Gardening

  • Most Topular Stories

  • The Greener Gardener: Best Horticulture Tips And Ideas

    Ten Minute Gardener
    Chris
    30 Aug 2014 | 12:13 am
    Horticulture may seem very involved and confusing, but if you put in a little study and a lot of practice, you can get started today. Now you know what you need to do, you can hopefully be more knowledgeable about horticulture, so you can hone your skills and turn into a wonderful gardener. Make sure that your sod properly. Pull all the weeds and break up any clods of soil.Make sure your soil is flat and even. Make sure the soil is moist soil. Lay the sod in rows, keeping the joints set off from one another. Your plants need to adapt and must be gradually introduced to changes of environment.
  • Long Day At Longwood

    A Leafy Indulgence
    Swimray
    23 Aug 2014 | 7:45 am
    This gardener of over a decade has never been to Longwood Gardens in Pennsylvania, or to the other nearby gardener ports of call. Longwood Gardens was on the list of staycation day trips assigned to any weekend with nothing else planned.The battle plan was to attack on Saturday in August. The weather was to be glorious. The route was arranged, camera batteries charged, and walking clothes readied. Then it rained Friday evening and the meteorologists changed their tune to Saturday showers. Dark overcast skies ready to burst open greeted Saturday morning so the trip was off.After plans were…
  • Freaky Flowers

    You Grow Girl
    Gayla Trail
    29 Aug 2014 | 9:25 am
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  • Cilantro Cucumber Garden Sipper Cocktail Recipe – A Light Bloody Mary

    Shawna Coronado
    Shawna
    1 Sep 2014 | 4:39 am
    Septembers cocktail is flavorful and filled with the garden harvest. It takes the traditional Bloody Mary and lightens it up a bit, making it perfect for hot Indian Summer days. It has Cilantro Vodka and a bit of Cucumber Vodka to kick in that veggie flavor. Make the Cilantro Cucumber Garden Sipper Cocktail Recipe when you are looking for something a smidge lemonier than the traditional Bloody Mary**. Watch the super quick video below if you want to see how it is all assembled. Cilantro Cucumber Garden Sipper Light Bloody Mary Cocktail Recipe – Muddled Cilantro and Cucumber – 1/2…
  • White Turtlehead: Wildflower Wednesday

    Cold Climate Gardening
    Kathy Purdy
    31 Aug 2014 | 6:12 pm
    White turtlehead (Chelone glabra) is one of those wildflowers that is easy to overlook. For one thing, when it blooms, much showier plants such as Joe Pye Weed, goldenrod, and flat-topped white aster are also blooming, and they tend to steal the spotlight. Also, by the time it blooms, the plants may not look so […]
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    You Grow Girl

  • Freaky Flowers

    Gayla Trail
    29 Aug 2014 | 9:25 am
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  • You Win Some, You Lose Some

    Gayla Trail
    27 Aug 2014 | 1:39 pm
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  • Introducing You Grow Girl Makes

    Gayla Trail
    26 Aug 2014 | 8:15 am
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  • This is My Own Quiet Rebellion

    Gayla Trail
    21 Aug 2014 | 10:01 am
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  • In My Garden of Solitude

    Gayla Trail
    14 Aug 2014 | 4:38 pm
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    Shawna Coronado

  • Cilantro Cucumber Garden Sipper Cocktail Recipe – A Light Bloody Mary

    Shawna
    1 Sep 2014 | 4:39 am
    Septembers cocktail is flavorful and filled with the garden harvest. It takes the traditional Bloody Mary and lightens it up a bit, making it perfect for hot Indian Summer days. It has Cilantro Vodka and a bit of Cucumber Vodka to kick in that veggie flavor. Make the Cilantro Cucumber Garden Sipper Cocktail Recipe when you are looking for something a smidge lemonier than the traditional Bloody Mary**. Watch the super quick video below if you want to see how it is all assembled. Cilantro Cucumber Garden Sipper Light Bloody Mary Cocktail Recipe – Muddled Cilantro and Cucumber – 1/2…
  • Egrets on the Illinois Prairie – Wordless Wednesday

    Shawna
    27 Aug 2014 | 4:30 am
    Egret photo taken up the street from my house during an August sunset at the prairie in Fermilab Natural Areas. The post Egrets on the Illinois Prairie – Wordless Wednesday appeared first on Shawna Coronado.
  • Cold Frames To Protect Your Garden

    Shawna
    25 Aug 2014 | 4:00 am
    Every spring and fall I try to make it out to the Chicago Botanic Garden to see what inspiration they might toss at me in those transitional gardening seasons. In both the fall and spring I am completely and totally captivated by the Chicago Botanic Garden’s lovely row of cold frames in the vegetable garden. Cold frames are used as a tool to protect your plants from frost either in spring or fall and can be an invaluable tool for lengthening the gardening season, particularly in northern states. It can also be used as a protective spot in southern states for container plants and…
  • Garden Design With Orange Colors

    Shawna
    18 Aug 2014 | 4:41 am
    Up the road a ways from my home in my very suburban neighborhood is a lovely little garden designed with orange colors and an adorable white cat. The gardener grows tall orange and mixed color zinnias along the city sidewalk that always make a show in August. Beyond the zinnias, the rest of her garden is decorated with plants that are varying shades of green. Her color design comes through with accessories like the amazing recycled orange garden chair that sits in the garden entryway above. Her goal with her urban garden is to make it a simple and comfortable place to relax; not perfection. I…
  • HGTV Plant Collection Makes a Difference For Kokomo, Indiana

    Shawna Coronado
    13 Aug 2014 | 2:47 pm
    Kokomo, Indiana is my hometown; a small town in central Indiana where I was born.  Without a doubt, my grandmother’s helped stimulate my passion for gardening in their country gardens near the city. I grew up climbing trees, crawdaddy fishing, and picking wildflowers on a farm in it’s outer limits, went to Northwestern High School, and learned from an early age in this small town that hard work and family were fundamental to life. For the last eight years the city has worked hard to revitalize parts of Kokomo by creating a beautiful, welcoming community via flower displays…
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    Cold Climate Gardening

  • White Turtlehead: Wildflower Wednesday

    Kathy Purdy
    31 Aug 2014 | 6:12 pm
    White turtlehead (Chelone glabra) is one of those wildflowers that is easy to overlook. For one thing, when it blooms, much showier plants such as Joe Pye Weed, goldenrod, and flat-topped white aster are also blooming, and they tend to steal the spotlight. Also, by the time it blooms, the plants may not look so […]
  • Why Your Next Garden Hose Should Be Flexzilla

    Kathy Purdy
    21 Aug 2014 | 4:29 pm
    The last time you went shopping for a garden hose, were you bewildered by all the choices? Did you wonder if the claims about durability and not kinking were really true? At the Garden2Blog event hosted by P. Allen Smith, I was introduced to a garden hose that truly is different–Flexzilla. Flexzilla was part of […]
  • Pink and Orange: Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day August 2014

    Kathy Purdy
    15 Aug 2014 | 7:50 pm
    Greetings, cold climate gardeners! It’s feeling autumnal around here, and starting to look it, too. The mid-August garden is a garden in transition. The early summer plants are looking shabby and the fall garden is just getting going. The beds that used to look so lush now have gaps in them because the Johnny-jump-ups have […]
  • Double Oriental Lilies: Do You Love Them Or Hate Them?

