soul this spring! It’s a great idea to start your plants from seed, you can save some big bucks and get a head start on the growing season. It also gives you much more flexibility with the types of plants you can grow. You aren’t limited by what the…
  • Easy Homemade Body Butter

    Guest Bloggers
    19 Feb 2015 | 12:57 pm
    All natural body butter or lotion is easy to make and great for both children and adults! I don’t know about you, but up here in Vermont we are in the midst of a real New England winter. For my family, that means dealing with very dry skin, of course our pellet stove doesn’t help the situation. My latest experiment has been to create the most luxurious, super-soothing, all natural body butter.  As testers, my three young children have been of late lubed up with various mixtures of coconut oil and shea butter, but I’ll save you this trouble and share with you the very best one we’ve…
 
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    The Mini Garden Guru - Your Miniature Garden Source

  • 16 Ways to Enjoy America’s Favorite Miniature Garden Center

    Janit Calvo
    27 Mar 2015 | 9:56 am
    16 Ways to Enjoy America’s Favorite Miniature Garden Center As the milestones click by more quickly nowadays, I need to stop and appreciate all the different things we have been doing to share and spread the joy of miniature gardening. Like a big tree with deep roots and multiple branches, Two Green Thumbs Miniature Garden […]
  • Robert’s Truly Magical Indoor Miniature Water Gardens

    Janit Calvo
    20 Mar 2015 | 2:03 pm
    Robert’s Truly Magical Indoor Miniature Gardens A funny thing happened the other day at the Philadelphia Flower Show. A fellow miniature gardener from the Miniature Settings Exhibit told me about this booth in the show with huge wall displays that were filled with a miniature gardens, complete with a working waterfall and creek. She was […]
  • Miniature Gardening for the Fairies with Plow & Hearth

    Janit Calvo
    12 Mar 2015 | 1:25 pm
    Miniature Gardening for the Fairies with Plow & Hearth While in Philadelphia last week, I just had to give our friends from Plow & Hearth a call to see what is new and fresh this season for their miniature fairy gardening. I got more than I bargained for – I was asked to create another […]
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    Organic Gardening Tips - Smiling Gardener

  • My one regret in life is that I am not someone else*

    6 Mar 2015 | 9:58 pm
    *A quote by Woody Allen To start off, a question - where are you gardening? {loadposition pollwhere}
  • It's Winter...

    27 Feb 2015 | 9:58 pm
    Click for video transcription Hey, it’s Phil from SmilingGardener.om. I apologize in advance for the wind noise - I don’t have a wireless mic on today so i just have to use the camera mic. I haven’t been making any videos this time of year because this is what my garden looks like under two feet of snow right now, but I wanted to share a couple of things with you today. First is if you follow me on facebook and especially on youtube, you’re not really seeing anything from me this time of year, but if you come over to SmilingGardener.com, I am still writing an article every Saturday.
  • Starting Plants From Seeds - A Few Tips To Ensure Success

    20 Feb 2015 | 9:58 pm
    Click for video transcription Phil: Welcome to my bedroom. If you haven't picked up my free online organic gardening course you can do that right on the home page of Smilinggardener.com. Today we're talking about starting plants from seeds. I like going right into something like this that has the trays and then you can grow the plants individually and then you pull them right out of here and put them into the garden. So this has holes in it for drainage, then I can plop it into this guy which doesn't have holes in it, and that can capture the water - so that's how that works! In terms of what…
  • How To Get Rid Of Moles And Voles

    14 Feb 2015 | 3:00 am
    A mole. So, you want to know how to get rid of moles and voles? First of all, moles are great! They plow the soil and eat insects such as grubs. Of course, they do leave behind some tunnels. And while they don’t eat your plants, they can disturb them. We may not mind a few tunnels, but when it gets to be too many, it can leave an unsightly mess of molehills, uneven soil and brown ridges in the lawn.
  • You Are Going To Fail

    30 Jan 2015 | 9:58 pm
    A photo from an Academy member of a tomato hornworm (explained below). You are going to fail this year... Hornworms will eat your tomatoes. A loved one will get sick. The bindweed you thought was finally under control will spring up again. Someone will make you feel bad about yourself just for being who you are. But…
 
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    The Hortiholic

  • Timely Tips for Spring Garden Cleanup

    Tony Fulmer
    24 Mar 2015 | 2:43 pm
    Are you itching to get out and start playing in your garden? Me too. It's time to: prune, mulch, stake and most important - plant! Here are a few things to consider as you head out in Slogger-shod feet and West County Rose gloved-hands armed with Felco pruners. Snow Mold1. Lawns - Check turf for this winter's gift - snow mold! You can't miss it (see picture). Symptoms look worse than their long term effect. Snow mold will disappear with fertilization and light raking once the ground warms and dries a bit more. Don't rake in deep shade where shallow-rooted fescues reside. You may pull them up…
  • Off to the Amaryllis Races

    Tony Fulmer
    23 Dec 2014 | 1:03 pm
    'Elvas'It's really easy to understand why amaryllis are so wildly popular. They grow quickly once awakened from dormancy, have flowers that are the epitome of spectacular, are practically maintenance-free (can be grown in water or soil) and are just plain fun to watch! I heard people are even having amaryllis races - they all pot them the same day, then keep track of whose grows fastest, tallest, or has the most flowers. But they're so-oo-o-o easy even a tot could grow them.Big bulbs!My first memory of amaryllis was shopping with Mom at the florist for an azalea. I saw a box on the counter…
  • A Year in the Life of a Fraser Fir

    Tony Fulmer
    25 Nov 2014 | 5:43 pm
    I was fortunate recently to have the opportunity to chat with a new friend, Fletcher, the Fraser fir. We talked long distance. He shared highlights of life on the Christmas tree farm before coming to Chalet. There's a lot happening down on the farm!Where I grew up in VirginiaWhere do you come from, Fletcher?Thanks for asking, Tony. My great-grandparents originally came from Mt. Rogers, the highest point in Virginia. I've kinda lost track, but I'm at least the 8th generation of Fraser fir coming from those cool mountains. I started out as a tiny seed from the cone of my parent tree. Did you…
  • The Garden Clock is Ticking....

    Tony Fulmer
    18 Oct 2014 | 11:50 am
    "The days dwindle down to a precious few" is so true for the October garden. As temperatures drop and you face the reality of rain becoming snow, the urgency to complete fall garden tasks becomes almost manic.You've probably already made the decision whether to cut your perennials now or let them stand as snowy winter sentinels. You've ripped the tired annuals out by their fuzzy little roots. What else could there possibly be to do? Want a few reminders?1) Don't let fall pass without planting bulbs. The soil temps are finally cool enough to put all the spring flowering beauties in. Who said,…
  • Conifers are the Cure

    Tony Fulmer
    30 Sep 2014 | 2:25 pm
    Does our Zone 5 plant palette ever seem limiting to you? Do you yearn for just one specimen plant that no one else in northern Illinois has? Do you ever look at your garden and think, "If I could just get a plant with year 'round interest for that spot I'd be so much happier with my garden?" I know I'm always thinking what would be hot in this or that spot. Do we need a support group for those of us looking for plants off the beaten path?If it existed I would suggest "Conifers are the Cure". For those that haven't been smitten or bitten yet, but want more landscape interest the world of…
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    Chicken Waterer

  • Probiotics For Chickens: What They Do & When To Use Them

    ChickenWaterer
    15 Mar 2015 | 7:36 am
    What Are Probiotics Probiotics are foods or dietary supplements that contain live bacteria. They are given to animals (and people too) in order to add to, or replace, the bacteria that exists in the animals gastrointestinal tract.  Probiotics are said to provide health benefits but these benefits are generally not well explained or understood.So Whats Going On in the GutAnimal gastrointestinal tracts are populated by hundreds of different species of bacteria in mind-boggling numbers (There are billions and billions of bacteria in any animals gut). A chickens gut harbors…
  • Chick Starter & Grower Feeds Compared

