Gardening

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  • How to Make Concrete Planters

    Garden Therapy
    Stephanie
    21 May 2015 | 2:57 pm
    These DIY concrete garden planters are simple to make in just a weekend and with materials you may already have around the house. They look modern with unique shapes that come straight from the recycling bin! I made these planters many years ago, and have since made many more for gifts or to decorate my home garden. At the time ... The post How to Make Concrete Planters appeared first on Garden Therapy.
  • Gardening Without a Garden

    You Grow Girl
    Gayla Trail
    30 Apr 2015 | 8:57 am
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  • Springtime in the Garden (Photos)

    Growing The Home Garden
    22 Mar 2015 | 3:21 pm
    Spring is here and the garden is most certainly coming alive! Unfortunately some freezing temperatures are in the forecast for later in the week here in Tennessee. Here's a quick look at what you will find in my garden at the moment!Purple leaf plum and forsythia  I trimmed the forsythia back after it bloomed last year into more of a small shrub. They can get very large if you let them grow. Forsythias are an easy plant to propagate if you want more of them. Just take a cutting 4-5 inches long and place it in a pot of soil and keep moist. There is no need for rooting hormone to propagate…
  • D.I.Y Tomato Protection

    You Grow Girl
    Gayla Trail
    20 May 2015 | 11:07 am
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  • Garden Patio Makeover and a Succulent Wok

    Shawna Coronado
    Shawna Coronado
    22 May 2015 | 5:00 am
    Let’s continue our three months of AE Outdoor “Creating the Perfect Patio” redecorating adventure and kick-off summer the right way – with an outdoor furniture front entry patio makeover. Last makeover I redid the back patio and created a fun cocktail outdoor room in middle of my well-used garden potting area (see right). AE Outdoor approached me about a couple outdoor garden room furniture ideas for our three month long garden room transformation and without a doubt the next area that needed some improvement was the front patio and entry area. I cleaned up my front…
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    You Grow Girl

  • D.I.Y Tomato Protection

    Gayla Trail
    20 May 2015 | 11:07 am
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  • The Lost Language of Plants

    Gayla Trail
    6 May 2015 | 2:19 pm
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  • Tumbling Composter Update

    Gayla Trail
    4 May 2015 | 4:05 pm
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  • Gardening Without a Garden

    Gayla Trail
    30 Apr 2015 | 8:57 am
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  • Recently in My Garden

    Gayla Trail
    22 Apr 2015 | 2:04 pm
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    Shawna Coronado

  • Garden Patio Makeover and a Succulent Wok

    Shawna Coronado
    22 May 2015 | 5:00 am
    Let’s continue our three months of AE Outdoor “Creating the Perfect Patio” redecorating adventure and kick-off summer the right way – with an outdoor furniture front entry patio makeover. Last makeover I redid the back patio and created a fun cocktail outdoor room in middle of my well-used garden potting area (see right). AE Outdoor approached me about a couple outdoor garden room furniture ideas for our three month long garden room transformation and without a doubt the next area that needed some improvement was the front patio and entry area. I cleaned up my front…
  • Easy Herbal Cocktail Garden Living Wall

    Shawna Coronado
    18 May 2015 | 4:06 am
    An herbal cocktail garden is a genius way to bring scent, taste, and passion to your balcony or patio. They’re filled with herbs and edibles and do remarkably well in small spaces. Living wall cocktail gardens are even more amazing because you can plant 35 to 40 plants easily in less than a 2 square foot floor area. Best yet; there is absolutely NO WEEDING. Wahoo! This standalone Gro Products garden living wall garden system does not require that it be attached to a wall permanently and it only takes a few minutes to set up. How easy can gardening be? THIS IS EASY PEOPLE! Below is an…
  • Cucumber and Onion Salad Recipe from Dee Nash

    Shawna Coronado
    11 May 2015 | 4:23 am
    Dee Nash, author of The 20-30 Something Garden Guide, runs a garden blog site called Red Dirt Ramblings which I absolutely adore. She posts tons of great ideas on gardening and culinary on her property in Oklahoma. All that red dirt adventure makes for great reading. When I mentioned to Dee that I have been craving some homemade magical recipes she sent a favorite cucumber salad recipe for me to share with you. Dee’s website is filled with family stories and I love that she sent me the recipe of her Grandma Nita’s astoundingly delicious cucumber salad. Her blog post is called…
  • How To Plant a Shrub Rose Container

    Shawna Coronado
    8 May 2015 | 4:35 am
    Planting a rose often seems like a complicated project, however, the new shrub roses such as the Knockout are easy to plant. Simply follow the instructions on the infographic below to plant a shrub rose this weekend. For Mother’s Day perhaps? They are easy plants to grow and love – you’ll see flowers all season! The post How To Plant a Shrub Rose Container appeared first on Shawna Coronado.
  • How To Grow a Tropical Jungle Garden

    Shawna Coronado
    6 May 2015 | 1:23 pm
    Every season I deliberately spread all my tropical plants apart in containers and at the back of the beds in an effort to distribute them evenly throughout the garden. This time I decided my barren and ugly spot needed something special (see right “before” photo), so I decided to go hog-wild and put all the colocasias, cannas, and dinosaur kale in one tropical jungle garden bed. Mixed in with the black-eyed susans and tall sedum at the back of my front lawn vegetable beds I made my very own tropical jungle garden which had it’s spectacular final show in September – at…
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    Cold Climate Gardening

  • Roadside Yellow Daffodils Brighten My Day

    Kathy Purdy
    10 May 2015 | 7:59 pm
    We’ve been suffering from meteorological whiplash. We had snow on April 23 and a low of 22 (-5C) on April 25 . Thirteen days later it got up to 88F and we’ve been sweltering ever since. The Roadside Yellow daffodils that I planted last fall have been delivering their sunshine almost as soon as the […]
  • A Dream Come True: My New Weather Station

    Kathy Purdy
    23 Apr 2015 | 8:47 pm
    Ever since I realized that the National Weather Service at our local airport under-reported both the lows and the highs at our first house, ever since I discovered we were a lot more likely to have frost than our region at large, I’ve wanted to track the weather in my yard, the uber-local weather. For […]
  • The Very First Blooms: Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day April 2015

    Kathy Purdy
    15 Apr 2015 | 11:01 am
    In other years, I’ve had the first blooms in March. Once, I managed snowdrops in February. But this year, I almost wondered if I’d have crocuses blooming for Bloom Day. Thankfully, this past week Spring finally arrived and I have a respectable showing. I’ve seen pictures of large patches of spring snowflakes, so I hope […]
  • What’s That?: When A Gardener Neglects Her Garden Journal

    Kathy Purdy
    11 Apr 2015 | 7:15 pm
    I actually like keeping records. I can get obsessive about it, and that has gotten me into trouble in the past. So last fall, when I was frantically planting out the plants I had kept in containers–some of them for two years–I left the documenting of that planting for “later,” applauding myself for not getting […]
  • Spring Flowers Grow Under the Snow–Really!

    Kathy Purdy
    7 Apr 2015 | 12:17 pm
    The calendar says it’s spring, but you’re still looking out on a vast expanse of snow: You look at it and think, “Before any flowers will bloom, first that stuff has to melt, then the soil has to thaw, then the leaves will emerge, and then–finally!–I’ll have flowers. Not so, dear gardener. Not so. The […]
 
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    A Way To Garden

  • psychedelic garden: my first adventure with deciduous azaleas

    margaret
    21 May 2015 | 5:09 am
    I’M BLAMING MARCO. (As you’ve perhaps noticed, I’m always blaming someone.) I’ve just planted what promises to be a psychedelic [read more…] The post psychedelic garden: my first adventure with deciduous azaleas appeared first on A Way To Garden.
  • a plant I’d order: the tree peony paeonia ostii

    margaret
    19 May 2015 | 6:14 am
    I TOOK IT AS A DARE when nurseryman Tony Avent named Paeonia ostii as one of his “plants that need [read more…] The post a plant I’d order: the tree peony paeonia ostii appeared first on A Way To Garden.
  • container-garden design, with untermyer’s timothy tilghman

    margaret
    17 May 2015 | 4:53 am
    THE PANSIES are pooped, and I’m scratching my head as always around this time: What to put in the pots? [read more…] The post container-garden design, with untermyer’s timothy tilghman appeared first on A Way To Garden.
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    The Occasional Gardener

  • Room to Grow

    27 Apr 2015 | 8:02 am
    The arbor in the tropical potager is now fully covered with the Passiflora Coccinea. What a great job its doing of that. Very nice even cover over the bamboo trellis  trailing over the edge with a string of red flowers. I was recently offered a rattan coffee table that made me rethink things and bring the table over from the verandah, which I don't know why I didn't do earlier, its slatted and matches the slatted bench I already have here. Then I found a bamboo gate that concertinas, allowing me to gate off entry into this area, see left pic, from my dogs who love to dig in the beds…
  • Green Flowers

    28 Feb 2015 | 9:37 am
    I don't often see green flowered orchids at the farmers market but I did today and two spectacular ones at that. Dendrobium Callophyllum on the right is a native of Java, Lesser Sunda Islands and the Moluccas. Hallelujah it likes  sun and I have just the spot for it. I will be moving it out of its pot (growing on charcoal) to attach to a branch to hang on the Dark Verandah. Most of the epiphytes I have, similarly set up are clustered around the shady bits so its great to have this filling one of the sunnier gaps. And fill nicely it will as it has 5 or 6 fairly lanky arched leaf…
  • False Rue

    24 Feb 2015 | 4:39 am
    As I often complain, I'm in ownership of a quite a few plants that remain unidentified as that's how plants are sold here- without any kind of label. Occasionally the seller might be knowledgeable enough to identify the plant- sometimes it even helps just to know the local name. Otherwise its a google search that might take a while to track down. Let me just say though, it is astonishing what google can do with a few keywords. I now also have about three textbooks written by local authors and make it a morning habit to flip through them, cup of coffee in hand. This is the other method that…
  • Lightning Orchids

    30 Jan 2015 | 1:03 am
    My dad called these Lightning Orchids, which I've discovered is not correct, the plant is Dendrobium Crumanatum and the common name for them is Pigeon Orchids. He said that they flowered after a lightning storm and he's not completely wrong about that. This orchid forms buds after there is a temperature drop, usually due to a thunderstorm. Nine days later long necklaces of white flowers with a yellow throat bloom gregariously with members of this species in its vicinity. The blooms are fragrant, particularly in the morning and last only a day.This ephemeral quality perfectly suits where these…
  • The Color Orange

    4 Jan 2015 | 9:12 pm
    The decision to go for a color palette with warm sunset accents in the Gravel Garden developed along a few lines. One was how well those colors look with the many succulents I have here. Another is how it pairs with all the concrete and gravel mulch and terracota that dominates the hardscape. It also makes sense that it is in the same spectrum as the berries of the Ficus Deltoides and also the ripe Citrus when it fruits. Finally, this garden's best moment is at the end of the day when the sun is just about to set providing a lovely glow to the space which reminded me of how the cottage…
 
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    Plant Whatever Brings You Joy

  • The Seed Bank

    Kathryn
    15 May 2015 | 11:54 am
    Readers of Plant Whatever Brings You Joy will be familiar with this one of the 52 lessons: “Never pull up and discard what you cannot identify,” a metaphorical invitation to not pre-judge that which enters your life that seems unfamiliar. “The Lord works in mysterious ways,” as we know. The blessings in our lives can show up in many different unexpected packages. So when I planted morning glory seeds in March on a rosy obelisk, well away from the rest of the garden, so it could not overcome whatever was growing nearby, I thought I was so clever both to get a head…
  • The Rustic Quiche

    Kathryn
    17 Apr 2015 | 7:53 am
    rustic quiche with roasted red peppers and kalamata olives Back when Antonia was a little girl a lovely Asian woman in San Francisco gave me a recipe for quiche which I vaguely recall making successfully a couple of times, and then, inexplicably, the recipe failed. I have no idea why. But I concluded that I “didn’t know how to make quiche.” (How many times do we do this one way or another?) I moved on to other endeavors in the kitchen. Making yogurt. Crafting tortillas. Baking bread. Astoundingly it’s taken me decades to get back to making quiches. And even that began…
  • Fire Pits: Part Two

    Kathryn
    19 Mar 2015 | 6:44 pm
    As some of you will recall my last blog post was afire with enthusiasm for fire pits, inspired by gardening author Helen Yoest, who wrote a guest post about her own fire pit in her garden. Kindled in my new found passion was the realization my 72nd birthday was upon me, nearly, and that if I applied myself aptly I might actually combine the two, making a new fire pit the center of my birthday festivities. I began researching fire pits and made the decision to purchase one made by Landman and to purchase it locally. All that was left was to decide which design. I chose the vine pattern since I…
  • Fire Pits: Part One

    Kathryn
    19 Jan 2015 | 1:22 pm
    It is probably fitting that following a post on leaving wild corners in your garden I would be drawn to a recent post I saw on author Helen Yoest’s blog Gardening with Confidence regarding her organic creation of what she calls her Fire Garden. I found I kept thinking of her post and had the occasion to inquire about a possible guest post after she most generously reviewed my book Plant Whatever Brings You Joy! We have some things in common other than writing about our gardens. She’s a Pisces lady living in North Carolina who owns a Border Collie! As many of you know, so much of…
  • Leave Wild, Undisturbed Corners in Your Garden

    Kathryn
    31 Dec 2014 | 10:41 am
    There is an irony that Plant Whatever Brings You Joy: Blessed Wisdom from the Garden must ultimately carry a caveat, being that as a conscious gardener we learn that our immediate landscapes, the ones we play with, plant things in and recreate, are not, as we thought, blank canvases to reconstruct to our own liking. Not really. They are pieces of something, a larger something of which we are all a part. And that as loving stewards of that reality we are rather obliged to consider what came before, as in the last several millions of years, and to consider that carefully as we make our mark…
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    May Dreams Gardens

  • How to plant a tomato plant

    Carol
    19 May 2015 | 6:37 pm
    How do you plant a tomato plant? You start off with a lovely tomato plant, maybe one you grew yourself from seed or one you bought at a local greenhouse where they grew it from seed. You pick a variety that reminds you of the tomato plants your dad bought, when 'Big Boy' and 'Beefsteak' and 'Supersteak' grew in many backyard gardens. Or perhaps you buy a variety called 'Old German' because
  • An Update on The Vegetable Garden Cathedral

    Carol
    17 May 2015 | 7:16 pm
    Radishes, 'Cherry Belle' and 'French Breakfast' Ah, yes, those radishes were quite good, and thank you for asking.  They were crunchy in a crisp sort of way and had just the right amount of kick for a Sunday morning snack. You should really grow some yourself. You know you should.  Radishes are oh-so-easy to grow, too. Just scratch up a little garden, then plant a few seeds in a row and about
  • Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day - May 2015

    Carol
    14 May 2015 | 9:05 pm
    Clematis integrifolia Welcome to Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day for May 2015. I hardly know where to start here in my USDA Hardiness Zone 6a garden in central Indiana.  We've had a wonderful spring, for the most part. There are flowers everywhere and lots of lush, green growth. I'll start with a new-to-me-this-year flower, Clematis integrifolia.  This is one of those clematis that isn't a vine,
  • Gillyflowers in bloom

    Carol
    12 May 2015 | 4:51 am
    Gillyflowers, Dianthus 'Bath's Pink' The gillyflowers are in bloom. Gillyflowers, you ask? Aren't those Dianthus, you ask politely? To you, maybe, but when I read that another common name for Dianthus is gillyflower, I decided that's the name for me. I got my starts of this particular gillyflower, which is Dianthus 'Bath's Pink' from the Hoosier Gardener. I remember she dropped off a
  • Because it makes me smile

    Carol
    6 May 2015 | 7:22 pm
    The minute I saw it, I wanted it to follow me home and come live in my garden, forever. And so I gave the guy who made it a little something called cash, and the bird followed me home. Or rather, I picked it up and carried it  to my vehicle, figured out how to put it in the back without gouging the upholstery, and drove it home. It's quite a bird, with its rakish tail feathers, big washer
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    Backyard Gardening Blog

  • How to Divide Daylilies and Other Perennials

    Administrator
    21 May 2015 | 2:57 pm
    My move gets ever closer, less than 2 months now and I say goodbye to the garden I’ve built over the last 12 years and… well… its traumatic. But one thing is for sure, I don’t want to have to buy a lot of these plants again. So I’ve been busy taking divisions and otherwise […]
  • Mantis Tiller Review: Making Quick Work of My Garden

    Administrator
    19 Apr 2015 | 12:44 pm
    So I’m sure we’ve all seen these commercials. The Mantis tiller, plowing through soil, I never bought into it. My only memory of using a tiller was when young, at my parents, a big tiller, twice as big as the mantis easy, and it’d have trouble breaking through the soil. Plus in the commercials it […]
  • First Flower of Spring 2015

    Administrator
    3 Apr 2015 | 7:58 am
    On March 31st I noticed the first bloom of the Spring, a crocus as always, same spot as last year. The first bloom last year was also March 31st. Here is my Michigan Misery Index over time: 2009: March 15th 2010: March 16th 2011: March 15th 2012: March 10th 2013: Forgot 2014: March 31st 2015: […]
  • Squish This, Not That: Confusion over Bugs

    Administrator
    3 Jan 2015 | 8:38 am
    Sometimes a little bit of knowledge is a bad thing. I’ve talked, multiple times, to novice gardeners, hobbyists (and, lets face it, I’m a hobbyist too, I don’t have a degree in horticulture, I am not a professional landscape architect, but I’m a garden blogger, gardening is serious business to me), laypeople, or just people […]
  • Frugal Gardening: Starting Perennials from Seed

    Administrator
    14 Dec 2014 | 7:23 am
    I think everyone loves a nice mass planting. Mixed plantings look nice too, but it is hard to beat the statement of a mass planting. A whole bed of lilies, a whole bed of hostas, a whole bed of daylilies, or cone flowers, or rudbeckias, or phlox, or whatever. Maybe not all the same exactly […]
 
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    Happy Mother's Day

  • Happy Mother's Day

    -
    8 May 2015 | 6:56 pm
    Mom, even though you have been gone for over 20 years, I can still feel your loving touch, and the soothing sound of your voice. You are always and will ever be at my side.
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    Digging

  • My Dry and Mighty article is in Wildflower magazine

    Pam/Digging
    21 May 2015 | 12:25 pm
    If you’re a member of the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, you’ll soon find the Summer 2015 issue of Wildflower magazine in your mailbox. I’m thrilled to announce that I wrote the cover story, “Dry & Mighty.” What’s it all about? “A dry garden doesn’t have to be drab. Make yours dazzle even in summer,” teases the contents-page tagline. In the 6-page spread, I offer design ideas for making a dry garden that looks great all year. The article will appear on the Wildflower Center’s website soon (I’ll link to it then). But…
  • Farewell visit to James David’s Austin garden, part 2

    Pam/Digging
    20 May 2015 | 7:28 pm
    A grand limestone staircase bisected by a rill leads from the back of the house to a large pond in the lower garden. Yesterday I showed you around the upper level of James David’s magnificent garden, which I visited in late March and which is currently for sale as the owners prepare to relocate to Santa Fe. Today let’s take the paths that lead down into the ravine behind the house and back up to the detached studio. Behind the house a large cistern collects rainwater from the roof and seems to spill surplus water into a stone trough. In actuality, I think this must be an illusion…
  • Farewell visit to James David’s Austin garden, part 1

    Pam/Digging
    19 May 2015 | 3:03 am
    James and Gary’s entry garden, a gravel garden featuring agaves, aloes, succulents, and other dry-adapted plants from around the world After 36 years devoted to creating an extravagantly plant-rich, terraced, one-of-a-kind garden on two acres in Austin’s Rollingwood neighborhood, landscape architect James David and his partner Gary Peese are leaving it all behind. Their home — an elegant, contemporary hideaway with a detached, modern concrete studio — is on the market, and they’ve already begun work on a new home and garden in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Entry garden,…
  • Screech owlet waiting to be fed

    Pam/Digging
    16 May 2015 | 1:54 pm
    I stalked this guy from the deck last night as dusk fell and he waited impatiently for his parents to bring him dinner. I wasn’t quick enough to get a shot of the feedings, but I did witness a couple. The hungry chicks — there are at least two — sure keep their parents busy. Night-crawling bugs and other small creatures had better watch their backs. All material © 2006-2015 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.
  • Purple prickly pear for Foliage Follow-Up

    Pam/Digging
    15 May 2015 | 10:05 pm
    Purple pot and purple prickly pear — ten years after planting I’m still enjoying the color echo, especially against the gray deck railing. Vivid orange pomegranate blossoms add a fun color contrast in the background. So what leafy love is going on in your May garden? Please join me for Foliage Follow-Up, giving foliage its due on the day after Bloom Day. Leave a link to your post in a comment below. I really appreciate it if you’ll also link to my post in your own — sharing link love! If you can’t post so soon after Bloom Day, no worries. Just leave your link when you…
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    Blithewold Blogs

  • A-May-zing

    Kristin Green
    15 May 2015 | 7:35 am
    It’s not often anymore that my posts fall on Garden Bloggers Bloom Day and I’m thrilled for the excuse to post endless pictures of what’s happening on the grounds right now. The daffodils have pretty much gone by, except for the extra-pretty latest ones, but spring is ready to move on and so am I. May […]
  • Stop and smell the daffodils

    Kristin Green
    8 May 2015 | 7:25 am
    Of all the seasons, spring is the one that puts every sense on high alert. We’re all eyes for the colors, have sharp ears for frog and bird songs (we heard the orioles this week), and those of us not plagued by allergies have been breathing so deeply to catch every scent we’re getting lightheaded. Or is it […]
  • The Trip on the Lusitania

    Margaret Whitehead
    1 May 2015 | 3:12 pm
      In April 1910 Bessie and William McKee, with Marjorie and 11-year old Augustine, took a 2-month long trip to Europe taking in the major cities and traveling first-class all the way.  They sailed on Cunard’s R.M.S. Carmania from New York to Liverpool, England, where they were met by their own chauffeur, Krohe, in their […]
  • Growing into May

    Kristin Green
    1 May 2015 | 9:00 am
    The gardens are on the move, with and without our help. This week the Bosquet made the (subtle) transition from stunning to glorious; the Rock Garden is coming into its May peak; and in every other garden the tulips moved into position, poised to take the spotlight away from the daffodils. This past week we moved more […]
  • It’s daffodi-lightful!

    Kristin Green
    24 Apr 2015 | 8:59 am
    All of our predictions (and hopes back in February and March) about the daffodils putting on a show for vacation week were spot-on. It has been a real spring spectacular! Not only did the daffodils come through for us but other beauties have joined the party too, including a few very early tulips. And just […]
 
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    Flatbush Gardener

  • Ripley, 2000-2015

    Flatbush Gardener
    21 May 2015 | 12:20 am
    Our Ripley died with us around 1:30 this morning. It's still the middle of the night. We had an 8am appointment with the vet for an ultrasound exam to find out what was going on. Instead, I'll be taking his body in for cremation. I need to try to... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Native New Yorkers: My Garden's NYC-Native Plant Checklist

    Flatbush Gardener
    14 May 2015 | 7:56 am
    This is a checklist of just the plant species native to New York City I'm growing in my garden. I'm posting this for the benefit of anyone attending the NYC Wildflower Week tour of my garden, Friday, May 15, from 1-3pm. It may also be of... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Place, Purpose, Plants: Urban Gardening with Native Plants

    Flatbush Gardener
    13 May 2015 | 5:07 am
    At last night's meeting of the Long Island Botanical Society, I spoke about my experiences gardening with native plants in an urban setting. These slides accompanied my talk. Related ContentAll my blog posts about My GardenOther Native... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Garden Deeper

    Flatbush Gardener
    9 May 2015 | 7:04 am
    I had a visceral (in a good way) reaction to Adrian Higgins' writeup of a visit, with Claudia West, to Shenk's Ferry Wildflower Preserve. I think I'll adopt "ecological horticulturist" to describe my own approach to gardening. Whether you... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Native Plant Profile: Adlumia fungosa, allegheny vine, climbing fumitory

    Flatbush Gardener
    3 May 2015 | 6:54 am
    A species new to me that I picked up at yesterday's plant sale for the Manhattan Chapter of the North American Rock Garden Society (MCNARGS). Since I don't know anything about it, I researched it to figure out what it wants and find a place for it... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
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    Ledge and Gardens

  • It's May, it's May, the Lusty Month of May,,,

    Layanee DeMerchant
    1 May 2015 | 4:20 am
    Yes, the lusty month of May. May, full of visible energy as leaves and flowers unfurl. Flowers are lusty. They are all about pollination and fertilization besides being just plain beautiful.  May always makes me think of  that song....you know the one Julie Andrews sings in 'Camelot'.  You can listen to that song here. We are having another 'slow' spring. It has been quite cool which is great for flowers and busy gardeners. The snowdrops which can bloom in late February had to wait this year due to the abundant snow still left on the ground until April.
  • The Bee's Knees

    Layanee DeMerchant
    23 Apr 2015 | 6:15 am
    This morning, the birds are singing, the grass is greening and the scilla are in full, blue bloom. Scilla siberica, to be exact. This little flowering bulb reaches about 3" in height in my garden and it naturalizes beautifully. I have heard the word 'invasive' in reference to scilla but I prefer 'naturalize'. It does spread. That can be a positive. What makes one plant invasive and another a desired naturalizer? Well, this one has beautiful flowers of bright blue and they attract honeybees. It might crowd out grass but in my 'Freedom Lawn' that is just desirable.
  • The Week in Review

    Layanee DeMerchant
    17 Apr 2015 | 12:52 pm
    The snow has left the gardens but there are still a couple of mounds in the drive from the winter snowplowing. No matter since now the garden work can begin. The crocus are up and taking turns debuting their outfits. The snowdrops have almost finished blooming which means that in spite of all the raking to be done, they need to be moved around right after the flowers fade. I have found that this is an easy transition time for them and they spread quite readily when given a helping hand. I just lift the larger clumps and carefully pull apart the bulbs. It is then an easy matter to pop them…
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    the back quarter acre

  • I've got sunshine on a cloudy day

    28 Apr 2015 | 7:50 pm
    Even on an overcast, raw, why-are-we-still-wearing-mittens kind of day, these patches of yellow make their own sunny weather. In the foreground is the daffodil "Yellow Cheerfulness," the middle ground is covered with"Wisley," and forsythia "Lynwood Gold" rules the background.  
  • Why the sunken garden makes me feel unsinkable

    26 Apr 2015 | 1:41 pm
    Visiting someone else's garden is always liberating: you're free of any responsibilities for unfinished seasonal chores, unblinkered of the eyesores of your garden design failures, and unburdened of battling nature's imperfections, your poor choices, or chance's victims. I'm always glad to have an excuse to pop into the Sunken Garden at Radcliffe Institute. A tall brick wall encloses the street sides, so passersby are likely to miss this serene site unless they peek through the Radcliffe Yard gates. Once inside, sounds of a fountain and weathered memorial benches offer a respite from the…
  • Garden goal roll, 2015

    20 Apr 2015 | 10:41 am
    It's spring now, so all things horticultural are possible. Cue the cock-eyed optimist: I'm preparing my annual garden goal roll: what needs to be done, when it should be done, and where it's all happening.    AprilDust peonies with copper fungicide to limit blight. Done 4/19/2015Top-dress spring-flowering bulbs with 3-5-3 when the leaf-tips emerge.  Except for small front walk bed, done 4/19/2015Place plant orders.  *  From Swan Island or other dahlia nursery: some small yellow dahlias, like "Baby Yellow," for old side bed? Prune and…
  • Boston Strong (and small and slow)

    19 Apr 2015 | 1:52 pm
    According to yesterday's news broadcast, this year's harsh winter has stalled us several weeks' behind our usual seasonal spring schedule.  So the blue and yellow markings of these little Iris reticulata "Katherine Hodgkin" typically don't unfurl in synchrony with the colorful celebration of the Boston Marathon.Iris reticulata "Katherine Hodgkin" looking upFinish Line, Old North Church, looking upWelcome signs of spring!  Several clutches of "Katherine Hodgkin" have survived for years in the beds along our front walk. Their tiny blooms are the perfect size for passers-by to…
  • Hoarders

    24 Nov 2014 | 11:31 am
    Not to get too personal, but certain members of my family have a hoarding issue. Well, one in particular. So, yesterday, when I saw an apple caught up high in the canes of climbing rose, I figured that our family hoarder had just parked a piece of fruit so that he could enjoy a snack later after completing his outside chores.  Our family hoarder likes to collect windfalls from a neighbor's apple tree, and this fruit looked just banged and bruised enough to be from that harvest.But after our hoarder denied all knowledge, I thought back to the other caches of food…
 
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    A Leafy Indulgence

  • Three Year Wait Is Over

    Swimray
    19 May 2015 | 7:12 pm
    The 2012 plant swap peony has finally bloomed today. It was the only peony (Paeonia lactiflora), and I got it. Its owner did not remember its color or variety.In its third year now, the thing sent out several stalks this spring, and there was hope in the air. One of the stalks had three buds, and the first opened to a deep magenta, double-ruffled flower. There is a nice fragrance. We had a violent rain downpour last night, and it survived without incident.It was planted in the side garden bed, the newest and therefore the one with the poorest soil. I placed a wire support disc as it grew,…
  • May 2015 Bloom Day

    Swimray
    15 May 2015 | 5:08 am
    Garden Bloggers' Bloom DayWhat's blooming in the garden on the 15th of the monthProjects (including working in the garden,) have been taking time away from blogging this spring.Nothing much on this bloom day, my 16th since blogging. Bearded iris galore, but you've seen them last year. May is a dead time in my garden before most impressive perennials get going and after the spring bulbs. So I tried for some smaller closeups, but need to get a new camera - this pocket Cannon Elph I used for all my photos over the past 12 years is beginning to show age with less and less clarity.Kalmia latifolia…
  • My Tulips Smell