    Kathy Purdy
    11 Aug 2014 | 9:59 am
    Last year Longfield Gardens sent some double Oriental lilies for me to try. This year they are coming up gangbusters.Double means that instead of a flower having a pistil and stamens, additional petals grow in their place. Some flowers, like peonies, have been double for so long that no one gives it a second thought. […]
  • Mountain Fringe In My New Garden: Wildflower Wednesday

    Kathy Purdy
    26 Jul 2014 | 7:35 pm
    Can you name a biennial vine native to North America? (Great trivia question!)If you read the words above, you know the answer is mountain fringe (Adlumia fungosa), more commonly known as Allegheny vine–but that’s not as poetic. I first discovered mountain fringe growing in moist, shady spots in my former garden. As I mentioned in […]
 
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    A Way To Garden

  • new heyday at untermyer gardens, where grandeur and marigolds mingle

    margaret
    1 Sep 2014 | 5:12 am
    HOW’S YOUR GARDEN LOOKING as summer winds down? Is it full of visual impact, with the promise of weeks and [read more…] The post new heyday at untermyer gardens, where grandeur and marigolds mingle appeared first on A Way To Garden.
  • 21 garden-y things to do on a 3-day weekend

    margaret
    30 Aug 2014 | 12:49 pm
    LIKE THE SQUIRRELS who are criss-crossing the yard with acorns and corncobs and more to stash, I’m busy, too. A [read more…] The post 21 garden-y things to do on a 3-day weekend appeared first on A Way To Garden.
  • giveaway: the wide world of beetles, with dr. arthur evans

    margaret
    25 Aug 2014 | 10:00 am
    BEETLES. Yes, we are going to talk about beetles—but not how to get rid of Japanese beetles, or Asian lily [read more…] The post giveaway: the wide world of beetles, with dr. arthur evans appeared first on A Way To Garden.
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    The Occasional Gardener

  • The Patient Path

    15 Aug 2014 | 8:17 am
    In the last few weeks, the stone path I laid in the dark verandah has finally 'clicked'. It's taken the best part of a couple of years. It's a short path that takes you from the concrete verandah, through the border and an opening in the bamboo fence. I found most of the 'stones' in the orchard where I think many years ago some renovation had occured and these broken pieces ended up being disposed there. They are really chunks of cement and gravel but having been laying around for years in the cooler shade of the orchard, had become mossy.Having transferred and laid them, which took a…
  • Malay Apples

    20 Jun 2014 | 8:11 am
    In the last few years of living in New York City I tried consciously to eat more seasonally which was all well and good in the summer months but as the seasons progressed into the colder months the selection would inevitably thin to root vegetables and apples. I ate a lot of apples. But then I did love going down to the farmers market at Union square and filling up my backpack with them.Here now in the tropics there are no heirloom apples to be found - just the bright red or green homogenous supermarket varieties - Granny Smiths and Red Delicious from Australia and New Zealand. Their…
  • Tropical Chocolate

    29 May 2014 | 8:50 pm
    Its amazing how a few small changes can substantially change the look of a garden. A few new acquisitions for the Dark Verandah have done exactly that. Last saturday on my usual hunt at the farmers market, I found not one but two chocolate colored coleus. Week after week this one vendor would have coleus but always in brighter colors of reds and pinks, then this week he had these two - a ruffled chocolate edge one and one with chocolate splashes.Having had some experience now with the shifting personalites of Coleus I'm going to keep these two in pots and in heavier shade. I've…
  • Riverine Wilderness

    5 May 2014 | 9:50 am
    A while ago, I visited Tanjung Piai, a listed Ramsar site, ie a wetland of international importance. To be honest, it was depressing. Poorly maintained, you could see from the boardwalks, garbage tangled in the mangrove roots. There was a stench that distracted from the beauty of the surrounding flora and as soon as you reached the coast edge, the horizon had a line of tankers en route to nearby Singapore and beyond. The fluctuations in tidal waves they create erode the shrinking coast, their illegal dumping of toxic sludge poison it further. It was hard to connect with this wilderness…
  • Painted Nettle

    6 Jan 2014 | 8:12 pm
    The painted nettle or Coleus has become a favorite in my garden. Although still much in use, the name Coleus is apparently defunct and should properly be called Solenostemon scutellarioides. Can't say I'm adjusting to that terribly well. In the Dark Verandah garden the few that I've planted there have become important color accents adding shots of lime or splashes of yellow or adding dark chocolates and charred purples to the dark theme.They also grow fairly vigorously so quickly fill the many blank spaces in in the border that desperately need filling. This growth habit is also part of…
 
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    May Dreams Gardens

  • Ten steps to de-clutter your garden

    Carol
    31 Aug 2014 | 10:05 am
    When you look around your garden, do you wonder how you ended up with so much stuff? All those decorative items you knew would be just perfect for your garden.  You placed some of them in the first open spot you found, while others you left on the porch or patio because you just couldn't decide where to put them.  Whatever were you thinking when you bought yet another plastic butterfly on a
  • The Theory of Seasonal Wildflowers

    Carol
    27 Aug 2014 | 5:50 pm
    Dear Gail, Thank you for providing us with Wildflower Wednesday on the fourth Wednesday of the month, reminding us to think about wildflowers for our gardens. While I was out mowing today, I thought about wildflowers and what I might post about them.  I mowed past some Black-eye Susans (Rudbeckia sp.) and considering posting about them. Black-eyed Susans Then I saw the big Joe Pye Weed (
  • The Old Woman at the Door teaches me about balance

    Carol
    24 Aug 2014 | 6:44 pm
    Sometimes, when I sit still in the garden for just a minute, the old woman at the door comes and pays me a visit. Long-time readers, you remember the old woman at the door, don't you? She seems quite familiar to me, and when I look her in the eyes, I sometimes see my own reflection. She keeps me on the straight and narrow and reminds me what gardening is all about. Sometimes, she reminds
  • Oh give me a lawn...

    Carol
    21 Aug 2014 | 7:23 pm
    "Oh give me a lawn Where the bees roam along And the rabbits have plenty to eat." Such a lawn will surely have clover in it. Lean in and let me tell you a secret about my lawn. I bought a bag of seeds for dutch white clover and sowed the seeds around my back lawn earlier in the spring. I'm not sure how well I timed my sowing but as I mow now I see little spots of clover coming up all over.
  • Dr Hortfreud: On Mowing in the Rain

    Carol
    18 Aug 2014 | 7:35 pm
    Hello, Carol Hi, Dr. Hortfreud. It's been awhile, hasn't it? Yes, Carol, but I sense you need a session with me now. Oh, yes, I do. Always. Well, it looks like rain, so why don't we meet in the sun room around the house plants. Oh no, Dr. Hortfreud, I would like to have a mowing session with you. Besides, if you look to the west, it's sunny out. But if you look to the east, Carol, it's
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    Bloomingwriter: Gardening in Nova Scotia

  • A Midsummer Miscellany of Colour

    Jodi DeLong
    22 Aug 2014 | 6:55 am
     It's now beyond 'Half Past August' and I thought you might need some encouragement because this is the time of year that I hear "there's no colour in my garden" from some folks. Sure there is--and you can add more! I keep adding as I see things I want to change or acquire plants that I have been looking for.You may remember I talked about plants that I purchase and treat as annuals, including this 'Cherry Brandy' rudbeckia. THIS is why I buy this plant every year if need be--look at that colour. Nothing else quite like it.Amazingly, all the buddleia I had…
  • It's easy loving green...flowers!