    ChickenWaterer
    11 Mar 2015 | 4:47 pm
    We put this chart together for backyard chicken owners who are interested in comparing various chick feeds.Below are tables that compare some of the larger brands.  We've also included the manufacturer's descriptions to provide additional insight regarding the benefits of their feed.Feed ComparisonManufacturers Product DescriptionsA Place To Put Your FeedThe New BriteTap Chick Feeder keeps chicks feed clean and then converts into an outdoor feeder for scratch, grit and oyster shells.  BriteTap chicken waterer. Clean water made simple! Visit us at ChickenWaterer.com.
  • Cochin Chicken: The Amazing Backstory of the Chicken That Changed The World

    ChickenWaterer
    8 Mar 2015 | 7:14 am
     The Cochin chicken changed the world. Its history is the juiciest and most interesting of any breed we've ever profiled. Technically classified as a "meat" bird, the modern Cochin is generally kept primarily as a pet because of its beautiful plumage, feathered feet and docile nature.  While not of commercial importance today, the Cochin is of incredible importance in the development of both commercial and backyard chicken keeping. What follows is the back story behind the bird.White CochinMutiny on the ChickenThe first Cochin was brought to England in 1842 by Captain Edward…
  • Classic Eggs Benedict Recipe

    ChickenWaterer
    22 Feb 2015 | 11:29 am
    According to one account, eggs Benedict were first created in 1942 by Lumuel Benedict, a retired Wall Street broker, looking for a cure for his hangover. Whatever the origin, eggs Benedict are our favorite breakfast egg dish and a real luxury.Cooking eggs Benedict is not difficult but there are lots of steps.  It's probably a recipe you'll want to keep for the weekend when there's a little more time to prep breakfast.Ingredients:8 Eggs4 English Muffins1 tablespoon vinegar8 slices Canadian Bacon (You can substitute sliced ham or even regular bacon if you can't get Canadian bacon)2…
  • Love Chickens Valentines Day Sweepstakes

    ChickenWaterer
    14 Feb 2015 | 7:02 am
    To celebrate Valentines Day Weekend, we're giving away "I Love Chickens" button to 10 lucky winners.Just Create A TweetTo participate, create a tweet with the following elements: A reason why you love chickensInclude the hashtag #LoveChickens Include the link to this web page (http://goo.gl/Ft7zgC) where we will post a list of entires during the course of the sweepstakes.Here's a Sample Of A Qualifying Tweet:I love chickens because they make me laugh. #LoveChickens http://goo.gl/Ft7zgCSweepstakes RulesYou can enter as many times as you like.  Contest begins Saturday…
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    Balcony in Berlin

  • springwatch

    sophos
    15 Mar 2015 | 10:03 am
    Some veery skinny iris there, and a rosemary that may or may not have survived winter. The cat has his vantage point back, overlooking the street corner. The bargain bin tulips are taking their time, but I love the grey-green of the leaves and the squeaky noise they make. My old friend Mr Clematis and his new shoots. Hellebores still provide the only pop of colour. More bargain bin bulbs – mini daffs and tulips of unknown denomination. This is the first time I’ve kept a lavender alive over winter.  True, the weather was mild, but I think maybe I just didn’t water the other…
  • topsy-turvy tulips

    sophos
    9 Feb 2015 | 11:47 am
    I put a vase of tulips out on the balcony to cool off and make them last a bit longer – but I forgot them overnight and it was -5° Frozen solid.
  • winter update

    sophos
    8 Feb 2015 | 2:11 am
    Like last year, the winter has been rather gentle. A light layer of snow now and then, but none of those Russian weather fronts I’ve grown accustomed to here. And like last year, it was February before we had several consecutive days of frost. With hindsight, then, my pelargoniums would probably have been ok in a hibernation station on the balcony, but they’re spending winter in the stairwell, by no means dormant, practically basking in light and temperatures between 8 and 15°C.Out in the cold, there are signs of life from some of the bulbs, but I’ve forgotten what I planted…
  • hellebore hero

    sophos
    8 Feb 2015 | 2:01 am
    An unpublished post from December: Just inside the entrance of my local, underground, supermarket, there are potted plants for sale in various degrees of distress. Wilting from lack of water and light, and this time of year sometimes sprayed with glitter or gold paint for that festive look… Every once in a while I get the urge to save one of them and give it a good home (though admittedly that doesn’t always work). My latest protg is this ivory christmas rose (Helleborus niger). I hastily repotted it in what I had at home: a mix of cactus soil, leaf mulch and a few nettle…
  • …and it’s gone

    sophos
    8 Nov 2014 | 8:39 am
    Summer, that is. I spent a lot of time on the balcony this year, but forgot to post. Of course, like everything else, it’s about the journey; the blog is a way to pass the time when growth is slow and anticipation high. For now, a look back: The blue and orange colour scheme worked ok, but truth be told I missed the pink and red. In August, they had already crept back onto the balcony… It only takes a couple of trips away for the vegetation to get a bit out of control and unquenchably thirsty, but despite some neglect the chilis and tomatoes did well. Late summer sunset When the…
 
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    Urban Gardens

  • Mobile Garden “Thrones” Reign in Paris

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    27 Mar 2015 | 1:24 pm
    Perched atop rolling mobile gardens adorned with plants, insect hotels, branches, shells and more, a group of spirited young women and girls–Princesses of the Earth and Climate–paraded recently down Paris’s rue du Chemin Vert (which happens to translate to … Read More...The post Mobile Garden “Thrones” Reign in Paris appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Spotted at Ambiente: The Rise of Balloon-Inspired Designs

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    14 Mar 2015 | 1:28 pm
    Art in the City’s 16 inch balloon dog figurines. On my recent trip to the Ambiente design fair, I spotted some balloon-inspired designs–furniture and objects which brought back fond memories of those iconic balloon sculptures of my childhood. Looks like the range of these products is expanding in … Read More...The post Spotted at Ambiente: The Rise of Balloon-Inspired Designs appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Glam Up the Garden: Fashion-Forward Garden Hoses

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    5 Mar 2015 | 9:49 pm
    Never before have garden hoses been this glamorous.  Swedish company, Garden Glory, brings high style into the garden with their colorful fashion-forward garden hoses that hang out on whimsical antler-shaped wall mounts. Put them in your garden and you’ll soon be asking, “do these hoses make my … Read More...The post Glam Up the Garden: Fashion-Forward Garden Hoses appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Going Whole Log at Ambiente 2015 in Frankfurt

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    2 Mar 2015 | 10:55 pm
    Distilling down the top trends and themes from an international design fair the size of 60 football fields (that’s 1300 tennis courts) is not a simple endeavor. Nonetheless, as I trekked in Frankfurt mid-February through the massive designfest otherwise known as Ambiente,… Read More...The post Going Whole Log at Ambiente 2015 in Frankfurt appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Fiskars Announces Project Orange Thumb Community Garden Grant Recipients

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    2 Mar 2015 | 3:17 pm
    Now in its 13th year, Fiskars Project Orange Thumbawards cash and garden tools to community groups across North America and Canada. I was honored to accept their invitation to be on their editorial board where I helped … Read More...The post Fiskars Announces Project Orange Thumb Community Garden Grant Recipients appeared first on Urban Gardens.
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    Epic Gardening | RSS Feed

  • How to Build a Garden Pond

    Kevin
    27 Mar 2015 | 9:22 pm
    The post How to Build a Garden Pond is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog. Getting a landscape gardener to build your free-form pond can be expensive, so follow the steps below and get the satisfaction of doing it yourself. Choose Your Location Site your pond where it will get plenty of light, with some direct sunlight to help plants grow. Avoid placing it near deciduous trees, otherwise you’ll spend […] The post How to Build a Garden Pond is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best…
  • How to Grow Salad Greens