    Swimray
    24 Apr 2015 | 7:02 pm
    Being in an area that goes from winter to summer in a two weeks, growing tulips is a challenge. In about the span of one week, they open, bloom, and get fried to a crisp. In subsequent years, whether left in the ground or lifted in the spring and replanted in the fall, they are a big disappointment. So like an addict, I try to stay clean of spending money on tulips.Every so often in the fall, photos on the tulip packages in the local nurseries (along with a discounted price) tempt me to a point of giving in. And after they bloom one year, my tulip has-beens proudly produce big leaves year…
  • Winter Walk Off

    Swimray
    19 Mar 2015 | 8:32 pm
    With a few minutes until the deadline for a winter walk off post, it seems I am almost late for everything these days. For yet another year, I chose to walk around Old Town Alexandria where I work. There is so much detail and little things to see. I start by heading to the water. The Potomac River was the lifeblood of our early historic seaport town.This anchor is placed prominently at the intersection of two paths. There is no information displayed.The McIlhenny Seaport Center. I don't know much about this place in such a prominent location along the river. Having looked through the window a…
  • The Quincunx And The Olitory

    Swimray
    10 Feb 2015 | 7:53 pm
    I added quincunx and olitory to my lexicon. Read on and you will too.2015 gardening began this weekend. I packed up and labeled my contributions for the Washington Gardener Magazine annual Seed Exchange. This one held in Virginia is scheduled on the first weekend in February. The day's program began at the registration table to pick up my goody bag of seeds and promotions. Then on to peruse the table full of garden catalogs, old magazines, and more promotions. Then down the ramp to the main attraction: the seeds.I brought some packets of my famous bombast rose poppy seeds [posted 2013.06.02],…
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    A Leafy Indulgence

  • Three Year Wait Is Over

    Swimray
    19 May 2015 | 7:12 pm
    The 2012 plant swap peony has finally bloomed today. It was the only peony (Paeonia lactiflora), and I got it. Its owner did not remember its color or variety.In its third year now, the thing sent out several stalks this spring, and there was hope in the air. One of the stalks had three buds, and the first opened to a deep magenta, double-ruffled flower. There is a nice fragrance. We had a violent rain downpour last night, and it survived without incident.It was planted in the side garden bed, the newest and therefore the one with the poorest soil. I placed a wire support disc as it grew,…
  • May 2015 Bloom Day

    Swimray
    15 May 2015 | 5:08 am
    Garden Bloggers' Bloom DayWhat's blooming in the garden on the 15th of the monthProjects (including working in the garden,) have been taking time away from blogging this spring.Nothing much on this bloom day, my 16th since blogging. Bearded iris galore, but you've seen them last year. May is a dead time in my garden before most impressive perennials get going and after the spring bulbs. So I tried for some smaller closeups, but need to get a new camera - this pocket Cannon Elph I used for all my photos over the past 12 years is beginning to show age with less and less clarity.Kalmia latifolia…
  • My Tulips Smell

    Swimray
    24 Apr 2015 | 7:02 pm
    Being in an area that goes from winter to summer in a two weeks, growing tulips is a challenge. In about the span of one week, they open, bloom, and get fried to a crisp. In subsequent years, whether left in the ground or lifted in the spring and replanted in the fall, they are a big disappointment. So like an addict, I try to stay clean of spending money on tulips.Every so often in the fall, photos on the tulip packages in the local nurseries (along with a discounted price) tempt me to a point of giving in. And after they bloom one year, my tulip has-beens proudly produce big leaves year…
  • Winter Walk Off

    Swimray
    19 Mar 2015 | 8:32 pm
    With a few minutes until the deadline for a winter walk off post, it seems I am almost late for everything these days. For yet another year, I chose to walk around Old Town Alexandria where I work. There is so much detail and little things to see. I start by heading to the water. The Potomac River was the lifeblood of our early historic seaport town.This anchor is placed prominently at the intersection of two paths. There is no information displayed.The McIlhenny Seaport Center. I don't know much about this place in such a prominent location along the river. Having looked through the window a…
  • The Quincunx And The Olitory

    Swimray
    10 Feb 2015 | 7:53 pm
    I added quincunx and olitory to my lexicon. Read on and you will too.2015 gardening began this weekend. I packed up and labeled my contributions for the Washington Gardener Magazine annual Seed Exchange. This one held in Virginia is scheduled on the first weekend in February. The day's program began at the registration table to pick up my goody bag of seeds and promotions. Then on to peruse the table full of garden catalogs, old magazines, and more promotions. Then down the ramp to the main attraction: the seeds.I brought some packets of my famous bombast rose poppy seeds [posted 2013.06.02],…
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    Garden Rant

  • Groundcovers Make the Rose Garden by Susan Harris

    Susan Harris
    22 May 2015 | 4:15 am
    I’m happy to see that (some) rose gardens are looking better these days, thanks to their good-looking and super-performing groundcovers. To my eyes, they cover all sorts of rosebush deficiencies throughout the year.  (Love the blooms; the plants not so much.) Here are some of my favorites, all appearing now at the U.S. Botanic Garden. These first 2 shots were taken on April 4,  when the only blooms in the Rose Garden are from early daffodils, but this Sedum ‘Angelina’ is already looking fabulous. Didn’t look bad in January, either. (That’s my now-vintage…
  • Saving Spiders by Evelyn Hadden

    Evelyn Hadden
    19 May 2015 | 10:52 pm
    Short of learning to teleport them, this is my favorite method of moving spiders from indoors to outdoors. Last year, I was organizing my new home and found myself in the bathroom doodad aisle of the local “everything” store, holding a blue glass jar with a fitted glass lid. It was just the type of item I usually talk myself out of buying. Years of decluttering have drilled into my head that I’m more likely to continue to appreciate useful items than purely decorative ones. I put it down and kept moving. After adding a few more useful items to my cart, I walked back to the blue glass…
  • It wouldn’t be spring without them by Elizabeth Licata

    Elizabeth Licata
    19 May 2015 | 5:30 am
    T. acuminata Gardeners give up on tulips for good reasons. They’re prime deer food, coming at a time at the end of winter when I suppose the creatures are extra hungry. The hybrids don’t reliably perennialize, generally faltering and disappearing after two or three years. The foliage is unattractive as it ages, and you have to have other plants emerging to take over when the tulips are gone in late spring. Finally, a big part of the US doesn’t have the cold winters needed for the dormancy period of these and many other bulbs. When I started gardening seriously about sixteen years ago,…
  • Growing Popularity of Gardening in DC by Susan Harris

    Susan Harris
    18 May 2015 | 6:48 am
    With legalization of pot in DC – in small amounts – residents are showing a remarkable interest in gardening, with one website happily soliciting photos from growers. Growers are careful to show just six plants (the maximum allowed) or post anonymously. As pointed out in today’s Washington Post, DC’s law weirdly doesn’t decriminalize the purchase of pot, so business is great for the dealers. Growing Popularity of Gardening in DC originally appeared on Garden Rant on May 18, 2015.
  • Scenes from the Georgetown Garden Tour by Susan Harris

    Susan Harris
    15 May 2015 | 4:58 am
    I recently attended the Georgetown Garden Tour in DC’s toniest neighborhood to find out how the other half gardens spends money on their yards, and naturally I have some comments about all that. Let’s start with the estate above, which was built as a home for the son of the Cafritz family next door. My tour-going companion told me this large gravel drive-up space is all the rage in England. I like the combination of modern art and traditional home style. But notice that the evil English ivy is covering the  facade! And it’s high enough to have matured and will set berries,…
 
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    Future House Farm

  • Preparing our Community Garden Plot

    7 May 2015 | 5:43 pm
    Last year we let our community garden plot get a little out of control. Typically we try to go no-till, but this time I needed the help.
  • Planting Beans

    5 May 2015 | 7:32 pm
    Jude has grown into an incredible garden helper. 
  • A Day with Will Allen

    28 Apr 2015 | 6:53 pm
    So we got to meet Will Allen. He came to our school to be the keynote speaker for a yearlong program I ran title "Agriculture and the American Identity." The event was surreal.The program gave me the time and resources to think about food and food production in ways I had not anticipated. Now I know that I've been far too absent from this rag to go off on a rant; so I'll save us all from that. However, there is something I want to share, something that I have felt for a very long time, but could only put into words shortly before this photo was taken:If we believe in social justice and the…
  • First Pruning

    6 Apr 2014 | 1:07 pm
    Two years ago we planted a plum tree out back. We have very little experience pruning, but we figured—What the hell, let's go for it. There is no established cone or goblet shape, I just didn't see how to do it. What we did do was eliminate any crossing branches and tall vertical spikes. Oh, and we made sure not to cut more than a third of the branches. In short, we shot from the hip and we're hoping for the best. I think it looks pretty damn good.
  • Mostly Tomatoes

    30 Mar 2014 | 11:26 am
    Our seedlings are doing great. I believe the number of tomato starts is somewhere between 100-125. A majority of these are determinate paste tomatoes for the community garden's market garden area. In a third tray we have a slew of greens and some flowers. 2014 is off to a solid start.
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    Life In Sugar Hollow

  • Well, Well, Well

    Tracey
    11 May 2015 | 12:09 pm
    Celebrating the sun, the rain, new plants and seeds that have been scattered. So many plant sales! I am trying out many new things this year - as a result of the generosity of other gardeners and their divisions. Forget-me-nots, blackberry lilies, asters, lamb's ears, 'Man in the Moon' marigolds, hollyhocks, lenten roses, obedient plants and foxgloves. I have also added a few more boxwoods and sowed seeds for four different zinnia varieties ('Blue Point,' 'Granny's Bouquet,' 'Cut and Come Again' and a diminutive variety - 'Pinwheel').There was also the transplanting of a very old…
  • When The Going Gets Great

    Tracey
    20 Apr 2015 | 6:38 am
    Hot damn, spring is here! And as a former girl from the North, I would say we earned it this go around. But all of that precipitation and those frigid temperatures were, actually, fantastic for the garden. My winter daphne is blooming and all of the bulbs appreciated their winter-time. That photo at the bottom is actually a tulip. 'Angelique.' They look like peonies. Amazing-amazing. And the bluebells are spreading more and more each year (top photo). Inside for a rainstorm yesterday, Willa and I worked on botanical letters (via The Postman's Knock's tutorial - second photo from top), after…
  • 9 Mar 2015 | 1:39 pm

    Tracey
    9 Mar 2015 | 1:39 pm
    We've been hit by several eleventh-hour snowstorms here in Virginia over the past few weeks. And we discovered a few things - one of which is that we have a perfect sledding hill right next to our house, and that sledding under a full moon is something everyone should do in their lifetime. Our little tri-colored terrier, Pearly, even hopped on for a ride. She knew what was good for her. Nothing shakes off cabin fever like flying down a slope into the dark and screaming your head off. Also, if snowed-in, blood oranges work nicely for a whisky sour.And, honestly, the rest of it is a blur. Lots…
  • The Winter, The Winter

    Tracey
    10 Feb 2015 | 10:26 am
    Lately, I feel as if my own voice has been reduced to a squeak. My multiple life roles can be a challenge to balance and as an introvert, I can only recharge through down-time that requires no verbal feedback from me (or additional stimuli). Writing needs time and thought and after responding to everyone else all day, I got nothing. I am okay with this, as long as I can pass out face first into the pillow at the end of the day, without anyone's feelings getting hurt. But my writing does suffer, or simply . . . . doesn't exist at all.Eeeeeeeeeeeeeep!The vast, quiet of winter landscapes is good…
  • Getting Back to Autumn

    Tracey
    13 Nov 2014 | 9:06 am
    A lot of cleanup happening in the garden these days. It is amazing, when I think that two years ago I was very pregnant with a big baby. (Sam was almost nine pounds when he was born - and me being 5' 1", you can imagine how I looked. I made everyone around me nervous, starting at about seven months.) And last autumn, I was whooped from work, adjusting to having a kindergartner and nursing that big baby.But this year, the mobility is back and it feels incredible! I have been raking and mulching leaves - to return to the beds for overwintering and a good feeding. I planted a fragrant winter…
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    Transatlantic Gardener

  • New plants on the Royal Horticultural Society website

    Graham Rice
    10 May 2015 | 1:00 am
    As we approach the mass launch of new varieties at this year's Chelsea Flower Show, I just thought you might like to see the new plants I've been writing up over the last few months on my New Plants blog on the Royal Horticultural Society website. Lots of goodies... And news of the newcomers at Chelsea will be here soon. 'Black Truffle': a superb new dark-leaved perennial lobelia Heavenly (more or less) hardy begonias A new star Is born: Clematis Astra Nova New blue-and-white flowered brunnera New double-flowered Christmas rose (left) The first golden-leaved pyracantha Nandina Blush Pink: new…
  • A Tale of Two Corydalis

    Graham Rice
    3 May 2015 | 4:00 am
    This is a tale of two corydalis. One spreads steadily, but very slowly, the other is worrying the invasive plants people. Corydalis solida ‘Blushing Girl’ (above) is a spring ephemeral for woodland conditions, at its peak today. It comes and goes relatively quickly in spring, then its little tubers sit and wait to do it all again the following year. The soft pink of its crowded flower heads is lovely, but it spreads only slowly. Corydalis solida has a wide European distribution and this form originates from the great Latvian plantsman Janis Ruskans. It was available in the US from the…
  • Himalayan blue poppies: A stupendous new book

    Graham Rice
    12 Apr 2015 | 3:40 am
    The blue poppies are amongst the most tantalizing plants we grow – or try to grow, at least. These exotic relatives of the corn poppy and Oriental poppy instantly attract visitors in any gardens where they’re in bloom. The Himalayan blue poppy… the very name is exciting. We’re almost in Indiana Jones country… But there’s no doubt that not only are many species difficult to grow but their classification and naming has all been more than a little baffling. So the arrival of this fat – nay, enormous – new book from the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and the expert on Meconopsis,…
  • Lettuce, golf courses and gardens - wasting precious water

    Graham Rice
    5 Apr 2015 | 5:07 am
    So, it’s finally dawning on California that there’s a water shortage. Better late than never, I suppose. But where does all the water go? Well, spectacularly inefficient irrigation of crops and golf courses, not to mention gardens, is one way it gets wasted. Like watering wheat - wheat! - above (click to enlarge) I remember, years ago, the PR guy from one of Britain’s top garden watering companies telling me – in a tipsy moment after a press party – that 85% of the water that came out of his company’s sprinklers evaporated. Wasted. Gone. Vanished into thin air. Research at the…
  • Anniversary pansies span the years and the river

    Graham Rice
    1 Apr 2015 | 4:12 am
    Now here’s a way to celebrate! British seed and plant company Thompson & Morgan celebrates its 160th anniversary this year and to mark the occasion they’ve done something rather amazing. They’ve hung 320 hanging baskets from a bridge over the river near their headquarters in Suffolk, 160 on each side (click the picture to enlarge). And they’re all planted with T&M’s brand new, own-bred, fragrant, trailing viola mixture – ‘Waterfall’ (Brits will be able to order it in May). First, they hired specialist highway contractors to fix the 320 heavy-duty hanging brackets in place,…
 
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    WashingtonGardener

  • Fenton Friday: Pleased with the Peas!

    WashingtonGardener
    22 May 2015 | 4:33 pm
    The Sugarsnap Peas are starting to come in at my community garden plot. Picked a couple yesterday and a handful today. I should have many more by Monday. This year, I planted far fewer pea plants as I overdid it in previous years, I may be regretting that choice now.The strawberries are going gangbusters now. It looks like I will need help to harvest them when the bulk ripen up in the next week or so. I will see if I can keep up with them. I really need to thin the plants out after this season and not let them take over my plot, as they definitely want to do. I had hoped to put in my…
  • Washington Gardener Magazine May 2015 ~ Garden Tours Round-Up, Top Local Azalea Spots, Basil Growing Tips, Kniphofia Plant Profile, and much more

    WashingtonGardener
    21 May 2015 | 5:00 pm
    The May 2015 issue of Washington Gardener Magazine is now out and is posted at: http://issuu.com/washingtongardener/docs/washingtongardenermay15 This issue includes: ~ Garden Tours Round-Up: Explore the Best Private Gardens in our Region~ Top Local Spots for Azalea Viewing~ May-June Garden Tasks List~ Kniphofia: Red Hot Poker  Plant Profile~ Tomato Terms and Types Defined~ New Strawberry Cultivar~ Meet Ari Novy, Executive Director of US Botanic Garden~ Easy Basil Growing Tips (and a terrific Pesto Recipe!)~ Local Garden Events Listingand much more...Note that any submissions, event…
  • ADVERTISER OF THE WEEK: Cannabis Concepts

    WashingtonGardener
    21 May 2015 | 9:09 am
    A Cannabis Concepts Event....Washington, DC Cannabis Cultivation Seminar on Saturday, July 18, 2015 on 9:30 AM to 3:30 PM. Learn to grow cannabis from a experienced cultivator with experience growing legal cannabis in Amsterdam. Visit: www.thecannabisconcepts.com.ADVERTISER OF THE WEEK Details:Every Thursday on the Washington Gardener Magazine Facebook page, Blog, and Yahoo list we feature a current advertiser from our monthly digital magazine. To advertise with us, contact wgardenermag@aol.com today.
  • Video Wednesday: Hope in Healthy Soil

    WashingtonGardener
    20 May 2015 | 10:08 am
    From the USDA: To most people, soil is far from huggable. But after watching this new, 90-second YouTube ad, the video’s producers hope viewers will embrace it with new-found respect and admiration. Because healthy soil, the ad suggests, could provide solutions to some of our planet’s biggest challenges.   As part of its “Unlock the Secrets in the Soil” campaign, USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) has released a new, 90-second public service announcement that encapsulates “The hope in healthy soil.”   According to Ron Nichols, the…
  • Fenton Friday: First Strawberries and Carrots

    WashingtonGardener
    15 May 2015 | 6:23 pm
    Another dry week here, which meant almost daily watering at my community garden plot. One blessing is that we finally received a load of compost and wood chips as my pathways and beds were an explosion of weeds overnight!I spent an hour yesterday just pulling out thistles that seem to have appeared out of nowhere.While weeding, I was amazed to see what looked like a touch of red on a couple of my strawberries and today I returned to find 3 of them full ripe! I ate them immediately and also pulled out a few carrots to check on them, though small, they are sweet and delicious.How is your edible…
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    A Tidewater Gardener

  • Briefly Back in Retail

    Les
    11 May 2015 | 5:14 pm
         My work colleagues and I have lately been consumed with preparing for and running this past weekend's annual plant sale at the Norfolk Botanical Gardens. We began meeting shortly after last year's sale to decide which plants to carry. Some of our offerings came from cuttings or divisions taken from the garden's collections, while others we bring in as plugs or as bare-root plants to grow on.
  • A Weekend in Williamsbug

    Les
    19 Apr 2015 | 2:42 pm
         I spent last weekend at the Williamsburg Garden Symposium. I have always wanted to attend this event, but its timing and my money never aligned. However, I was invited to speak at this year's event, and I agreed before self-doubt had a chance to step in and sway me otherwise. While I am not adverse to public speaking, and in fact do it frequently, this talk was my highest profiled gig to
  • Bloom Day - Last Minute Filing

    Les
    15 Apr 2015 | 5:39 pm
         When I got home from work today I took my usual stroll around the garden to see what might have opened or may have leafed out today. In the middle of my inspection I had an aha moment when it dawned on me that today was not only tax day, but was also Bloom Day. I didn't need to worry about the taxes, so I went inside to get my camera. (If you hover over the photos, the plant's name should
  • Out to Lunch

    Les
    8 Apr 2015 | 4:52 pm
         I've been trying to keep my camera close for the past few weeks, hoping to be inspired by the unfolding spring. Although we have had some beautiful weather lately, I just haven't been able to enjoy the season like I thought I would. I am sure being under the weather probably has had something to do with it. Today that changed, and it wasn't blue skies that brought me out of my funk; it was
  • Magazine Worthy

    Les
    30 Mar 2015 | 5:44 pm
         Late last summer I had a chance to visit the garden of a co-worker. Hearing others talk about how nice it was, and knowing the garden had been on a tour sponsored by the Norfolk Botanical Garden, I pestered her into letting me come see for myself, camera in hand. As much as I love seeing what other gardeners have created, I also had been on the lookout for an opportunity to write another
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    clay and limestone

  • Almost Wordless Wednesday

    Gail
    13 May 2015 | 6:33 am
    The garden this morningxoxogailGail Eichelberger is a gardener and therapist in Middle Tennessee. She loves wildflowers and native plants and thoroughly enjoys writing about the ones she grows at Clay and Limestone. She reminds all that the words and images are the property of the author and cannot be used without written permission. Subscribe in a reader
  • Erigeron philadelphicus for National Wildflower Week

    Gail
    8 May 2015 | 8:24 am
    Common fleabane is a biennial/short lived perennial that blooms from April through July in my Middle Tennessee garden. It is native throughout much of the US and Canada and is often seen growing in open fields, grassy ares/lawns and the edges of woodlands. While it prefers a moist soil it will adapt to almost any soil type and sets seeds with abandon; thus this Asteraceae family member is often seen as a weed instead of the ecologically valuable pollinator plant that it is. the flowers are sometimes a lovely pinkThe pollen or nectar of the flowers attracts many kinds of insects,…
  • National Wildflower Week: Eastern Columbine

    Gail
    7 May 2015 | 7:58 am
    Beloved of hummingbirds and bumblebees, Aquilegia canadensis's flower lanterns are a must have for any wildlife gardener in the Eastern United States.Red or Eastern Columbine (Aquilegia canadensis L.)I discovered them in my garden the Spring after we moved here and they have been stars ever since. They're native to the Central Basin where I garden, but, I've always thought of them as a gift of the floral arranger who once lived here. Eastern Columbine's bloom period overlaps with Golden ragwort and Phlox pilosa and I dubbed them the Happy Trinity of Clay and Limestone. In my metaphorical…
  • Wordless Wednesday for National Wildflower Week: Tradescantia virginiana

    Gail
    6 May 2015 | 6:00 am
     xoxogailGail Eichelberger is a gardener and therapist in Middle Tennessee. She loves wildflowers and native plants and thoroughly enjoys writing about the ones she grows at Clay and Limestone. She reminds all that the words and images are the property of the author and cannot be used without written permission. Subscribe in a reader
  • Hydrophyllum appendiculatum in Celebration of National Wildflower Week

    Gail
    5 May 2015 | 5:28 am
    Appendaged waterleaf/Great waterleaf is a biennial plant about 1–2½' tall that I wish made a bigger impact in my garden. It's found a damp space and every year there is at least one plant, of which I am most  greatful. It's a sweet flower and has common characteristic of the Hydrophylloideae family~a taprooted plant whose flowers have 5 petals and 5 stamens. The flowers of this plant are perfect. Of course they are lovely, but, in botany terms that means that each individual flower has both male and female structures (stamens and carpels). The lovely pale purple flowers are very like…
 
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    Dirt Therapy

  • Rosy close-ups

    Phillip Oliver
    22 May 2015 | 1:53 pm
    "Sweet Chariot""Petite Pink Scotch""Lyric""Daydream""Buff Beauty" Text and photos by Phillip Oliver, Dirt Therapy
  • May roses

    Phillip Oliver
    11 May 2015 | 11:20 am
    "Rambling Rector" on pergola"Sea Foam" and "Blaze" roses along with honeysuckle "American Beauty""Gartendirektor Otto Linne" (hedge) and "Tausendschon" on back of fence. "Veilchenblau" "Veilchenblau"Text and photos by Phillip Oliver, Dirt Therapy
  • April Beauties

    Phillip Oliver
    11 Apr 2015 | 6:07 pm
    Azalea "Coral Bells"A florist azalea that I received when my father died 14 years ago.Unknown azaleaChinese SnowballViburnum macrocephalum)Deutzia gracilisEpimedium rubrumSolomon's Seal, Jacob's Ladder, EpimediumLeatherleaf Viburnum (Viburnum rhytidophyllum)Persicaria microcephala Red DragonSpanish Bluebells (Hyacinthoides) Bridal Wreath Spiraea (Spiraea prunifolia) White Chinese Wisteria (Wisteria sinensis 'Alba') White Chinese Wisteria (Wisteria sinensis 'Alba') Text and photos by Phillip Oliver, Dirt Therapy
  • Latest blooms

    Phillip Oliver
    6 Apr 2015 | 1:01 pm
     Kerria (Easter Rose) Lilac "Declaration"Money Plant (Lunaria) Hardy Orange (Poncirus trifoliata) Tree Peony foliage and Euphorbia "Despina" Viburnum "Mohawk" Viburnum "Mohawk"Viburnum "Mohawk"  Darwin Tulip Darwin TulipText and photos by Phillip Oliver, Dirt Therapy
  • The garden is waking up

    Phillip Oliver
    27 Mar 2015 | 12:12 pm
    Yoshino CherryMy last post was exactly one month ago and I was posting photos of the snow. A lot has changed in just a few weeks and it is beginning to look a lot like Spring! A cold front brought rain and colder temperatures today but the first part of the week was great. I have been pruning and mulching. Here are a few photos taken yesterday -Jacob's Ladder "Stairway to Heaven" Star Magnolia Anenome nemerosaEpimediumEpimedium Saucer Magnolia "Rustica Rubra"Camellia "Taylor's Perfection"Text and photos by Phillip Oliver, Dirt Therapy
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    Natural Gardening

  • Composting on a city scale

    Lisa Wagner
    22 May 2015 | 6:34 pm
    Great to see cities harvesting the organic waste stream!  Here's NYC's version. As an ecologist and gardener, it's always seemed nuts to me to throw away anything compostable. I've worn only clothes made from renewable sources for many decades now (cotton, linen, wool, hemp, etc.) since learning the difference in college, and almost always buy "recycled" clothing, too, at local thrift and consignment shops. I love the 'passing it forward' ethos that it represents, even though I could easily buy "new" clothes. Perhaps I'm just distancing myself one or two degrees from…
  • A robust hemlock and flame azalea in full flower

    Lisa
    22 May 2015 | 3:07 pm
    Adding plants... This Eastern hemlock and Rhododenron calendulaceum (in flower) have flourished in the side garden between our house and the neighbors. We're flanked by a rental house on one side and a probably century-old brick apartment building on the other; we've been cleaning up and gardening on both sides (with the owners' blessings), with lots of native plants and others, since we first bought this house over 7 years ago.It's amazing now to reflect on what a transformation that it's been so far. That's the magic of gardening! Posted with Blogsy
  • A lovely white rose

    Lisa Wagner
    19 May 2015 | 6:53 pm
    When the Garden Blogger's Fling was in Asheville a few years ago, I was lucky enough to win a gift certificate from a rose grower as a raffle gift.  She was a Florida rose grower who grew all sorts of heirloom roses, etc.I'm not a rose person who's willing to coddle them, so I picked the hardiest white climbing rose that she had in her catalog.It's done just fine.  It drops all of its leaves early due to some sort of leaf spot, but flowers quite nicely.  This spring is the best ever!
  • Bird communication

    Lisa Wagner
    18 May 2015 | 6:58 pm
    An illuminating piece about birds at the NYT!
  • Tomatoes, peppers, basil, and eggplant

    Lisa Wagner
    10 May 2015 | 6:36 pm
    I finally managed to snag warm-season transplants last week, and they're now in the ground (with the usual dance around spinach, lettuce, garlic, and the peas that are finally growing rapidly -- probably just to be zapped by hot dry weather).Soon to follow are the direct-seeded warm season veggies, although not that many. I sorted through my seeds today, matching up space to seed and will need to be careful.  I'm mindful of climbing squash in the front garden looking AWFUL in mid-season, because of powderly mildew!I think I'll sow pole beans of various sorts tomorrow, set up…
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    Outside Clyde

  • Miranda Gets Her First Bubble

    Christopher C. NC
    22 May 2015 | 5:30 pm
    My idea of colored glass balls for Miranda the Mermaid was really liked. The first ball was produced. There will be more to come. I buy plants and other needed garden supplies. The Lady of the House does the rest of the shopping. When I had the idea I went online and looked. They will be easy to find. Glass balls are an ad everywhere I go online now of course.
  • Another Cracked Pot

    Christopher C. NC
    21 May 2015 | 7:44 pm
    I went to my favorite local independent garden center today and came home with another cracked pot for the garden. I have first dibs on cracked pots there. I already knew where I wanted to put it. When the second cracked pot was placed in the garden the need for and siting of a third one shouted out right away. I told my cracked pot dealer I wanted another big one when it
  • Lorelei Gets Around

    Christopher C. NC
    20 May 2015 | 7:11 pm
    It was just a quick drive by viewing to determine how long before my next visit. There she was stealing the show, Lorelei, sent off as a gift maybe three years ago. Lorelei not once but twice, grown into big fat clumps from small divisions. At this point there is plenty more Lorelei to spread around. But I was far more intrigued by this unknown
  • Hiding In Plain Sight

    Christopher C. NC
    18 May 2015 | 8:02 pm
    There is something about the roadside vegetable garden. Every time I have been up there working this year one or more cars have stopped to compliment the garden or one of my roadside attractions. My wildflower surround is not quite tall enough to hide me while I am up there yet. I keep thinking I need me some bib overalls, no shirt, to enhance the scenery even more. Don't I wish. Perhaps almost
  • They Left With Lorelei

    Christopher C. NC
    17 May 2015 | 6:16 pm
    Bulbarella is single handedly going to populate the entire county and beyond with Lorelei iris. Half or more of the visitors to the wild cultivated gardens eventually leave carrying some Lorelei. It is one prolific iris that blooms no matter what. My part of the garden was toured first. It is still pretty much all green. The really big show starts when you head down the
 
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    Growing The Home Garden

  • Propagating Grape Vines Through Greenwood Cuttings - Video

    15 May 2015 | 3:43 pm
    I took a short video today of some grape vine cuttings I'm attempting to root. Grape vines root easily from greenwood cuttings or from hardwood cuttings. I prefer the greenwood cutting method just because they seem to root a lot faster and I get the pleasure of faster gratification! Hopefully in about 6 weeks I'll have some rooted grape vine cuttings that I can pot up then plant this fall. Here's the video, thanks for watching!Rooting Grape Vines from Greenwood CuttingsSubscribe to read more from The Home Garden Originally written by Dave @ The Home Garden Not to be reproduced or re-blogged…
  • Greenworks Pro 80V 18 Inch Chainsaw Review

    22 Apr 2015 | 6:44 am
    When you think about power tools do you think electric? Maybe it's time you should! Recently Greenworks sent me their battery powered Greeworks Pro 80Volt 18" Chainsaw to test. I had some doubts. Could a battery powered chainsaw actually cut through well enough to be a part of my arsenal of power tools? Would a charge last long enough to get through all the jobs I would need to attack in one day? Would the chainsaw be able to be recharged fast enough to get back to work when it did run out of energy? Those were the questions in my head and probably the questions anyone wanting to purchase a…
  • Redbuds in the Spring Garden (Cercis canadensis)

    2 Apr 2015 | 6:13 am
    Spring in many ways is just like listening to your favorite song. The parts of the song that make it special to you are those that make you replay it countless times over and over again. The chorus of springtime is very much the same. Old favorites pop up again and again for us to enjoy. One of my favorite trees here in Tennessee is the redbud (Cercis canadensis). It's native to our area and blooms prolifically in the spring. There are areas of our state where the redbuds grow in such quantities that you feel like you are inside of a painting. Nature's artwork is hard to top!It's a special…
  • Springtime in the Garden (Photos)

    22 Mar 2015 | 3:21 pm
    Spring is here and the garden is most certainly coming alive! Unfortunately some freezing temperatures are in the forecast for later in the week here in Tennessee. Here's a quick look at what you will find in my garden at the moment!Purple leaf plum and forsythia  I trimmed the forsythia back after it bloomed last year into more of a small shrub. They can get very large if you let them grow. Forsythias are an easy plant to propagate if you want more of them. Just take a cutting 4-5 inches long and place it in a pot of soil and keep moist. There is no need for rooting hormone to propagate…
  • Planting Azaleas from Monrovia

    15 Mar 2015 | 6:49 pm
    Today was a fantastic day to be outdoors, and of course for most of the time being outdoors means I'm planting something! Today I planted three azaleas into one of my gardens courtesy of Monrovia. Monrovia gave me an opportunity to try out these 'Savannah Sunset' azaleas in my garden. 'Savannah Sunset' is a part of Monrovia's Bloom N' Again collection of repeat blooming azaleas. They will bloom in the spring then produce more blooms in the fall!When planting any plant the location is very important. Azaleas generally prefer a part sun location with an acidic soil. If your soil isn't acidic…
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    Sharing Nature's Garden

  • Magical mulch transforms the garden...