    Jodi DeLong
    12 Aug 2014 | 8:04 am
     Perhaps no colour in the floral world is more polarizing than the colour green. Many people dislike green flowers, saying they don't show up well enough--others adore them. Put me firmly in the 'adore' camp. Let's kick off the festival with one of my favourite coneflowers, 'Green Jewel'--which is fragrant as well as gorgeously green.Read more »
  • The joys of daylilies

    Jodi DeLong
    1 Aug 2014 | 7:32 am
     This is the time of year where I regularly have people saying to me, "You have something on your nose." It is almost always either true lily pollen, or daylily pollen, because once those beauties start to flower, I can't help but check for fragrance. (Beautiful Edgings) So, you know the difference between daylilies and true lilies, right? (I'll save lilies for another post). Daylilies have foliage that looks like wide, large grass, and flowers grow up on stems arising from the foliage. Each flower lasts for only a day, and the proper name for these plants is Hemerocallis,…
  • Singing the Blues...of the Garden

    Jodi DeLong
    24 Jul 2014 | 5:54 pm
     While flowers in any colour are quite lovely and sometimes fantastic, the blue flowers are definitely my absolute favourites. True blue flowers are quite rare, and as anyone who has ever browsed a seed catalogue, a plant website, or a nursery can attest, those who describe flower colours often play fast and loose with what they define as being blue. This flower, blue pimpernel (Anagallis 'Skylover') is for real blue. Often, the so-called 'blue' flowers are more purple than they are blue, which is fine because purple is a great colour, but when you have your heart set on…
  • Colour Echoes in the Garden

    Jodi DeLong
    15 Jul 2014 | 11:25 am
    One of the great joys of gardening, of course, is the chance to play with colour. It's like painting with plants: you get to create wonderful colour combinations that please your eye, and that can be changed up yearly, or by moving a couple of container plantings around. We all have particular colours that please us, or that we use a lot of in a garden planting. Myself, I am fond of pretty much all colours in the garden,  but I have made a dedicated effort this year to creating drifts of colours. I'm doing this for several reasons. Read more »
 
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    Zanthan Gardens

  • Week 34: 8/20 – 8/26

    M Sinclair Stevens in Austin, Texas
    26 Aug 2014 | 10:57 am
    2007-08-27. The desert trumpet vines clambers over the Spanish bayonet yucca as weeds smother the buffalograss in the meadow. The lawn is green! And the monkey grass came back and is blooming.
  • Rhodophiala bifida Bulbs

    M Sinclair Stevens in Austin, Texas
    22 Aug 2014 | 12:24 pm
    2014-08-22. Rhodophiala bifida bulbs. On the left, the offset has formed a new, small bulb. On the right, the offset growth (looking like a large root) is just beginning to grow up toward the surface.
  • Week 33: 8/13 – 8/19

    M Sinclair Stevens in Austin, Texas
    20 Aug 2014 | 5:46 am
    The colors of August. Austin, TX. August 20, 2006. This is not a photo of my garden because there is nothing to photograph this week in my garden. It is in my neighborhood though.
  • Week 15: 4/9 – 4/15

    M Sinclair Stevens in Austin, Texas
    13 Apr 2014 | 7:24 pm
    2014-04-13. Almost no larkspur this year. The meadow is given over to cilantro. Some yellow iris surprised me.
  • Week 40: 10/1-10/07

    M Sinclair Stevens in Austin, Texas
    4 Oct 2013 | 5:10 am
    2013-10-03. The rain garden with the pigeonberrry in full flower.
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    Digging

  • Mid-century house inspires Palm Springs-style garden in Austin

    Pam/Digging
    1 Sep 2014 | 5:29 am
    Charlotte Warren, a photographer and former co-chair of the local Garden Conservancy tour, inherited a steeply sloping, west-facing zoysia lawn when she moved into her home in the hills of West Austin. Aside from requiring lots of water and regular mowing, the lawn offered zero privacy for her front-yard swimming pool and did nothing to complement the mid-century lines of her 1957 Barton Riley-designed home. Inspired by the Palm Springs, California-style architecture of her house, Charlotte hired landscape architect Curt Arnette of Sitio Design to create a garden in the modern, desert-oasis…
  • Plant This: Candy lily blooms are a sweet surprise

    Pam/Digging
    29 Aug 2014 | 5:28 am
    Visiting the garden of my friend Cat/The Whimsical Gardener earlier this summer, I exclaimed over a dainty, freckled flower on a long stem, with the sword-like leaves of an iris. Candy lily, she said, adding that she took no particular care and it thrived in morning to mid-afternoon sun. I was smitten. By happy coincidence, a week later Katina of Gardening in Austin mentioned on Facebook that she’d seen 4-inch pots of candy lily (× Pardancanda norrisii) on sale for $.99 at Barton Springs Nursery. Despite the fact that late June is way past my stop date for planting anything except…
  • Inspiration for my new bottle tree comes from the desert

    Pam/Digging
    28 Aug 2014 | 4:25 am
    When it’s too hot to plant, consider planting a bottle tree. It’ll never need watering, and the more the Death Star shines on it, the better it looks. I made a simple, post-style bottle tree 5 years ago. But the cedar post was rotting, and it was beginning to list. I decided to replace it, and as I pondered my options I remembered a plant I admired at Big Bend National Park and in Phoenix last spring. Suddenly I knew what I wanted. An ocotillo bottle tree! Poetic license means its blooms are blue instead of red, but I like the organic, vase-like structure — a nice change…
  • Garlic chive time!

    Pam/Digging
    27 Aug 2014 | 3:52 am
    Like Captain von Trapp’s edelweiss, the clean and bright flowers of garlic chives (Allium tuberosum) cheer me up when I’m feeling down in the August dumps. “Won’t be long now,” they whisper. “This is summer’s last gasp.” With puffballs of white flowers held aloft on slender stems over liriope-like leaves, garlic chives refresh everything nearby — in this case, Mexican oregano (Poliomintha longiflora) and purple fountain grass (Pennisetum setaceum). These blossoms of snow in the August garden don’t actually help me feel any cooler.
  • I spy a garden spider, and she’s not alone

    Pam/Digging
    26 Aug 2014 | 5:44 am
    Everyone’s been talking this month about the common but uncommonly large garden spider, also known as black-and-yellow argiope. As it happens, my garden is home to at least one of these colorful, creepy, yet beneficial predators. She’s a big ‘un! She builds her web in the curbside garden between a softleaf yucca and a cluster of Salvia greggii. She’s large enough that I can see her as I slow the car to turn into the driveway each day. I have a mild phobia of spiders and won’t tolerate them in the house. Outside, however, I appreciate the essential part they play…
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    Blithewold Blogs

  • In transition

    Kristin Green
    29 Aug 2014 | 8:55 am
    Change is in the air. Gail is always the first to point out how the light has shifted — it is well into its golden slide to the south now. So pretty. And although this week we have been hit with the most summer-like weather of the summer so far — intensely hot and sultry […]
  • So glad about summer bulbs

    Kristin Green
    22 Aug 2014 | 10:25 am
    If this had been a “normal” summer (is there any such thing?) by now we would probably be feeling beat by the heat. The gardens might have started to look sun scorched, faded, and dusty — IF we hadn’t planned ahead to prevent that from happening. We always plan — and then plant — for […]
  • August blooms

    Kristin Green
    15 Aug 2014 | 8:48 am
    I’m so glad it’s Garden Bloggers Bloom Day today because I can’t think of a better way to celebrate my return to the gardens after a week’s vacation. And looking back in my archives here I’m amazed to see that I haven’t participated in an August Garden Bloggers Bloom Day since 2008. (Where have I […]
  • August already?