    Kevin
    27 Mar 2015 | 9:07 am
    The post How to Grow Salad Greens is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog. If you're used to eating boring iceberg lettuce salads that are covered in a flavorful dressing, fear not - there are plenty of more exciting and delicious salad greens to add to your garden!  Standard iceberg lettuce is great, but it's even easier in many cases to grow other salad greens that are more nutritious […] The post How to Grow Salad Greens is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban…
  • How To Grow Peas

    Kevin
    25 Mar 2015 | 9:28 am
    The post How To Grow Peas is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog. Peas are one of those vegetables that embody spring: the crispness balanced with a little bit of sweetness has made them a garden staple for many of us.Before agriculture was developed by humans, peas were a staple food that hunter-gatherer peoples would forage regularly.​Interestingly, the Romans believed that fresh peas were poisonous, so they dried […] The post How To Grow Peas is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the…
  • How To Grow Lettuce

    Kevin
    22 Mar 2015 | 10:55 am
    The post How To Grow Lettuce is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog. There's a reason that lettuce is one of the most popular plants to grow...Lettuce is so easy to grow, packed with nutrients, and absolutely delicious, so it's no surprise we all love to grow this versatile green.  It can be grown in almost any location in the garden - straight in the soil, on the […] The post How To Grow Lettuce is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening,…
  • How To Grow Spinach

    Kevin
    19 Mar 2015 | 9:57 am
    The post How To Grow Spinach is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog. ​Spinach is one of the best cool-weather crops that you can grow.It produces huge yields of nutritious, delicious green leaves that are a worldwide staple in salads and most dishes you can whip up in the kitchen.​Because it's a cool-weather crop, the long, hot days of summer will cause spinach to bolt (send up its […] The post How To Grow Spinach is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening,…
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    Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden

  • Butterflies LIVE! Returns on April 17

    Jonah Holland
    27 Mar 2015 | 4:31 am
    Learn More about Butterflies LIVE!  ….coming April 17 – Oct. 11, 2015.
  • Eye Candy: Cherry Blossoms are Starting to Pop!

    Jonah Holland
    26 Mar 2015 | 8:28 am
     by Jonah Holland,  Public Relations & Marketing Coordinator, Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Prunus campanulata ‘Okame,’ Lake Sydnor and the Conservatory. photo by Christine Watson We promised you we’d let you know when the Cherry Tree Walk was budding up and starting to bloom and it’s well on its way! As we mentioned earlier, it’s really a guess as to when the peak bloom time will be but some varieties (Prunus campanulata ‘Okame’ and Prunus mume ‘Kobai’ as you can see in the photos) have already started blooming! This weekend…
  • On Being Second

    Jonah Holland
    17 Mar 2015 | 5:18 am
    by Executive Director, Shane Tippett, Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden This time last year, Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden was fortunate to be included in a month-long, on-line “10 Best Public Garden” survey sponsored by USA Today and 10Best. Our friends and neighbors who participated in the polling checked in when it was all said and done, asking, “How did the Garden do?” “We finished second, thank you!” Then other questions came: “Who was first?” (First went to Longwood Gardens in Kennett Square, PA, a truly remarkable place, well worth a visit.) The next question: “How do we…
  • Cherry Blossoms Make Debut on New Cherry Tree Walk

    Jonah Holland
    12 Mar 2015 | 9:40 am
    Text and photos by Jonah Holland,  Public Relations & Marketing Coordinator, Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Have you ever been issued a “save the date” card without an actual date? Seems silly I suppose, but with our new Cherry Tree Walk blooming for the first time this year, we are gearing up for a very exciting spring. Trouble is, no one can predict exactly when they will bloom. Predicting the bloom time for Washington, D.C.’s National Cherry Blossom Festival around the Tidal Basin has become a focus “Bloom Watch,” set up by the National Park Service.
  • Narcissus ‘Rijnveld’s Early Sensation

    Jonah Holland
    11 Mar 2015 | 4:42 am
    by Jonah Holland,  Public Relations & Marketing Coordinator, Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Narcissus ‘Rijnveld’s Early Sensation’ Narcissus ‘Rijnveld’s Early Sensation’ is our first daffodil to bloom each year. It made it through last week’s ice and snow storm just fine. Spring starts in 9 days, not that we are counting!
 
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    The Horticult

  • Herbs, Not Ammo: How to Garden With Ammunition Cans

    Ryan Benoit
    25 Mar 2015 | 3:00 am
    It’s a powerful thing when an object so often associated with damage and destruction takes on a new, life-giving incarnation. (Emphasis on carnation.… ► The post Herbs, Not Ammo: How to Garden With Ammunition Cans appeared first on The Horticult.
  • Intense Inflorescence: Day Tripping at the 70th Annual Santa Barbara International Orchid Show

    Chantal Aida Gordon
    19 Mar 2015 | 3:00 am
    Sultry and complicated and scandalously expressive, the orchid has a way of bringing out bee-like behavior in even the most sensible of people.… ► The post Intense Inflorescence: Day Tripping at the 70th Annual Santa Barbara International Orchid Show appeared first on The Horticult.
  • Desert Flora and Beyond: 10 Tips for a Surreal Joshua Tree Experience

    Chantal Aida Gordon and Ryan Benoit
    13 Mar 2015 | 4:00 am
    For the weekend we headed east — traded our cushy garden sofa and aloe hammock for a campsite in Joshua Tree National Park.… ► The post Desert Flora and Beyond: 10 Tips for a Surreal Joshua Tree Experience appeared first on The Horticult.
  • All in the Family: How and Why to Start Planting Heirloom Seeds This Spring

    Christine Dionese
    5 Mar 2015 | 3:00 am
    In the cycle of challenge/triumph/better-luck-next-time that is gardening, planting seeds has always thrown us for a loop. How can one humble kernel contain so many expectations?… ► The post All in the Family: How and Why to Start Planting Heirloom Seeds This Spring appeared first on The Horticult.
  • Bromeliads in the Bronx: A Visit to the New York Botanical Garden

    Chantal Aida Gordon
    26 Feb 2015 | 3:00 am
    Set on 250 acres and home to one million living plants, the New York Botanical Garden is one of our Happy Places even (especially!) during the winter.… ► The post Bromeliads in the Bronx: A Visit to the New York Botanical Garden appeared first on The Horticult.
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    Easily Grown Garden

  • When to Plant Vegetables

    Kiesha Easley
    22 Mar 2015 | 8:00 am
    I understand that people from all over the world might be reading this blog and because of this, there’s always a chance that there is some confusion about when to plant vegetables.  While I might be starting seeds for cool weather crops in late December or early January – that would be absurd for someone […]The post When to Plant Vegetables appeared first on Easily Grown Garden.
  • How to Start a Garden Step by Step

    Kiesha Easley
    15 Feb 2015 | 9:00 pm
    It doesn’t matter if you’re a beginner, if you want to know how to start a garden, this post will help you do it, step by step. The idea of planting a vegetable garden can be exciting.  Most people dash off to the nearest garden center, load their carts up with plants, soil and a few […]The post How to Start a Garden Step by Step appeared first on Easily Grown Garden.
  • Gardening tips: You DON’T need a GREEN thumb

    Kiesha Easley
    12 Feb 2015 | 1:00 pm
    You don’t need a green thumb when you’ve got the basic gardening tips down.  Anyone can learn to garden. Over the years I’ve learned that you don’t have to know everything about gardening to have a fruitful season. It’s more about your level of commitment than about your knowledge.  If you can commit to the […]The post Gardening tips: You DON’T need a GREEN thumb appeared first on Easily Grown Garden.
  • 5 Benefits of Beekeeping

    Kiesha Easley
    7 Feb 2015 | 8:00 pm
    There are a lot more benefits of beekeeping than harvesting affordable, local, delicious honey (although I must say, that is the sweetest benefit of all).  In these high-tech times, people rarely think about keeping honeybees.  Most people think, why  keep bees when you can go buy a bottle of honey from the grocery store, with less hassle? If you […]The post 5 Benefits of Beekeeping appeared first on Easily Grown Garden.
  • Free Bee Removal in Columbia, SC – Don’t Kill those Honeybees!