    Diana
    4 May 2015 | 7:15 pm
    I love spring.  I love the first bulbs, buds and beautiful colors that emerge in the landscape.Once pruning is done, new plants are planted and the garden is basically on its way,  I'm ready for the next color in the garden -- brown.That's right.  Not dead brown, but bright, organic great-smelling mulch brown.  Native Texas hardwood much is my favorite.  It helps protect the plants from the heat and the cold, and it helps keep precious moisture in during the drought. And it is another color in the garden -- it provides a great deal of the contrast we want in our…
  • One for me, one for you, one for me, one for you...

    Diana
    3 May 2015 | 6:30 am
    Passalong.  One of my favorite words.  This simple word represents the cornerstone of gardening.  Just as heirloom vegetable seeds, carefully preserved and handed down from generation to generation, passalong plants represent the intricately woven past of our gardens.I'm fortunate to be part of a group of more than 50 other gardeners in the Austin area that write garden blogs.  While not everyone in the group is active, a core group of gardeners meets once a month at someone's garden to oooh and ahhh, commiserate, eat, drink, teach, and share in the joy of gardening. …
  • Spring spruce up from a wide angle lens

    Diana
    28 Apr 2015 | 4:15 pm
    One of the rites of spring (even though it has already been 94 degrees here in Austin, Texas), after the whining about winter, pruning, planting and mulching, is taking photos of the garden as it grows.I recently bought a wide angle lens, primarily for use in photographing our landscaping jobs and getting a good overview.  But, I haven't put it to use here at home. When I finished the recent spring planting and mulching work on the back garden (which is technically outside of our property line in the neighborhood easement), I decided to try out the new lens. If you're wondering…
  • What's down there inside of all these bluebonnets?

    Diana
    12 Apr 2015 | 8:36 am
    Who knew that dogs were so interested in bluebonnets?  She's my sniffer girl - part long-legged hound, part catahoula and part husky.Truth be told, she's not really that interested in the bluebonnets - but she does like having a nice winecup snack.Last year, she uprooted all of my winecup plants in this flagstone and decomposed granite path.  Apparently this beautiful trailing wildflower's tuberous roots are quite tasty!Side note:  Dakota has also been known to dig up and eat other bulbs, like agapanthus.  I dug it out of the front garden because the deer were eating…
  • Brilliant bluebonnets brighten the spring countryside in Central Texas...

    Diana
    11 Apr 2015 | 7:30 am
    It's a banner year for Texas wildflowers.  Just the right amount of fall and spring rain has bluebonnets, Indian paintbrush, Indian Blanket and a slew of other wildflowers cover Central Texas.This burst of blooms even made the national news; I was delighted to see it on Monday night's NBC Nightly News.  We're so proud of our wildflower displays that have their roots in the beautification efforts started by Lady Bird Johnson while her husband was president.Lady Bird wanted to clean up Washington D.C. and the country's highways by regulating billboards, junkyards and other unsightly…
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    Kiss my Aster!

  • (Keep Feeling) Fasciation

    Kiss My Aster!
    6 May 2015 | 1:31 pm
    I remember seeing some seriously messed-up-by-Mother-Nature mutant dandelions when I was a kid, sometimes they looked like 15 stems melted together, sometimes just one giant tube. Although, I'm sure I saw them all the time because I took the time to study dandelions like it was my job when I was 6. Now that I've grown up (physically and not mentally) and actually made it my job, I see these super-sized dandelions less often (again, because I spend less time looking) but I've learned that the correct term for them is "fasciated" or "fasciation". I saw one in my yard today:In recent years, as…
  • Hey girl, what's your garden fantasy?

    Kiss My Aster!
    17 Apr 2015 | 10:03 am
  • Hey Girl: Spring Clean Up Edition

    Kiss My Aster!
    14 Mar 2015 | 1:29 pm
    For the record, I only make these because you like them.If it were up to me, it'd be Ewan McGregor.I hardly know who Ryan Gosling is. Go figure!
  • Things That Are Going DOWN

    Kiss My Aster!
    10 Mar 2015 | 8:44 am
    1. All of a sudden, spring is here. The snow is melting and I should be able to actually SEE my garden by the end of the day. It hasn't been accessible in a loooooong time. It's either been too cold or required a snowsuit. I don't play that shizz.2. I've opened a vintage shop at kissmyaster.com after some soul searching. It has been a great process so far but now my house is filled with vintage crap, everywhere. I'm not embarrassed to say that Hazel's old pack n play is in the living room and filled with clothing to photograph and measure. Soon I'll have plants and planters available, I…
  • Hey Valentine!

    Kiss My Aster!
    13 Feb 2015 | 8:55 am
    I have a soft spot for Valentine's day, even though I'm far from romantic. So I made these for you. Cut, sign and distribute as needed.
 
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    Our Little Acre

  • There's a New Tool in Town! Barebones Hori Hori Garden Knife (+ a giveaway!)

    Kylee Baumle
    26 Apr 2015 | 11:23 am
    This past week's Earth Day festivities, ongoing since the first Earth Day in 1970, are meant to call attention to our planet and to urge us to be kind to it. It is life-giving in that we derive our sustenance from it, either directly or indirectly. Did you do anything special to observe Earth Day?Just a couple of days before, I had received a new tool in the mail to test. It was not only new to me, but new to the rest of the world as well, with it being officially introduced on Earth Day by Barebones. The Hori Hori knife is a multi-purpose tool that comes in handy in ways that might surprise…
  • Wordless Wednesday: Winter Jewels™ 'Painted Doubles'

    Kylee Baumle
    15 Apr 2015 | 8:01 pm
    I picked this up today at The Anderson's in Maumee, Ohio, making it the first official plant purchase of the 2015 season. A fine choice, don't you think?Helleborus Winter Jewels™ 'Painted Doubles'Hybridized by Marietta O'Byrne, owner of Northwest Garden Nursery in Oregon, this fully double hellebore is just one of the Winter Jewels™ series.Of course, I want all of them.
  • Weekend Wisdom: I Like the Way the Greeks Do It

    Kylee Baumle
    12 Apr 2015 | 7:19 am
    Having been the guest in homes outside the U.S., I know that different locations and cultures have what they consider to be proper guest etiquette. I try to take my cues from my hosts, but sometimes you just don't know what to give your host as a thank you gift for having you in their home, whether it be for a meal or for a few days.Huffington Post to the rescue! Photo of Aglaonema from my book, Indoor Plant Décor: The DesignStylebook for HouseplantsA cut flower bouquet is always in good taste for your host, now matter where you live, but in Greece, a potted plant is a common gift.Despina…
  • The Trees of Our Little Acre: Cornelian Cherry

    Kylee Baumle
    11 Apr 2015 | 8:13 pm
    Several years ago, I visited the historic home of Gene Stratton-Porter (1863-1924), Indiana author of more than 20 books, and a celebrated naturalist. In the latter part of her life, Gene and her husband built a home near Rome City, Ind., on Sylvan Lake, which they called "Cabin in the Wildflower Woods." There, she worked on her nature studies and her writing, before moving to Los Angeles about 1920, so that she could be more involved in the making of movies based on her books.Cabin in the Wildflower WoodsHome of Gene Stratton-PorterWhen I visited the cabin, I was given a tour of the gardens,…
  • 65 Gallons of Sap on the Wall...

    Kylee Baumle
    7 Apr 2015 | 7:42 pm
    Mmmmm...The second year of maple syrup making is now completed. We were first-timers last year and we beat ourselves on the noggins for not doing it before then. Eating real maple syrup made from the sap of your own trees is like a taste of heavenly nectar.We were just a tad late getting the trees tapped last year, so I watched the weather closely this year in order to take advantage of the sap season as long as possible. Sap begins to flow when the daytime temperatures are above freezing, but the night temperatures are below.Our first taps went into the trees on March 2nd and we found that…
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    Our Twenty Minute Kitchen Garden

  • Before and After: What 20 Minutes Looks Like (3)

    20 Minute Jim
    22 May 2015 | 8:00 am
    It’s hard to believe that meaningful amounts of gardening can be accomplished in just 20 minutes. If there’s a trick, it’s learning to imagine what you can get get done and not over extending yourself. In the interest of transparency, Jan and I have started this series of posts about what 20 minutes looks like. […] The post Before and After: What 20 Minutes Looks Like (3) appeared first on Our Twenty Minute Kitchen Garden. Related posts: Before and After: What 20 Minutes Looks Like (1) It’s hard to believe that meaningful amounts of gardening can... Before and After: What 20…
  • Before and After: What 20 Minutes Looks Like (2)

    20 Minute Jim
    20 May 2015 | 7:00 am
    It’s hard to believe that meaningful amounts of gardening can be accomplished in just 20 minutes. If there’s a trick, it’s learning to imagine what you can get get done and not over extending yourself. In the interest of transparency, Jan and I have started this series of posts about what 20 minutes looks like. […] The post Before and After: What 20 Minutes Looks Like (2) appeared first on Our Twenty Minute Kitchen Garden. Related posts: Before and After: What 20 Minutes Looks Like (1) It’s hard to believe that meaningful amounts of gardening can... 5 Tips on how to shop for…
  • Before and After: What 20 Minutes Looks Like (1)

    Jardinier
    18 May 2015 | 7:00 am
    It’s hard to believe that meaningful amounts of gardening can be accomplished in just 20 minutes. If there’s a trick, it’s learning to imagine what you can get get done and not over extending yourself. In the interest of transparency, Jan and I have started this series of posts about what 20 minutes looks like. […] The post Before and After: What 20 Minutes Looks Like (1) appeared first on Our Twenty Minute Kitchen Garden. Related posts: Ground Rules #1 – 20 Minutes on Average Our first rule of thumb is to work 20 minutes... It’s THAT Time of the Season…
  • Gardening Presentations at Penguicon 2015

    20 Minute Jan
    21 Apr 2015 | 7:58 pm
    This coming weekend is Penguincon 2015, and we’re very excited to attend once again. What is Penguicon? Penguicon is defines itself as a not-for profit, community run convention for open source software, science fiction, music, gaming, DIY and more. I’ve attended 3 Penguicons in the past, and I can say without hesitation that it’s educational, […] The post Gardening Presentations at Penguicon 2015 appeared first on Our Twenty Minute Kitchen Garden. Related posts: Local clubs provide opportunities to make new gardening friends One of the unexpected benefits of…
  • Planting your first garden — without Pinterest!

    20 Minute Jan
    10 Apr 2015 | 2:15 pm
    Is 2015 going to be your year, the year that you are going to make that dream of a first garden into a reality? Growing a first garden can be a scary proposition, one full of expectations and unknowns. Your first inclination might be to run to Pinterest for inspiration. The site is chock full […] The post Planting your first garden — without Pinterest! appeared first on Our Twenty Minute Kitchen Garden. Related posts: 5 Reasons to plant a vegetable garden this year… even if you’ve never done it before! If you’ve ever wanted to have a vegetable garden, this... How…
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    The Gardens of Petersonville

  • Garden Tours and Durantas

    Sheila
    13 May 2015 | 1:51 pm
    So last weekend was the Master Gardener garden tour and I wish I had some great photos to share but I was too busy running around visiting with people to take pictures! It was a nice cool day for visiting gardens and we had lots of guests. It is always nice to have other gardeners that actually know what they are looking at visit the gardens. When someone gets excited over my tall oakleaf hydrangea or rice flower bush it is so rewarding that all the hours preparing seem worth it. One of the shrubs looking especially nice that day was this duranta in the garden by the front door. I had to tell…
  • Welcoming Garden Visitors

    Sheila
    6 May 2015 | 7:36 pm
    This weekend my SJC garden will be open to the Orange County Master Gardeners as a part of their annual tour. This is the third time over the past eight years I have participated and I am always happy to share my garden and experiences with my fellow Master Gardeners. Contrary to what most people may think, gardeners are much more forgiving as visitors to a garden, probably because they really understand just how difficult it is to create and keep up a beautiful space, especially when trying to practice ecologically responsible habits. I have to say though, while going back through pictures…
  • High Praise for Bonica

    Sheila
    5 May 2015 | 9:04 pm
    These 'Bonica' roses in Laguna have not been fertilized in probably ten years but they continue to produce a ton of blooms every year. I must say they hardly miss me at all! I would highly recommend this rose for a low maintenance - high performance pink rose that performs all summer long! It would make a lovely shrub.
  • The Butterfly Bush

    Sheila
    29 Apr 2015 | 8:04 pm
    There are butterflies everywhere and I have to give credit to the aptly named butterfly bush or buddleia. I have a few of them around the gardens but there is one that is always host to at least one butterfly whenever you look at it, this lovely purple one. Unfortunately it is situated in a bed that faces west and the plant shows its best side to the neighbors horse stalls and we get a look at the rangy back side of the plant, but I'll put up with that because the butterflies love it! It is fragrant and about five feet tall. I do cut the flowers and they are lovely, long lasting additions to…
  • Adding Alstroemeria

    Sheila
    28 Apr 2015 | 8:16 am
     Every year I say I'm going to plant some more alstoemerias and I finally did! I always claim these are perennials that I grow mainly for their cut flowers that last for a couple weeks in a vase and fill in with other cut flowers beautifully, but I have to admit that they bloom for months and months and are never bothered by bugs or diseases. They are always a nice spot of color in the garden almost year round. Although I am guilty of taking them a bit for granted because they seem to thrive on neglect and any fertilizer that makes it to the garden is focused on the high demand…
 
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    Blog the blogging nurseryman- The Golden Gecko Garden Center

  • It's compost tea time!

    Trey Pitsenberger
    20 May 2015 | 4:07 pm
    We are brewing compost tea today! It will be available for sale Thursday, Friday, and Saturday. Bring your own clean container with tight lid, or buy 5 gallons and get a free container with lid, that you can use over and over again. $5 per gallon.
  • We are having a tomato sale!

    Trey Pitsenberger
    15 May 2015 | 1:58 pm
    Check out some of the great varieties we have available.
  • Floating row covers for frost and hail protection

    Trey Pitsenberger
    14 May 2015 | 12:24 pm
    Weather forecast for this afternoon includes the possibility of hail. See the video below for how we protect our tender plants. We carry the floating row cover here.
  • High Density Fruit Tree Planting Video

    Trey Pitsenberger
    14 May 2015 | 7:58 am
    We we're going through our YouTube channel last night for the first time in a long time. Never have given it much thought but was surprised to see this short 50 second video I made a number of years ago had reached 38,300 views! Even more surprising was the majority of views are from India. I think it's time to do a few more.
  • Tomato seedling sale

    Trey Pitsenberger
    13 May 2015 | 10:37 am
    We have an abundance of organically grown tomato starts. Actually more than we want to have here right now. So, tomato starts are now on sale for 1.99ea. (regular 2.99). Don't miss out as the selection is as large as it's going to be this year. Many heirlooms available.
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    Skippy's Vegetable Garden

  • freight farming?

    kathy
    21 May 2015 | 5:06 pm
    Have you read about freight farming? In Boston, this is where food may be coming from now. Wow. This is the future! Freight cars transformed into aquaponic vegetable gardens. Lights, nutrients all delivered artificially. It removes the variables of weather, airborne disease spores and sunlight availability. Amazing.As an outdoor gardener, I question this approach. Do we want to eat vegetables raised in a "freight car" environment? Yes, I do buy the aquaponic tomatoes and lettuce in the grocery store IN THE WINTER in New England. But has our environment become so pathogen infested that this is…
  • in the paper: effort to save bees, butterflies

    kathy
    21 May 2015 | 9:39 am
    This was in the Boston Globe yesterday. (link to article) US effort attempting to save bees, butterfliesThe Obama administration hopes to save the bees by feeding them better.A new federal plan aims to reverse America’s declining honeybee and monarch butterfly populations by making millions of acres of federal land more bee-friendly, spending millions of dollars more on research, and considering the use of fewer pesticides.While putting different types of landscapes along highways, federal housing projects, and elsewhere may not sound like much in terms of action, several bee scientists…
  • organic potting mix

    kathy
    20 May 2015 | 11:15 am
    This year I used an organic potting mix for the first time. I didn't realize that it would be any different and forgot I had made the change. When I bought the soil, I was really happy that the big bags sold at Costco were organic. Later I began to wonder why my tomatoes weren't growing as fast and were pale. The onions got yellow at the tips. Some things grew just as well: the peas and even the peppers. The main problem was really the tomatoes. In addition to the organic soil, I seeded them in smaller pots than usual. Finally it occurred to me that they needed more nutrients. I transplanted…
  • bee notes

    kathy
    18 May 2015 | 3:35 pm
    On Monday's I do my hive checks. For now I'm doing these checks weekly.
  • garden work

    kathy
    18 May 2015 | 11:26 am
    At my community plot: Dug potato trenches and planted 2 lb Canela russets Turned the winter rye cover under in three bedsMoved perennials so the big helianthis is now behind the daisy and echinaceaTransplanted leeks, shallots, bunching onions and lots of standard onionsWatered everything well (its a dust bowl here today! no rain in weeks)
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    Home Garden Companion

  • Finally. I Have Chickens

    Ilona Erwin
    9 May 2015 | 10:01 am
    It had been years since I had chickens, and I said for the past three to four years that, “This year I’ll get chicks”, but something always intervened in my plans. Well, no more! I now have a new little chicken coop (a bit flimsy, but it will do), half a dozen pullets, and one bantam laying hen, and one bantam rooster. About that… We ordered “pullets” and I was always under the impression that this would mean laying hens (I always had baby chicks, previously). I wanted to start out with hens that were laying since in the past it was always a good five…
  • Entering The No Frost Zone

    Ilona Erwin
    30 Apr 2015 | 4:01 pm
    Clumps of daffodils from those my mother gave me years ago. Soon we will will pass the expected last frost dates. Entering the safe time to plant frost sensitive annuals means trips to the garden centers and greenhouses to purchase all my tomatoes and container plants. This has been one year when the temperatures have been quite chilly and I would not have dreamed to try to plant tomatoes early. I did manage a small patch of lettuce which is showing some pretty green leaves now. It weathered through some late frosts. It is time to do another succession planting. The seesaw temperatures meant…
  • I Found Out About “She Sheds” And Coincidentally, About Friends

    Ilona Erwin
    25 Apr 2015 | 7:54 pm
    My Houzz: A Backyard Getaway Emerges From a Grain Shed A high school friend of mine is considering lending his sizable carpentry talents to making “She Sheds”.  I hadn’t even heard of them, although I could make an educated guess as to what they might be. Still, since having a guess is never as good as solid knowledge on a subject, in my opinion, you can see why I then thought I would research the topic a bit. As it happened, I came upon a Houzz article, which isn’t surprising, since anything to do with houses, or buildings, and interiors sooner or later seems to land…
  • A Nice Early Spring Visit To Inniswood

    Ilona Erwin
    28 Mar 2015 | 6:41 pm
    I keep working on trying to make videos of garden subjects. Early spring in the morning meant a quiet visit with no distractions, as my husband and I walked around the garden.
  • Brand New Post On The New Site

    Ilona Erwin
    21 Mar 2015 | 8:00 am
    Here we are… the first post in a new season. It inspires me. The first inspiration is to update my garden as well. For years I have renovated, and renovation is always somehow lacking. I want to return to some of the joy that comes from creating something new. My idea is to redo some of the gardens in a ways that identifies and places focal points inside the garden rooms, and indeed make more of a room from some of the gardens. The entire place needs sprucing up, and I think adding more design and worrying less about weeds is the direction I want to take. This, of course, is secondary…
 
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    Garden Ideas

  • Tips for Building a Large Garden Shed in a Back Yard

    DeneWood
    19 May 2015 | 5:00 am
    You know that folding French doors will create a new atmosphere in your home. Maybe you consider it as something that is complicated, and confiscated many spaces. Folding doors are an ideal concept if you have a spacious building. Thus, it is reasonable that you should consider the size and design. Later, you can develop […]
  • Best Stone Garden Ornaments

    DeneWood
    12 May 2015 | 5:00 am
    You can make the appearance of your house look wonderful with stone garden ornaments. When you apply this type of ornament, you will find that it can provide you with the things that you need. Many people love to apply this type of ornament in order to make the appearance of their garden become nice. […]
  • Nice Style Metal Garden Ornaments

    DeneWood
    5 May 2015 | 5:00 am
    People like to apply metal garden ornaments which are available with a good design in it. By choosing a nice style of home decoration, there is nothing that you need to worry anymore. You can finally feel new and obtain a refreshing appearance of home decoration that you will love. It is indeed that you […]
  • Interesting Stone Benches for Garden for Home Decoration

    DeneWood
    28 Apr 2015 | 11:00 am
    It is time to apply a nice appearance of garden decoration to your house. You can do it with using stone benches for garden. When you select this type of home decor to be used for your house, you can find a new style of house that you will like so much. In this type […]
  • Benefits of Using Teak Garden Benches in Home Decoration

    DeneWood
    27 Apr 2015 | 11:00 pm
    Don’t hesitate to apply teak garden benches. When you can select the best style of home decoration in your garden, you will be able to feel the happiness that you need. Many people love choosing an amazing appearance of home décor in their garden. When you want to make your dream in having a nice […]
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    Bananas.org

  • thai bananas

    druss
    22 May 2015 | 3:32 am
    Anyone know if these are legit varieties? http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/1-Bulb-Mu...item1e6a1b860a http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Bulb-MUSA...item1e5e2fd458
  • New leaf goes soft brown in one afternoon

    Butts
    21 May 2015 | 6:17 pm
    I have two dwarf cavendish in containers. I bought the original last year and seperated them a few months ago. Both are in Roots Organics potting soil. They were in the same soil last year and did very well. The wife put them outside when temps passed 55 F - high was 70 today. It was real cold for 2 days and they sat in my hallway with very little light during those 2 days. The moisture meter says they have plenty of water. although when i dig down about 4 inches or so it still only seams barely moist. I checked the roots in the top parts of the soil, they are beautifully white and fuzzy. I…
  • Anyone have a dwarf papuya tree?

    blownz281
    21 May 2015 | 5:12 pm
    Was looking for some seeds if you had any. Thanks.
  • To harvest or not to harvest. That is the question.

    caliboy1994
    21 May 2015 | 2:45 pm
    I have these two bunches that have been hanging for about 7 months and 9 months respectively now. As I'm going to be moving down south for the summer in a few weeks, I want to cut these down before I take off. Here's what we've got. I have this healthy two year old Misi Luki mat. These have been hanging since around September of last year. They are pretty filled out, but the main p-stem lost most of its leaves to winter frost. The fruits are intact and pretty nicely filled out, but no signs of yellowing yet. Pics: I also have this Blue Java/Ice Cream bunch that has been hanging since last…
  • Dwarf Cavendish getting old

    GardenGuy
    20 May 2015 | 8:20 pm
    Hi all, I've had this Dwarf Cavendish for about three years now in a 15 gallon container. Once it broke dormancy this spring I transplanted it to a 25 gallon pot because it was very root bound. Now it's about 3 feet tall and pushing new leaves like crazy with regular water and fertilizer. As I expected, it has (unfortunately) also resumed sending up pups. I'm hoping to get fruit from the main culm eventually but want to know if I should remove the pups or leave them alone? Best, Kane
 
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    Ewa in the Garden

  • Hydrangea Anomala Petiolaris Thriving in the Shadow Places

    15 May 2015 | 2:42 am
    Climbing hydrangea - Hydrangea anomala petiolaris - is beautiful plant, easy to grow in narrow places and half shadow. I see it often planted in front gardens or right at the gate. These charming plants look very heatlhy with very little sunlight.  It will bloom very soon - would you like to see it then?
  • Dirty secret pushing Epiphyllum oxypetalum growing tall and fast

    6 May 2015 | 10:08 am
    Remember my photos of the amazing flowering show of Epiphyllum oxypetalum? That day I decided to take a  little piece of this magnificent plant. For two years it was growing slowly. Secong year flowered. But look at the photo what happened in third year in only two months! In February it started grow a twig (?). What can I say. It keeps growing since 2 months at the speed of approximately
  • Epiphyllum oxypetalum flowering show photographed every 10 minutes

    26 Apr 2015 | 1:14 am
    This large epiphyllum exypetalum plant is really old and still blooming beautifully. I decided to document this spectacular flowering show and take photo every 10 minutes.  Every flower lasted about 2 hours. Blooming usually happens in the evening, in winter time on northern hemisphere. #flowers #epiphyllumoxypetalum #dutchmanspipe #queenofthenight #
  • Impressive Dogwood Sibirica Hedge

    21 Apr 2015 | 7:05 am
    I have a chance to admire this hedge for last few weeks and every time I am passing by I simply have to take a minute to take a closer look. Since first little fluorescent green buds appeared on the red wood of that variety of  dogwood (Cornus alba) Sibirica, entire hedge is really  showing off.        Deciduous hedges have one big defect – their leaves are disappearing in the winter time.
  • Happy Easter 2015! and no snow! (like here)

    5 Apr 2015 | 10:35 pm
    Happy Easter my dear readers! On the photo there is a twig of decorative prunus cut one week ago and put in the vase with warm water. Flowers opened right on time. I had to do is, because there is lazy spring this year. And this morning it was snowing! Have look below. I hope we all have more sun this Easter. And less snow :( 
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    Your Small Kitchen Garden

  • Grubs and Birds

    Daniel Gasteiger
    29 Apr 2015 | 12:42 am
    I didn’t stretch to capture this photo; the robin’s nest is at shoulder level where two paths converge in my yard. A robin has nested in the spruce tree that stands just four feet from my compost heap. The spruce tree is quite large; the nest could be thirty or more feet above the ground—and it could be deep in the branches. But no! The robin chose stress. It built at shoulder level on a branch you almost have to brush as you walk between the compost heap and the house—or as you step off the front porch taking the shortest path from the kitchen to the compost heap. To live as I’m…
  • Mint Menace: the Herb that Takes and Takes

    Daniel Gasteiger
    26 Apr 2015 | 10:03 am
    In early spring, I had purchased two mint plants from the produce department of a grocery store—those plants sold as fresh herbs you’re supposed to throw out once you’ve removed the leaves to season your dinner. I left them on my screened porch, watered them as-needed, potted them up once, and eventually transplanted them into my herb garden. Cooped up in their tiny nursery pots, both plants had produced rhizomes with new plants emerging every half inch or so. I told some of the story here. Mint is dangerous. Yes, I’ve said it before. I’ve said it so many times I’m sure I’ve…
  • Hen and Chicks?