    Kristin Green
    1 Aug 2014 | 9:42 am
    Why is it that winter tends to drag on but summer goes by in a flash? Not that it’s anywhere near “gone by” but I can’t believe it’s August already. Ever since somewhere around this time last year or at least since … February … I have been counting down the days to my summer […]
  • Serving up a feast

    Kristin Green
    25 Jul 2014 | 11:41 am
    Whenever anyone asks, “When is the best time to visit Blithewold?” Gail and I usually run through a list that includes spring for the daffodils, early summer for the roses and Rock Garden, and late summer and fall to see the Idea Gardens in their full glory. But now I wish I could go back and […]
 
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    Flatbush Gardener

  • Megachile, Leaf-Cutter Bees

    Flatbush Gardener
    10 Aug 2014 | 8:26 am
    A leaf-cutter bee removes a segment from a leaf of Rhododendron viscosum, swamp azalea, in my urban backyard native plant garden and wildlife habitat (National Wildlife Federation Certified Wildlife Habitat #141,173). You can see other segments -... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Synanthedon exitiosa, Peachtree Borer/Clearwing Moth

    Flatbush Gardener
    26 Jul 2014 | 5:35 am
    CORRECTION 2014-07-27: ID'd by William H. Taft on BugGuide as a male S. exitiosa, not S. fatifera, Arrowwood Borer, as I thought. A lifer for me. I never even knew such a thing existed. Synanthedon exitiosa, Peachtree Borer/Clearwing Moth, male, on... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Event: Saturday 6/21 NYCWW Pollinator Safari of my Gardens

    Flatbush Gardener
    14 Jun 2014 | 1:50 pm
    On Saturday, June 21, in partnership with NYC Wildflower Week, in observation of Pollinator Week, I'm opening my gardens for a guided tour, what I'm calling a "Pollinator Safari." This is only the third time, and the first time in three years, I've... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Off-Topic: Vows

    Flatbush Gardener
    19 May 2014 | 6:02 am
    Two years ago, on May 19, 2012, I married my husband, John. These were my vows: John: I don’t know what I can say to you that I’ve not already said. In front of family, friends, neighbors, and community, I can say this: Today is not a beginning –... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • What's Blooming

    Flatbush Gardener
    10 May 2014 | 4:06 pm
    Updated 2014-05-11: At the request of one of my readers, I started adding photos of the flowers. Retracted Erythronium; I checked, and its petals have fallen. Hoping for seedset; I have plenty of ants to disperse them! My backyard native plant... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
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    Ledge and Gardens

  • Summer Shots

    Layanee DeMerchant
    28 Aug 2014 | 5:32 am
    Summer is busy. The gardens have gone from lush to munched. The deer have taken liberties and the gardener has been lax with the spray program. Still, there is beauty to be found in the shortening summer days. Shadows are lengthening and the late flowering shrubs and perennials are starting to bloom. Above, the Caryopteris is attracting bees. I think this one is Caryopteris x cladonensis 'Bluebeard'. The honeysuckle has both berries and blooms right now. This one sits by the fishpond along with a Heuchera 'Caramel' which is languishing in the hot sun. The butterflies don't…
  • High Summer

    Layanee DeMerchant
    26 Jul 2014 | 3:10 am
      It is high summer in the garden here on the hillside right now. It is a small hill and the only 'Lucifer' in sight is the crocosmia which is blooming  flame red. Hydrangea leaves wilt in the sun even with ample moisture at their feet and the whine of cicadas slices through the still silence of summer. The spicy scent of tomato greens hangs in the heavy morning air as I flick the little suckers off the plants to keep the plants a bit tidier and inside their cages. My fingers turn green along with my thumb. The plants are laden with unripe tomatoes. It will be a few weeks…
  • White Elegance - Hydrangea arborescens

    Layanee DeMerchant
    9 Jul 2014 | 5:18 am
      If I could have only one species of hydrangea in my garden I would choose the smooth hydrangea, Hydrangea arborescens. It is native. It will grow in acid soils or in alkaline soils. It will grow in full sun or shade, even fairly deep shade. It has a lots of flowers which grow on new wood so there is no challenge to the flower bud hardiness. It is hardy from Zone 3-9. It grows from Canada to Florida and west to Missouri. It thrives in Minnesota. The further north it grows, the more sun it will tolerate.  I have rarely seen a pest problem although the deer do like to nibble on the…
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    the back quarter acre

  • Sweet end of summer

    25 Aug 2014 | 7:27 pm
    Cool temperatures this past week have stirred up conversations about an early fall.  The plant world, too, seems to be pushing the seasons forward.The end of summer is sweetened by the sight and scent of the appropriately named Summer Sweet Clethra alnifolia "September Beauty." Because these natives flourish in damp, acidic soils, several are sited adjacent to the rain garden and another next to a down spout. This time of year, they are over-loaded with intoxicating pure white racemes. Bees and butterflies flit, land, and sip like reeling, happy drunks. No complaints from that…
  • Geraniums: celebrating the commonplace

    8 Aug 2014 | 10:41 am
    Until a couple of years ago, I had always lumped geraniums into that group of trailer trash flowers--carnations, impatiens, petunias--that Big Box stores and uninspired landscapers inflict upon horticulturally sensitive souls. With such diversity of plant life available, why bother with geraniums? They are boring and clichéd. And they smell funny.But then I went to France.  Specifically, I went to Alsace, the eastern region of France that borders the river Rhine.  This is the country of geraniums, half-timbered buildings, and Riesling wine. Geraniums…
  • Re-location, re-location, re-location!

    28 Jul 2014 | 3:00 pm
    Summer construction is underway across campus: parking lots are being torn up, buildings knocked down, and new foundations dug.  Yes, here we're partying like it's early 2008! In the midst of all of this activity, a few weeks ago I noticed a mournful clump of Variegated Solomon's Seal wedged between an asphalt roadbed and a chain-link fence. I asked folks working in the area if I could help myself to these orphans. "No problem" was the response.   On site: Variegated Solomon's Seal (Polygonatum falcatum "Variegatum")    Last week,…
  • Boundary issues

    19 May 2014 | 3:00 pm
    I have boundary issues. Not as in a lack of any boundaries--quite the opposite. I like boundaries. I like clearly marked property. I like name tags, monogrammed stationary, and signet rings. I like knowing what belongs to me and what doesn't. Don't even think about asking me to share my dessert.  It's not going to happen.Garden boundaries not only mark off your bit of turf from your neighbor's, but they also organize all that green stuff into visually comprehensible blocks of lawn, bed, and hedge. A line of privet separates one portion of the front yard from our neighbor's…
  • More May daffodils

    14 May 2014 | 9:40 am
    The yellow-citron-cream-white-gold-chiffon-canary color carnival continues into mid-May!Clockwise from upper left:  "Hawera," "Thalia," "Pheasant's eye"  (Narcissus poeticus), "Ceylon" 
 
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    A Leafy Indulgence

  • Long Day At Longwood

    Swimray
    23 Aug 2014 | 7:45 am
    This gardener of over a decade has never been to Longwood Gardens in Pennsylvania, or to the other nearby gardener ports of call. Longwood Gardens was on the list of staycation day trips assigned to any weekend with nothing else planned.The battle plan was to attack on Saturday in August. The weather was to be glorious. The route was arranged, camera batteries charged, and walking clothes readied. Then it rained Friday evening and the meteorologists changed their tune to Saturday showers. Dark overcast skies ready to burst open greeted Saturday morning so the trip was off.After plans were…
  • August 2014 Bloom Day