    Kiesha Easley
    31 Jan 2015 | 8:00 pm
    Swarm season is just around the corner.  Spotting a swarm of bees in your yard can be scary! The first response for most people: Freak out! The second response: Grab some bug spray or call an exterminator.  I’d like to offer another option: Stay calm and call for a free bee removal. Free Bee Removal […]The post Free Bee Removal in Columbia, SC – Don’t Kill those Honeybees! appeared first on Easily Grown Garden.
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    Grow Up Hydrogarden

  • The Road to Sustainable Living

    Amanda Kuhn
    25 Mar 2015 | 2:44 pm
    Recent studies show that children who are taught the proper education behind growing your own produce are more likely to increase their intake of fruits and vegetables. Food education is considered the entry point for learning because by growing your own food you are creating life. Urban cities are taking note of this trend and are now deciding to incorporate teachings within their curriculum thatRead More
  • Rumor Has It

    Amanda Kuhn
    18 Mar 2015 | 8:34 am
    Many novice growers share the common misconceptions when it comes to hydrogardening. That it is a simple do it yourself process and requires little to no time. When in reality, hydrogardening requires the same amount of tender love and care that a regular grow system would require. However, hydroponic gardening takes up no room and with a Grow Up system you can utilize space bothRead More
  • Laws of Attraction

    Amanda Kuhn
    11 Mar 2015 | 11:55 am
    The Farm-To-Table Restaurant Movement & How it’s Bringing in Customers from Various Areas. About almost every new wave, upscale restaurant you check into now a days promotes the fact that they support local farms and use ingredients that are considered “farm-to-table”. Now what exactly is this you ask? Farm-to-table is the coined term to better describe a restaurants use of locally sourced food and products.Read More
  • Lions? Tigers? Bears or Hydroponics?

    Amanda Kuhn
    4 Mar 2015 | 8:19 am
    Growing your own food doesn’t seem to be an exclusive trend with humans, but with animals too. Many zoo’s located across the nation in major cities (Bronx, St. Louis, Phoenix, Chicago etc) are starting to invest in their time and space into turning areas of the parks into hydroponic food chambers. They do this through vertical gardening which allows them to utilize more space andRead More
  • The Veggie Haters Guide to Loving the Veg Life

    Amanda Kuhn
    25 Feb 2015 | 1:00 am
    We have all experienced dinners where they end abruptly because of a temper tantrum over eating your vegetables. How many times have you said (or heard), “You can’t leave the table until you finish your veggies”? Hiding your veggies in your milk can only last for so long. Most of us grow out of our picky eating habits once we leave our adolescence but whatRead More
 
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    Made with love and garlic

  • The leaning tower of seeds(a)

    Catherine: Made with love and garlic
    21 Mar 2015 | 6:34 am
    My tiny front garden has always been a problem, not least because it's been paved over and used as a driveway. Parking in London is a problem, and so having our own driveway does make life much easier. I've planted bulbs and wildflowers in large troughs lining the driveway and finally moved the birdfeeder from the back garden to the front. I'd much rather have it in the back garden but now that it's been cat-proofed so that the cats are stuck in there, I didn't think it'd be fair to lure the birds in to be pounced on. So I've left it in the front garden and I'll just have to cross my fingers…
  • Maintaining bush plants in pots (or, a recipe for happy gooseberries)

    Catherine: Made with love and garlic
    20 Mar 2015 | 6:55 am
    I have a certain fondness for gooseberries, something that I think is shown by the fact that I've squeezed five bushes (two green hinnomakis, two red hinnomakis and a trusty old invicta) into my tiny space. They're marvelous things, gooseberries, useful for everything from a liquor to liven up fizz through to pies. They're one of those fruits that I think are a brilliant idea to grow in small spaces because they're hardy but also grow an expensive crop so you're maximising what you save on fruit as well as enjoying tastier produce. I grow my gooseberries in containers because of the size of…
  • Enthusiasm for seeds must be genetic...

    Catherine: Made with love and garlic
    16 Mar 2015 | 1:58 pm
    I am a total geek when it comes to seeds. One of the highlights of my shopping year is when the seed catalogues come out and I can sit down in the evening with a glass of wine and a stack of them to pore over and covet. Once they actually arrive (cue much joyous "THE SEEDS HAVE ARRIVED" capering about the place), I get almost as much pleasure sorting the packets into my little seed box, which allows me to sort them by month sown. See? Geek. But I'm delighted to say that this kind of delight in seeds appears to be genetic! I was sorting my seeds near to GarlicBaby when he was playing on the…
  • The first seedlings have sprouted!

    Catherine: Made with love and garlic
    16 Mar 2015 | 1:10 am
    Last week I was in a rush to take the GarlicBaby to the local aquarium. I was putting the babyseat into the taxi when I turned my ankle on an uneven bit of pavement and broke my foot. Apparently I have a Lisfranc injury, which is pretty appallingly bad when you consider that it happened so quickly. I'm in a hard cast now (and slowly going out of my mind with boredom) so it was with enormous joy that I noticed that my first seedlings are sprouting in the greenhouse! Look at that! Tiny shoots of joy and happiness. I am taking great care of my tomato, pepper, aubergine and tomatillo futures.
  • Gift guide: Presents to delight urban gardeners

    Catherine: Made with love and garlic
    15 Mar 2015 | 10:39 am
    I have been perusing the internet a lot lately in pursuit of practical (read: boring) things. And so I thought that today, for a change, I'd share a little wishlist of fun presents that any gardener would enjoy. This has absolutely nothing to do with any birthdays that may, or may not be rapidly approaching. This gift guide is completely impartial. See? I'm completely straightfaced. The practical gift: You Grow Girl by Gayla Trail I'm such a fan of the You Grow Girl blog and I'd love to get my hands on a copy of Trail's book!The joke gift: Heart and star mould kitJust…
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    O'Connors Lawn Equipment

  • March Lawn And Garden Tips

    Verenice Torres
    1 Mar 2015 | 7:12 am
    Lawn Scalp Bermuda grass and catch clippings (never scalp fescue or rye!) Apply pre emergence to bermuda grass if not applied in February. Plant fescue and rye seed. Fertilize fescue and rye. Mow 2 ½ – 3” tall. Water weekly (est.) Treat for grubs.   Garden Plant shrubs, azaleas, pansies, cold –hearty vegetables (leafy and root crops) Prune climbing roses before growth starts. Prune azaleas before growth starts. Divide and replant summer and fall blooming perennials. Cut back liriope, pampass & ornament grasses. Remove tree wrap. The post March Lawn And Garden Tips appeared…
  • O’Connor’s is pleased to offer a military discount on 2015 residential zero turn riding products.