    Daniel Gasteiger
    5 Apr 2015 | 10:33 pm
    I spent a dollar to buy two Hen and Chicks plants at a yard sale in autumn. With snow predicted, I “heeled in” the plants in my vegetable bed. When the snow finally melted in March, I found this little family looking healthy and ready for action. Eventually, these will find a home in a rock garden I plan to build where the compost heap now rests. I’ve been a sucker for succulents since I grew a jungle in my bedroom during my high school years. So, despite my garden’s intense focus on food plants, I’ve mused for a long time about establishing a succulent garden in my yard. Near the…
  • Chili Pepper Seedlings Under Lights

    Daniel Gasteiger
    2 Apr 2015 | 12:09 pm
    My first chili pepper sprout of the year is a sweet pepper, but I don’t know what type. Last year I collected orange bell and sweet Italian pepper seeds from my harvest and managed to store them unlabeled. I’ve two distinct packs of seeds, and planted as many from one pack as from the other. Nearly all have sprouted. I’ll find out in August which plants are which. Just a week ago I reported on the success of my tomato starts (Tomatoes Under Lights). Two days later, my first chili pepper seedling of 2015 emerged. You might surmise I get a special rush when my seeds start each year. I…
  • Tomatoes Under Lights

    Daniel Gasteiger
    28 Mar 2015 | 12:51 pm
    It took just over four days for my first tomato seedling of 2015 to emerge. Saturday and Sunday, March 21st and 22nd, I planted 73 tomato seeds in five planters. The planters are under lights in my office. The 73 seeds represent 18 varieties of tomatoes – six varieties I brought back from last year’s garden, and 12 I bought from seed companies this spring. The first seedling emerged on March 26, just five (or four) days after planting. I snapped photos but here it is about 36 hours later and I’m just creating a post. A lot happens in 36 hours! At last count, 67 seeds had…
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    Native Sons - Plant of the Week

  • Euphorbia 'Dean's Hybrid'

    Melissa Berard
    8 May 2015 | 2:27 pm
    Euphorbia ‘Dean’s Hybrid’ is an evergreen perennial shrub to 30” tall and wide with fine-textured, bright green foliage that mature to orange hues. Clusters of bright lime green to yellow flowers bloom in late spring to summer. Cold hardy and easy to grow in full sun with well drained soil and the occasional summer water once established. Recommended for use in containers and borders. Hardy to 0F. Euphorbia ‘Dean’s Hybrid’ is available this week in one gallon containers.
  • Muhlenbergia capillaris

    Melissa Berard
    5 Sep 2014 | 2:07 pm
    Muhlenbergia capillaris or hairy awn muhly is a clumping, deciduous grass to four feet tall by two feet wide with masses of violet-pink, airy flowers that often obscure the blue-green foliage in a purple haze from summer to early fall. Useful as a border specimen, or massed in large groups, this species is especially suitable for coastal gardens in sandy soils. Plants will tolerate partial shade and dry conditions, though flower production is much stronger in full sun and plants often look best with moderate summer water. Hardy to 10F. Muhlenbergia capillaris is available this week in one…
  • Agapanthus 'Gold Strike' (Patented)

    Melissa Berard
    29 Aug 2014 | 11:02 am
    Agapanthus ‘Gold Strike’ is a colorfully variegated compact evergreen with clusters of green and gold foliage, one to two feet tall and wide, topped with twenty four inch tall dark stems holding deep blue buds that open to blue and pale blue striped blooms. This plant is a very striking plant in or out of bloom and would be great in a mass planting, a border, as a groundcover, or a specimen container plant. As with other Agapanthus this plant is fairly care free and relatively drought tolerant. Plant in full sun to light shade and irrigate occasionally to regularly for best performance.
  • Trichostema lanatum

    Melissa Berard
    8 Aug 2014 | 9:18 am
    Trichostema lanatum or woolly blue curls is a branching evergreen shrub up to four feet tall and six feet wide, with narrow, 2” long leaves that emit a wonderfully pungent aroma when bruised. Foliage is shiny, dark green on top, white and woolly beneath with leaf edges rolled under. Blue flowers appear in clusters along a stalk and show arching stamens from April to June, longer if spent flowers are removed. Stalks and parts of flowers are covered with blue, pink or white wool giving an appearance of tight curls. Requires full sun, excellent drainage, and little or no irrigation once…
  • Calluna vulgaris 'Kerstin'

    Melissa Berard
    3 Jul 2014 | 2:13 pm
    Calluna vulgaris ‘Kerstin' is a multi-stemmed, dwarf evergreen shrub with a mounded form. It lends an extremely fine and delicate texture to the landscape composition with stems clothed in tiny overlapping grey green leaves and short spikes of mauve flowers in the late summer and autumn. A slow grower, Kerstin Heather will grow to be about 8 inches tall at maturity extending to 12 inches tall with the flowers, with a spread of 18 inches. This shrub should only be grown in full sunlight. It requires an evenly moist well-drained soil for optimal growth, but will die in standing water. It is…
 
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    Veggie Gardener: Organic Vegetable Gardening Tips

  • Avoiding Blossom End Rot in the Veggie Garden

    Veggie Gardener
    17 May 2015 | 6:06 pm
    There is frustration aplenty to be had when you set out into the garden in search of that perfect tomato only to instead find one with blossom end rot. Though it is a common issue with which veggie gardeners are faced, it is no less disheartening when it rears its ugly head. Rather than letting […]
  • The Benefits of Kale from the Garden

    Veggie Gardener
    10 May 2015 | 8:55 pm
    If you’re a fan of leafy greens with staying power then you might want to consider getting acquainted with kale. A member of the cabbage family, kale has made appearances as a garnish on many dinner plates only to be discarded and ignored, but the fact of the matter is that kale has a plethora […]
  • The Benefits of Tea Leaves in the Garden

    Veggie Gardener
    3 May 2015 | 6:16 pm
    Tea is a beverage enjoyed by many of us on a frequent or daily basis. After you make your favorite brew, what do you do with the used teabags? Disposing of them is one answer, but a better one would be to take them out to your vegetable garden or compost bin so they can […]
  • Starting Seeds Indoors to Help Your Garden Along

    Veggie Gardener
    26 Apr 2015 | 5:40 am
    Upon deciding what you want to plant, your natural course of action may be to go to a nursery and purchase those plants. From that point, most can be transplanted directly into your garden and will continue to grow and thrive. Though this method is convenient, it is not always practical or efficient for everyone. […]
  • Reuse and Repurpose to Save Gardening Dollars

    Veggie Gardener
    19 Apr 2015 | 11:16 am
    Everyone likes to see a few extra dollars in their bank account. Not only is saving money nice, but so is having a little extra to put into the things you enjoy, such as gardening. This is why saving money when growing vegetables is important, as it allows you to purchase the necessary supplies to […]
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    Miss Rumphius' Rules

  • Contemporary Tiles and the Middle Ages

    Susan aka Miss. R
    19 May 2015 | 4:25 am
    Sometimes my mind connects the dots in unexpected ways.  I visited ICFF (International Contemporary Furniture Fair) in New York over the weekend.  You would think I’d be all mid-mod and forward thinking. But no. I fell for these concrete tiles from Grow House Grow.  They are a new product for the company, frost proof and come a a wide variety of colors. My mind immediately went to the Middle Ages and the floor at Sainte-Chapelle in Paris. Since my images of that were lost in an iPhone debacle, I borrowed this one from Wikimedia to illustrate the point. Now to find a place to use the…
  • Magnolia Lust

    Susan aka Miss. R
    26 Apr 2015 | 6:24 am
    As part of my job as a landscape designer, I regularly walk the growers and nurseries to see what is new and what looks good.  I learn about plants new to me that I may want to trial and try. Like many other designers, I get on a plant jag and have a love affair with a group of plants for a while and then move on to flirt with something else that catches my rather short plant attention span.  Today I have plant lust.  I was at the fabulous NJ wholesale grower, Pleasant Run Nursery yesterday and fell for Magnolia x brooklynensis ‘Black Beauty’ that is just now…
  • Trials and Neglect in my Home Garden

    Susan aka Miss. R
    17 Apr 2015 | 7:53 am
    I’m not a landscape designer who has a wonderfully designed garden that is a terrific advertisement for my craft at my home. I should, I live on a corner, but as I’ve shared here before it’s mostly a neglected mess with good bones and a rotating cast of plants. My home garden is quirky and in a constant state of flux. Since my landscape design practice is design only, I don’t have a crew I can ‘borrow’ for the big tasks, so they wait and are ignored for as long as possible. I’m mostly not very motivated to work in my own garden after spending my…
  • Garden Visit: Filoli

    Susan aka Miss. R
    24 Mar 2015 | 11:43 am
    My visit last week to one of the great American gardens, Filoli, in northern California, was a revelation in many ways.  I have wanted to visit since I first saw pictures of it years ago. The garden was designed in the early 20th century by its original homeowners with a team of architects, artists, and horticulturists. There is no known master plan yet it has survived largely in tact which is a rarity for American estate gardens of this size and scope. Sometimes my travels are guided by my desire to experience specific places firsthand. My trip to Marrakesh and Majorelle was one of…
  • Green Gardens

    Susan aka Miss. R
    27 Feb 2015 | 4:34 am
    Green is a thing. Right now it’s a missing thing. It’s what I miss most during winter and what makes me smile first in the spring–those small green shoots pushing up through frigid earth. I’ve been thinking about making flowerless gardens. Gardens that are mostly green. Gardens that rely  on scale and texture and subtlety of hue and maybe some skilled pruning. In New Jersey, where I practice landscape design, this may prove to be more difficult than it is in warmer climates where there are bolder choices and plants with immense architectural leaves. Many of the…
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    Journal

  • When New Phlox Perennials Are Hard to Find

    Allan
    18 May 2015 | 7:13 am
    PHLOX PANICULATA AUTUMN JOYNew introductions of Phlox paniculata are usually offered in my area by online plant seller Veseys. Those hybrids offered in their spring catalogue that appealed to me finally arrived by post the other day and are now planted.  I hope they flower true to their photos and not as a variation of an already existing variety. Here are the four I chose: Phlox Anastasia. This hybrid is expected to reach 3 feet in height. I was attracted to the color description; bright pink is a pleasant addition to the summer garden. Phlox Autumn Joy, captioned above, belongs at the…
  • The Best Root-Dividing Tool for the Perennial Flower Gardener

    Allan
    11 May 2015 | 10:05 am
    It’s easy to botch a perennial while dividing its roots. Traditional tools such as a spade or shovel, when strategically positioned over a root clump, can slip out of place and accidentally separate a plant’s stem from its root. The intended new plant is damaged beyond repair. Similarly, the blade of a hand-held saw can tilt from its upright position, cut at the wrong angle and give us nothing but useless, rootless foliage. These unintended and unwelcome occurrences arise when we deal with mature root balls, including those perennials that dislike being uplifted. Either the…
  • A Review of "Garden Design, a Book of Ideas"

    Allan
    15 Apr 2015 | 11:28 am
    Garden Design, a Book of Ideas, Heidi Howcroft & Marianne Majerus, Firefly Books Glance at the image above to appreciate the shape and color of the Eupatorium flower head close-up in the foreground. Let your eyes caress the feathery texture of the upright ornamental grass in the background and notice how it contrasts with the smooth bark of the vertical trees while delineating the horizontal border of the pool. The book cover photo captures an example of garden design at its best and is an indication of the quality of information to be found inside. In an age of sensory overload, authors…
  • Lespedeza Gibraltar Is A Waterfall Flowering Perennial

    Allan
    18 Mar 2015 | 9:53 am
    Extreme close up of a Lespedeza floret in my garden. With normal viewing, it isn't as attractive as it appears above.Whenever I receive a catalogue from an online nursery, my first action is to search for perennials I’ve never seen before. I pay attention to those that are considered hardy in USDA Zone 4 [Canada Zone 5]. I delve into details to select only flowering plants with a long bloom period. Finally, for those that appear to have potential, I evaluate for attractiveness and for colors that work well in the English-style flowerbed. Photos used in the above-mentioned publications…
  • Fran Sorin's Inspirational Garden Guide Has Been Reissued.

    Allan
    22 Feb 2015 | 10:05 pm
    Digging Deep: Unearthing Your Creative Roots Through Gardening,  Fran Sorin,   Braided Worlds Publishing.              There is one book in my library that I can never part with: Fran Sorin’s Digging Deep. When it was published ten years ago, it validated the personal creativity I discovered when I first began to garden. On its pages, I also found a lifetime mentor in the author’s warm, inspiring voice and I return to her words whenever I need to refresh my creativity. Recently, the book was republished in a revised tenth anniversary…
 
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    Garden Therapy

  • How to Make Concrete Planters

    Stephanie
    21 May 2015 | 2:57 pm
    These DIY concrete garden planters are simple to make in just a weekend and with materials you may already have around the house. They look modern with unique shapes that come straight from the recycling bin! I made these planters many years ago, and have since made many more for gifts or to decorate my home garden. At the time ... The post How to Make Concrete Planters appeared first on Garden Therapy.
  • Growing Strawberries in Hanging Containers / Grow Bags

    Stephanie
    13 May 2015 | 2:49 pm
    Even if space is a problem, you can certainly find a corner of your world to hang a strawberry planter.  The sun-warmed, sweet berries are far superior to the store bought ones that ripen in plastic domes. Once established you have plenty more plants year after year. Growing strawberries in hanging containers is a simple way to grow a large number of plants, and you don’t even ... The post Growing Strawberries in Hanging Containers / Grow Bags appeared first on Garden Therapy.
  • Smudge Your Fire to Keep Away Bugs!

    Stephanie
    9 May 2015 | 10:03 am
    Whether you are camping or enjoying a little backyard entertaining around a firepit, you can easily keep mosquitoes at bay by tossing in a few herb branches. Mosquitoes hate herbs like lavender, mint, lemon balm, sage, and of course, citronella. Toss a few branches of herbs fresh or dry into the fire and what smells heavenly to you, will send ... The post Smudge Your Fire to Keep Away Bugs! appeared first on Garden Therapy.
  • 10-Minute Outdoor Candle Planter

    Stephanie
    8 May 2015 | 10:41 am
    I was strolling through my local garden center a few weeks back and saw the most brilliant use of terracotta – outdoor candle planters! I quickly gathered the materials and went straight home to make my own, and I LOVE how it turned out! Here are the steps if you want to make your own and have 10 minutes to ... The post 10-Minute Outdoor Candle Planter appeared first on Garden Therapy.
  • Nail Polish-Marbled Painted Pots

    Stephanie
    7 May 2015 | 5:30 pm
    Unless you have spent all of your free time out in the garden instead of browsing Pinterest trends then you have probably seen someone using nail polish to marble something. The craze started from nail artists adding a few colors of polish to water, then dipping fingers in there. The finger comes out a mess of polish but some quick work of the ... The post Nail Polish-Marbled Painted Pots appeared first on Garden Therapy.
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    Urban Organic Gardener

  • How to Build a Tee-Pee Vine

    UOG
    18 May 2015 | 9:00 pm
    This post originally was found on SeedsNow.com Vine tee-pees are a fun way to encourage children to spend more time in the garden. They will add a whimsical touch that even the adults will appreciate and are not only fun to look at but are extremely functional. Because they save space in the garden by using vertical gardening techniques, you’ll be able to grow more food in less space, and who doesn’t love that? (Image Source) You can construct your own vine tee-pee on a weekend with minimal materials, often ones that are free or you may already have on hand. This is a great…
  • 5 Quick Growing Veggies you can Harvest In No Time

    Sariann Irvin
    7 May 2015 | 10:50 am
    Gardening isn’t usually a process that should be rushed. It takes time to prepare a spot that you’ll be planting in, and patience usually pays off when you’re growing your own food. There are a few crops, however, that always mature fairly quick.  If you’re short on time during your growing season or just want to get your toes wet as a first time gardener, we’ve put together a list of a few crops that are quick to grow and will have you harvesting your own homegrown veggies in no time at all.   1. Lettuce Learn how to grow your own organic Lettuce >…
  • Seattle Mom Quits Her Job to Become a Full-Time Homesteader

    UOG
    30 Apr 2015 | 10:45 am
    Most of us may have thought once or twice about throwing in the towel, walking up to our boss and calling it quits. Maybe you’ve gotten to a point in your life where what’s important to you now isn’t what was important to you when you first started your career. We all have moments in life when we need to re-evaluate what we’re doing with our time and energy. Sometimes you just need to overcome your fears and do what your gut is telling you to do.  The results just might surprise you. Here’s a story about how one Seattle mom decided to close her business of…
  • 14 Urban Gardening Tips That Will Save You Time, Energy & Money

    Sariann Irvin
    25 Apr 2015 | 9:02 am
    Whether it’s using leftover coffee grounds from your morning brew, drying herbs on the backseat of your car or using soap under your fingernails before digging into the soil… Paul James, a Master Gardener shares his top 14 gardening tips that will save you time, energy and money in the garden. This post was originally shared on HGTV.com. Here, the latest tips and tricks from Paul James, host of Gardening by the Yard: 1. To remove the salt deposits that form on clay pots, combine equal parts white vinegar, rubbing alcohol and water in a spray bottle. Apply the mixture to the pot…
  • How to Grow Perfect Peppers & Tomatoes in a 5 Gallon Bucket

    Sariann Irvin
    8 Apr 2015 | 11:26 am
    Short on growing space but still yearn for homegrown tomatoes and peppers? Is your garden located on a balcony or terrace and you’re afraid you can’t savor the taste of vine ripened tomatoes or experience the heat of your favorite variety of pepper? Well you can, and all you need is a 5 gallon bucket, nutrient rich soil, a few amendments, water and your favorite variety of heirloom seeds. Start by finding a 5 gallon bucket. Make sure it is clean and food grade, meaning there’s never been any nasty chemicals stored or shipped in your container.   Usually you can acquire…
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    The Yarden

  • Five (Make That 10) Heirloom Tomatoes We Can’t Live Without

    LaManda Joy
    27 Apr 2015 | 5:49 pm
    Each year when the garden season ends my husband, Peter, and I have a conversation about cutting back on our gardening activities. We have a resolve. An agreement. A decision has been made. And then gardening season rolls back around... The post Five (Make That 10) Heirloom Tomatoes We Can’t Live Without appeared first on The Yarden.
  • Memories of Victory

    LaManda Joy
    11 Mar 2015 | 8:00 am
    When I’m on the speaking circuit and talking about Peterson ... The post Memories of Victory appeared first on The Yarden.
  • “Let Mommy get the feel of it…” (Kitchen Inspiration)

    LaManda Joy
    22 Jan 2015 | 2:11 pm
    My first memories are of garden and kitchen with Father ... The post “Let Mommy get the feel of it…” (Kitchen Inspiration) appeared first on The Yarden.
  • My new book!

    LaManda Joy
    4 Dec 2014 | 3:28 pm
    I wanted to call this post “be careful what you ... The post My new book! appeared first on The Yarden.
  • Grow2Give

    LaManda Joy
    30 Nov 2014 | 3:01 pm
    This post first appeared on We Can Grow It. I’m proud ... The post Grow2Give appeared first on The Yarden.
 
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    Gardener's Journal

  • Succession Planting with Flowers? Sure!

    gscadmin
    20 May 2015 | 12:07 pm
    At the garden center, I noticed some beautiful large-leaf rhododendrons covered in plump buds. They were in small pots — starter shrubs for a woodland-garden-to-be. If I planted them in the landscape, I knew they’d be lost at that size. True, gardening is about patience — and dreaming of what will happen in, say, five years. But gardening is also about instant gratification. To showcase these irresistible rhodies, I made them the “thrillers” of a late-spring/early summer planter. They replaced a set of tulips and hyacinths that had gone by, while complementing the…
  • First Harvest is Right at Our Doorstep

    gscadmin
    18 May 2015 | 11:13 am
    The makings of a spring salad: arugula, baby claytonia, baby beet greens and cress.   Vates kale It’s May 18 and we just harvested the first crops from our front-yard garden. Home-grown salad tonight! Here’s what we harvested: Arugula: The crop is fully mature, so we’ll harvest the whole block. We’ll replant with a compact type of eggplant called Little Finger, which has been growing under lights. When the eggplants are harvested at the end of the summer, we’ll squeeze in a second crop of arugula. Cress: Wrinkly, ruffled leaves have a surprising peppery…
  • Monarch Butterflies are Still in Trouble

    gscadmin
    5 May 2015 | 5:47 am
    The counts are in, and monarch butterflies are doing a bit better this year, though there is still much to be done. Gardeners can help in many ways—primarily by planting native species of milkweed. In recent years, butterfly aficionados and nature lovers have watched in horror as the population of monarch butterflies has crashed. The fight to save them is turning out to be more complicated—and more contentious—than many expected. There is some good news, though: The population of monarchs that spent the winter in their usual forested haunts in Mexico increased a bit in 2015 from the…
  • One Pot, One Plant: a Simple Masterpiece

    gscadmin
    20 Apr 2015 | 11:17 am
    This planter started two years ago as a set of three 4″ kalanchoe from the garden center. A variety called Flapjacks, it spends the winter in a west-facing window. In spring, I move it out to a concrete urn. This agave has become difficult to manage — and dangerous because of its thorny leaves. However, it has bold form and stands out in any planter. Hauling it indoors each winter is worth the effort. When composing porch and patio planters, it’s easy to get overwhelmed by the abundant array of plants at the garden center. Even when you group them by color — as we do at…
  • Railing Planters Hold Tight on High-Rise Balcony

    gscadmin
    13 Apr 2015 | 1:04 pm
    The Balcony Railing Planters seem to float on the glass walls of this high-rise garden. Photo is from Paul and Dedra Diehl, who have five planters on the railings of their balcony. From a review of the Viva Balcony Railing Planter by Paul and Dedra Diehl in Iowa: Last winter I went to Gardeners to buy balcony “saddle” planters. Once there, I saw these stunning planters and crossed off the saddles. I was skeptical that the actual item would look as good as the photos but ordered them anyway. Am I ever glad I did! I’d expected thin, tin-like metal with a cheap finish that had…
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    This Grandmother's Garden

  • They're Back!

    Carolyn ♥
    8 May 2015 | 8:51 am
    HUMMINGBIRDS!I looked out my window early yesterday morning just as a hummingbird was zipping toward the Red-bud tree. Quite suddenly, he stopped his flight... hovering in mid air.He cocked his head in all directions then seemed to stare right at me."What? No feeders up?"He then flew away just as quickly as he came.Did you know that Hummingbirds return to the same nesting place year after year?Yes, they do... it has actually been documented."Most of these birds DO return to the same feeders or gardens to breed year after year. What's more, they often stop at the same spots…
  • Oh Thank Heavens!

    Carolyn ♥
    21 Apr 2015 | 12:55 pm
    Early morning in my gardens...is simply magical.And while the snow lingers in our Mountains...all is as it should be down here.Oh Thank Heavens!"I plant the seed,You make it grow. You send the rain,I work the hoe."-AnonymousVerse contributed by Bonnie...it warms my heart. ♥All content created by Carolyn Bush | Copyright © 2010 - 2015 All Rights Reserved This Grandmother's Garden | Highland, Utah, USA All content created by Carolyn Bush | Copyright © 2010 - 2014 All Rights Reserved | This Grandmother's Garden | Highland, Utah, USA
  • Serendipity in Spring

    Carolyn ♥
    16 Apr 2015 | 2:53 pm
    Snowing!!!  Sometimes, SPRING gets a little confused. Rebuds in SnowPerhaps she's so busy painting the pastels that she doesn't see Old Man Winter rushing in for a final fling.Periwinkle taking a Peek Such a SERENDIPITOUS event, don't cha think?Boomerang Lilac with SnowcapsNo worry.The moisture is always welcome!Pincushions in CrystalAnd the colors peeking through the snow...simply MAGICAL!Besides... Winter always enjoys it's last beautiful blast!And the budding trees and flowers...always seem to survive.( This snow storm gathered 3 inches in my gardens…
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    The Good Thing - About Gardening & Crafting

  • A quilted rooster

    Administrator
    17 May 2015 | 8:37 am
    Some of the first projects that I started my quilting obsession with were pin cushions. Who knew pin cushions could be so fun, elaborate, and decorative while at the same time being functional? Here are a two teacup pincushions that I made for birthday gifts for my mom and daughter: Quilted and embroidered teacup pincushion               Quilted, beaded teacup pincushion                 and the quilted rooster pincushion which was a lot of fun to create. I drew the pattern free hand and then pieced left over scraps…
  • Quilting – just getting started

    Administrator
    16 May 2015 | 8:22 am
    You may not know that I have ADD when it comes to crafting which means that I have supplies for many different arts including polymer clay, painting (acrylic, oil, watercolor), knitting, crocheting, Tunisian crochet, jewelry making, and my latest is quilting. I dabbled in doll making this past winter and really enjoyed the fact that I could use many different crafts to create one doll. Sewing the body and creating clothes with crochet and embroidered flowers led me into quilting. Here are a few photos from my experiments. The dress was made for a friend of my daughter who wanted to have a…
  • Finding The Right Approach To Lawn Repair Is Crucial

    Administrator
    27 Aug 2011 | 6:19 pm
    If you are a home owner that is looking to take the best care of their lawn possible, you really are going to want to do everything you can to try and make the switch over to tools the pros use. Take some of the same approaches that the pros take to repairing bare spots and you will definitely end up with the kind of results you are going to be genuinely happy with. Experts know how hard it can be to tackle lawn issues and come up victorious, but their very jobs rely on finding the best solutions for these types of tasks so they are going to be more particular about just what must be done to…
  • Why you will need to Plant Trees on Your Lawn?

    Administrator
    26 Aug 2011 | 8:39 pm
    Tons of new subdivisions are finding trees to produce area for extra homes. Many inhabitants leave their lawn treeless just they believe it really is an extreme amount of an inconvenience to plant far more trees. You will find numerous good reasons why you want to get time to plant trees on your lawn. Outlined here are a couple of from the good reasons which will straight aid you. 1. Shade. Acquiring plenty of trees on your lawn will give you shade which could help you keeps great on the hot summer season day? The trees will even support your ac bill decrease via shading…
  • Bruschetta Recipe

    Administrator
    7 Aug 2011 | 2:42 pm
    These tomatoes were grown organically in a raised garden bed. Tomatoes and fresh basil from the garden make delicious Bruschetta. Here’s a delicious tomato recipe that you and your family are sure to love: Fresh Tomato and Basil Bruschetta Recipe 1 loaf crusty Italian bread, sliced 3/4-inch thick (about 16 pieces) 2 Tbsp olive oil 2 cups fresh, chopped tomatoes 2 Tbsp chopped basil 4 cloves of garlic, chopped very fine 1/2 tsp salt 1 oz. shaved mozzarella cheese Butter Parmesan cheese Mix the olive oil, tomatoes, basil, garlic, salt and cheese. Spread butter on the slices of bread, then…
 
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    Annie's Gardening Corner

  • Holiday Tips

    22 May 2015 | 5:19 am
    Happy Memorial Day 2015A couple of quick tips for this upcoming holiday weekend.  There's a widespread freeze warning that has been issued for this evening in many parts of New England so whether you plan to head out of town or you're celebrating at home, be certain to protect your tender plants. Anything you can't bring indoors, make sure you blanket and protect from this expected frost. This wacky, extra dry spring with hot than cold temps is raising havoc on plants overall,which leads me to one more important note. Many irrigation companies aren't scheduled to pressurize and get the…
  • Sea of Green

    19 May 2015 | 7:49 am
    The beautiful part of spring in New England - the sea of green that can be found.Wide open meadows, especially during the springtime are bountiful fields of green teaming with wildlife and bird activity.Yes, the beautiful part of spring in New England is the sea of green that can be found. Be it our own properties and gardens or just a wide open reserve, there’s an amazing amount of green all around. Where are you finding your green spots? Here’s one that deserves its own blog post – these volunteer mustard greens are beautiful in their own right. Volunteer mustard greens that…
  • Wherever You Place Your Roots

    15 May 2015 | 8:42 am
    There’s been a huge resurgence in gardening the last five years and leading the way - Millennials!Great news yesterday on the gardening front – according to a Huffington Post article and reiterated in a Ball Publishing newsletter, there’s been a huge resurgence in gardening the last five years. The most exciting factoid listed - Millennials are the fastest-growing segment of this gardening population. To point out some other interesting notes, take a peek at these two articles worth the read. One discusses sustainable cities and the role landscape architects play in it all while this…
  • Wednesday Garden & Nature Tidbits

    13 May 2015 | 5:31 am
    Last week’s ‘Digging the Shades’ post talked about massing your plantings and creating a shade respite.  Couldn’t resist sharing these Fern and Epimedium images to join the plant mix.Close up of Ferns & Epimediums  How cool are these textures & shapes? A big plus of massing your plantings together.And just in case you didn't know, May is also bike month so just another reason to get outdoors, discover nature and cycle to your favorite place. My morning ride is always the lake.       Take a bike ride - May is bike month. Make a…
  • Always Something to Celebrate

    8 May 2015 | 7:15 am
    May 8th, 2015 is National Public Gardens DayToday, May 8th, 2015 is National Public Gardens Day. A big bonus - with our New England spring weather a bit more like summer, it’s a perfect reason to take a cruise and find a nearby favorite. In some cases, you may not be familiar with a few of the undiscovered public gardens right in your own neighborhood. If you visit the National Public Gardens Day website, it tells you lots of information like finding your closest public garden location plus great discounts and offers at many of the places. How cool is that? There's no reason not to explore…
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    Serenity in the Garden

  • Cottage Garden Flowers

    Jan Johnsen
    21 May 2015 | 5:13 am
    The traditional cottage gardens of Great Britain contain both vegetables and flowers - the flowers attract the bees to pollinate the crops. cottage garden, design - Jan JohnsenThus cottage gardens are filled with colorful, scented blossoms and herbs. The tallest plants are at the back and shortest ones in front.The flowers border the gravel paths and make quite a show. A confluence of shapes, color and texture make the garden an exuberant display of nature's finest. You can't make a mistake with this so have fun!Sunny Border Blue veronica - from Bluestone Perennials
  • Its All About the (annual) Flowers

    Jan Johnsen
    18 May 2015 | 5:07 am
    ( Profusion zinnias, marigolds,salvia, plectranthus - Jan JohnsenAnnual flowers - those that bloom all summer into late fall (then give it up for good) - are the secret to a joyful and colorful garden. I know some people might think that colorful flowers are too bright, too eye-catching or overstated but I say, 'embrace the color!'Nature communicates through color. Color is its catalyst and its signal. Birds and insects navigate by color, among other things, and besides, annual flowers' color makes us happy.(Jan Johnsen - coleus, plectranthus,angelonia, and more)It does require…
  • Blue and Red in your Garden - Henri Matisse

    Jan Johnsen
    17 May 2015 | 9:51 pm
    Painting - Henri MatisseA certain blue enters your soul.A certain red has an effect on your blood pressure. - Henri Matissegarden - Jan Johnsen
  • Euphorbia 'Diamond Frost' - Beautiful and Deer Resistant too

    Jan Johnsen
    15 May 2015 | 11:31 am
    White flowers in this pic are Diamond Frost  My favorite deer resistant annual flower isEuphorbia 'Diamond Frost'.This plant, which looks like airy Baby's Breath, made its debut in 2005 in the Proven Winners catalog of annual flowers and since then has become the Most Award Winning Plant in Proven Winners History Why?Well, besides having a nice mounded habit to it (about 12 to 18 inches tall),  it blooms continuously in clouds of airy white flowers through summer heat and drought.It stays beautiful without deadheading. And it is deer resistant!(internationl…
  • Design Tips for an Enchanting Garden Gate

    Jan Johnsen
    13 May 2015 | 7:47 am
    Jan Johnsen -  Johnsen Landscapes & Pools A gate announces a new experience.If you elongate or expand the entry area it makes the transition even more tantalizing. The gate shown here is in a lovely property that I redesigned ...We installed a pool and renovated the old gate with new hinges, roofing and paint. I installed a bluestone threshold beneath and extended it out into the peony garden. The overhead roof makes a grand statement. The white color stands out against a green setting.The gateway leads down existing brick steps which extends the 'entry experience'.That is Salix…
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    MySecretGarden

  • Hidcote Manor Garden: May 2015

    20 May 2015 | 7:50 am
    After visiting Lawrence Johnston's Jardin Serre de la Madone outside Menton, France (post is HERE), I knew that I must see his other garden, Hidcote Manor Garden in England. I did it recently, on May 12th 2015. As it became usual for my blog, there are more pictures than words in my posts, and you know the reason - life is bigger than blogging, especially now, in May, when your own garden calls,
  • My May Garden Before and After Vacation

    16 May 2015 | 7:39 am
    Just several hours after we left for our European trip, I was sent this picture.  It's taken from the window of our breakfast room. A deer in my garden is not anything extraordinary, but there were four of them and they weren't at the perimeter of the garden, as usual, but in the very middle of it!  The plants in this part of the garden are never sprayed with 'Liquid Fence', and the fact that
  • Le Мas Provencal. A Restaurant or a Garden?