    Swimray
    15 Aug 2014 | 6:06 am
    Garden Bloggers' Bloom DayWhat's blooming in the garden on the 15th of the month Rather than the same ol' same ol' let's present some of the newer items rearing their heads this year. I will throw in a few items that have not been here a while, too. I even put the photos on the X-Large setting for this posting. Today it's about the pictures -- not the story.The Irish Eyes are smiling. This rudbeckia "Irish Eyes" with the green centers was planted from seed twice in the past two years, but this was the first year anything survived and bloomed. They are growing but blooming sparsely. Let's see…
  • Thomas Jefferson's Chinese Ixia

    Swimray
    6 Aug 2014 | 8:10 pm
    Belacamda Lily was Belamcanda chinensis until about a year ago. Then botanists started playing with the names of some plants due to newfound genetic knowledge, and presto. The name changed to Iris domestica. Could its leaves actually resemble the irs family?The seeds hopped into my goodie bag at the annual Seed Swap in February 2012. Here we go again with another free plant from the seed swap or from a neighbor. During the first year, they were sown indoors and transplanted, producing one flower stalk that summer. The next year, (last summer) the plant came back half-heartedly, but did not…
  • Leisurely Blue

    Swimray
    28 Jul 2014 | 4:12 am
    Balloon bud in the lower leftA friend offered a share of a balloon flower plant from her front garden. The balloon flower did not excite me much, but I needed filler material for the recently-created, clay-packed side yard garden along new platform steps to the back yard and deck.Five years have passed, and the plant is finally beginning to spread a little. This year it sent up a short, second stalk. And, the flowers are more numerous, forming small clusters. The rude rudbeckia and brute baptisia have invaded the side yard garden, and are elbowing out the balloon flower and a few others that…
  • Daylilies And Shakespeare

    Swimray
    18 Jul 2014 | 5:44 am
    Annuals in the shadeIt's been about three years since I visited the Cutler Botanical Garden back in my hometown, Binghamton NY. My first visit saw a vegetable garden and a generous balance of perennials, annuals, and a few specimen trees. The second time, however, was different. Flood waters of the Chenango River had just receded, and any plants not washed away were encrusted with mud. It has recovered since then.Most botanical gardens, I believe, have a specialty or focus that distinguishes them from others and gives them a unique personality. I found something on my recent visit to Cutler…
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    A Leafy Indulgence

  • Long Day At Longwood

    Swimray
    23 Aug 2014 | 7:45 am
    This gardener of over a decade has never been to Longwood Gardens in Pennsylvania, or to the other nearby gardener ports of call. Longwood Gardens was on the list of staycation day trips assigned to any weekend with nothing else planned.The battle plan was to attack on Saturday in August. The weather was to be glorious. The route was arranged, camera batteries charged, and walking clothes readied. Then it rained Friday evening and the meteorologists changed their tune to Saturday showers. Dark overcast skies ready to burst open greeted Saturday morning so the trip was off.After plans were…
  • August 2014 Bloom Day

    Swimray
    15 Aug 2014 | 6:06 am
    Garden Bloggers' Bloom DayWhat's blooming in the garden on the 15th of the month Rather than the same ol' same ol' let's present some of the newer items rearing their heads this year. I will throw in a few items that have not been here a while, too. I even put the photos on the X-Large setting for this posting. Today it's about the pictures -- not the story.The Irish Eyes are smiling. This rudbeckia "Irish Eyes" with the green centers was planted from seed twice in the past two years, but this was the first year anything survived and bloomed. They are growing but blooming sparsely. Let's see…
  • Thomas Jefferson's Chinese Ixia

    Swimray
    6 Aug 2014 | 8:10 pm
    Belacamda Lily was Belamcanda chinensis until about a year ago. Then botanists started playing with the names of some plants due to newfound genetic knowledge, and presto. The name changed to Iris domestica. Could its leaves actually resemble the irs family?The seeds hopped into my goodie bag at the annual Seed Swap in February 2012. Here we go again with another free plant from the seed swap or from a neighbor. During the first year, they were sown indoors and transplanted, producing one flower stalk that summer. The next year, (last summer) the plant came back half-heartedly, but did not…
  • Leisurely Blue

    Swimray
    28 Jul 2014 | 4:12 am
    Balloon bud in the lower leftA friend offered a share of a balloon flower plant from her front garden. The balloon flower did not excite me much, but I needed filler material for the recently-created, clay-packed side yard garden along new platform steps to the back yard and deck.Five years have passed, and the plant is finally beginning to spread a little. This year it sent up a short, second stalk. And, the flowers are more numerous, forming small clusters. The rude rudbeckia and brute baptisia have invaded the side yard garden, and are elbowing out the balloon flower and a few others that…
  • Daylilies And Shakespeare

    Swimray
    18 Jul 2014 | 5:44 am
    Annuals in the shadeIt's been about three years since I visited the Cutler Botanical Garden back in my hometown, Binghamton NY. My first visit saw a vegetable garden and a generous balance of perennials, annuals, and a few specimen trees. The second time, however, was different. Flood waters of the Chenango River had just receded, and any plants not washed away were encrusted with mud. It has recovered since then.Most botanical gardens, I believe, have a specialty or focus that distinguishes them from others and gives them a unique personality. I found something on my recent visit to Cutler…
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    Garden Rant

  • Blackwater Wildlife Refuge, Late August by Susan Harris

    Susan Harris
    30 Aug 2014 | 11:26 am
    I spent a sublime morning this week at the Blackwater  National Wildlife Refuge on the Eastern Shore of the Chesapeake Bay, in the beautiful State of Maryland. Outside the Visitor’s Center, a wildlife garden that includes Ironweed (Vernonia noveboracensis), The very-familiar Rudbeckia with the less common Obedient Plant (Physostegia virginiana). One of the many abandoned farmhouses within the Refuge. Grasslands. Osprey perch. Erosion control measure. Photo of osprey heron in a tree taken from the driver’s seat, leaning over my passenger. Same view, with osprey heron not as…
  • Postcards From The Edge – DROUGHT by Ivette Soler

    Ivette Soler
    27 Aug 2014 | 7:05 am
    I have lived through drought before, but I have never seen anything like what I am witnessing now. I live in what is usually called an “up and coming” community – this is one of those places where artists and musicians come to raise their families, and before the drought, it looked like an adorable upper-middle class community of post-war bungalows. Now it looks abject, a neglected place, even though the homeowners are anything BUT neglectful of their homes. These pictures were taken on one block, around the corner from my house. This is how things have looked since March,…
  • Sensational by Elizabeth Licata

    Elizabeth Licata
    25 Aug 2014 | 5:49 am
    Amorphophallus Titanium (Corpse Flower) image courtesy of Shutterstock It’s a fact that botanical gardens have to keep on their toes to attract visitors throughout the year. Just as with art museums, a great collection is not enough.  In addition to the traditional special events, like orchid, mum, spring flower, coleus, and poinsettia shows, there must be model trains, bright lights in winter, Santa, (maybe) the Easter Bunny, rentals, fundraising, and—increasingly—dramatic displays like a yearly showing of Amorphophallus titanium, the corpse plant. That’s a lot of visitors and a lot…
  • Who’s more controversial – Michelle Rhee or Scotts Miracle-Gro? by Susan Harris