    Bridgett Davis
    27 Feb 2015 | 1:00 am
    In appreciation for the sacrifice and service of our military both past and present, O’Connor’s is pleased to offer a $100 military discount on all 2015 residential zero turn riding mowers. Just input the promo code “2015” at check out to receive $100 off your purchase of a 2015 Toro, Snapper or Simplicity residential zero turn rider.  The post O’Connor’s is pleased to offer a military discount on 2015 residential zero turn riding products. appeared first on O'Connors Lawn Equipment.
  • Free Cargo Carrier with purchase of any Toro SW series TimeCutter Zero Turn Mower

    Bridgett Davis
    19 Feb 2015 | 1:23 pm
    For a limited time… only at O’Connor’s Lawn and Garden get a Toro Cargo Carrier, ( A $200 Value) FREE with any purchase of a SW Series Timecutter Zero Turn Mower! That’s Right just BUY this..And GET this…. While supplies last. The post Free Cargo Carrier with purchase of any Toro SW series TimeCutter Zero Turn Mower appeared first on O'Connors Lawn Equipment.
  • February Lawn And Garden Tips

    Verenice Torres
    1 Feb 2015 | 7:03 am
    Lawn Water when dry. Mow fescue 3” tall. Fertilize fescue and rye. Spray weeds when 50F. Apply pre-emergence to Bermuda grass.   Garden Plant bare root trees. (Grape, Pecan, etc.) Prune summer flowering shrubs/vines: (Rose bushes to outward buds, Grape vines to 80%) Remove tallest 1/3 of canes from standard Nandinas. You can cut Nandinas low, they will sprout at roots. Trim groundcovers. Spray dormant oil The post February Lawn And Garden Tips appeared first on O'Connors Lawn Equipment.
  • January Lawn and Garden Tips

    Bridgett Davis
    29 Jan 2015 | 1:51 pm
    You may think there is not much to do in your garden right now, but with a little preparation and maintenance you can have a yard you can be proud of. Tips for January: Lawn Take equipment in for service. Water landscape when dry…especially before a freeze! Mow fescue 3″ tall. Spray weeds with glyphosate when temp is above 50F. Garden Prepare garden soil…(Till every two weeks) Spray horticultural oil for scale Prune shade trees, birch, elm, maples (Never top them!) Water when dry. Fertilize pansies The post January Lawn and Garden Tips appeared first on O'Connors Lawn…
 
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    Your Hub of Garden Creativity | Garden Buildings Direct Blog

  • Perfect Foundation For Your Shed

    Maria Karla Salinas
    27 Mar 2015 | 6:20 am
      Good Shed Foundation Qualifications The foundation will support the weight of the spread and will be evenly spread over the ground. It will prevent any type of moisture or seepage coming from the ground from entering the shed as well as protect the wood. There should be features that prevent vegetation or weeds growing underneath and around the shed. (For larger sheds) It should protect the shed against moving throughout its range, for sometimes soil will change in volume when exposed to moisture (Learn more about improving structure of wooden garden sheds). Price and Development…
  • Tips on Organizing your Garden Shed

    Maria Karla Salinas
    26 Mar 2015 | 5:55 am
    Garage organization may seem like a daunting task for most, but the truth is that it does not have to be difficult or expensive. In fact it can be a fun experience! Many people are frustrated when looking at their unorganized garage but it is very important you keep the space clean where all of your things are easy to find. There are many things you may do to keep your garage or storage space organized. The following are many DIY projects, tips and projects anyone can use to take care of your space. No more need to daunt the mundane task of organizing your garage! 1. Add Cabinets Cabinets…
  • Arranging a Backyard Path

    Maria Karla Salinas
    25 Mar 2015 | 6:38 am
    Appealing, economical and simple to build. A garden path upgrades any patio. Learning designs, constraints and establishment methods for rock, stone, block and pavers, alongside appealing edging alternatives. 1. Gravel Paths Gravel paths are very simple to construct. Gravel ways are the most convenient to fabricate. In spite of the fact that these ways look casual, a limestone fringe like this one truly dresses them up. Gravel is the simplest to handle yet still extravagant road material. It feels delicate underneath, yet it’s sufficiently strong to handle a stacked wheelbarrow. Also, in…
  • Regular Maintenance for Garden Sheds

    Maria Karla Salinas
    18 Mar 2015 | 10:16 pm
    Garden sheds are getting more mainstream as cutting edge living seems to request that we all have more stuff to store. Proper care of a garden shed bodes well as it can truly enhance its lifespan.   Work From the Ground Up The lifetime of a wooden garden shed depends principally on how waterproof it is and the state of the roof. The base is the spot to begin. On the off chance that you are putting another shed in, a solid base is the best for a long life. Verify that it is precisely the same measurements of the shed floor. In the event that it is too little, the shed floor will shade and…
  • Peaceful Garden Hideaway

    Maria Karla Salinas
    18 Mar 2015 | 2:55 am
    Do you always wish you could simply escape the house and far from the family, for a little time that is all your own; in a spot only where you can think of your own contemplations and have some peace and quiet, to be lost in your private world? In a place where you could make a space in your shed where you can sit back, unwind, and perhaps appreciate your most loved book. Wouldn’t that be the ideal hideaway? All things considered, it isn’t so much that hard to do. The first thing you need to do is choose that you need your hideaway to possess a corner of your shed or in the event…
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    A Garden for All

  • Exclamation Points!

    Kathy
    24 Mar 2015 | 6:00 am
    Skyrocket Juniper makes a Statement (photo credit: Kathy Diemer) There’s a lot of hub-bub amongst the literary hierarchy regarding the use, or contended misuse, of the exclamation point in a sentence. Use them after an interjection or an emphatic declaration. Use them as a tool to add punch to a statement.  But, use them sparingly, lest you be strung up for your grammatical faux pas!  Although the use of exclamation points dates back to the 15th century, we didn’t see them on our keyboards until the 1970’s.  Perhaps only groovy hipsters (that’s us) truly…
  • Tropical Punch

    Kathy
    17 Mar 2015 | 6:00 am
    Yucca with snow (photo credit: Kathy Diemer) If, like me, you crave a touch of adventure in your garden, then yucca could be the plant for you.  For those of us in colder zones, we can’t grow many of the desert dwellers such as agaves or cactus.  But yucca is a different story.  Quite cold hardy, not only do they add a spiky, prickly character to an otherwise oval leafed garden, they look good all year long.  Yes, that’s right.  When other cold climate plants have gone below for the winter, yucca happily stands up to whatever mother nature can dish out. Yucca w/summer annuals…
  • Leave It To Beavers

    Kathy
    10 Mar 2015 | 6:00 am
    Neighborhood Beaver Lodge (photo credit: Kathy Diemer) Just footsteps from my door is a beaver dam surrounded by a beautiful wetland.  I walk by it almost every day, but as yet have been unable to spot the reclusive residents that live in One Beaver Place.  And that is part of the mystery of beaver lodges for me; all the excitement is taking place under the cover of mud and branches.  As a lover of all creatures, I’d like to think that this small wetland created by my flat tailed friends is a beneficial part of our neighborhood.  So, I decided to do some research and find out…
  • Essential Ice

    Kathy
    3 Mar 2015 | 6:00 am
    Frozen Lake Candlewood (photo by: Kathy Diemer) Right about now, most of us in the northern states are holding up a white flag in surrender to this seemingly never ending, bitterly cold winter.  But what you might find interesting is that not so long ago (into the early 1900’s) this frigid weather would have been considered a blessing, something to be very grateful for.  You see, many of us have forgotten as we reach into our Frigidaire to grab a few ice cubes, just how precious and essential ice was to our ancestors. Massachusetts 1850 ice harvest (image: wikipedia) When you consider…
  • Connecticut Flower & Garden Show 2015

    Kathy
    24 Feb 2015 | 6:00 am
    Sir Peacock greets everyone at the entryway (photo by: Kathy Diemer) There’s only one way to fight a seemingly endless winter; enlist some serious flower power! In my neck of the woods this entailed taking a much needed break from the snow and frigid temps to attend the 34th annual Connecticut Flower & Garden Show, just an hour away at the Connecticut Convention Center in Hartford. If you didn’t have a chance to visit, there are other flower shows across the east coast such as Vermont Flower Show from February 27 through March 1, the Boston Flower and Garden Show from March 11 through…
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    Tree Service Portland - Northwest Arbor-Culture » Blog