    29 Apr 2015 | 9:23 am
     Le Мas Provencal France This place is located near the beautiful gardens in Eze:  Cacti, Succulents, etc. Eze Exotic Garden Exotic Garden. Eze. France. Part-2 Home and Garden Thursday ***Copyright 2015 TatyanaS
  • Bunny-Helper. Wordless Wednesday

    22 Apr 2015 | 6:25 am
    ***Copyright 2015 TatyanaS
  • Skagit Valley Tulip Festival - 2015 and Around. Just Pictures

    21 Apr 2015 | 6:35 am
    Beginning is here: RoozenGaarde Display Garden-2015.150 pictures On the way to the Tulip festival (March 27th):  These Snow geese (about 70,000) come here in the winter from the  Wrangler Island (Northwest Russia), covering a stunning 3,100 miles during one or two month.
 
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    Veg Plotting

  • Separated at Birth? Surreal Pillars of Mexico

    VP
    22 May 2015 | 12:30 am
    Just like last year's Unexpected Items in the Bagging Area, time spent in the Great Pavilion on the last day of this year's build provided a neat insight into how Chelsea happens. Here we have the original design drawings and the execution of the National Dahlia Collection's Surreal Pillars of Mexico exhibit.This gives a nod to the south American origins of the late-summer blooms I love. I always marvel how so many bright show-grade flowers can be produced so early in the season. This was one of the largest exhibits in the Great Pavilion and deservedly won Gold.If you're not reading this on…
  • Resonance

    VP
    21 May 2015 | 12:30 am
    The overall view - based on Joseph Paxton's trout stream and rock gardenWhen I heard Dan Pearson was returning to Chelsea after an absence of 11 years, I got very excited. Then when I learned his design would be based on the famous rock garden at Chatsworth, I was both excited and afraid.Why the fear? Well, I've usually been disappointed when designers talk about using a particular garden as their inspiration. I either fail to see the connection between reality and the show, or to my untrained eye it's a pastiche.In this case I needn't have worried. Dan Pearson's show garden is a triumph and…
  • Singing in the Rain

    VP
    20 May 2015 | 12:30 am
    Previously I've experienced plenty of gales, strident heat and shivering coolness at Chelsea Flower Show, so I suppose a trot around in the rain was long overdue. Luckily Monday's weather turned out to be a good thing...Raindrops add an extra dimension, especially if you're using your client's signature black water like John Warland did for World Vision's Fresh garden. Dark shadows add intrigue too - for once I wasn't annoyed by someone getting into the shot either. The zingy lime greens and yellows, plus the attractive 'windows' into the world below provided contrast. I revisited this garden…
  • Postcard From Chelsea Flower Show

    VP
    19 May 2015 | 12:06 am
    The Chelsea Flower Show is always full of surprises, but I didn't expect my first at 7.15am yesterday when I found Prince Harry at the show garden which highlights his Sentebale charity. He'd arrived well ahead of the rest of the royal party for a conducted tour by Matt Keightley, the garden's designer.It's a fantastic show this year. If you've got tickets, then you're in for a treat. There's more from me to come...If you're not reading this on vegplotting.blogspot.com, Blotanical or your own web reader such as Bloglovin' or Feedly, then the website you're using is a blogpost feed scraper.
  • Tulip Time at West Green House Garden

    VP
    18 May 2015 | 12:30 am
    I chose the best day to visit West Green House Garden last week - glorious sunshine, fresh green growth and the jewel-like tulips in the walled garden and potager was most uplifting.Marylyn Abbott - the garden's lessee* - was my guide and it was great to have her insight into the garden's creation and what it was like when she arrived 10 years ago. It's unbelievable to think there was once a huge thickets of bramble where now there is beauty.Hers is a constantly changing creation as she tries out new ideas and plants. There were hints of glories to come too - the mass planting of 'streams' of…
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    GrowBlog

  • The Benefits of Growing Catnip (Catmint)

    21 May 2015 | 7:36 am
    Herbs are such mysterious plants. You just get to know one well because of some incredible talent, and then it shows you another trick. Catnip (catmint) is a classic example...
  • The Secret to Success With Courgettes (Zucchini)

    14 May 2015 | 1:55 pm
    The courgette (also known as zucchini) is one of the easiest vegetables for new gardeners to grow from seed - simple to care for, quick to grow, reliably prolific and endlessly useful in the kitchen.
  • A Simple Way to Get High Yields of Potatoes

    7 May 2015 | 3:02 pm
    It's no secret that I love growing veggies - potatoes in particular - so it upsets me that so many people are getting sad results when they try growing potatoes in novel ways. I just spent an evening watching videos of people who planted potatoes in various enclosures, grew beautiful plants, and then harvested two handfuls of small, knobby potatoes.
  • 3 Ways to Minimise Soil Moisture Loss

    30 Apr 2015 | 10:51 am
    The arrival of growing season warmth signals great things, not least the return of luscious abundance and rich pickings. It’s wonderful to be out on the plot – in T-shirt rather than winter coat – busying oneself with all those essential but immensely pleasurable jobs that keep the harvests a-coming.
  • Protecting Apples from Codling Moths using Bags

    24 Apr 2015 | 3:09 am
    One of the things I enjoy most about contributing to GrowBlog is the way problem-solving ideas get shared between continents. Today's topic is an excellent example. In the last few years, more and more American gardeners have begun bagging their most perfect apples to protect them from codling moths and other pests until they are ready to pick in the fall. It's an easy idea ripe for sharing!
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    The Enduring Gardener

  • More Shopping at the Chelsea Flower Show

    The Enduring Gardener
    22 May 2015 | 9:54 am
    I was very taken by the Karro Wheelbarrow. Lightweight, robust and durable with a large wheel (this always helps manoeuvring) it is made entirely from plastic. It weighs 9kg, has ergonomic handles, a low centre of gravity and is very stable. What’s not to like? £140 and can be ordered through www.mykarro.com Gloves are always of interest to gardeners – I have an enormous collection, many of which have holes in the fingers, so I think it is time to cull the less than perfect and invest in a few more. I came back from the show with a pair of MechanixWear womens’ leather-palmed gloves…
  • Shopping at the Chelsea Flower Show

    The Enduring Gardener
    21 May 2015 | 10:45 am
    Although you can’t buy plants at Chelsea (except for very little ones) there are plenty of shopping opportunities – and if you don’t feel like lugging your purchases round with you, with most things you can window shop and buy them later online. Here’s my eclectic pick of some of the products that caught my eye. One of a series of charming or thought provoking laser cut panels from the Sculpture by the Lakes stand. Prices on application. Tripod ladders are by far the best solution for gardens – safer, more stable, adjustable for uneven or sloping ground and much more versatile.
  • Not everything at Chelsea is beautiful

    The Enduring Gardener
    20 May 2015 | 12:58 am
    Hmm……… Not everything at Chelsea is beautiful – it was a close run thing to choose the object that I most objected to, but this year’s award goes to this pig seat!
  • The Artisan Retreats at Chelsea

    The Enduring Gardener
    19 May 2015 | 12:00 pm
    Chelsea isn’t just about show gardens and a pavilion bursting with blooms. There are all manner of things for sale too, from the sublime to the frankly ridiculous. At the very peak of the sublime, is the work of various craftsmen and women that is on display in the Artisan Retreats. Curated by The New Craftsmen, the Retreats are tucked away on a grassy knoll off South Ranelagh Way – not only are there beautiful things to see – it is also a wonderfully quiet place to visit away from the hurly burly of the rest of the show. Glass artist Michael Ruh has designed a collection of…
  • Mahonia Soft Caress

    The Enduring Gardener
    19 May 2015 | 6:40 am
    Mahonia Soft Caress is a fairly new plant that is so very different from its prickly, upright and at times rather ungainly relatives. It’s delicate foliage fills a gap between a grass and a fern and surprisingly (but very effectively) it is used by Dan Pearson in his Chatsworth inspired garden at Chelsea. I had been wondering how this plant could be used – now I know – and I’m sure I will find a spot or two for it in the shady corners of my garden.
 
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    Urban Gardens

  • Wanted Design NYC Launch Pad Unveils Cool Firepit

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    22 May 2015 | 10:15 pm
    Brian Keyes: Brændt Firepit At the recent Wanted Design New York, designer Brian Keyes unveiled his prototype for the Brændt Firepit, a low profile firepit which he says is meant to  be “a domestic centerpiece for socializing, roasting marshmallows, or … Read More... The post Wanted Design NYC Launch Pad Unveils Cool Firepit appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Plant Furniture and What Lies Beneath the Surface

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    9 May 2015 | 1:43 pm
    Say you want a table or a set of tables and you also want some planters. But in your small space you don’t have room for all of them, so you have to choose. No you don’t. Frédéric Malphettes, designer … Read More... The post Plant Furniture and What Lies Beneath the Surface appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • 13 Mobile Gardens To Move You

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    30 Apr 2015 | 11:24 pm
    We’re back with the second part of our roundup of itinerant and otherwise roaming, traveling, and always portable mobile gardens. Take a peek before they pass you by: 1. Get Rolling With This DIY Mobile Vegetable Garden The only  available … Read More... The post 13 Mobile Gardens To Move You appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • 10 Mobile Gardens to Grow On the Go

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    26 Apr 2015 | 9:29 pm
    While not exactly nomadic, urban dwellers are known to be constantly on the go. It’s no surprise then that many urban gardens are designed to follow suit. With the roots to grow and the wings to fly, mobile gardens are … Read More... The post 10 Mobile Gardens to Grow On the Go appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Teaching Kids Through Play About “Urban Survival”

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    21 Apr 2015 | 4:55 pm
    Tasked with designing an educational kit to convey “the contributing factors of urban poverty,” designer Ryan Romanes dreamed up the Urban Survival Pack. To be used in the classroom, the package’s playful shape and tactility is intended to engage children … Read More... The post Teaching Kids Through Play About “Urban Survival” appeared first on Urban Gardens.
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    Lead up the Garden Path

  • Lovely new foliage everywhere.GBFD May

    Pauline
    22 May 2015 | 1:38 am
    It’s not just that we have wonderfully coloured flowers everywhere in May, the foliage isn’t bad either!  Everywhere is still looking so fresh and the leaves are every bit as good as the flowers in some cases. Quite a few weeds have crept into the photos, but my last post explains why there hasn’t been time to eradicate them! Candelabra Primula The foliage of the candelabra primulas in the bog garden, is almost like a lettuce! At this time of year they are so fresh and plumped up with all the rain we have had over the past couple of weeks. Rogersia. I love the early foliage…
  • At last, we can stay at home!

    Pauline
    18 May 2015 | 3:11 am
    Or, we can go out whenever we like!  For the last eight weeks the undergardener and I, have been going to the hospital in Exeter every day for radio therapy treatment for his prostate cancer. Last Friday was his last session, thank goodness, we now just have to wait 8 weeks to see the Oncologist to make sure that everything is ok once more. Hormone therapy will continue for another 3 yrs. Looking through the rhododendron bed to the back garden. Only the essentials in the garden and house have been done, so it will be good to get out into the garden once more and have a good session clearing…
  • Blooming Maytime. GBBD.

    Pauline
    15 May 2015 | 12:10 am
    May is the time when the garden goes into overdrive, everything seems to want to bloom at the same time, I just wish I could press a pause button and slow everything down a bit. Rhododendrons and Azaleas are now flowering with the wonderful perfume of the deciduous azaleas wafting around the garden. Rhododendron Fantastica This Rhodo is flowering in the woodland and we can see it from the house. This is a very reliable one, flowering every year with just the occasional bucket of water when we have a drought, yes we do sometimes have droughts ! Rhododendron luteum Deciduous Rhododendron luteum…
  • A slow, slow, worms eye view.

    Pauline
    13 May 2015 | 3:28 am
    It was the under gardener’s birthday last week and we went to Cornwall for the day looking for steam trains. After having a ride behind one we made our way to the Plume of Feathers Inn where we had a  wonderful lunch. We then just happened to be in the area and stopped at  the Duchy of Cornwall’s Nursery! For those outside the UK, Prince Charles is the Duke of Cornwall and profits from the nursery go to his charities. Rhododendron There were some lovely plants for sale, lots of these rather expensive large rhododendrons, Rhododendron No, these were too heavy to jump into the…
  • Scaling the heights.

    Pauline
    7 May 2015 | 5:24 am
    My pink Clematis montana is quietly scrambling up one of the ancient oaks at the side of the garden,  at the back of the rhododendron bed. For years I thought it had died because the first year after planting I kept forgetting to water it and there was nothing to be seen. Clematis montana I had planted it on the side of the tree facing the  house, thinking we would then be able to see it from the kitchen and dining room. Clematis montana It had other plans. Unknown to me, it was slowly climbing the other side of the oak which faces the morning sun! Clematis montana It came as quite a…
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    leavesnbloom

  • How to Create a Small Ecosystem in Your Garden with Bee-flies

    Rosie Nixon
    26 Apr 2015 | 1:41 pm
    Ferocious looking little insects fly about in my Perthshire garden at this time of year. Seriously they really do strike a touch of fear in you the very first time you encounter them. They look so intimidating with their large proboscis that looks just like a sharp sewing needle.  They also have a thick hairy body like a small bumble bee along with a high pitch buzz.  They look and sound so threatening but honestly they're no threat to anyone ...that isunless you're a ground nesting solitary wasp or bee Read more »
  • Dress your Garden with a Little Black

    Rosie Nixon
    6 Mar 2015 | 12:43 pm
    Why not dress your garden with a little black this year? All of us ladies have a timeless little black dress in our wardrobe; it's versatile and perfect for so many occasions; there's always a style to flatter no matter what our shape and size.  It's just the same with almost black foliage and flowering plants.  They're useful in the garden; they add a touch of glamour; and there are many to choose from no matter what the size of your garden. The late Christopher Lloyd called it 'sophisticated black'. Read more »
  • Ladybirds in Winter

    Rosie Nixon
    3 Feb 2015 | 11:45 am
    It's the 21st January.  Snow blankets the garden like a thick white woollen shroud.  The thermometer reads -6.8°C and daylight has finally arrived.  It's time to layer up and get out into the winter garden.  With every step you take there's a distinct crunch.   The air feels thick, raw and piercing.  It chills to your very bones.  You inhale and the lining of your nose starts to sting. You exhale and your breathe lingers in the air like fog.  Thickly gloved hands clumsily try to adjust the legs on the tripod.  It's no use ...the gloves have to come off as I…
 
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    Garden Walk Garden Talk

  • It’s Time for Perennials – The May Garden

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    21 May 2015 | 4:00 am
    I bet you are in the swing of gardening here in May. You just finished all the garden chores, cleaning up debris, edging beds, adding amendments to the soil with compost, topping off with mulch, weeding, dead-heading, cutting back spent … Continue reading →
  • Are Annuals More Expensive Than Perennials?

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    18 May 2015 | 4:00 am
    A post I did recently, Pep Up the Perennials – Use Annuals, generated a comment mentioning annuals as “pricy”. I deal with a lot of nurseries in my job … and I never want them to get the idea I … Continue reading →
  • Plant Pampering and Soil Quality

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    16 May 2015 | 4:00 am
    You might not realize how much pampering goes into gardening… especially when installing new plants. Some gardeners think using native plants is the cure all for plant pampering, but that is never the case when getting plants fresh from the … Continue reading →
  • Oriole Visited Me in My Garage

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    13 May 2015 | 4:00 pm
    This is a new one in my garden. I have had very courageous and curious birds come right up to me many times, even a hummingbird flying into my powder room when I was photographing them in the garden. You … Continue reading →
  • Pep Up the Perennials – Use Annuals

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    11 May 2015 | 4:00 pm
    What is all the fuss on planting annuals? “Annuals require too much water, fertilizer and care? Annuals are “unnatural” because they are only around for one season.” Not a valid argument because wild landscapes are made up of perennials and … Continue reading →
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    Gardenerd

  • Wordless Wednesday: Mid-Spring Garden Flourish

    Christy
    20 May 2015 | 6:27 am
    It’s too pretty out there, we had to share. Enjoy these photos from the Gardenerd Test Garden in mid-spring as the garden flourishes. That’s our mid-spring garden flourish. What’s growin’ on in your garden this week? Share what’s flowering, fruiting … Continue reading → The post Wordless Wednesday: Mid-Spring Garden Flourish appeared first on Gardenerd.
  • Starter Garden for Family

    Christy
    19 May 2015 | 8:00 am
    A family in Manhattan Beach called us saying they were “accidentally” growing pumpkins in a plastic storage container, and they wanted a real garden instead. In truth, they had great instincts and those pumpkins were growing like crazy on their … Continue reading → The post Starter Garden for Family appeared first on Gardenerd.
  • Recipe: Andrew’s Kumquat Marmalade

    Christy
    6 May 2015 | 7:30 am
    The kumquat tree was planted for the husband. Yours truly doesn’t care for them. To be honest, the husband uses them as an appetite suppressant (the sourness makes one not want to eat anything afterward; it has the same effect … Continue reading → The post Recipe: Andrew’s Kumquat Marmalade appeared first on Gardenerd.
  • Harvesting Radish Seeds

    Christy
    5 May 2015 | 8:02 am
    Locally adapted seed is an important ally in the garden. Seeds you save and plant again become more adapted to your climate, water conditions, soil, etc. Each time you save seed and then grow it out properly, that seed improves. … Continue reading → The post Harvesting Radish Seeds appeared first on Gardenerd.
  • Hand Pollinating Squash

    Christy
    29 Apr 2015 | 7:12 am
    Early-season gardeners in warm-weather climates are planting zucchini, yellow crookneck and winter squashes already. Flowers open, bees and other pollinators arrive, and soon there will be an abundance of squashes for eating and sharing. But with pollinator populations on the … Continue reading → The post Hand Pollinating Squash appeared first on Gardenerd.
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    Perennial Meadows

  • Theme Plants

    Michael
    17 May 2015 | 2:16 am
    Snowdrops, hellebores, daffodils and tulips: these are the plants that flower in sequence to bring my gardens to life each spring. But now that Tulipa sprengeri is coming into flower the end of spring has been signalled and I must look forward to the next group of theme plants to take the show forward into summer. Theme plants in my perennial meadows are the key plants that dominate the schemes in their season and carry the banner forward. Together they grow happily together to create a coherent block of vegetation that functions as one of the design elements in the garden’s planting…
  • Tulips from Amsterdam

    Michael
    15 May 2015 | 2:49 am
    Plants in their season can bring spectacle to the garden when used boldly. I search for such players in my gardens and use them repeatedly, at numerous intervals throughout the planting  – I call them the theme plants in my perennial meadows. In my recent posts I suggested mid-season daffodils as the leading theme plants for late spring to be followed by tulips before the arrival of summer. The city of Amsterdam has in recent years started to celebrate the tulip by placing pots filled with them throughout the main tourist areas. At one level this pleases me as the flower is…
  • Looking at Garden Planting Design Mistakes

    Michael
    30 Apr 2015 | 12:31 am
    As a keen gardener I am always making mistakes and learning from them, but invariably gardening books only tell us the correct way to do things and only show perfectly composed photographs of gardens to which we must aspire. Looking at your own gardens is different than looking at those of others. When I see my low-growing, open garden in spring I see it in the context of how it will be in high summer when the air will be filled with arching grasses and billowing clumps of head-high perennials. Others might view my garden now as lacking in structure and variations in height; I see the…
  • The Vernal Garden

    Michael
    5 Apr 2015 | 9:04 am
    Seasonal Highlights in the Perennial Meadow Garden For more than three weeks the weather has been cold, wet and very windy here in the Netherlands, but now it is Easter and it feels like the gardening season has begun. The nights are still cold, but the days are calm and sunny and daffodils dominate the garden; finally it is the place to be. In every season I take the time to note which plants really make their mark and then try to build upon these highlights to improve the garden’s appearance in future years. Hellebores have been flowering in my garden for almost two months, but it is…
  • Looking back at a Perennial Meadow Scheme for Christmas

    Michael
    25 Dec 2014 | 1:11 am
    There is a small perennial border in the centre of my garden where for many years I grew a random mixture of plants – all interesting, but as a whole chaotic. Finally, I decided to bring order and a sense of design back to this section of the garden; a garden which is essentially a trial garden and where all design rules can be broken for the sake of trying out a new plant. The aim was for an open, relatively low planting scheme over which the eye can travel, but which nevertheless is interesting without screaming for attention. Why not lay a simple lawn you might be thinking and…
 
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    Beautiful Wildlife Garden

  • Bird Population Soaring

    Loret T. Setters
    22 May 2015 | 8:46 am
    Spring 2015 is once again proving to be a banner year for bird broods in my beautiful wildlife garden.  Bluebird brood #2 has successfully hatched and 4 healthy mockingbird babies located in a holly shrub not 15 feet away joined them this past week.  It is dizzying watching the two sets of parents feed the […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Monarda Madness

    Ellen Honeycutt
    21 May 2015 | 4:45 am
    The first Monarda blooms of 2015 opened up this week, kicking off a series of great blooms from now until late summer.  Every year I learn to appreciate this genus of native flowers so much more until I feel that I might just be on the edge of monarda madness because last year I actually […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Twinleaf

    Brenda Clements Jones
    19 May 2015 | 4:30 am
      A very early wildflower, Twinleaf, Jeffersonia diphylla, is native to eastern North America. It is a plant that I must remind myself to hunt for, well before I’m used to finding wildflowers blooming. Here in the mountains of central Virginia, that crucial time is late March into early April. Each flower only lasts for a very […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Trilliums

    Brenda Clements Jones
    21 Apr 2015 | 4:25 am
    There is not much more thrilling than hiking through the woods and finding a patch of native wildflowers. Some are minuscule, not of bright color, others can knock your socks off. Trilliums fill the bill for knocking my socks off! In the picture above, you see White Trillium, Trillium grandiflorum, about to bloom in one of my gardens. I’ve […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Help for Hummers

    Ellen Honeycutt
    16 Apr 2015 | 5:00 am
    Putting up a hummingbird feeder is a fun way to bring hummingbirds close to a viewing space like a window. Like other types of bird feeders, it is often the first step in developing a love of our feathered friends and a desire to nurture them. So once you’ve taken the first step, I’d encourage […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
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    Vegetable Gardener - All featured posts

  • More Williamsburg and HSA Conference

    21 May 2015 | 1:04 pm
    Posted by cookinwithherbs On my last blog, I highlighted the Colonial Gardens in Williamsburg, having to limit myself to just 12 images. Here are 12 more with details on the conference, farmers' market, two great books, and a few more herbs.
  • Visit to Williamsburg for HSA Conference

    19 May 2015 | 3:33 pm
    Posted by cookinwithherbs I recently attended and presented at the annual Herb Society of America conference, which took place this year in Colonial Williamsburg. If you haven't visited Williamsburg, Virginia, or been there recently--it is a wonderful place for a getaway or family vacation. There is lots to see and do, many gardens to walk through, it is educational and historic and there are no rides (well except for a horse and buggy)and no plastic. Things there are built out of wood and stone and brick as was done in colonial times.
  • Benefits of Container-grown Sandy Lettuce

    19 May 2015 | 12:19 pm
    Posted by WesternGardener If you're looking for a new lettuce to try this season, why not plant some 'Sandy' lettuce? Despite its name, this All-America Selections winner is tender, sweet and grows exceptionally well in patio containers.
  • New 'Roxanne' Radish Certainly is a Winner

    12 May 2015 | 8:39 am
    Posted by WesternGardener All-America Selections picked a real winner when it selected 'Roxanne' radish for the 2015 season. This hybrid radish offers everything a vegetable gardener could ask for and in record time.
  • Keeping Insect Pests Out of the Vegetable Garden

    4 May 2015 | 1:42 pm
    Posted by WesternGardener About 90 percent of the insects you see in your garden won’t cause plants any significant harm. Here are organic tips for handling the 10 percent that do.
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    Tsubo-en Zen-garden diary « Tsubo-en Zen-garden diary

  • Midoritsumi, ‘green picking’ and Momiage ‘thinning’, combined

    Karesansui
    9 May 2015 | 6:56 am
          Due to my health status during 2014 (see: A forced recess: Infective or bacterial Endocarditis) for the first time ever, my wife (on here own initiative) had done Midoritsumi, the ‘green picking’ of our Pinus- densiflora. This must have been a hell of a job, because it was done with a [...]
  • Pilgrimage: Ofuda (御札 charm, talisman), a shrine or a temple seal

    Karesansui
    2 Jan 2015 | 12:12 pm
    A popular custom is to buy a blank booklet at the beginning of the pilgrimage and have a calligraphy named 'Ofuda', painted in it, at each of the temples (1). It is believed that one after one's death, when one can show this booklet to the deity at the gate of heaven, one obtains permission to [...]
  • A forced recess: Infective or bacterial Endocarditis

    Karesansui
    23 Dec 2014 | 2:40 am
    The garden has seen one of its poorest years ever. Initially. At the end of the year all looks good again. During the first half year of 2014 my wife had to do the maintenance on here own. During the second half of the year I gradually gained control again. Not only about the garden [...]
  • Buxus disease, Box Blight? Cylindrocladium Buxicola, continued

    Karesansui
    17 Sep 2013 | 5:56 am
    In Buxus disease, Box Blight? Problem with box topiary I wrote about a new, at the time the latest, buxus problem in our garden. Now, about three years later, we know that this is a problem that is here to stay and will not easily go away. In 2002, the cause of a new [...]
  • Resurrection of our Wisteria sinensis

    Karesansui
    29 May 2013 | 7:05 am
    In Frost damage 2011/2012, final damage report I wrote about the frost-damage in our garden during the winter 2011/2012 and the subsequent growth and our attempts to give it a second life. This frost damage was particularly sat with regard to our garden pride, the solitary Wisteria sinensis. Now the second season after the disaster, [...]
 