    Susan Harris
    22 Aug 2014 | 6:03 am
    To most of the media, it’s the famous education reformer Michelle Rhee, ex-DC Schools Chancellor, who’s controversial, unpopular, even reviled by some, especially teachers’ unions. (Interesting read on the subject.)  So when Scotts MiracleGro recently named her as a trustee, teachers called for a boycott of Scotts, and readers were presumably left with the impression that Rhee could threaten the otherwise stellar reputation of this fine company. One report  concludes that her backtracking from national education reform and accepting a “gig on the board of…
  • Courtyard Garden: One Year Later by Evelyn Hadden

    Evelyn Hadden
    19 Aug 2014 | 7:29 pm
    It’s time for an update on my courtyard garden. The thrill of saying that hasn’t dimmed after a year, and I imagine I will still be delighted about it if I am lucky enough to have a courtyard garden decades from now. First, a quick before-and-after pairing to show the changes in the structure of the garden. I built a fence between the house and the detached garage, then replaced all the lawn with paved walking and sitting areas and planting beds. I kept the lily pond and the mature apple tree, and there are a couple of mature pines that hang over the fence. Before it was a…
 
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    Life In Sugar Hollow

  • Letting August Bring Us On Home

    Tracey
    21 Aug 2014 | 7:37 am
    All photos from our gardens, except the top photo and the last. {The last is from Hollywood Cemetery in Richmond - a landscaping feat in and of itself, overlooking the James River.} Sam and I also visited the Edgar Allan Poe Museum during that same day - and finally got to see its Enchanted Garden.The top photo is Willow Spring - in Sugar Hollow. We have hit that time of year when we are celebrating tomato and melon harvests, zinnias, cleomes, black-eyed susans and daisies. I have to say, this is the first time in a long time that I am sad to see summer go. A beach vacation to Chincoteague;…
  • The Pace of June

    Tracey
    26 Jun 2014 | 7:43 am
    Things to be grateful for: St. Germain + strawberry nectar + seltzer + apple mint cocktails.Trailing roses (pre-Japanese beetle infestation - grrrrrrr.)A toddler who plucks raspberries right off of the canes and shoves them directly into his mouth. Also, dimpled elbows.Fragrant dayliles that smell like lily-of-the-valley. (Word.)Black raspberries and wildflowers from our woods.Sweet ice-box pickles.
  • Getting More Verdant, Still

    Tracey
    5 Jun 2014 | 1:29 pm
    Love-in-a-mist patches.Roses and fern terrarium.Horticultural retail therapy at Milmont Greenhouses in Stuarts Draft. {Pale green nicotiana, summer-blooming alyssum, pineapple sage, lavenders, St. John's Wort!}First elderflowers in our garden {second photo up from the bottom on the right}.Handpicked bouquets in my favorite shades.Also, made honeysuckle jelly this past weekend.
  • Late Spring, Welcome to the Jungle

    Tracey
    30 May 2014 | 12:30 pm
      Things have been BUSY in the garden and the hollow - work, play, party hosting, country road evening twirling. But it has been at a pace I am really cherishing. Plants have been moved around, some new ones have been added - including several varieties of spiderwort, boxwood, columbine and anemone. Maple and tulip poplar saplings are becoming small trees (coveted shade!). I am attempting the propagation of an old-fashioned mock orange (photo with cloches), while my elderberry propagation has been successful! The iris patch under the walnut took shape and smote down the dead zone…
  • Article in Richmond Magazine's RHome - Heirloom Zinnias!

    Tracey
    21 Mar 2014 | 1:51 pm
    My brain is slowly returning and I am getting back to freelance garden writing. I am lucky, in that favorite editors reach out to me, and make it fun.A piece I wrote a while back is in the March/April issue of Richmond Magazine's RHome. It is on heirloom zinnias. Read it here.
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    Lois de Vries' Garden Views

  • Dee Weeder Review

    Lois J. de Vries
    19 Aug 2014 | 11:05 am
    <!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]>
  • When Life Gives You a Hurricane – Make a Birdhouse!

    Lois J. de Vries
    31 Jul 2014 | 4:58 am
     “The hurricane devastated our wooded lot; we’re still in clean-up mode. I was determined to create something that would symbolize the positive energy of new life that can grow up out of death and destruction – the hope of birds nesting and laying their eggs in a house made from the wreckage of Hurricane Sandy.”                      .....Dan Freed, Wood Artist I know this may
  • The Eagles Have Landed

    Lois J. de Vries
    29 Mar 2014 | 5:01 am
    The Duke Farms eagles, that is. By 7:17 this morning when the screenshot was taken, one chick had hatched and another was pipping. The third chick is not due until Sunday but, since the first two were late in arriving, it's likely the third one will be, as well. You can watch live at: http://www.dukefarms.org/en/Stewardship/WildlifeCams/eagle-cam/   The eagles' tree was downed by Hurricane
  • Orchids in Bloom

    Lois J. de Vries
    6 Mar 2014 | 1:13 pm
    Miltoniopsis Whether you like your orchid shows big or small, ‘tis the season. Stony Hill Farms’ 26th Annual Orchid Open House starts today and continues through Sunday, March 9th. It includes free lectures, and wine and cheese tasting stations hosted by vendors from Sussex County. Stony Hill’s orchid house is located along Route 24/513 West in Chester, NJ. Go slow along the driveway; it’s
  • Share The Love - give me a piece of your mind

    Lois J. de Vries
    7 Feb 2014 | 12:13 pm
    <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 <![endif]--> Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net Here’s your chance to play a part in shaping the future of Cultivating The Inner Gardener. Please take a few moments to weigh in and tell me a little about yourself, share your thoughts about how you prefer to receive information,
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    Transatlantic Gardener

  • Everlasting pea: an undervalued garden climber

    Graham Rice
    23 Aug 2014 | 3:46 am
    Sometimes, people ignore plants simply because they're common. We see them all the time, even growing by the side of the road, and they sink into our subconscious and simply fail to emerge.What is sometimes called the perennial sweet pea, or everlasting pea, is a case in point. Lathyrus latifolius is easy to grow, we see patches thriving along sunny roadsides in Britain and in North America, and in gardens it may annoy us as it can be uncomfortably vigorous. But it’s very colourful, very productive, clings to fences or shrubs with its tendrils and is a splendid long lasting cut flower.
  • Book Review: A brilliant new month-by-month bird book

    Graham Rice
    15 Aug 2014 | 5:33 am
    Birds and plants seem to go together naturally. Birders usually seem to be interested in plants, while gardeners enjoy birds. In the US, there’s even a very popular magazine, Birds & Blooms, that combines the two enthusiasms. But not all bird books appeal to gardeners – they may be too focused or too esoteric – but this one is different.Tweet Of The Day began as a BBC radio series, a one hundred second daily focus on an individual British bird starting each time with its song (the closest North American equivalent is the two minute BirdNote). The popularity of the series has led to…
  • Purple loosestrife - is it really that bad?