  • How to Build a Treehouse

    Jon Nash
    11 Mar 2015 | 1:18 pm
    Building a treehouse is a fun and time-consuming process—especially if you’ve never built one before. They come in all shapes and sizes, from small tree forts to giant luxury hideaways. In this post, I’ll show you how to build one type of simple backyard treehouse, but I’ll offer plenty of resources along the way for those of you with more ambitious plans. Source: M S No matter what kind of treehouse you want, safety is your first priority. If you’re not confident with your building skills or you want an elaborate design, consult a professional treehouse builder, such as Nelson…
  • 5 Tree Pruning Tools You Need

    Jon Nash
    16 Feb 2015 | 2:18 pm
                      Are branches blocking your windows or walkways? Are you tired of that overgrown tree dropping twigs all over the yard? Or is an old tree simply growing out of control? Residents of the Pacific Northwest are no strangers to tree woes. With the right tools, you can solve many small tree problems with a little DIY pruning. (Save major tree issues for us professionals.) Trimming can keep trees healthy, add value to your property, and make you the envy of your neighbors. But which tree pruning tools should you use? The best tree…
  • What Is Arboriculture?

    Jon Nash
    26 Jan 2015 | 3:26 pm
    The simplest definition of arboriculture is tree care. This post will answer “What is arboriculture?” in more detail, explain how it’s different from forestry and landscaping, and explain what certified arborists do. People like Chris and I who plant and prune trees are arborists. But not all arborists trim trees. And definitely not all tree services use certified arborists. More on that below too. Arboriculture Definition Arboriculture means growing, tending, studying, or removing individual trees and shrubs. (It also encompasses woody plants and vines.) Here are a few different…
  • How to Kill Tree Roots Naturally

    Jon Nash
    15 Jan 2015 | 12:11 pm
    Most of the time, you want tree roots to thrive. But if you’re removing a tree and don’t want regrowth, or if tree roots are dangerously close to something underground, you may need to kill them. It’s something we handle here at Northwest Arbor-Culture, Inc., and some homeowners like to DIY as well. Here’s a basic primer on how to kill tree roots. How to Kill Tree Roots Naturally, Without Chemicals An easy way to kill tree roots is to spray chemicals like hexazinone or bromacil onto the soil above, then wait for rain to push the chemicals down to the roots and kill them. But here in…
  • Can Trees Prevent Flooding?

    Jon Nash
    2 Jan 2015 | 11:37 am
    Trees have a ton of benefits: clean air, beauty, fruit, and shade, to name a few. But did you know they can also prevent flooding? It’s true! “The typical medium-sized tree can intercept as much as 2,380 gallons of rainfall per year,” the USDA says. To understand how, let’s look at why flooding happens. Without trees, rain runs off soil and into rivers and streams, raising the water level. Trees help keep soil in place, and their roots soak up water. (This is called reducing erosion and anchoring topsoil.) Source: Greening.in Even trees’ leaves help prevent flooding. When raindrops…
 
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    DIY Backyard Gardening

  • Jump-start Your Garden with End of Winter Gardening Prep

    Chellet
    22 Mar 2015 | 1:09 pm
    Here’s a very useful gardening infographic that can help you jump-start your garden next season… End of Winter Gardening Preparations and Tips     The post Jump-start Your Garden with End of Winter Gardening Prep appeared first on DIY Backyard Gardening.
  • My Published Contribution on Sage Living Wall

    Chellet
    21 Mar 2015 | 9:42 am
    A year ago I wrote a gardening article for Sage Living Wall: Gardening Tips for Small Spaces Share this post to your friends as well.   Also, check out their living wall products. They’re perfect for indoor and outdoor gardens – whether for you or as a gift for a friend.           The post My Published Contribution on Sage Living Wall appeared first on DIY Backyard Gardening.
  • Backyard Gardening Update – March 2015 Blooms!

    Chellet
    4 Mar 2015 | 10:57 pm
    I’ve been meaning to write and publish this post weeks ago, but I’ve decided that today’s the best day because I had to take very recent photos of our backyard garden. But first let me say that the start of the year looks good especially when it comes to our backyard plants. I think I’ve already conquered […] The post Backyard Gardening Update – March 2015 Blooms! appeared first on DIY Backyard Gardening.
  • Backyard Gardening Update

    Chellet
    12 Feb 2015 | 10:42 am
    Since we started gardening in mid 2012, I was truly determined to keep it alive and well no matter the weather and challenges. We’ve lost several plants because of my brown thumb and for lacking enough knowledge on how to properly choose and care for specific plant species. I’ve learned my lesson the hard way. […] The post Backyard Gardening Update appeared first on DIY Backyard Gardening.
  • Backyard Gardening Blog Update

    Chellet
    10 Feb 2015 | 8:55 am
      Dear readers, My sincerest apologies if you’ll find the DIY backyard gardening blog changing quite a bit. I’ve been updating the free theme I’m using in order for us to have a cleaner and more reader-friendly navigation. Thank you for your understanding. The post Backyard Gardening Blog Update appeared first on DIY Backyard Gardening.
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    Lawn And Pond

  • Choosing a Garden for your Space – Ultimate Gardening Guide Part 1

    Admin
    5 Mar 2015 | 6:18 am
      Choosing a Garden for your Space Gardening is not only considered as a mere hobby for some people as they consider it as an art form. While most gardens are a result of a particular landscape or climate, majority of gardens are simply an extension of the gardener’s passion and creative mind. If you are one of the people who are new to gardening or interested in starting one, you need to know first which type of garden you would like to have. Gardeners have a reason why they choose a specific style of gardening. Some simply have the passion for growing and tending specific plants…
  • 4 Gardening Ideas for Kids

    Stephen R
    24 Dec 2014 | 9:31 am
      Photo Credit In our increasingly virtual world, many children are missing out on connecting with nature and the outside world. I’m sure most of us have fond memories of trips to parks and gardens, of weekends spent gardening as a family. It seems as though this tradition has largely died out within the course of barely a generation. Let’s get our kids back into gardening, and back into truly experiencing the world around them. A little fresh air and exercise is something we can all use, in addition to teaching your kids how plants grow in a hands-on environment. Below we’ll look…
  • The Frugal Garden : Save money with 10 frugal gardening ideas

    Admin
    20 Dec 2014 | 10:55 am
    It seems like everybody is looking for ways to reduce their food bill. A quick look at the price of organic vegetables at your local grocery store might make you want to run the other way or compromise, but growing organic produce doesn’t have to be a chore. How do you find the best bang for you buck when choosing what to grow? By following these basic gardening tips and frugal gardening ideas. 10 Frugal Gardening Ideas 1. Consider Return on Investment When Planting It may seem weird, but try thinking about your return on investment (ROI) when selecting what plants to grow. Certain…
  • A Look to the Past: The Victory Garden

    Stephen R
    18 Dec 2014 | 7:50 pm
      Photo credit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sow_victory_poster_usgovt.gif The victory garden movement began during the first world war, and proved itself just as critical during the second. We can directly trace the modern popularity of home vegetable gardening to this century old beginning.   During this period in time most farming was done primarily by hand, as tractors and other agricultural machinery were still in their infancy. A combination of war decimated farm land across Europe, and the enlistment or draft of many farm workers, left much of the world on the verge of…
  • Small Garden Design Ideas

    Stephen R
    9 Dec 2014 | 8:39 pm
      Photo credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/bike/4753073846/ Are you eager to start a home garden, but restricted by a small yard or apartment living? There are several quick and easy ways to maximize your available space, and get your garden growing in no time. We’ll outline a few small garden design ideas below to help you get started.   Indoor Gardening     Photo credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/jsimonericcardi/5912812106/ This approach serves as a great option for those without outdoor garden space, or those living in colder regions. Planters or pots can be…
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    Mill Race Garden Centre Blog

  • 12 Great Ground Covers for Sun & Shade (PLUS: Edible Ground Covers!)