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    Miss Rumphius' Rules

  • Contemporary Tiles and the Middle Ages

    Susan aka Miss. R
    19 May 2015 | 4:25 am
    Sometimes my mind connects the dots in unexpected ways.  I visited ICFF (International Contemporary Furniture Fair) in New York over the weekend.  You would think I’d be all mid-mod and forward thinking. But no. I fell for these concrete tiles from Grow House Grow.  They are a new product for the company, frost proof and come a a wide variety of colors. My mind immediately went to the Middle Ages and the floor at Sainte-Chapelle in Paris. Since my images of that were lost in an iPhone debacle, I borrowed this one from Wikimedia to illustrate the point. Now to find a place to use the…
  • Magnolia Lust

    Susan aka Miss. R
    26 Apr 2015 | 6:24 am
    As part of my job as a landscape designer, I regularly walk the growers and nurseries to see what is new and what looks good.  I learn about plants new to me that I may want to trial and try. Like many other designers, I get on a plant jag and have a love affair with a group of plants for a while and then move on to flirt with something else that catches my rather short plant attention span.  Today I have plant lust.  I was at the fabulous NJ wholesale grower, Pleasant Run Nursery yesterday and fell for Magnolia x brooklynensis ‘Black Beauty’ that is just now…
  • Trials and Neglect in my Home Garden

    Susan aka Miss. R
    17 Apr 2015 | 7:53 am
    I’m not a landscape designer who has a wonderfully designed garden that is a terrific advertisement for my craft at my home. I should, I live on a corner, but as I’ve shared here before it’s mostly a neglected mess with good bones and a rotating cast of plants. My home garden is quirky and in a constant state of flux. Since my landscape design practice is design only, I don’t have a crew I can ‘borrow’ for the big tasks, so they wait and are ignored for as long as possible. I’m mostly not very motivated to work in my own garden after spending my…
  • Garden Visit: Filoli

    Susan aka Miss. R
    24 Mar 2015 | 11:43 am
    My visit last week to one of the great American gardens, Filoli, in northern California, was a revelation in many ways.  I have wanted to visit since I first saw pictures of it years ago. The garden was designed in the early 20th century by its original homeowners with a team of architects, artists, and horticulturists. There is no known master plan yet it has survived largely in tact which is a rarity for American estate gardens of this size and scope. Sometimes my travels are guided by my desire to experience specific places firsthand. My trip to Marrakesh and Majorelle was one of…
  • Green Gardens

    Susan aka Miss. R
    27 Feb 2015 | 4:34 am
    Green is a thing. Right now it’s a missing thing. It’s what I miss most during winter and what makes me smile first in the spring–those small green shoots pushing up through frigid earth. I’ve been thinking about making flowerless gardens. Gardens that are mostly green. Gardens that rely  on scale and texture and subtlety of hue and maybe some skilled pruning. In New Jersey, where I practice landscape design, this may prove to be more difficult than it is in warmer climates where there are bolder choices and plants with immense architectural leaves. Many of the…
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    Native Plants and Wildlife Gardens

  • Golden Ragwort: Groundcover Gold

    Suzanne Dingwell
    22 May 2015 | 9:57 pm
      Everyone is looking for groundcovers these days, and if we let go of the idea that a groundcover has to be short and have blades, a whole new world is opened up. Packera aurea is a plant with an awful name but a lot to offer to those looking for a good way to […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Spring Cleanup in the Perennial Garden, Part TWO

    Pat Sutton
    18 May 2015 | 11:20 am
    Several years ago I wrote Part ONE of this post, “Spring Cleanup, Don’t Overdo It.” Part ONE addressed the first sweep through the garden, breaking the previous growing season’s dead perennial stalks, gathering them up, and laying them loosely somewhere safe, where the coming year’s butterflies and moths could safely evolve and emerge (overwintering eggs, […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • The Milkweed Community

    Beatriz Moisset
    7 May 2015 | 4:00 am
    Monarch conservation should be a portal to ecosystem conservation. Even monarch predators have a place in the web of life. We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Wildflower Week: Ten Favorite Native Wildflowers

    Susan J. Tweit
    5 May 2015 | 3:15 am
    In honor of National Wildflower Week (May 4-10, 2015), here are ten of my favorite native wildflowers for habitat gardens in the inland West. Why use wildflowers in landscaping? The LadyBird Johnson Wildflower Center makes the case succinctly: Wildflowers and native plants help conserve water, reduce mowing costs, provide habitat for birds, butterflies and other wildlife and protect […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • May Lily: A Native Groundcover

    Mark Turner
    1 May 2015 | 6:00 am
    Sometimes we have large swaths of ground that we’d like to cover. In the Pacific Northwest there are several plants that can fill that niche, but today I’ll highlight just one that’s beginning to come into bloom. May Lily, aka False Lily of the Valley, Maianthemum dilatatum, thrives in moist, somewhat shady woods from Alaska […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
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    Big Blog Of Gardening

  • EWG’s Dirty Dozen Fruits & Vegetables: How many can you grow in your garden?

    Todd Heft
    27 Apr 2015 | 7:09 am
    Big Blog Of Gardening Looking at the Dirty Dozen fruits and vegetables list, I counted 7 which I grow in my garden and rarely consume from any other source. Continue reading → EWG’s Dirty Dozen Fruits & Vegetables: How many can you grow in your garden?
  • Grow Bigger, Better Carrots: Soil Prep, Planting & Harvesting

    Todd Heft
    16 Mar 2015 | 7:09 am
    Big Blog Of Gardening The key to growing carrots succesfully in your garden is in the soil preparation, especially if you live in areas with rocky or clay soil. Continue reading → Grow Bigger, Better Carrots: Soil Prep, Planting & Harvesting
  • 10 Of The World’s Weirdest Flowers

    Guest Author
    9 Mar 2015 | 10:33 am
    Big Blog Of Gardening From the Monkey Face Orchid to the Corpse Lily, here are ten of the weirdest flowers in the world. Continue reading → 10 Of The World’s Weirdest Flowers
  • Birds: A Gardener’s Best Pest Control

    Todd Heft
    8 Feb 2015 | 2:36 pm
    Big Blog Of Gardening As we've moved away from our agrarian roots, we seem to have lost sight of the fact that birds are helpers, not pests, for gardeners. Continue reading → Birds: A Gardener’s Best Pest Control
 
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    The Pond Blog

  • Dealing with Duckweed in Your Pond

    Bill Dubert
    21 May 2015 | 7:28 pm
    I have a confession to make. I really like duckweed. I think that it’s pretty, and can be really interesting to look at. The way that it propagates so rapidly is really impressive, and the free-floating roots are neat. Watermeal, a type of duckweed, doesn’t even have roots, it just absorbs nutrients and water directly through the bottom of it’s frond. Watermeal is also worth noting for being the smallest known flowering plant. Duckweed, though, can be a huge problem in a pond. In good conditions, a duckweed plant can bud and divide once per day, meaning a daily doubling of…
  • Save up to $100 off of Aquascape products today at Loch Ness Water Gardens!

    Bill Dubert
    26 Mar 2015 | 2:56 pm
    Need a new pump? A new pond vacuum? Stocking up on water treatment supplies? Now’s the time with one of the best deals you’ll see all year. From now until May 31, 2015, Aquascape is offering a fantastic mail-in rebate worth up to $50 off of their products. Now, that’s a great deal, but it gets better: Combine it with our Spring Savings coupon deal, also worth up to $50 off exclusively at Loch Ness Water Gardens, and you can save up to $100 off of a purchase of any combination of Aquascape products! Here are the details: From March 15th – May 31, 2015, Aquascape is…
  • Tips for your Spring Pond To-Do List

    Bill Dubert
    20 Mar 2015 | 1:41 pm
    Well, Spring is officially here after what has been, for much of the US, a particularly nasty winter. That means that it’s time to pull off the cover net, clean up around the pond, squirt various liquids into your water, etc. You know the drill. Here are a few quick tips to make things go more smoothly this year. Make an actual to-do list This is one of those tips that took me a long time to figure out, but has since been absolutely invaluable. Sitting down with a pen and pad to make out a physical list that you can check off is incredibly useful for a few reasons. First of all,…
  • 5 Things You Need to be Ready for Spring

    Bill Dubert
    24 Feb 2015 | 8:28 pm
    Spring is coming at us fast, and I can’t wait for it to get here (and not only because my kayak paddle is in the corner, mocking me). One thing that I’m NOT looking forward to, though, is the inevitable scramble to get those last-minute items that I forgot to have ready ahead of time, before the pond warms up. Since I was already making a list for myself, I figured that I’d point out a few items for my readers that will be necessary sooner than you think, all of which I’ve forgotten at some point in the past. 1. Pond Vacuum I’ve talked before about the importance…
  • Why the Lotus Flower is So Important

    Bill Dubert
    23 Jan 2015 | 9:23 pm
    “Padma” is the Sanskrit word for the Lotus plant, which is also called the Sacred Lotus or Indian Lotus. The Lotus Temple in Delhi is the Mother Temple of the Bahá’í faith in India and draws as many as 150,000 visitors in a day. Image copyright Jeremy Vandel. The lotus flower, Nelumbo nucifera, occupies a huge space in the minds of many pond owners and designers. Deciding whether or not to include a lotus among a pond’s flowers can be a big decision when choosing pond plants and even layouts. Many water gardeners consider their lotus flowers the pride of their pond,…
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    Nigel Gnome grows a vegetable

  • Carrots are up!

    Nigel Gnome
    27 Apr 2015 | 11:06 pm
    My lovely prepared soil must work, the carrot seedlings are just peeping out, the recent rain hasn't harmed them at all even though it has been quite heavy at times.A lovely gift from friend, a handsome grey pupkin, the best. :)Lovely grey pumpkin detailThe forest pansy tree has been dropping it's leaves very quickly in the last few days, they look lovely on the lawnAutumn is definetely here.Forest pansy whirlI have been sent a link to an interesting website to encourage people to let their gardens go wild, well sort of. :)It's an American site but the ideas would aply anywhere.Garden Gone…
  • Beanless but there is hope of carrot

    Nigel Gnome
    20 Apr 2015 | 12:57 am
    Poor old beans met their fate this weekend, they were looking like they were suffering. It was surprising to find how many pods they were still hiding deep under the leaves. These palnts have produced so many beans, many bags full. At times the yellow ones would be flourishing, then the greens ones seem to respond and grow a whole new crop, then the yellows would do it back. They were planed 6th January I cut the stems leaving the roots in the ground enabling them to add nitrogen to the soil over winter.last beans and more chilliesI wanted to plant some more carrots and have another go at the…
  • Mad March

    Nigel Gnome
    15 Mar 2015 | 10:28 pm
    Cyclone Pam is supposed to be thrashing us at the moment, but luckily so far there has only been a bit of rain and some huge swell at the Heads. Hopefully that will be it. I did take down the back yard shade sails in case they were going to be blown away. Pruned all the young inward growing plum branches to keep the tree open. New zucchini seedlings are growing well and all the seeds planted recently have come up. The limes look good.Lovely limesPulled the last of the carrots to make way for winter plantings, not a bad lotHup Holland Took a panorama from the roof as I was up there getting the…
  • Garden reconfigure

    Nigel Gnome
    8 Mar 2015 | 10:32 pm
    March is upon us and the changes in the light direction and the shortening of days is becoming apparent. The sun is nice to sit in at the end of the day as it slants through the back garden. Quite different this year as the large titoki tree that graced the font garden has now gone, it blocked a lot of the late evening light. Lots of seed planting for the coming season, beetroot, tender stems broccoli, parsley, a couple more zucchini, more rocket and fennel, and lots of corianderThe vege garden path as been rethought, made wider and also made more potential growing space, a win all…
  • The end of the road for three tomato plants

    Nigel Gnome
    5 Feb 2015 | 6:35 pm
    Waitangi Day! Lovely having a Friday off. :)The tomato plants began looking sickly and quickly went yellow. I suspected it may have been from spraying with Neem oil but that may be coincidental. All the plants got blight but we did get quite a few tomatoes in the end. The Romas were probably the best. I have pulled them all out and harvested as many of the tomatoes that will still ripen.Final harvest of the romas and the sweet 100's I planted the sweet 100 on September 22 last year, so they have been going for four months. There is still a small tub tomato doing well and a lateral baby…
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    Flowerona

  • Flowerona Reflects Video : 23/05/15

    Rona
    22 May 2015 | 4:01 pm
    This week’s Flowerona Reflects video features footage of the RHS Chelsea Flower Show, an event at Designers Guild, A Celebration of the Rose with Neill Strain, Fiona Humberstone’s book launch and Chelsea in Bloom. I hope you enjoy watching the video and don’t forget, if you’d like to subscribe to my YouTube channel, please click here and then click on Subscribe.
  • Chelsea in Bloom 2015 – Images of the floral-inspired entries

    Rona
    22 May 2015 | 2:35 am
    One of my favourite events of the year is Chelsea in Bloom and this year it celebrates its 10th Anniversary. If you’ve not heard about it before, retailers in Sloane Square, Sloane Street and the Duke of York Square transform their shop fronts with flowers. This year’s theme is ‘Fairy Tales’ and last night I went to take a look at the designs on a complimentary rickshaw tour. Best Floral Display Sarah Chapman was crowned overall winner, taking home the prize for Best Floral Display. Designed by Foxgloves + Glory and Victoria Flowers, the store’s beautiful…
  • RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2015 – The Cloudy Bay Garden

    Rona
    22 May 2015 | 12:50 am
    Many congratulations to Cloudy Bay in association with Vital Earth, and garden designers Harry and David Rich of Rich Landscapes for winning a Gold medal for The Cloudy Bay Garden at this year’s RHS Chelsea Flower Show! The garden echoes the terroir of the Marlborough region in New Zealand, with deep red and fresh white flowers representing Cloudy Bay’s signature wines, Pinot Noir and Sauvignon Blanc. The two wines are also represented in the two different hard landscaping areas…the rusticness and earthyness of the oak reflecting the red wine and the clear crispness of the…
  • RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2015 – NAFAS Exhibit

    Rona
    21 May 2015 | 4:01 pm
    Revitalisation & Regeneration is the name of the NAFAS (National Association of Flower Arrangement Societies) exhibit at this year’s RHS Chelsea Flower Show. It was inspired by the NAFAS’ love of plant material and the preservation of the environment. The exhibit highlights the revitalisation of land and materials that can be regenerated to make areas which encourage flora and fauna. The flowers used include Ranunculus ‘Elegance Orange’, Allium stipitatum ‘Mount Everest’,  Ammi visage, Geum ‘Totally Tangerine’ and Rosa…
  • RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2015 – The Laurent-Perrier Chatsworth Garden – Best Show Garden

    Rona
    20 May 2015 | 4:01 pm
    Many congratulations to Laurent-Perrier and garden designer Dan Pearson for winning a Gold medal and Best Show Garden for the Laurent Perrier Chatsworth Garden at this year’s RHS Chelsea Flower Show! Representing a small part of the 105 acre Chatsworth Garden, the design can be viewed from all sides and it was inspired by Chatsworth’s ornamental Trout Stream and Paxton’s rockery. I loved the Primula pulverulenta and the Silene dioica (red campion). The latter, which is featured in the last image in this post, reminded me of growing up in Devon and seeing this dainty bloom in the…
 
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    Your Easy Garden

  • Beating the Drought with Gardening Tips from the Pros

    judieyeg
    18 May 2015 | 8:49 am
    Flower Carpet Yellow after days of 100° temperatures With a widespread drought now affecting Texas, California and other parts of the US, many homeowners are about to give up on their gardens.   Don’t despair – there are ways to beat the drought and continue gardening.Here are a few tips from the pros (many of whom live in Australia where they just came out of a 13-year drought!). Choose the right plants Start by looking at your neighbors’ yards and gardens to see what’s working for them. Don’t assume that just because a plant has loads of blooms it’s a high-water use…
  • Lettuce Heads – A Fun Gardening Project for Kids

    Guest Bloggers
    14 May 2015 | 4:55 pm
    Face Plants are funny and fun for kids to create! I’m always looking for new ways to make gardening fun for my classes with the local elementary school at Hiland Hall Gardens. Whenever I can integrate humor into my lessons, I find it’s always well received. Who doesn’t love to laugh, right? The kids dubbed my latest garden lesson “Face Plants”, which is basically a new take on the chia head phenomenon. We created small pots out of clay, but if you don’t have access to a kiln, you could use air-dry clay or even create a simplified version by drawing a face on the side of a paper…
  • Creating an Easy-Care Cottage Garden

    judieyeg
    30 Apr 2015 | 1:32 pm
    Even if you don’t have a cottage, you can blend your home and lawn into a cottage-style landscape. By learning the basics of this carefree style and using plants that thrive in your area, cottage gardens can be the easy to design and to maintain. Here are 3 basic steps to get your started. Garden phlox like these mixed varieties of Volcano phlox add season long color to cottage gardens. They attract butterflies too! 1. Start with design The key to cottage garden design is to not make it look designed or formal.  Try to avoid tight shapes, rigid patterns and straight lines. Curving or…
  • Garden and Fashion: The recurring themes . . .

    Phillip Townshend
    26 Apr 2015 | 7:46 am
    Just as with fashion across all areas of our lives (clothing, furniture, hairstyles and social trends), it seems that we constantly see what’s old being touted as new again.  As it turns out, this is no different when it comes to gardening. Just like trends for fashion and the like, we see cyclical changes in style that is supposed to be the “latest and greatest answers” to improving either our lifestyle, our surrounding environment. Some trends are even touted as helping us to deal with dealing with a specific issue, as with flared jeans (but I am not sure what problem they were…
  • DIY Hammered Spoon Plant Markers

    Guest Bloggers
    9 Apr 2015 | 8:01 am
    Hammered spoon plant markers are easy and inexpensive to make! It’s a cold, spring day here in Vermont, but all I want to do is get out there and put my hands in the dirt! But it’s snowing, yes actually snowing, so that is obviously out of the question! If you are feeling the itch to get growing, but can’t actually get out there yet, here’s a garden project to help you make it to a long awaited warm day full of sprouts and blooms! It’s almost here, really! This project is another eco-friendly idea, reusing old silverware to create beautiful garden markers. It also gets some of that…
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    The Mini Garden Guru - Your Miniature Garden Source

  • The Art of Miniatures with Caveman Al

    Janit Calvo
    22 May 2015 | 1:33 pm
    The Art of Miniatures with Caveman Al “If it’s not built from scratch, I can’t call it art.” – Caveman Al We followed the line of pavers next to the parking lot behind the building. “She said it was in the alley.” Steve and I were apprehensive about nosing around, it looked like someone’s backyard. We […]
  • Plants for Growing Small: Miniature Gardens, Fairy Gardens, Railroad Gardens and Bonsai

    Janit Calvo
    14 May 2015 | 4:53 pm
    Plants for Growing Small: Miniature Gardens, Fairy Gardens, Garden Railroads and Bonsai It happens every spring. The trees inspire me to write about them. So when I searched for what I had written before, I came across a boatload of my blogs from years past. Whew! Who knew so much could be said about a few […]
  • In the Miniature Garden With Mom: Happy Mother’s Day!

    Janit Calvo
    8 May 2015 | 3:42 pm
    Happy Mother’s Day! Hope you are making miniature gardens for Mother’s Day. She will love the garden. Then she will love you more for doing that for her, way more than any of your brothers and sisters. Then you’ll be her favorite child. Then it’s all good. Have fun, Janit & Steve. PS – See America’s […]
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    Garden Landscaping Ideas

  • Innovative Backyard Patio Designs Ideas for a Wonderful House

    admin
    7 May 2015 | 1:49 am
    It’s common knowledge that a patio in your backyard could increase the price of your property. Patios are one of those portions of the house where you can just cast all your worries in thin air. It’s also where you get to hang out with your favorite people. However, creating wonderful backyard patio designs has at all times been considered as the exciting and difficult crafts. The fact is, once you come up with a good design, it will meet your expectations and satisfy your desires at their peak. The following are some of the best points to be considered in making those…
  • Top Landscaping Ideas for Front Yard

    admin
    15 Feb 2015 | 6:03 am
    Landscaping ideas for front yard : You can transform your front yard into a stylish and nice looking yard. The scent and scenario that flowers have make your yard a welcoming place. Bright and bold flowers make a big impact even when planted in a small place. They attract insect and birds that seek nectar,making your yard more lively. Adding a patio to your front yard make your yard feel part of your home.You can have breakfast in your front yard with your family and even have a barbecue with your friends in the evening. You can also let your landscaping ideas front yard take a natural…
  • Small Backyard Landscaping Ideas and Suggestion

    admin
    14 Feb 2015 | 8:22 pm
    If you’re struggling to come up with small backyard landscaping ideas, simplify the issue by thinking of it as a choice between two options. You can either embrace the size of your yard for what it is, or you can try to hide it by drawing attention to a particular feature or making the lawn look expanded. Embrace The first approach to small backyard landscaping is arguably the easiest. Small backyard landscaping can be quite simple if you simply plant some flowers, keep the landscape relatively flat, and maybe put out a small bench or a couple of chairs where you can sit outside and read a…
  • Cool Desert Landscaping Ideas For Your Backyard Landscape Design

    admin
    10 Nov 2014 | 6:32 am
    If you are looking for some cool desert landscaping ideas and design for your backyard landscape, here we will bring to you a collection of specially selected design and ideas which might be suitable for your need. For those who love the beautiful and relaxation touch to their garden landscaping ideas, desert landscaping style will make your dream come true. Is it backyard or front yard, you are free to choose and decorate your outdoor space by your own ideas. Comprise of several beautiful desert landscaping ideas for front yard or backyard in our Cool Desert Landscaping Ideas For Your…
  • Small Backyard Landscaping Ideas On A Budget

    admin
    17 Aug 2014 | 9:05 am
    Many families have been found to spend most of their time in either front or backyards, while at home. Yards should then be well designed and decorated to offer a conducive and friendly spaces for kids and their parents. Although landscaping design and implementation might require a lot of funds allocation, a simple small backyard landscaping ideas can be applied to achieve the desired aesthetic value of the yards. There are a number of simple landscaping ideas for backyard that if put in use while designing backyard improvement, they can help home owners save on their budgets and at the…
 
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    Organic Gardening Tips - Smiling Gardener

  • How To Get Rid Of Slugs And Snails In The Garden

    1 May 2015 | 9:00 pm
    Not all snails and slugs are pests, so if they’re not eating your plants, you don’t need to get rid of them in your organic garden. Slugs and snails are closely related. The main difference is that snails have a shell, while slugs don’t. Most molluscs live in the water, but slugs and snails are the two that can live on land as well. In fact, there’s your most important clue right there for how to get rid of slugs and snails in the garden - they like it wet.
  • 9 Ways To Help The Beneficial Fungi In Your Soil

    10 Apr 2015 | 9:00 pm
    Starting seeds indoors for planting outside this spring - the inoculant goes on right before sowing the seed. Without sufficient beneficial microbes on (and in) our bodies, we get sick very fast. It's the same for plants. Perhaps the most beneficial fungi for plant health is a group of fungi you may have heard me talk about before called mycorrhizal fungi. This week, I received a fresh batch of mycorrhizal inoculant, a powder that brings these fungi onto the roots of my plants.
  • Vegetable Garden Layout - Rows, Square Foot Or Wild?

    2 Apr 2015 | 9:00 pm
    You may have noticed I don’t usually plant in straight rows. I prefer a much wilder garden:
  • My one regret in life is that I am not someone else*

    6 Mar 2015 | 9:58 pm
    *A quote by Woody Allen To start off, a question - where are you gardening? {loadposition pollwhere}
  • It's Winter...

    27 Feb 2015 | 9:58 pm
    Click for video transcription Hey, it’s Phil from SmilingGardener.om. I apologize in advance for the wind noise - I don’t have a wireless mic on today so i just have to use the camera mic. I haven’t been making any videos this time of year because this is what my garden looks like under two feet of snow right now, but I wanted to share a couple of things with you today. First is if you follow me on facebook and especially on youtube, you’re not really seeing anything from me this time of year, but if you come over to SmilingGardener.com, I am still writing an article every Saturday.
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    Sow and So

  • D is for Dicotyledon – Word Up!

    Bridget Elahcene
    21 May 2015 | 11:31 pm
    Dicotyledon \ˌdʌɪkɒtɪˈliːd(ə)n\ A plant that is distinguished by its having two seedling leaves which extend at germination to start photosynthesis. The post D is for Dicotyledon – Word Up! appeared first on Sow and So.
  • Spider on a Leaf – Wordless Wednesday

    Laila Noort
    20 May 2015 | 12:07 am
    The post Spider on a Leaf – Wordless Wednesday appeared first on Sow and So.
  • Leafy greens and summer dreams …in the Ardennes polytunnel!

    Laila Noort
    19 May 2015 | 12:57 am
    This spring has been pretty normal, weather wise, here in the Belgian Ardennes. A proper spring with average temperatures, enough rainfall and only the occasional cold spell during the night. All good news for the garden! Blossom Especially for the fruit trees. It is always tricky when spring starts early and the blossom is in bloom when a cold spell during the night wreaks havoc  causing severe damage and depriving you of a decent crop for the year. But as I said, this year the blossom appeared bang on time and surprise surprise there were even some flowers on an dwarf apple and pear tree I…
  • C is for Clamp – Word Up!

    Bridget Elahcene
    14 May 2015 | 11:54 pm
    Clamp \klamp\ Mound of harvested root crops protected from frost or rain with a covering of straw or soil. The post C is for Clamp – Word Up! appeared first on Sow and So.
  • Blueberry Flowers – Wordless Wednesday

    Bridget Elahcene
    12 May 2015 | 10:03 pm
    The post Blueberry Flowers – Wordless Wednesday appeared first on Sow and So.
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    The Hortiholic

  • Dahlia Do's and Don'ts

    Tony Fulmer
    2 May 2015 | 6:56 pm
    Flowers, like celebrities, can have cyclical popularity. Based on the volume of customer questions, dahlias are the smokin' hot plant right now. Never grown them? Check them out at your local garden center and prepare to be dazzled.   A wealth of choicesHybridizers have expanded the range of flower and plant sizes, colors and flower forms so there's a dahlia for every taste. It's pretty darned cool to watch a quarter-sized bud open into an 8" (or larger) flower later in the summer! Yep, I'm in awe of big ole' dinnerplate dahlias.Here are a few tips for success from my experience growing…
  • Timely Tips for Spring Garden Cleanup

    Tony Fulmer
    24 Mar 2015 | 2:43 pm
    Are you itching to get out and start playing in your garden? Me too. It's time to: prune, mulch, stake and most important - plant! Here are a few things to consider as you head out in Slogger-shod feet and West County Rose gloved-hands armed with Felco pruners. Snow Mold1. Lawns - Check turf for this winter's gift - snow mold! You can't miss it (see picture). Symptoms look worse than their long term effect. Snow mold will disappear with fertilization and light raking once the ground warms and dries a bit more. Don't rake in deep shade where shallow-rooted fescues reside. You may pull them up…
  • Off to the Amaryllis Races

    Tony Fulmer
    23 Dec 2014 | 1:03 pm
    'Elvas'It's really easy to understand why amaryllis are so wildly popular. They grow quickly once awakened from dormancy, have flowers that are the epitome of spectacular, are practically maintenance-free (can be grown in water or soil) and are just plain fun to watch! I heard people are even having amaryllis races - they all pot them the same day, then keep track of whose grows fastest, tallest, or has the most flowers. But they're so-oo-o-o easy even a tot could grow them.Big bulbs!My first memory of amaryllis was shopping with Mom at the florist for an azalea. I saw a box on the counter…
  • A Year in the Life of a Fraser Fir

    Tony Fulmer
    25 Nov 2014 | 5:43 pm
    I was fortunate recently to have the opportunity to chat with a new friend, Fletcher, the Fraser fir. We talked long distance. He shared highlights of life on the Christmas tree farm before coming to Chalet. There's a lot happening down on the farm!Where I grew up in VirginiaWhere do you come from, Fletcher?Thanks for asking, Tony. My great-grandparents originally came from Mt. Rogers, the highest point in Virginia. I've kinda lost track, but I'm at least the 8th generation of Fraser fir coming from those cool mountains. I started out as a tiny seed from the cone of my parent tree. Did you…
  • The Garden Clock is Ticking....