    Graham Rice
    11 Aug 2014 | 2:00 am
    It’s purple loosestrife season here in Pennsylvania. Swamps and other wet habitats are vivid in its purple coloring (above, click to enlarge), in some places it looks as if it’s smothered everything. This colourful European native is generally viewed as a destructive menace and many millions of dollars are spent every year in a futile attempt to eradicate it.In Britain, by the way, where purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) originated, it’s far less common and is a popular plant for bog gardens with over a dozen named varieties, two of which have been awarded the prestigious Award of…
  • Book Review: Trees and shrubs - a new edition of the essential reference

    Graham Rice
    4 Aug 2014 | 3:00 am
    The classic British* reference book on trees, shrubs and climbers is The Hillier Manual of Trees and Shrubs. My copy sits with a small and very select group of references just to left of my computer monitor; I probably use it every day.Now, a new revised edition of this classic has been released by the Royal Horticultural Society, twelve years after the last edition. It has been significantly updated and expanded to include an amazing total of 13,215 individual plants (plus 3,258 cross-references and synonyms) from 706 genera; 1,490 plants have been added to those in the previous edition and…
  • Intriguing recent plant discoveries

    Graham Rice
    29 Jul 2014 | 2:00 am
    Making the hour’s drive back and forth to my cardiac rehab three times a week, and often walking woodland trails on the other days, I’ve spotted some interesting plants along the way.A couple of years ago I wrote about a yellow-leaved form of common milkweed, Asclepias syriaca, which I spotted growing by the side of the road and last week in a quiet area at the back of the radiology unit (yes, I was just poking around…)  I found a yellow-leaved plant of a different Asclepias species – A. tuberosa, butterfly weed. As you can see (left, click to enlarge) it looks very dramatic and…
 
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    WashingtonGardener

  • Fenton Friday: Harvest Donation for the Hungry

    WashingtonGardener
    29 Aug 2014 | 5:00 am
    This week at the Fenton Community Garden, three of us gathered donations from various plots and then tallied and weighed our annual harvest donation for a local food pantry. Here is our preliminary total: cut flowers 3 dozen (not counted in total weight) zucchini squash 5 lbs beans 2 lbsswiss chard 1 lb 11 ozbeets 2 lbs 2 ozcherry tomatoes 39 oztomatoes (full-sized) 6 lbs 11 ozmelons 5 lbspeppers (hot) 1 lb 12 ozcarrots 3 lbs basil 2 ozparsley 2 ozcucumber 12 ozmisc. 9 oz TOTAL: 31 lbs 2.5 oz Thank you to all who participated! If you would like to donate excess harvest from your garden, it…
  • Win Passes to the Morris Arboretum at the University of Pennslyvania

    WashingtonGardener
    28 Aug 2014 | 9:21 am
    For our August 2014 Washington Gardener Reader Contest, Washington Gardener is giving passes to the Morris Arboretum at the University of Pennslyvania (www.morrisarboretum.org).     Spend time with family and friends exploring the Arboretum’s 92-acre lush and colorful gardens just outside of Philadelphia, PA. Discover your favorite garden spaces and learn from 12,000 labeled plants, trees and flowers. See the forest from a new perspective from 50 feet up in the treetops on the Out on a Limb canopy walk, part of the Arboretum-wide interactive Tree Adventure exhibit.   To…
  • Video Wednesday: Busy Bumblebee

    WashingtonGardener
    27 Aug 2014 | 10:25 am
    I lost my computer hard-drive and as I was going through recovering files these last few weeks, I noticed that there were several videos I had created that were never shared on the Washington Gardener Magazine Youtube channel. This one of a very busy bumblebee was among them. I will try to add more of these "lost" videos to the channel in coming weeks, inbetween filming new ones and will share the links from this blog every Wednesday.
  • Support the Garden Media Before it is GONE ~ Washington Gardener Enews ~ August 2014 issue

    WashingtonGardener
    25 Aug 2014 | 2:37 pm
    The Washington Gardener Enews ~ August 2014 issue is now out. It was emailed as a PDF to all Washington Gardener Magazine current subscribers. It is also posted and archived online at:  http://issuu.com/washingtongardener/docs/wgenews-aug14/0Inside This Enews Issue:• Back Issue Sale• August-Sept To-Do List• Magazine Excerpt: Eastern Yellow Jackets• Latest Blog Links• Local Garden Events Listings • Support the Garden Media Before it is GONE!• New ‘Velour’ Wave Petunias• Reader Contest to Win Passes to the Morris ArboretumSubscribe to Washington Gardener Magazine today…
  • Sun Sugar Reigns Supreme in Field Crowded with Sweet Competitors

    WashingtonGardener
    23 Aug 2014 | 3:01 pm
    Tomato Taste 2014 Results We had over 150 come to today's Washington Gardener Magazine 7th Annual Tomato Taste at the FreshFarm Silver Spring Market. This is about 100 fewer than in previous years, but is not surprising given the weather. We had two heavy downpours and spitting rain throughout the morning, so many market shoppers may have stayed home.Here are the results of the more than ballots submitted.Sun Sugar from Chicano Sol FarmPineapple from Three Springs Fruit FarmSun Gold from The Farm at Our HouseChocolate (Black) Cherry from Mock's Greenhouse and FarmDoctor Yellow from Spiral…
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    A Tidewater Gardener

  • The Road to Mt. Evans

    Les
    24 Aug 2014 | 5:38 pm
         I'm an early riser, and if I sleep much past 6 a.m., even on my day off, someone better check on me. On our first full day in Colorado, I was up early, as usual, even given the different time zone. While having coffee with Sherpa Girl K, I remarked that I did not see how we were going to work everything into our limited vacation schedule, especially time to get up into the mountains. With
  • At the Denver Botanic Garden Without Glasses

    Les
    18 Aug 2014 | 2:00 am
         With all the wonderful glare coming from the Chihulies, it was somewhat difficult to focus on just the plants and gardens at the Denver Botanic Gardens (DBG), but I forced myself. This trip was my third to DBG, and I've been impressed from the first visit. For a botanic garden, it is not large, basically just a couple of enclosed city blocks. However, because of the way space is utilized and
  • Bloom Day - Not Bad for August

    Les
    15 Aug 2014 | 3:54 pm
         I don't know about the rest of you, but we are having a spectacular August. So far, the temperatures have not gotten above the 80's, and we have had sufficient rainfall to keep the garden looking good. Of course the moisture has been just as welcomed by the weeds and grass, as it has by the garden. My neighbors can thank me for the rain. Every time we leave for vacation, I water like a mad
  • Chihuly at the Denver Botanic Gardens

    Les
    9 Aug 2014 | 5:30 pm
         For our vacation this summer we drove out to Colorado to spend some time with our friends the Sherpa Girls. In planning the trip I knew I would be visiting the Denver Botanic Gardens again whether anyone else would join me or not, but when Sherpa Girl K told me that they were hosting a Dale Chihuly exhibit the deal was sealed. I've seen bits and pieces of Chihuly's glass in museums, at
  • Seventh Annual Citywide Bloom Day

    Les
    15 Jul 2014 | 2:00 am
         Typing this, I realize just how long it's been since my last post - exactly one month ago for June's Bloom Day. Ironically, my job affords me more free time than I have known in my adult life, yet, I seem to have so little of it. Evenings find me satisfactorily wrung out from work, and the heat. Weekends find me adventuring, usually on my bike or in the kayak, as I feel a need to take
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    clay and limestone

  • Wildflower Wednesday: It's Not All About The Susans, But, It's A lot About Them!

    Gail
    26 Aug 2014 | 11:00 pm
    It's been a while since I've written about the Susans/Rudbeckia fulgida! They're a mainstay in the garden, but, easily over looked until mid July when Mother Nature turns on the switch and overnight the garden is a field of golden yellow. They're pushy and would take over if I let them and truth be told some years I haven't had the heart to rip out all the Susans that I should/could have! When visitors stop by and comment on the abundance of Susans in the sunny and shady garden areas, I secretly feel like the adoring mother of that unruly, but, delightful child, who's been running amok at a…
  • Pollinator of the Day: Bumble on Joe!