    16 Mar 2015 | 4:25 am
    Any experienced gardener will tell you that ground cover plants can be worth their weight in gold for fending off weeds and helping to create a lush outdoor space that’s filled with gorgeous greenery. But which ones should you go for? Here, we run through some excellent contenders for each space in your garden, and offer tips on preparing the ground well so your plants will flourish. Ground Covers for Sun There are lots of ground covers to choose from that will thrive in full sun, from evergreens to annuals, and plenty in between. Here are a few of our favourites: 1. Cotoneaster…
  • Learn to Garden By Watching YouTube: 23 of the Best Gardening Videos

    26 Feb 2015 | 3:13 am
    Have you ever tried to figure out just how many hours you’ve spent watching cat videos on YouTube? I have, and it’s rather more than I’d care to admit. However, YouTube is filled with more than just cute animals. There is actually a huge amount of useful information on there, too. My favourite topic, naturally, is gardening! Whether you’re a complete novice in the gardening world, or you’re hoping to learn a particular skill, YouTube is a fantastic resource – especially for visual learners. I’ve gathered together some of the most useful videos here as a handy guide. Enjoy!
  • 20 Tips on Feeding British Wild Birds in Your Garden

    16 Feb 2015 | 9:03 am
    Whether you’re a wildlife enthusiast, a keen gardener, or you have young children who are learning about the environment, it’s a joy and a pleasure to feed our feathered friends a decent meal. But what exactly is a decent meal for British birds? And when should you provide food? In this bird feeding guide, we’ll unravel all of the dos and don’ts of wild bird feeding so that you’re equipped to feed with confidence. What to feed wild birds Perhaps the most pertinent question is just what to put out. There are a number of different foods that will provide great nutritional value: 1.
  • 8 Tips for Gardening Indoors In Winter

    28 Jan 2015 | 4:10 am
    As fans of Game of Thrones will no doubt have informed you, winter is coming. In fact, winter is already here. But the dark, dank days from December to February don’t necessarily mean that we have to hang up our gardening gloves until spring arrives. There is plenty for the keen gardener to do indoors over the winter period; and even newbies can get in on the action, too. Follow our tips and you’ll be growing in no time! 1. Go for herbs Root vegetables are delicious during the winter months, but growing them indoors isn’t often going to work as they need lots of light to grow (some…
  • 10 New Year's Resolutions For Your Garden in 2015

    19 Jan 2015 | 9:10 am
    This year, why not show your garden some love? Make a resolution now to ensure that your garden is the best it can be, and you can look forward to showing it off during a few fabulous garden parties during the summer! Investing in your garden is always rewarding, and a little time spent digging, weeding and pruning will result in a gorgeous garden that you can be proud of. Even if nothing at all grows, you’ll at the very least have benefited from some exercise! So, what are you waiting for? Here are 10 New Year's resolutions for your garden in 2015! 1. Become a gardener We know that we’re…
 
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    Organic Lesson

  • Vegan Diet: 3 Spring Vegetables to Add to Your Recipes

    gardenhero
    22 Mar 2015 | 1:22 pm
    Spring is finally here! These days, we have the convenience of having access to all types of seasonal fruits and vegetables regardless of the time of year. However, it can be said that these fruits and vegetables taste best during the season when they are naturally harvested. In this infographic, we showcase three great spring vegetables you can add to your vegan diet. We also provide three great recipe suggestions for each of the vegetables. Rhubarb lemonade? Fava bean hummus? I can’t wait to get started on cooking up a great feast. These vegetables may not always be available in your…
  • Day 78: Growing Herbs Indoors – Cilantro, Chives, Basil

    gardenhero
    18 Mar 2015 | 5:54 pm
    Hey everyone. Apologies for the lack of update but frankly there hasn’t been too many stuff to post about since my last Shoebox Gardening post. Now we are at around day 78 of growing cilantro, chives, and basil leaves indoors. If you remember what happened in the last update then you would know that I had quite a few sprouts appearing for each herb. Unfortunately, many of them have died due to a lack of watering. Here is the progress of my garlic chive plant. It hasn’t grown all that much but it is definitely looking a lot healthier than last time. Apparently, garlic chives are…
  • Heirloom Seeds vs. Hybrid vs. GMO Infographic

    gardenhero
    28 Feb 2015 | 5:30 pm
    As a new gardener, I was not aware that there were differences in seed types. As I was looking to purchase my first set of seeds, I noticed some were labeled as heirloom. As I researched further, I noticed there was a difference between heirloom, hybrid, and GMO. If you have also been having some trouble understanding the differences then check out the infographic below! It should help clear up some of the misunderstandings between the different seed types. Keep in mind, however, that GMO seeds are generally not available to home gardeners. What is Heirloom? Heirloom seeds basically come…
  • Day 35: Growing Herbs Indoors – Cilantro, Chives & Basil

    gardenhero
    3 Feb 2015 | 8:53 pm
    Wow. What a great few weeks it has been since my last update. After seeing my first attempt at growing cilantro seeds fail in a matter of days, I decided to give it another go but with a slightly different method. Instead of putting the seeds in a germinating tray, I decided to give the seeds a nice soak for around seven to eight hours then put them straight into the soil. After three or four days, I saw the first sprouts appearing from the soil. During this time, I also decided to give the basil seeds a go and what you see in the image above is the amount of progress I have made so far.
  • Six Innovative Gardening Tools from CES 2015

    gardenhero
    24 Jan 2015 | 2:48 pm
    The Consumer Electronics Show (CES) isn’t just about showcasing the latest iPhones and TVs. We take a look at six awesome gardening devices that were showcased in CES 2015. The theme of these six devices has a lot in common with cloud technology. How can gardeners conserve water using real-time data? How can gardeners provide the most optimal growing conditions for their plants? Let these innovative tools answer those questions for you. Want to publish this infographic on your own blog or site? Feel free to use the embed code below. Source: Organic Lesson Gardening, particularly urban…
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    Great Garden Supply: New Products

  • Mrs Meyers Clean Day Lavender Multi-Surface Everyday Cleaner

    24 Mar 2015 | 7:43 am
    Mrs. Meyers Hardworking Homekeeping Aromatheraeutic Household Products. Creating clean and happy homes since 2001. Mrs. Meyers Clean Day Multi-Surface Everday Cleaner is tough on dirt and grime, but gentle on the earth. For generations, Lavender has been valued for its wonderfuly re..Price: $4.99
  • Mrs Meyers Clean Day Basil Multi-Surface Everyday Cleaner

    24 Mar 2015 | 7:43 am
    Mrs. Meyers Hardworking Homekeeping Aromatheraeutic Household Products. Creating clean and happy homes since 2001. Mrs. Meyers Clean Day Multi-Surface Everday Cleaner is tough on dirt and grime, but gentle on the earth. BASIL, cool, crisp and fragrant. This favored garden variety is known..Price: $4.99
  • Mrs Meyers Liquid Hand Soap Geranium

    24 Mar 2015 | 7:43 am
    Aromatherapeutic Hand and Body Care from Mrs. Meyers. A gentle and 98% all-natural foaming hand cleanser, perfect for the whole family, especially those little dirty hands. Hard-working, naturally derived ingredients and essential oils provide a fresh and clean approach. Oh, how gentle! G..Price: $4.99
  • Mrs Meyers Foaming Hand Soap Lemon Verbena