    Tony Fulmer
    18 Oct 2014 | 11:50 am
    "The days dwindle down to a precious few" is so true for the October garden. As temperatures drop and you face the reality of rain becoming snow, the urgency to complete fall garden tasks becomes almost manic.You've probably already made the decision whether to cut your perennials now or let them stand as snowy winter sentinels. You've ripped the tired annuals out by their fuzzy little roots. What else could there possibly be to do? Want a few reminders?1) Don't let fall pass without planting bulbs. The soil temps are finally cool enough to put all the spring flowering beauties in. Who said,…
 
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    guzmansgreenhouse.com

  • The Difference Between Bird of Paradise Plants

    Paul Guzman
    22 May 2015 | 5:22 am
    Recently many folks have been asking our staff and myself what the difference between the following Bird of Paradise Plants. Red Bird of Paradise Yellow Bird of Paradise Mexican Bird of Paradise Bird of Paradise So…without further ado here are those differences Red Bird of Paradise Botanical name – Caesalpinia pulcherrima: The Red bird of … Continue reading The Difference Between Bird of Paradise Plants The post The Difference Between Bird of Paradise Plants appeared first on .
  • Plants to help clean and filter indoor pollution

    Paul Guzman
    27 Apr 2015 | 9:38 am
    Is your home or office environment void of indoor plants?  Did you know there are hundreds of plants that help clean and filter out indoor pollution.  The EPA blog says plants can help reduce chemical toxins indoors. Materials such as treated wood, glues, paints, varnishes and a multitude of other household materials give out a … Continue reading Plants to help clean and filter indoor pollution The post Plants to help clean and filter indoor pollution appeared first on .
  • Unusual Indoor Houseplants

    Paul Guzman
    8 Feb 2015 | 1:39 pm
    Fabian Aralia – Polyscias scutellaria This is a great plant for small sized pots.  The root system is small thus only needs occasional watering.  It resembles a stump with round foliage. Use a bonsai pot for a great looking Bonsai indoor plant. I would suggest water once maybe twice per month.  Make sure to keep … Continue reading Unusual Indoor Houseplants The post Unusual Indoor Houseplants appeared first on .
  • What is composting and how does it work

    Paul Guzman
    24 Jan 2015 | 12:29 pm
    So what the heck is compost anyway?  Good question…and I’ll try my best to answer that question on this post. Compost is decomposing matter that turns into nutrients that all plants need in order for them to maintain healthy growth.  This matter is what all plants need to survive. You can use chemically made fertilizers … Continue reading What is composting and how does it work The post What is composting and how does it work appeared first on .
  • How to start a container garden

    Paul Guzman
    18 Dec 2014 | 6:25 am
    Planning Your Container Garden  The first thing you need to decide when planning a container garden is whether you’d prefer to grow your plants indoors or outdoors.  A lot of people think container gardening is only for indoor growing and patios, but containers can actually be useful for any garden situation. Containers are great for … Continue reading How to start a container garden The post How to start a container garden appeared first on .
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    Chicken Waterer

  • Deflate Gate Investigation

    ChickenWaterer
    7 May 2015 | 6:07 am
    Blossom, ChickenWaterer.com's favorite hen, has concluded her investigation of the New England Patriots. According to Blossom, it is more than likely that Equipment Assistant John Jastremski intentionally deflated the team's breakfast during the AFC champion game. The scandal has rocked professional football and left some yolk on the face of quarterback Tom Brady. When asked to comment, coach Bill Belichick said "We just like our eggs soft boiled. Nothing wrong with that." BriteTap chicken waterer. Clean water made simple! Visit us at ChickenWaterer.com.
  • How We Manufacture The BriteTap Chicken Feeder

    ChickenWaterer
    26 Apr 2015 | 7:12 am
    BriteTap Convertible Chick & Chicken FeederCheck out this two minute video that shows how we manufacture our new chick and chicken feeder.The threaded feeder tube is unique because it lets backyard chicken owners raise the shield the same way that a nut moves up a bolt.  The shield prevents chicks from standing on the feed tray and pooping in their food. When the chicks grow up and leave the brooder, the shield prevents rain and snow from spoiling the food and is a perfect feeder for scratch, grit, mealworms and oyster shells.The mold used to make the feeder tube is complicated…
  • Fast Egg Recipe Everyone Will Love

    ChickenWaterer
    19 Apr 2015 | 6:23 am
    A country ham and broccoli frittata cooked in a cast iron skilletReaders of this web site know that we're always looking for fast dinner ideas so that we can get the kids to music lessons, sports, religious school and the countless other activities on the modern family calendar.  The difficulty is in finding recipes that meet all these requirements:Quick- 30 minutes max on nights when we need to get out of the house in a hurry.Nutritious - balanced one pot dishes that include a protein and a vegetable.Customizable - My kids just don't like eating the same things. We're always looking for…
  • Book Review: A Kid’s Guide To Keeping Chickens

    ChickenWaterer
    18 Apr 2015 | 6:31 am
    There are a number of good books on the market today that help chicken owners create and manage a small backyard flock. Some of these books are for newcomers and others for pros. Some focus on one specific aspect of poultry keeping such as chicken health or coop design, and some are general guides. However, there’s always been a gap in the chicken book market. That is until now.Melissa Caughey’s A Kid’s Guide to Keeping Chickens is the first truly comprehensive and accessible book on the topic written for kids.  The book is a general guide to chicken keeping and covers all the same…
  • The Way To Pick A Chicken Today

    ChickenWaterer
    11 Apr 2015 | 8:25 am
    This video of baby chicks just says "welcome to Spring." So cute! A Way To Pick A Chicken Today from ChickenWaterer on Vimeo.Also, the new BriteTap convertible chick & chicken feeder is now in stock. To learn more about our newest product for backyard chicken owners, check out the information on our Chicken Feeder Web Page. BriteTap chicken waterer. Clean water made simple! Visit us at ChickenWaterer.com.
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    Balcony in Berlin

  • pigeon problem

    sophos
    17 May 2015 | 10:29 am
    Regular readers may recall that the hellebores are spending summer on the kitchen window ledge. No? Well, they are. I thought they might be happier in the cooler courtyard, where the sun is filtered through the leaves of the tree. That’s until two wood pigeons decided to try them out for nesting size. The couple returned a few times but after careful consideration opted for somewhere else. Probably because of their prospective neighbour.
  • the edibles

    sophos
    7 May 2015 | 3:41 am
    The plan is to get a small vegetable crop from the balcony each year and so far I’ve successfully grown radishes, sugar snap peas, rocket and tomatoes. This summer, I’m attempting some purple common beanswith the pleasingly Wagneresque name Blauhilde (captured here last week, when they werejust peeping up from their coir pots). Below is the set-up – I’ve placed the bean plants directly in a bag of compost for a number of reasons: a) the drain pipe is the only real climbing structure on the balcony at the moment, but b) I’ve already weaved the ivy…
  • bargain bin bulbs

    sophos
    25 Apr 2015 | 9:52 am
    From this: to Dutch painting
  • rookie roses

    sophos
    24 Apr 2015 | 11:33 am
    It was time to try my hand at rose gardening, even though I know they’re not the most suitable balcony plants. I got caught up looking at disease resistance and pretty colours and ended up buying exactly the kind of sturdy climber they particularly advise against for container growing – as well as the more suitable, bushy Cubana (above left). They were delivered on straw to the Späti on the corner. Here they are in place. I think the containers are slightly more generous than they appear in comparison with the cat, but you can see the climber is already in a bit of tight spot…
  • under construction

    sophos
    12 Apr 2015 | 8:32 am
    Not much happening here. The weather hasn’t been co-operating – occasional hail, snow and gales makes the balcony an inhospitable place. I have a few seedlings on the go, above a dwarf cherry tomato from the 2013 seed harvest. There are signs of life and regeneration, but I should probably replace this second-year parsley with a new sowing, and the hellebores have already moved to the kitchen window ledge, to be spared the intensifying sun.           My herbs seem to have been tended by gnomes this winter. The Swedish pelargoniums definitely didn’t go dormant in the…
 
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    The Foodie Gardener™

  • Garden Fresh Tangy Salad

    Shirley Bovshow
    22 May 2015 | 12:13 pm
      I took the salesperson by surprise as I approached the garden center kiosk to pay for my plants. She had just bitten into her salad and the tomato in her mouth squirted a seed on to my flat of arugula.   “I love tomato and arugula,” I joked, so she wouldn’t feel awkward. “Oh, I’m so sorry,” she replied. So began our conversation and my obsession with her salad!   Fingerprints marked her salad plate, but it didn’t take away from my delight with her lunch. They lent a “fresh from the garden” look to her salad. Crazy, right?
  • Grow Gourmet Summer Squash From Seed

    Shirley Bovshow
    12 May 2015 | 11:55 am
    I made a decision early in my food growing career: if I’m going to grow summer squash it will be gourmet varieties ONLY. Before you call me a vegetable snob, I’ll give you a great argument for this practice. Summer squash plants (common zucchini, patty pan, scalloped, etc.) are relatively inexpensive vegetables to buy at the supermarket, while gourmet varieties are expensive. Are you following me?     Aside from cost, I’m an adventurous eater! I want to taste new squash varieties that are not available at the market. There are hundreds of heirloom and hybrid…
  • TOMATO TOWERS: SUPER TALL TOMATO PLANT SUPPORT

    Shirley Bovshow
    24 Apr 2015 | 2:25 am
    If your tomato support cage isn’t at least 6 feet tall, it’ll probably do a lousy job holding up your tomatoes.     Most tomato cages are too short and you end up with a top-heavy plant that doubles over on itself. Grafted tomatoes, as well as all indeterminate type tomatoes, need a strong support system installed at the time that you plant your tomatoes.   Are you ready for a REAL tomato support cage?   I have a design for a tomato support system that expands to 10-ft tall and is affordable and easy to build. I call them “tomato towers.” They…
  • Grapefruit and Rosemary Water: Fresh From the Foodie Garden

    Shirley Bovshow
    4 Feb 2015 | 2:15 pm
    I mixed fresh grapefruit peel and flowering rosemary sprigs to make a delicious flavored water. It’s what’s fresh in my garden, so I put it to work for me. The beauty of the flowers and invigorating grapefruit scent is all I need to entice me to drink more water. What’s fresh in your foodie garden today and how are you using it? Shirley  
  • Grow Lights For Beginners: Start Plants Indoors

    Shirley Bovshow
    29 Jan 2015 | 11:42 pm
    When I was a beginner gardener, I made a lot of mistakes and spent too much money on products that were supposed to ensure success in the garden but didn’t. This was especially true with anything involving indoor plants or indoor gardening, particularly with starting seeds.   I learned to keep things simple and to invest only in products that truly made a difference because it respected what plants needed to grow. Correct lighting is one of those things. You have to buy the right lights in order to see your seedling establish roots, sprout and begin to leaf out.    …
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    Urban Gardens

  • Wanted Design NYC Launch Pad Unveils Cool Firepit

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    22 May 2015 | 10:15 pm
    Brian Keyes: Brændt Firepit At the recent Wanted Design New York, designer Brian Keyes unveiled his prototype for the Brændt Firepit, a low profile firepit which he says is meant to  be “a domestic centerpiece for socializing, roasting marshmallows, or … Read More... The post Wanted Design NYC Launch Pad Unveils Cool Firepit appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Plant Furniture and What Lies Beneath the Surface

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    9 May 2015 | 1:43 pm
    Say you want a table or a set of tables and you also want some planters. But in your small space you don’t have room for all of them, so you have to choose. No you don’t. Frédéric Malphettes, designer … Read More... The post Plant Furniture and What Lies Beneath the Surface appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • 13 Mobile Gardens To Move You

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    30 Apr 2015 | 11:24 pm
    We’re back with the second part of our roundup of itinerant and otherwise roaming, traveling, and always portable mobile gardens. Take a peek before they pass you by: 1. Get Rolling With This DIY Mobile Vegetable Garden The only  available … Read More... The post 13 Mobile Gardens To Move You appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • 10 Mobile Gardens to Grow On the Go

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    26 Apr 2015 | 9:29 pm
    While not exactly nomadic, urban dwellers are known to be constantly on the go. It’s no surprise then that many urban gardens are designed to follow suit. With the roots to grow and the wings to fly, mobile gardens are … Read More... The post 10 Mobile Gardens to Grow On the Go appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Teaching Kids Through Play About “Urban Survival”

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    21 Apr 2015 | 4:55 pm
    Tasked with designing an educational kit to convey “the contributing factors of urban poverty,” designer Ryan Romanes dreamed up the Urban Survival Pack. To be used in the classroom, the package’s playful shape and tactility is intended to engage children … Read More... The post Teaching Kids Through Play About “Urban Survival” appeared first on Urban Gardens.
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    Epic Gardening | RSS Feed

  • 15+ Upcycle Ideas For The Garden

    Kevin
    13 May 2015 | 6:20 pm
    The post 15+ Upcycle Ideas For The Garden is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog. Quick Navigation 1. Turn Styrofoam Cups Into Planters2. Turn Mushroom Containers Into Planters​3. Turn Egg Cartons Into Germination Trays​4. Use Plastic Bags To Create Mini Greenhouses5. Use a Crib for a Trellis6. Use Clothing as Plant Ties7. Use Fence Pieces For Container Gardening8. Use Trash Cans For Compost Bins9. Turn Wine Corks Into Containers10. Weave […] The post 15+ Upcycle Ideas For The Garden is by Kevin…
  • How To Grow Your Own Wheatgrass

    Kevin
    12 May 2015 | 1:52 pm
    The post How To Grow Your Own Wheatgrass is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog. I'll be the first to admit...For a while, I thought wheatgrass was one of those "health nut" foods that people raved about just because they thought they were being healthy. After I got into gardening and realized just how easy (and fun) they are to grow, and some of the nutritional benefits to them, I […] The post How To Grow Your Own Wheatgrass is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening,…
  • Epic Gardening Reviews: The AquaFarm

    Kevin
    9 May 2015 | 12:35 pm
    The post Epic Gardening Reviews: The AquaFarm is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog. We've got an Aquafarm to take a look at today on the blog.  It's a pretty cool countertop aquaponics system that was first brought to life via Kickstarter by the same guys who do the Mushroom Kit that I've also reviewed here on the blog.​The Aquafarm is designed to be a mini-aquaponics system, an introduction to […] The post Epic Gardening Reviews: The AquaFarm is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic…
  • How To Grow Asparagus: Everything You Need To Know

    Kevin
    8 May 2015 | 12:54 pm
    The post How To Grow Asparagus: Everything You Need To Know is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog. Asparagus is one of those perennial veggies that takes patience to grow, but is ever so satisfying once you have it up and running. It's absolutely delicious and is usually one of the first crops to come to harvest in the spring time. As far as nutrition, it's packed with vitamin C, B vitamins, iron, and […] The post How To Grow Asparagus: Everything You Need To Know is by Kevin and appeared first…
  • Epic Gardening Basics: How to Grow Beans

    Kevin
    7 May 2015 | 9:50 am
    The post Epic Gardening Basics: How to Grow Beans is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog. Beans are one of the most powerful and versatile plants you can plant in your garden.  They yield a massive amount of pods, and are nitrogen-fixers, meaning they add valuable nitrogen back to your soil. No matter how they're eaten - shelled, whole, dried, or fresh - beans are one of the most popular veggies […] The post Epic Gardening Basics: How to Grow Beans is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic…
 
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    Grow Our Way

  • When to Fertilize Your Lawn

    Safer® Brand
    12 May 2015 | 12:11 pm
    What do you think of when you hear the word lawn? A rolling green carpet forming a picture-perfect frame for your home? A place for your children to safely play in peace? Whatever image the word lawn conjures in your mind, you’re not alone. Americans love lawns. According to NASA – yes, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration – satellite data reveals that Americans grow more lawn space than corn and wheat. Between residential and commercial lawns, golf courses and other recreational facilities, lawns cover 128,000 square kilometers in America. That’s a lot of lawn! Use Safe…
  • Why Are My Plants Turning Yellow?

    Safer® Brand
    28 Apr 2015 | 7:51 am
    It happens to all gardeners. One day you wake up and realize your tomato plant’s leaves are yellow and you have no idea why. Don’t panic! We are here to help you answer that daunting question of “why are my plant’s leaves turning yellow?” Use the infographic below to understand what your plant might be trying to tell you through different types of yellow leaves. After the graphic, we’ll explore a little more in depth of why leaves turn yellow and brown, and how to give your plants the nutrients they need to stay green. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons…
  • How to Get Rid of Eastern Tent Caterpillars

    Safer® Brand
    23 Apr 2015 | 5:50 am
    If you notice web-like structures between branches of your trees, including your ornamental and fruit trees, then you may be dealing with a common pest found all over North America: the tent caterpillar. These pests are actually the larvae of several types of moths that make their home in your trees and feed on plant leaves.  Tent caterpillars are aptly named for the conspicuous, silk tents they build in the branches of host trees. With severe infestations, they can defoliate your trees. By learning how to get rid of tent caterpillars and finding safe control methods, you’ll help save your…
  • How to Get Rid of Spiders in the House

    Safer® Brand
    21 Apr 2015 | 5:49 am
    Have you noticed one too many spiders in your home? Perhaps they hitchhiked on a few boxes from the shed or maybe they’ve set up camp in the corners of your windows between the screen and glass. Whether it’s just a few or a spider infestation nightmare, here’s your guide to help recognize common household spiders to see if they are dangerous and the best way to get rid of spiders in the house. Spider Season Some spiders live in your home all year but remain out of sight most of the time. Many of these spiders mean you no harm — they just want shelter and insects to eat. Some spiders…
  • How to Treat Powdery Mildew on Plants

    Safer® Brand
    7 Apr 2015 | 7:58 am
    Though the weather across much of the country may indicate otherwise, spring is on the horizon. That means it’s time to at least start thinking about what to plant in your garden this year and which types of diseases your plants may be susceptible to. Powdery mildew is a relatively common fungus that many plants can contract. If you find powdery mildew on your plants, it’s not necessarily fatal, but you don’t want it hanging around. Fortunately, there are many options for powdery mildew treatment. What Is Powdery Mildew? Powdery mildew thrives in conditions opposite those where you’d…
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    The Horticult

  • Who, What, Rare: Where to Find Hard-to-Find Succulents

    Chantal Aida Gordon and Ryan Benoit
    20 May 2015 | 3:00 am
    Instead of meeting for coffee, we met over plants. Makes sense, though, right — when you’re breaking the IRL ice with one of your most interesting garden friends on Instagram?… ► The post Who, What, Rare: Where to Find Hard-to-Find Succulents appeared first on The Horticult.
  • ‘Art Alive’ 2015: Petals, and the Paintings That Inspire Them

    Chantal Aida Gordon
    12 May 2015 | 3:00 am
    Blossoms alone are a good enough reason to dance. When blossoms interpret, in their blossomy way, great works of art? Forget about it.… ► The post ‘Art Alive’ 2015: Petals, and the Paintings That Inspire Them appeared first on The Horticult.
  • Notes From the ‘Field to Vase’ Dinner Tour (Coming to a City Near You!)

    Chantal Aida Gordon
    5 May 2015 | 3:00 am
    There are dreamy meals, and then there are dreamy meals served in a field of full of flowers. That’s the very attractive USP of the first annual American Grown “Field to Vase” Dinner Tour, nationwide events that celebrate (and raise awareness of) sustainably and locally grown flowers.… ► The post Notes From the ‘Field to Vase’ Dinner Tour (Coming to a City Near You!) appeared first on The Horticult.
  • We’ve Been Drinking: ‘The Spicy Paloma’ for Cinco de Mayo (and Beyond)

    Chantal Aida Gordon
    29 Apr 2015 | 3:00 am
    Grapefruit season’s winding down, and pepper season’s kicking up! And so our thoughts turn to where these two ingredients intersect best: inside the spicy paloma cocktail.… ► The post We’ve Been Drinking: ‘The Spicy Paloma’ for Cinco de Mayo (and Beyond) appeared first on The Horticult.
  • Portable and Practical: A New Way to Build Raised Garden Beds

    Ryan Benoit
    27 Apr 2015 | 3:00 am
    This spring, we’ve been busy changing up a few things in our garden — and jumping into some fresh new design projects!… ► The post Portable and Practical: A New Way to Build Raised Garden Beds appeared first on The Horticult.
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    The Diligent Gardener

  • Is it a Cucumber, Is it a Melon, No! Its Cucamelon

    Gaz
    5 May 2015 | 7:27 am
    How cool are these, not a melon and not a cucumber but a cucamelon. One of the highlights of James Wongs new book "Home Grown Revolution".Described by the seed company as follows:An heirloom that packs a lot of flavor in an adorable, teaspoon-sized treat! These little charmers are like no other, packing a powerful, sweet, cucumber flavor with a tangy, citrus twist. Delicate foliage and fist-fulls of fruit that look like doll-sized watermelons make these plants pretty enough to grow trellised in a flower garden or cascading in a hanging basket.They are very small, just an inch and a half tall,…
  • Competition: How To Grow Vegetables DVD

    Gaz
    5 May 2015 | 6:10 am
    We have kindly been given a copy of Thompson and Morgan's DVD "How to grow Vegetables" to give away to one lucky reader. Normally selling for £14.99 on the T&M website it could be yours.With step by step instructions on how to prepare, sow and tend to your vegetables this DVD will assist new grow-your-own fans as well as old hands.To be in with a chance to win simply tell us what your favourite vegetable is and why.Extra entries can be made by sharing this competition on Twitter (include #DiligentGardener) or by liking our page and sharing the competition…
  • Hedgehog Awareness Week 2015

    Gaz
    4 May 2015 | 3:06 am
    Hedgehog Awareness Week runs from 3rd-9th May 2015 and hedgehoggy events are being organised all around the country!Hedgehog Awareness Week is organised by the British Hedgehog Preservation Society and takes place every year.  It aims to highlight the problems hedgehogs face and how you can help them.This year efforts are focussed on gardeners – there is so much that gardeners can do to help the hedgehog, very simple things like:Ensuring there is access into the garden (all that is needed is 5” square gap).Checking areas before strimming or mowing.Moving piles of rubbish to a new…
  • Spring Tips

    Gaz
    4 May 2015 | 3:04 am
    Gardening nourishes the mind, body and soul when you spend time caring for your plants, helping them to thrive and enjoying the meditative benefits of enjoying nature. If you love to garden but are not always sure how to keep your plants green and healthy, look no further, here are some great tips for newcomers on how to keep your garden thriving:Keep pruningBy regularly pruning your plants you will prevents them from growing out of control. Just go through and trim the ends off your plants every so often to keep them tidy. What’s more, keeping your plants trimmed helps then to grow more…
  • The Chelsea Flower Show: what to see at the biggest event of the year

    Gaz
    24 Apr 2015 | 6:38 am
    The M&G Garden from Chelsea 2012On 19th May, thousands of horticulture fans will head to the grounds of the Royal Hospital Chelsea to take in some of the most stunning displays the garden world has to offer.  The Chelsea Flower Show remains incredibly popular, and it’s not hard to see why.If you’re heading down to the biggest garden event in the world, you might be a bit stumped as to which of the many hundreds of displays on offer you should check out.  We’ve already earmarked these…For nature lovers, The Laurent-Perrier Chatsworth GardenIt’s a mouthful of a name, but…
 
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    Grow Up Hydrogarden

  • Q&A Help! Roots Are Taking Over My Garden

    Erika Raia
    21 May 2015 | 8:37 am
    Do you have roots that are taking over your garden? Are your pots overflowing because the roots are clogging the drainage holes? One of our favorite hydrogardeners, Neil from South Carolina wrote us this morning about that very issue that he is having with overgrown roots clogging the drainage holes in his Grow Up unit. One of the solutions we offered was to switch hisRead More
  • Why Not Earth Day Everyday?

    Amanda Kuhn
    22 Apr 2015 | 3:24 pm
    April 22nd, 2015 marks the birthdate to one of the biggest environmental movements of all time.  Earth Day is a now a global holiday, celebrated by vast amounts of people of all different cultures. Global awareness became present in 1970, during the peak of student activists protesting and holding anti war social unions. The idea came to Earth Day founder Gaylord Nelson, then a U.S.Read More
  • April Showers Bring May Flowers, And Then Some.

    Amanda Kuhn
    15 Apr 2015 | 5:55 am
    It’s no surprise that when getting ready for the new seasons bloom, there is some initial hesitation when it comes to deciding what plants to pick. When Jack Frost finally chooses to melt away and you’re plants are all brown and dreary, your garden can look like a cemetery. But you can fix that. There are many varieties of plants that are perfect for plantingRead More
  • Florals in Fabric

    Amanda Kuhn
    1 Apr 2015 | 11:56 am
      Its no surprise that when it comes to spring fashion that gardening becomes on of the main muses of inspiration. Designers such as Oscar de la Renta, Balmain, Sam Mcknight and Fendi have all featured fashionable florals within their catwalks. Christopher Kane set the standard with futuristic petal cut-outs, biological depictions of the photosynthesis process and flower-motif sweats during the showing of his springRead More
  • The Road to Sustainable Living

    Amanda Kuhn
    25 Mar 2015 | 2:44 pm
    Recent studies show that children who are taught the proper education behind growing your own produce are more likely to increase their intake of fruits and vegetables. Food education is considered the entry point for learning because by growing your own food you are creating life. Urban cities are taking note of this trend and are now deciding to incorporate teachings within their curriculum thatRead More
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    Made with love and garlic

  • Aims for 2015

    Catherine: Made with love and garlic
    26 Apr 2015 | 11:57 am
    I've been thinking about all of the ways in which our garden is making us happy and I thought I'd try to organise said happiness into a list of all of the things I'd like to get from it this year. So here are my main aims, in no particular order. Did I miss any?1. Make condiments (ketchup and mustard at the very least)2. Save at least £250 on fruit and vegetables by using our own produce3. Eat at least one thing from our tiny garden every week from May onwards4. Dry and store my own garlic5. Make ice lollies with our own fruit6. Make jam with garden fruit7. Make at least one botanical…
  • White mustard (homegrown)

    Catherine: Made with love and garlic
    24 Apr 2015 | 11:23 pm
    I love mustard. And one of the things that I can't wait to make this year (as well as ketchup) is my very own mustard. There are just so many potential variations! Lemon juice or vinegar? Whole grain or smooth? But before all of that comes the mustard seed, my fastest growing crop to date. This weekend I moved it from seedling pots to one of my vertical garden hanging baskets. Now all we do is wait!
  • Photo Friday: Jostaberry audit

    Catherine: Made with love and garlic
    24 Apr 2015 | 5:04 am
  • I've bean trying to learn from past mistakes

    Catherine: Made with love and garlic
    22 Apr 2015 | 4:29 pm
    Last year I decided to try to grow peas and beans in recycled shopper bags. It didn't really work. The bags didn't hold their shape and so the bean and peas couldn't scramble up the supporting canes properly. My harvest was pretty minute but what I did get was utterly delicious. So with that in mind, I decided to try to do things properly this year. The bags were out, deep vegetable planters with proper bean supports were in. I've got six planters and six varieties of pea and bean. I started some of them (the borlotti beans for example) in root trainers but I sowed the others (mainly snow…
  • Romanesco broccoli: A bad idea in the making

    Catherine: Made with love and garlic
    21 Apr 2015 | 4:07 pm
    Have you ever started something and thought, halfway through, what a bad idea it was (by which time you were too advanced to go back?). This year I decided to plant some winter greens. I've got so little space in my tiny urban garden that I usually only grow soft fruits and summer vegetables but this year the blackthorn bushes were irritating me by growing at a snails pace in their raised sleeper bed and so I rashly decided to fill their raised bed with broccoli, leeks and a bit of kale. So I planted some romanesco broccoli seedlings and set about removing the top layer of (cat deterrant)…
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    O'Connors Lawn Equipment

  • May Lawn And Garden Tips

    Verenice Torres
    1 May 2015 | 8:18 am
    Lawn Plant Bermuda grass & warm season grass. ( you can sod or seed) Fertilize Bermuda grass with O’Connor’s. Water to 6” deep (early morning) Mow hybrid bermuda ½ – ¾ “ high. Mow common Bermuda 1 ½ – 2” high. Mow fescue 1 ½ – 3” high. Address emerging weeds. Garden Plant heat tolerant plants: bougainvilleas, hibiscus, cherille, lantanas, rose, moss, daises, celosia. Vegetables: sweet potatoes, okra melons. Spray evergreens for bag worms, lace bugs. Treat elms for elm – leaf beetle. Mulch 2 – 3” deep. The post May Lawn And Garden Tips appeared first…
  • April Lawn And Garden Tips

    Verenice Torres
    1 Apr 2015 | 8:16 am
    Lawn Fertilize Bermuda grass with O’Connor’s. Address post –emergence weeds. (Apply weed n feed or spray with herbicide) Check dead spots for fungus or grub. Water 1 ½ “ per week (early morning) Mow Bermuda grass 1 ½ – 3” tall. Mow fescue 2 ½ – 3” tall. Garden Plant warm season vegetables: peppers, tomatoes, melons, after April 15th Prune winter kill, spring flowering vines after blooming. Pinch out growing tips of mums. Fertilize flowers and vegetables. Add iron for acid – loving plants. Spray fruit trees after blossom drop. Address pine blight, euonymous scale.
  • March Lawn And Garden Tips

    Verenice Torres
    1 Mar 2015 | 7:12 am
    Lawn Scalp Bermuda grass and catch clippings (never scalp fescue or rye!) Apply pre emergence to bermuda grass if not applied in February. Plant fescue and rye seed. Fertilize fescue and rye. Mow 2 ½ – 3” tall. Water weekly (est.) Treat for grubs.   Garden Plant shrubs, azaleas, pansies, cold –hearty vegetables (leafy and root crops) Prune climbing roses before growth starts. Prune azaleas before growth starts. Divide and replant summer and fall blooming perennials. Cut back liriope, pampass & ornament grasses. Remove tree wrap. The post March Lawn And Garden Tips appeared…
  • O’Connor’s is pleased to offer a military discount on 2015 residential zero turn riding products.

    Bridgett Davis
    27 Feb 2015 | 1:00 am
    In appreciation for the sacrifice and service of our military both past and present, O’Connor’s is pleased to offer a $100 military discount on all 2015 residential zero turn riding mowers. Just input the promo code “2015” at check out to receive $100 off your purchase of a 2015 Snapper or Simplicity residential zero turn rider.  The post O’Connor’s is pleased to offer a military discount on 2015 residential zero turn riding products. appeared first on O'Connors Lawn Equipment.
  • Free Cargo Carrier with purchase of any Toro SW series TimeCutter Zero Turn Mower

    Bridgett Davis
    19 Feb 2015 | 1:23 pm
    For a limited time… only at O’Connor’s Lawn and Garden get a Toro Cargo Carrier, ( A $200 Value) FREE with any purchase of a SW Series Timecutter Zero Turn Mower! That’s Right just BUY this..And GET this…. While supplies last. The post Free Cargo Carrier with purchase of any Toro SW series TimeCutter Zero Turn Mower appeared first on O'Connors Lawn Equipment.
 