    24 Mar 2015 | 7:43 am
    Aromatherapeutic Hand and Body Care from Mrs. Meyers. A gentle and 98% all-natural foaming hand cleanser, perfect for the whole family, especially those little dirty hands. Hard-working, naturally derived ingredients and essential oils provide a fresh and clean approach. Oh, how gentle! F..Price: $4.99
  • Mrs Meyers Clean Day Basil Daily Bar Soap

    24 Mar 2015 | 7:43 am
    Aromatherapeutic Hand and Body Care from Mrs. Meyers. Kick off your everyday routine with a bit of aromatherapy. Use in the bath, shower or at the sink. Made using 100% pure vegetable base with olive oil, this soap is milled three times to make its lather rich and creamy. Cruelty-free, not tested ..Price: $4.99
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    BackToMyGarden - Discover Your Passion For Gardening

  • BTMG 093: Alabama Gardening Tips with Deb Elliott

    gardentips
    22 Mar 2015 | 10:57 pm
    Deb Elliott gardens near Helena Alabama in zone 7b.  Her plants have coped with hard frosts, torrential rains, brutal droughts, strange fungal diseases, snowy blizzards and  the odd tornado.  Deb has a great garden blog where she shares her adventures and experiments with other plant and nature lovers.  She is often asked, "What Makes Moss Grow?". [...]
  • BTMG 092: Your Dream Garden with Heather McLean

    gardentips
    15 Mar 2015 | 11:39 pm
    Heather McLean loves helping people to rediscover and remember their connection to nature and the Earth.  She helps design personal garden environments and wonderful spaces for her clients.  It starts with a powerful question, "how would you describe your dream garden?".  Heather gardens in the challenging climate of Central Texas.  Heather believes an empty space [...]
  • BTMG 091: American Allotment Gardening with Eric Steltzer

    gardentips
    8 Mar 2015 | 10:58 pm
    Eric Steltzer loves the connection to seasonal cycles of nature, escaping the city stresses, and the feeling of self-sufficiency from growing ones own flavorful vegetables.  He is an American gardener working the soil of England.  Eric is adventuring in organic and permaculture gardening near London.  He believes that "gardening is a playground -- keep it fun!". [...]
  • BTMG 090: Gardening In Michigan with Andrea Hughes

    gardentips
    1 Mar 2015 | 9:21 pm
    Andrea Hughes enjoys all 4 seasons of gardening in Brighton Michigan.  She blogs about cooking, food preservation, sustainability and Michigan garden history.  Andrea believes that a gardener needs to garden at their own pace, to do what's right for you and your soil, and that the plant is always on your side. In This Episode You [...]
  • BTMG 089: How To Build Harmonious Lucky Gardens with Shelley Sparks

    gardentips
    24 Feb 2015 | 9:26 pm
    Shelly Sparks is a talented garden designer and feng shui advisor.  Her company Harmony Gardens helps clients to create beautiful spaces and a lucky life.  Shelly is the author of "Secrets of The Land, Designing Harmonious Gardens With Feng Shui".  She teaches, is a landscape architect, lecturer and consultant, and garden blogger in Los Angeles California. [...]
 
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    In the Garden...with Mariani Landscape

  • Buttonbush, Privet, Deutzia, and Roses

    Gina Iliopoulos
    27 Mar 2015 | 4:00 am
    Last time we started telling you about “plants to watch”, relatively new cultivars that have proven to be great landscape additions.  Today we bring you six more from Proven Winners! We’ve quite a bit to cover so let’s get started. … Continue reading →
  • Spilled Wine® Weigela and Bangle® Genista

    Gina Iliopoulos
    25 Mar 2015 | 4:00 am
    Last time we promised you more plants to watch so today we have two wonderful shrubs to show you.  We start with weigela.  The cultivar we are watching is Spilled Wine®, from Proven Winners.  Their images say it all.  Incredibly … Continue reading →
  • Great Plants and Plants to Watch

    Gina Iliopoulos
    23 Mar 2015 | 4:00 am
    With every new season we see the introduction of new plants.  There is even an annual event called the California Spring Trials that features some of the newest developments.  New plants mean new colors and textures, and improved features like … Continue reading →
  • Hardscapes in the Garden

    Gina Iliopoulos
    20 Mar 2015 | 4:00 am
    Last time we promised you some new trends in hardscapes, an exciting aspect of landscape design because they add so much to a landscape.  Hardscapes are the non-plant based material used in a design.  They are driveways, walkways, patios, stairs, … Continue reading →
  • Outdoor Lighting and Irrigation News

    Gina Iliopoulos
    18 Mar 2015 | 4:00 am
    Last time we promised you some new trends in the industry so today we get into a couple of interesting details.  We will start with landscape lighting and later tell you about smart irrigation.  Lighting your landscape at night gives … Continue reading →
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    Harmony Gardens Landscaping

  • Pruning

    HGadmin
    24 Mar 2015 | 6:33 pm
    Pruning is a very important part of plant, shrub and tree care that is performed for both aesthetic reasons and for plant health. Pruning is the cutting away of unwanted parts of a plant for more fruitful growth and shaping. You should prune a plant or shrub to remove crossed, damaged or diseased branches which will stress the plant. Pruning also improves air flow through the plant and can encourage better branch distribution which results in a healthier, more vigorous plant that is more disease tolerant. Post-bloom pruning maximizes the blooms for the following season. […] The post…
  • How to Maintain a Healthy Lawn in Seven Simple Steps

    HGadmin
    19 Mar 2015 | 10:46 am
    How to Maintain a Healthy Lawn in Seven Simple Steps Step 1: De-thatching and Core Aeration -use a de-thatching machine or contact Harmony Gardens Landscaping to de-thatch your lawns. -ensure to rake up the removed thatch from de-thatching and dispose of -thatch can harbor insects and disease -thatch prevents water and nutrients from reaching grass roots -healthy lawns have 1cm or less of thatch – more is not healthy -core aerate lawns after de-thatching in the spring and the fall and before top dressing, fertilizing and over-seeding -core aerators should have the weights on to […]…
  • Essential Hardscaping Design Elements

    HGadmin
    12 Mar 2015 | 11:11 am
    In the past, hardscapes were traditionally utilitarian, a place to park the car or a pathway leading to the door, thus bringing a sense of order to the space. In today’s world, the attributes and the details of exterior landscaping are just as important as the interior spaces. Hardscaping can extend our living space to the outdoors effectively and beautifully. As a hardscaping contractor, Harmony Gardens Landscaping, considers the key elements that are required to create an attractive and functional outdoor living space. With so many houses looking virtually identical, the creation of an…
  • Grubs in the Lawn

    jeannette
    7 Mar 2015 | 7:40 pm
    Grubs in the Lawn The grub is the larval stage of a variety of beetles: Japanese beetles, European chafer and June beetles are the three most common. Damage Identification: Grubs feed on grass roots thus causing your lawn to die. The key symptom of grub invasion is irregular dead patches which lift up quite easily if tugged on. These patches have had the roots severed off and thus there is nothing to anchor the sod or lawn in place. The lawn may also have patches that have been burrowed in or been turned over by […] The post Grubs in the Lawn appeared first on Harmony Gardens…
  • Edible Gardening: The Tea Garden

    HGadmin
    4 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Edible Gardening: The Tea Garden In days gone by, tea was not just a beverage it was an event. Victorian tea or high tea was a time to pause, relax and enjoy a cup of tea, with little sandwiches and fancy desserts amongst friends. The tea was ceremoniously poured into fine china cups and sipped leisurely. The ambience, the visual delight, the aromas and delicate flavours were savoured and enjoyed as a simple pleasure. Things are different today and I am not suggesting we need to go back in time but we can include some […] The post Edible Gardening: The Tea Garden appeared first on…
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