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    A Garden for All

  • Jeepers Weepers

    Kathy
    19 May 2015 | 6:00 am
    Weeping Katsura Background (photo credit: Kathy Diemer) When it comes to structure, weepers are a form that shouldn’t be denied an opportunity to accentuate your garden.  Average plants and shrubs tend to grow upright, so incorporating a little downward flow will shake things up a bit.  Adding an umbrella shaped tree or shrub, whether deciduous or evergreen, will provide a focal point for any season.  And, you needn’t be limited to keeping weepers in a garden setting, as they are quite competent to stand alone in the landscape as well. Weeping Crabapple provides soothing…
  • Saving Sweetgum

    Kathy
    12 May 2015 | 6:00 am
    Variegated Liquidambar creates a vibrant focal point (photo by: Kathy Diemer) Trials and tribulations are many when you loose your home, and sometimes the least little thing can create extreme joy . . . or extreme angst.  Though it may sound silly, I had this sort of situation with a sweetgum tree.  Yes, a sweetgum tree.  Besides the entire house and contents, we also lost a lot of trees and shrubs from the fire and its incredible heat, so finding any plants that survived became cause for great celebration.  When we discovered that another tree would have to be sacrificed to make room…
  • Seven, Eight, Ninebark

    Kathy
    2 May 2015 | 6:00 am
    Physocarpus opulifolius ‘Dart’s Gold’ (photo credit: Kathy Diemer) I’m a sucker for a pretty face, and when it comes to ninebark, there’s plenty of beauty to go around.  Coming in an array of colors ranging from a lively chartreuse green (Physocarpus opulifolius ‘Dart’s Gold’) and shimmery copper (Physocarpus opulifolius ‘Coppertina’) to the deepest burgundy, commonly known as Diabolo (Physocarpus opulifolius ‘Monlo’) or Summer Wine (Physocarpus opulifolius ‘Seward’), you are limited only by space and…
  • Heaths and Heathers

    Kathy
    28 Apr 2015 | 6:00 am
    Calluna Vulgaris with Geranium, Spruce & Grass (photo credit: Kathy Diemer) While visiting a local nursery a few years ago, I spotted a group of heathers sitting all alone on a bench.  Their interesting texture and compact form instantly intrigued me, so I decided to give them another try.  You see, I had tried to grow heathers decades ago, with no success.  They were there one year and gone the next.  And with so many other options to experiment with, I gave up heather without a fight.  Here was my chance to be redeemed in the world of heathers and heaths; so far, so…
  • Golden Opportunities

    Kathy
    21 Apr 2015 | 6:00 am
    Golden Oriental Spruce (photo credit: Kathy Diemer) The buds of our deciduous trees are starting to swell and the leaves are gently unwinding after a long winter’s slumber.  Yes, spring has arrived and our trees and shrubs are starting to awaken.  But, they won’t be fully displayed until sometime in May, which leaves us with a landscape that still seems a bit colorless.  Enter, stage right, a few golden needled conifers and “Shazam“, problem solved! When the yard and gardens are needing a little pick me up, nothing illuminates an area more efficiently than a…
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    Tree Service Portland - Northwest Arbor-Culture » Blog

  • 10 Crazy Tree Photos from Around the World

    Jon Nash
    15 May 2015 | 1:36 pm
    Trees are beautiful and purify the air we breathe, but they can also be breathtaking, funny, and just plain weird. Get ready to see infrared trees and trees with faces, 1,000-year-old trees and trees from the future. Let’s take a trip around the world to look at 10 crazy tree photos from four different continents! 1. Great Banyan Tree – India This looks like a forest, but believe it or not, it’s just one tree. In 1925 the central trunk had to be removed due to rot, but the rest of the tree is still alive and well. It lives in a botanical garden near Kolkata, India. Photo: McKay…
  • How to Build a Treehouse

    Jon Nash
    11 Mar 2015 | 1:18 pm
    Building a treehouse is a fun and time-consuming process—especially if you’ve never built one before. They come in all shapes and sizes, from small tree forts to giant luxury hideaways. In this post, I’ll show you how to build one type of simple backyard treehouse, but I’ll offer plenty of resources along the way for those of you with more ambitious plans. Source: M S No matter what kind of treehouse you want, safety is your first priority. If you’re not confident with your building skills or you want an elaborate design, consult a professional treehouse builder, such as Nelson…
  • 5 Tree Pruning Tools You Need

    Jon Nash
    16 Feb 2015 | 2:18 pm
                      Are branches blocking your windows or walkways? Are you tired of that overgrown tree dropping twigs all over the yard? Or is an old tree simply growing out of control? Residents of the Pacific Northwest are no strangers to tree woes. With the right tools, you can solve many small tree problems with a little DIY pruning. (Save major tree issues for us professionals.) Trimming can keep trees healthy, add value to your property, and make you the envy of your neighbors. But which tree pruning tools should you use? The best tree…
  • What Is Arboriculture?

    Jon Nash
    26 Jan 2015 | 3:26 pm
    The simplest definition of arboriculture is tree care. This post will answer “What is arboriculture?” in more detail, explain how it’s different from forestry and landscaping, and explain what certified arborists do. People like Chris and I who plant and prune trees are arborists. But not all arborists trim trees. And definitely not all tree services use certified arborists. More on that below too. Arboriculture Definition Arboriculture means growing, tending, studying, or removing individual trees and shrubs. (It also encompasses woody plants and vines.) Here are a few different…
  • How to Kill Tree Roots Naturally

    Jon Nash
    15 Jan 2015 | 12:11 pm
    Most of the time, you want tree roots to thrive. But if you’re removing a tree and don’t want regrowth, or if tree roots are dangerously close to something underground, you may need to kill them. It’s something we handle here at Northwest Arbor-Culture, Inc., and some homeowners like to DIY as well. Here’s a basic primer on how to kill tree roots. How to Kill Tree Roots Naturally, Without Chemicals An easy way to kill tree roots is to spray chemicals like hexazinone or bromacil onto the soil above, then wait for rain to push the chemicals down to the roots and kill them. But here in…
 
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    Lawn And Pond

  • Choosing Flowers for your Vegetable Garden

    Admin
    2 May 2015 | 1:04 pm
    Vegetable gardens can be beautiful and adding flowers can make them to look magical. Even if your garden space is limited, including a few variety of flowers in it is a great idea (Companion Planting). We’ve created the guide below to choosing flowers for your Vegetable Garden. Companion planting is an age-old practice that has proved to be beneficial to home gardeners and commercial farmers alike. Besides instantly transforming the look of your garden into something more appealing, growing different flowers on your garden offers many other benefits for both plants including promoting…
  • Choosing a Garden for your Space – Ultimate Gardening Guide Part 1

    Admin
    5 Mar 2015 | 6:18 am
      Choosing a Garden for your Space Gardening is not only considered as a mere hobby for some people as they consider it as an art form. While most gardens are a result of a particular landscape or climate, majority of gardens are simply an extension of the gardener’s passion and creative mind. If you are one of the people who are new to gardening or interested in starting one, you need to know first which type of garden you would like to have. Gardeners have a reason why they choose a specific style of gardening. Some simply have the passion for growing and tending specific plants…
  • 4 Gardening Ideas for Kids

    Stephen R
    24 Dec 2014 | 9:31 am
      Photo Credit In our increasingly virtual world, many children are missing out on connecting with nature and the outside world. I’m sure most of us have fond memories of trips to parks and gardens, of weekends spent gardening as a family. It seems as though this tradition has largely died out within the course of barely a generation. Let’s get our kids back into gardening, and back into truly experiencing the world around them. A little fresh air and exercise is something we can all use, in addition to teaching your kids how plants grow in a hands-on environment. Below we’ll look…
  • The Frugal Garden : Save money with 10 frugal gardening ideas

    Admin
    20 Dec 2014 | 10:55 am
    It seems like everybody is looking for ways to reduce their food bill. A quick look at the price of organic vegetables at your local grocery store might make you want to run the other way or compromise, but growing organic produce doesn’t have to be a chore. How do you find the best bang for you buck when choosing what to grow? By following these basic gardening tips and frugal gardening ideas. 10 Frugal Gardening Ideas 1. Consider Return on Investment When Planting It may seem weird, but try thinking about your return on investment (ROI) when selecting what plants to grow. Certain…
  • A Look to the Past: The Victory Garden

    Stephen R
    18 Dec 2014 | 7:50 pm
      Photo credit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sow_victory_poster_usgovt.gif The victory garden movement began during the first world war, and proved itself just as critical during the second. We can directly trace the modern popularity of home vegetable gardening to this century old beginning.   During this period in time most farming was done primarily by hand, as tractors and other agricultural machinery were still in their infancy. A combination of war decimated farm land across Europe, and the enlistment or draft of many farm workers, left much of the world on the verge of…
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    Mill Race Garden Centre Blog

  • 21 Signs You’re at a Quintessentially British BBQ

    22 May 2015 | 4:33 am
    Come rain or shine, nobody does a BBQ quite like us Brits. And while we can't always rely on good weather, the UK has its own list of well-established BBQ traditions that we can all relate to. To celebrate the 19th National BBQ Week and the Bank Holiday weekend, we have compiled a list of 21 signs you might be in attendance at a quintessentially British BBQ. And if you've never been to one before, you're in for a treat! 1. Someone cut the lawn for the first time all year Image credit: F_A This is always a sign that somebody is about to cook something outdoors. 2. It’s a bank holiday Image…
  • The 3 Best Apps for UK Gardeners

    28 Apr 2015 | 10:24 am
    No hobby has bypassed the digital age, gardening included.  You can find dozens of apps within the Apple Store ripe for the picking.  But how do you sort the wheat from the chaff? Luckily, we have rounded up some of our favourite apps for green-fingered tech lovers.  Here are three of our favourites: 1)  intoGardens About:  intoGardens is an app for iPad and Android tablet users.  (In the Google Play store, the app is simply called “Gardens.”) This app is basically a gorgeous glossy magazine packed full of ideas and inspiration.  There’s plenty of content for both beginners and…
  • 7 Secrets to a ‘No Work’ Garden: A Guide for Lazy Gardeners

    16 Apr 2015 | 6:00 am
    Who wouldn’t like a ‘no work’ garden? Even if you enjoy gardening regularly, let’s face it, there are always times you wish it could just take care of itself! If your previous attempts at gardening have been unsuccessful, or your busy schedule doesn’t allow enough time to maintain a viable garden, today’s post will help. With a little planning and preparation, you may be surprised at what you can achieve without sacrificing much time or effort at all! So without further ado, here are our seven secrets to a ‘no work’ garden. 1. Choose companion plants One great way to reduce…
  • 8 Tips to Starting a Permaculture Garden: A Beginners Guide

    30 Mar 2015 | 4:46 am
    Are you hoping to get back to nature? Most gardeners are, but there are certain methods of gardening which are more sustainable and akin to nature than others – perhaps none more so than the permaculture method. The word ‘permaculture’ – or ‘permanent agriculture’ – was coined in the 1970s, and its focus is on creating agricultural systems based on natural ecosystems. In the domestic garden, it basically means using nature as an inspiration and guide, allowing you to create your own ecosystem in your garden. In today’s world of processed foods and waste, many gardeners are…
  • 12 Great Ground Covers for Sun & Shade (PLUS: Edible Ground Covers!)

    16 Mar 2015 | 4:25 am
    Any experienced gardener will tell you that ground cover plants can be worth their weight in gold for fending off weeds and helping to create a lush outdoor space that’s filled with gorgeous greenery. But which ones should you go for? Here, we run through some excellent contenders for each space in your garden, and offer tips on preparing the ground well so your plants will flourish. Ground Covers for Sun There are lots of ground covers to choose from that will thrive in full sun, from evergreens to annuals, and plenty in between. Here are a few of our favourites: 1. Cotoneaster…
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    Great Garden Supply: New Products

  • Mantis 2-Cycle Tiller

    20 May 2015 | 4:57 am
    Commercial-grade 2-cycle engine spins the tines at up to 240 RPM, twice as fast as other tillers. Push button priming. Tough one piece gear box, folding handles, cushioned grips and with a variable speed control and shut-off switch at your fingertips. Serpentine tines quickly cut through hard s..Price: $429.99
  • Pearl's Premium Grass Seed, Sun/Shade Mix

    18 May 2015 | 7:55 am
     Pearl's Premium Grass Seed, a low input, environmentally friendly mix that will save you money and time in the long rung! Mow Once a Month in Summer Seldom or Never Water once Established* Eliminate Harmful Chemicals Pearl's Premium Shade Mix i..Price: $39.99
  • Pearl's Premium Grass Seed, Shady Mix

    18 May 2015 | 7:37 am
     Pearl's Premium Grass Seed, a low input, environmentally friendly mix that will save you money and time in the long rung! Mow Once a Month in Summer Seldom or Never Water once Established* Eliminate Harmful Chemicals Shady Mix is blended to per..Price: $35.99
  • Espoma Organic Bio-tone Starter Plus

    13 May 2015 | 6:39 am
    Bio-tone® Starter Plus is an all-natural plant food that is combined with a stronger concentration of Espoma's beneficial bacteria along with both endo and ecto mycorrhizae. The ideal starter plant food, originally designed f..Price: $8.99
  • Espoma Organic Bone Meal

    13 May 2015 | 4:47 am
    Bone Meal (4-12-0) Organic Plant Food ALL NATURAL PLANT FOOD Espoma Bone Meal is an all natural organic source of nitrogen and phosphorus. Bone Meal helps develop sturdy root systems and promotes plant growth, and is ideal as a supplement for bulbs, flowers and ro..Price: $8.99
 
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    Back To My Garden

  • BTMG 101: Rare Heirloom Seeds with Julie Slezak

    gardentips
    18 May 2015 | 8:56 am
    Julie Slezak encourages all gardeners to embrace heirloom seeds.  The flavors that come out of her garden are unique and incredible.  Julie and her husband Scott run Annie’s Heirloom Seeds, a non-GMO heirloom seed company.  They grow some of the rarest, hard to find varieties on an island in Lake Michigan as well as with […]
  • BTMG 100: Gardening for Mind, Body & Creativity with Jennifer Simmons

    gardentips
    10 May 2015 | 11:45 pm
    Jennifer Simmons loves plants, gardening in the beautiful outdoors, and chatting about growing with friendly gardeners.  Gardening professionally gives her the opportunity to embrace and meld all three.  She believes that gardening engages the mind as well as the body and is an amazing outlet for creativity.   @GrdnGirlL       Sponsor How healthy […]
  • BTMG 099: The World of Herbs with Marcy Lautanen-Raleigh

    gardentips
    3 May 2015 | 11:00 pm
    Marcy Lautanen-Raleigh loves herbs.  The intoxicating fragrance of herbs often distracts her from the weeding in her garden.  She is a contributing author to Essential Herbs Magazine’s new book “Through the Seasons” and Mary blogs at BackyardPatch.com   Her online store markets her proprietary blends of teas, bath products and dried herbs.     Sponsor […]
  • BTMG 098 – Teaching Gardening with David R Clark

    gardentips
    27 Apr 2015 | 8:19 am
    David R. Clark fell in love with gardening through his parents.  It has evolved into the love of teaching others the many aspects of how to garden.  David is the horticulture instructor for the Buffalo & Erie County Botanical Gardens, a National Garden Speaker, and an educator at Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Gardens.   DavidClarkWNY.com […]
  • BTMG 097 – Raising Awareness for Community Gardens with Heather Wood

    gardentips
    19 Apr 2015 | 10:57 pm
     Heather Wood adores composting, bees and mycelium.  She composts in her town in Washington and helps raise awareness of her community gardens.  OlySunrise Compost Concierge is Olympia’s first and only 100% bike-powered home compost collection service.  You can learn more about Heather and her company at http://oly-wa.us/OlySunrise/   Sponsor How healthy are you really?  Take the […]
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    Grow Our Way

  • When to Fertilize Your Lawn

    Safer® Brand
    12 May 2015 | 12:11 pm
    What do you think of when you hear the word lawn? A rolling green carpet forming a picture-perfect frame for your home? A place for your children to safely play in peace? Whatever image the word lawn conjures in your mind, you’re not alone. Americans love lawns. According to NASA – yes, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration – satellite data reveals that Americans grow more lawn space than corn and wheat. Between residential and commercial lawns, golf courses and other recreational facilities, lawns cover 128,000 square kilometers in America. That’s a lot of lawn! Use Safe…
  • Why Are My Plants Turning Yellow?

    Safer® Brand
    28 Apr 2015 | 7:51 am
    It happens to all gardeners. One day you wake up and realize your tomato plant’s leaves are yellow and you have no idea why. Don’t panic! We are here to help you answer that daunting question of “why are my plant’s leaves turning yellow?” Use the infographic below to understand what your plant might be trying to tell you through different types of yellow leaves. After the graphic, we’ll explore a little more in depth of why leaves turn yellow and brown, and how to give your plants the nutrients they need to stay green. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons…
  • How to Get Rid of Eastern Tent Caterpillars

    Safer® Brand
    23 Apr 2015 | 5:50 am
    If you notice web-like structures between branches of your trees, including your ornamental and fruit trees, then you may be dealing with a common pest found all over North America: the tent caterpillar. These pests are actually the larvae of several types of moths that make their home in your trees and feed on plant leaves.  Tent caterpillars are aptly named for the conspicuous, silk tents they build in the branches of host trees. With severe infestations, they can defoliate your trees. By learning how to get rid of tent caterpillars and finding safe control methods, you’ll help save your…
  • How to Get Rid of Spiders in the House

    Safer® Brand
    21 Apr 2015 | 5:49 am
    Have you noticed one too many spiders in your home? Perhaps they hitchhiked on a few boxes from the shed or maybe they’ve set up camp in the corners of your windows between the screen and glass. Whether it’s just a few or a spider infestation nightmare, here’s your guide to help recognize common household spiders to see if they are dangerous and the best way to get rid of spiders in the house. Spider Season Some spiders live in your home all year but remain out of sight most of the time. Many of these spiders mean you no harm — they just want shelter and insects to eat. Some spiders…
  • How to Treat Powdery Mildew on Plants

    Safer® Brand
    7 Apr 2015 | 7:58 am
    Though the weather across much of the country may indicate otherwise, spring is on the horizon. That means it’s time to at least start thinking about what to plant in your garden this year and which types of diseases your plants may be susceptible to. Powdery mildew is a relatively common fungus that many plants can contract. If you find powdery mildew on your plants, it’s not necessarily fatal, but you don’t want it hanging around. Fortunately, there are many options for powdery mildew treatment. What Is Powdery Mildew? Powdery mildew thrives in conditions opposite those where you’d…
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    In the Garden...with Mariani Landscape

  • Uncommon Lilacs

    Gina Iliopoulos
    22 May 2015 | 4:00 am
    Earlier this week we featured the very popular common lilac, Syringa vulgaris.  Today we show you other lilacs from the Syringa genus, some true species and many hybrids. On the right is the peeling bark of the Peking lilac ‘Morton’, … Continue reading →
  • Purple and Blue Lilacs

    Gina Iliopoulos
    20 May 2015 | 4:00 am
    Last time we showed you pink and white lilacs, today we show you purples and blues, like the image on the right.  Once again all these are cultivars of the common lilac, Syringa vulgaris. Below are two purple lilacs; on … Continue reading →
  • Common Lilacs

    Gina Iliopoulos
    18 May 2015 | 4:00 am
    This week we embrace spring and feature lilacs, botanically the Syringa genus.  All the lilacs you see here are cultivars of the common lilac, Syringa vulgaris.   There are so many different common lilacs we will organize them for you by … Continue reading →
  • A French Courtyard in Downtown Chicago

    Gina Iliopoulos
    15 May 2015 | 4:00 am
    We come down from our previous rooftop gardens for today’s post and show you a city courtyard that is reminiscent of the French countryside.  On the first level of a four-level building, and surrounded on four sides with textured stone, … Continue reading →
  • Penthouse Garden and Landscape

    Gina Iliopoulos
    13 May 2015 | 4:00 am
    Last month we showed you some stunning landscapes and this week we thought we would take you into the city for some extraordinary views.  Today we have another truly exceptional space to show you, this one much more traditional in … Continue reading →
 
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    Harmony Gardens Landscaping

  • Lawn Fertilization

    HGadmin
    19 May 2015 | 6:43 am
    Fertilization is the addition of necessary nutritional elements to keep your lawn’s soil healthy. The soil itself needs to replenish its nutrients so it can continue to keep your lawn healthy. All fertilizers provide three main nutrients for the grass which are listed by percentage weight on fertilizer packages. These are nitrogen(N) which is necessary for grass stem and leaf growth; phosphorous(P) which promotes grass root, fruit and flower growth; and potassium(K) which assists other nutrients to function well within the plant. The ratio of nutrients are always listed in the order of N…
  • Why is turf (lawns and sod) so important in the landscape?

    HGadmin
    14 May 2015 | 6:20 pm
    Why is turf (lawns and sod) so important in the landscape?  With recent problems of grub infestations in the Ottawa area many have chosen to get rid of their turf. But turf is very important within the landscape as there are many benefits of turf. Turf grass is North America’s largest agricultural crop. Turf grass is an integral part of our serene and beautiful outdoor living space. Benefits of turf grass (lawns and sod): 1) Business and Economic Improvement: lawns increase the value of our property by 15 to 20 per cent. They improve curb […] The post Why is turf (lawns and sod) so…
  • Top Dressing Your Lawn

    HGadmin
    11 May 2015 | 6:55 am
    Top dressing is the process of applying compost, top dressing soil, garden soil, topsoil or composted top dressing pellets over the surface of your lawn. Top dressing restores balance to your lawn, builds good soil and increases your soil flora. The benefits of top dressing are immense and now that we readily have available an all natural screened composted top dressing in pellet form, which can be applied via a fertilizer spreader for a very reasonable price to build good soil and improve your lawn, we recommend the application of these pellets every spring and […] The post Top…
  • Five Budget Friendly Tips to Harmonize your Outdoor Space

    HGadmin
    6 May 2015 | 6:39 am
    Five Budget Friendly Tips to Harmonize your Outdoor Space An outdoor living space can add instant charm to your home and extend your living space into the great outdoors. Many outdoor projects can get costly but there are a few budget friendly tips to make your space lush, beautiful and livable with just a bit of time and money. Plants and Flowers: No outdoor space is complete without the right plants and flowers. Giving your space a green makeover is more budget-friendly than you would think. City of Ottawa offers free trees for you to […] The post Five Budget Friendly Tips to…
  • Over-seeding

    HGadmin
    15 Apr 2015 | 9:30 pm
    Over-seeding (sowing grass seeds on an established lawn) is one way to ensure your lawn stays dense from one season to the next. Thick grass will crowd out weeds. In the spring one should check for dying grass and repair it with over-seeding and possibly top dressing. Weed seeds are very opportunistic and will establish themselves wherever bare soil exists. It is not necessary to cover grass seeds with soil unless there are bare areas, then one needs top dressing to be done too. Over-seeding is done with a broadcast spreader to evenly apply the […] The post Over-seeding appeared first…
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    goldfordgardens

  • 6 Tips on How to Clean Cast Iron Radiators

    ameliagoldford
    22 May 2015 | 8:45 am
    One of the distinctive features in the old UK homes is the availability of a cast iron radiator. While this is not exactly a sign of opulence (at least it wasn’t the case when they appeared), nowadays this heating item brings some vintage charm in your home. Some of these radiators are actually well-decorated. Some old homes even have patterned heating devices with ornamental curves and other pleasant details. On the other hand, such radiators can have their looks ruined if nobody takes care of their hygiene. Make sure that none of this will happen and follow the techniques used by the…
  • 6 Tips on Cleaning Soot Stains from Your Carpet

    ameliagoldford
    13 May 2015 | 4:04 am
    If you have a fireplace in your living room, prepare for a risky situation – the forming of persisting dark stains on your carpet. Even more, every source of soot can create such stains – from candles to ovens. These are some of the nastiest stains – it looks like the more you scrub and wipe the sooty area, the more it spreads. The problem will be even more obvious if you have a bright-coloured carpet. Luckily, not everything is ruined – you can even use some DIY techniques for the clean-up of your carpet. You will be able to find most of the required ingredients in your pantry.
  • What to Cook With a Few Garden Tomatoes

    ameliagoldford
    7 May 2015 | 5:00 am
    Home gardening is more popular than ever and many vegetable gardeners in the UK know well the pleasure of growing delicious tomatoes. There are many uses for your harvest of garden tomatoes. You can enjoy them fresh, also as tomato sauce, salsa, pasta sauce and barbecue amendment. So how to use your garden tomatoes for a nutritious recipe? The following tips provided by professional gardeners will be of use. You can enjoy these quite easy and so yummy recipes with just a minimum quantity of tomatoes. Tomato Appetiser 1 loaf of long bread, baguette-like for the win; 7 to 9 tomatoes,…
  • Enjoy Home-Grown Tea from Your Own Garden

    ameliagoldford
    23 Apr 2015 | 8:00 am
    You will enjoy the flavour of a home-grown tea. Tasting the bounty of your own green yard infused in a refreshing cup of tea can be achieved. Herbal teas can be prepared with one plant or a combination of plants, if you wish. If you’re gardening in Liverpool, the mild temperate climate will make many options at your disposal. Before you start planting, you’ll need to prepare your soil and the future rows. The following are herbs that thrive under direct sunlight, with no special watering requirements. You can wait for natural rainfall, or water them every couple of days. For tea…
  • 6 Things to Clean Before Moving Out of a Flat

    ameliagoldford
    17 Apr 2015 | 6:26 am
    Being a student can be sometimes chaotic and among the many evil necessities, the need to move out of your tenancy is the most soul-crushing experience, period. Whether its a campus or a true tenancy, it’s not that important. The problem is that you need to be extra careful and concentrated on the details. So, how to clean before moving out of a flat? Read further to get some useful ideas. The right strategy for moving out will help you gain approval form the inevitable inspection. If you are successful, you will get your deposit back and move on without suffering damage fee. Of course,…
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    Duqaa.com

  • OUTDOOR LIVING SPACE ESSENTIALS

    Duqaa
    21 May 2015 | 3:48 am
    1- Comfortable cozy seating 2- an Area rug to define the space 3- Outdoor curtain panels to soften the space and add privacy 4- Plants, flowers, and trees – lots of them! 5- Lighting to create that special ambiance – candles, solar lights, torches     6- Accessories & outdoor decor – wall art, decorative pillows, side tables & garden stools 7- a Patio fire pit – for cool summer nights * shop these looks and view item sources here    
  • PATIO FURNITURE

    Duqaa
    21 May 2015 | 3:46 am
    Duqaa.com a leading manufacturer,exporters & suppliers in Outdoor Patio Furniture has Launches the New Modern Style Patio Furniture for Your Garden   Finding great deals on outdoor patio furniture has never been easier – duqaa.com  here you’ll find a selection of designer furniture for outdoors. All available to order with a click of a button.   Outdoor patio furniture designed under the concept of the joy of nature, integration and harmony with the environment with high quality, simple design and high durability of materials which is suitable for any occasion.
  • LIGHTING TO ACCENTURATE YOUR GARDEN

    Duqaa
    21 May 2015 | 3:43 am
    Shop Beautiful Garden Lanterns Products Online From Duqaa.com Newest Looks in Lighting are Reflected in Eye-Catching Styles   We offer a huge range of garden and outdoor lighting options for you to choose from duqaa.com. Let us bring you out of the darkness with this illuminating guide, designed to help you choose your perfect garden and outdoor lighting systems. An eco-friendly alternative to traditional lighting – energy-efficient garden lighting.   Our custom lighting products are all hand-crafted and made from solid copper and brasses, iron, cast-brasses, cast bronzes and…
  • VOTIVES AND CANDLE HOLDERS

    Duqaa
    21 May 2015 | 3:40 am
    Duqaa Give An Elegant Look To Your Home With Home Decor Items Decorating home with Votive, lanterns and candle Holders are becoming the most popular trend. These can be used in various purposes, such as family function, party, get-together, festive occasions among others. These help to explore the beauty as well decoration of your function. As well as lanterns bring the perfect texture. If you are looking for the reliable source that can offer your quality as well as affordable lanterns post,cylinder vases then you can take the help of the internet. One of the most reputed and reliable online…
  • TOP TEN FLORAL TRENDS FOR VALENTINE’S DAY

    Duqaa
    21 May 2015 | 3:38 am
    1. Experiment with colour Red and white flowers continue to be the favourite, but this year, vibrant colours are leading the popularity contest. Rich shades of pink, violet, plum, magentas, green, purple, white and mango will be showcased in brilliant bouquets. For hot colour combinations, why not try red with orange or fuchsia, or raspberry pink with lime green accents. 2. Find flowers on a budget  If you’re looking to save a few extra dollars, opt for a single, long-stemmed rose or a bouquet of shorter-stemmed roses instead of the traditional long-stemmed bunch. Other inexpensive…
 
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    Tipsplants.com

  • 22+ Health & Beauty Benefits of Aloe Vera Juice That Really Matter

    admin
    13 May 2015 | 4:36 am
    AloeWhat’s so special about Aloe Vera juice? This is a fresh supply of possibly endless health & beauty benefits! According to the latest scientific research & clinical studies, the name of the game is ‘A Miracle Drink’ in 25 parameters minimum. However, both effectiveness & safety of Aloe Vera derivatives – juice, gel or extract Aloe Vera juice – for cosmetic/medicinal purposes seem to be frequently contradicted as well.
  • 26 Pictures Of Flowering & Fruiting Bonsai Trees Will Make You Re-Evaluate Your Entire Existence

    admin
    24 Apr 2015 | 6:22 am
    Bonsai TreeFlowering bonsai are very popular and fruits on miniature trees fascinate almost everybody. But there are a number of things you must pay attention to if you want to make sure these bonsai tree species will produce the desired flowers and fruits. fatalii.net blogspot.com
  • 10 Awesome Tips for Hardy Hibiscus Garden Care

    admin
    22 Apr 2015 | 5:26 am
    HibiscusHardy Hibiscus Exotic Plants – Tropics in Your Garden Hardy Hibiscus flowering plants used to grow in tropic climate, i.e. wet area with lot of sun and heat. So due to changeable weather it will come up only in late spring in your garden. If you decide to enrich your garden with this gorgeous tropic oasis, here are some tips for aspiring gardener: 1. Hardy Hibiscus has specially produced varieties for our climate, which are considered to be fast-growers and reach their mature size within 3 years.
  • Bonsai: 3 Easy Ways to Break the Dormancy: Scarification of Seeds

    admin
    15 Apr 2015 | 6:18 am
    Bonsai TreeThe nature took care of protecting the bonsai seeds. They are protected by a hard coat. At the same time it’s difficult for water and air penetrate this coating, thus, germination can be inhibited. Scarification is an artificial way of getting rid of the outer coat. It presupposes its scratching or cracking. In the wild scarification is done by animals. They eat the seed and digest it. Here are 3 easy ways you have to follow to hasten germination:
  • Proper Germination: Stratificating Bonsai Seeds Efficiently

    admin
    15 Apr 2015 | 5:56 am
    Bonsai TreeThere is something pure about growing a bonsai from the very beginning. On the one hand, growing a tree from seeds, you can make a massive cultivation of rare species and it will not cost you an arm and a leg; on the other hand, you can grow a quality tree as you will be able to monitor each stage of its development. However, starting from scratch has its drawbacks. First of all, you will need plenty of time to grow such a tree. Secondly, new seedlings are very fragile that’s why extra care may be required.
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