    Gail
    18 Aug 2014 | 5:00 am
    I love the Joes, but then what's not to love with those big beautiful mauve/lavender-pink flower heads that bloom all summer and attract almost every kind of pollinator that visits the garden.If you want the full story on the Joes that live at Clay and Limestone go here...Perhaps, you'll find yourself thinking as I do, "So many Joe-Pyes and not nearly enough garden space."xoxogailI am on the mend.Gail Eichelberger is a gardener and therapist in Middle Tennessee. She loves wildflowers and native plants and thoroughly enjoys writing about the ones she grows at Clay and Limestone. She reminds…
  • Wordless Wednesday

    Gail
    6 Aug 2014 | 10:43 am
    Pearl Crescent (Phyciodes tharos) on Coreopsis 'Garnet'I've been taking a small break while my sprained wrist and thumb heal! I'll be back soon.Miss you all.xoxogailGail Eichelberger is a gardener and therapist in Middle Tennessee. She loves wildflowers and native plants and thoroughly enjoys writing about the ones she grows at Clay and Limestone. She reminds all that the words and images in this and all posts are the property of the author and cannot be used without written permission. Subscribe in a reader
  • Wildflower Wednesday: In Praise of a Rather Tall Wildflower!

    Gail
    22 Jul 2014 | 11:00 pm
    Silphium perfoliatum is one tall wildflower! Some would say that this beauty is a beast of a plant and I might have agreed several years ago when it stood 9 feet tall and 3 foot wide in my little sunny Susan's Bed! I've since learned to cut it back at the same time I clip the ex-asters. I suggest you do the same, because banning this beauty from your garden because it's tall and colonizing would be a shame.You just can't beat the composite flowers when it comes to wildlife value, but, there's something especially wonderful about Cup Plant. Once the flowers open the pollinators descend upon…
  • The Phlox is Blooming

    Gail
    2 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    ....and I couldn't be happier!It's blooming in most gardens in Nashville, but I was worried that there would be no phlox in my summer garden. This past spring I discovered that Phlox Bug had infected my plants. Long time readers know that I go to great lengths to insure that that horrid life sucking bug never gets another toe hold in my garden...But, it did.It's my practice to let the garden go to seed and stand all winter. (A Garden Cleanup Reminder) The seed heads and stalks of native plants provide winter interest and hiding places for  the critters who live and visit my garden. But,…
 
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    Dirt Therapy

  • August blooms and foliage

    Phillip Oliver
    18 Aug 2014 | 9:53 am
    There isn't a lot going on in the garden which is typical for August. We have had some relief from the humidity with some really nice days. Next week, however, promised to be a scorcher.The Sweet Autumn Clematis is beginning to bloom. It always blooms in August. Despite the fact that this vine is in almost complete shade, it does well.   It was a dud year for hydrangea blooms (because of the cold winter) but the foliage is looking great as a result of the recent rainfall. Rudbeckia and Sweet Potato Vine on the lamppost. Early morning sunrise Text and photos by Phillip Oliver, Dirt…
  • Hummingbird frenzy

    Phillip Oliver
    13 Aug 2014 | 9:20 am
     I know, this doesn't look like much of a frenzy but we have more hummingbirds this year than I can ever recall. This feeder is on the patio and I only see one hummingbird on it. However, on the north side of the house, outside our kitchen window, is where the action is. We have counted at least 8 hummers at one time and in past seasons only one or two. I added a second feeder to alleviate the traffic and it just seems to be growing. They are so much fun to watch.Text and photos by Phillip Oliver, Dirt Therapy
  • Read any good gardening books lately?

    Phillip Oliver
    30 Jul 2014 | 7:55 am
    I usually read gardening books in the winter time. They tend to recharge my enthusiasm during the "down time" from the gardening season and get me excited for the coming spring. This year has been an exception and I have been reading quite a few books lately. For one thing, gardening books seem to be coming back on the scene after a long dull period. Back in the 1990s, the publishing market was over-saturated with books on the subject and it has taken some time to reignite that interest. Since I am a librarian, I keep up with the trade publications (like "Publisher's Weekly" and "Library…
  • More lilies

    Phillip Oliver
    8 Jul 2014 | 6:39 am
    The lilies are spectacular this year (with the exception of those annoying white flies that leave the powdery residue)."Caravan" - 7 feet tall and gorgeous color  "Scheherazade" - another 7 feet tall lily with loads of blooms Tiger LilyText and photos by Phillip Oliver, Dirt Therapy
  • Lily "Stargazer"

    Phillip Oliver
    4 Jul 2014 | 12:01 pm
    "Stargazer" lily - one of the best. This lily always blooms faithfully and it is mostly in shade. I used to grow it in a pot but transplanted it years ago to the ground. It now grows in our little vegetable garden.Text and photos by Phillip Oliver, Dirt Therapy
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    Natural Gardening

  • Pocket meadow and views

    Lisa
    30 Aug 2014 | 7:28 pm
    view through the front door I'm grateful today for the wonderful view out the doors in our small mountain house.pocket meadow- late August 2014We've certainly created the view out the front door, and the back -- well, the forest overstory was there, but it was my gardening companion's hard work that freed the understory from invasives, and created a semblance of a natural forest.view from back deck
  • Sunflowers and morning light

    Lisa
    29 Aug 2014 | 2:59 pm
    I've just started walking along the path near the French Broad River in Biltmore Estate on a regular basis.  It's a magical place, and we've certainly enjoyed visiting the gardens and lagoon paths over the years, with Woody and our previous dogs, too.But the path that extends from Antler Hill Village to the lagoons is a long, relatively new one, and I'd always thought a bit too far to drive simply for a walk, when there are so many wonderful walkable places nearer to our house.It's well worth the extra effort.  And I have time now, too. Time to spend on touching base with myself,…
  • A cleaned up vegetable bed

    Lisa
    25 Aug 2014 | 6:10 pm
    I may just be preparing food for woodchucks, but I was so happy this weekend to get my main vegetable garden bed cleaned up. I'd be too embarrassed to show what it looked like at its worst. But this image is evocative.A last block to be weededNow, I've sown beet, spinach, cress, arugula, turnip, and other greens.  And, I put in transplants of lettuces and radicchio, too.This is a garden that's shady in winter, so it's really just a matter of what might produce in the next couple of months.Transplants have been planted, seeds have been sownI also sowed six large flats with mesclun mix,…
  • Gardening renovation and clean-up

    Lisa
    21 Aug 2014 | 6:15 pm
    Happily, a couple of days of spending quite a bit of time in our weedy and overgrown landscape (left alone all summer) is starting to feel like progress is being made.The main vegetable garden is almost free of its cloak of crabgrass and some sort of amaranth-like weed, my potting bench (which had been almost engulfed by the giant Florida Anise behind it) has been moved forward, with a nicely reordered set of concrete pavers in front.  And the glazed containers have been moved around for sowing some fall greens.Amazing what progressive improvements can do, encouraging the gardener. …
  • Taking my own advice (re gardening)

    Lisa
    19 Aug 2014 | 6:13 pm
    I've found doing landscape consultations both fun and rewarding (interesting, too).What I love to do is help encourage people to consider all of their "needs" in their landscape (they're all SO different), but most importantly, I find, is to encourage them to focus on what kind of gardening they enjoy and what kind of garden welcomes them home.We don't want to come home to containers or perennials that need watering ASAP, that's for sure, or have the same niggling weedy mess in the corner to look at, or the outdated pot collection.  Decluttering and editing in the garden is a process…
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    Outside Clyde

  • The Day Of Arrival

    Christopher C. NC
    30 Aug 2014 | 8:15 pm
    They got here a bit late so they won't see any of this until the morning. It should still be here. With even more open blooms.
  • A Garden In The Wilderness

    Christopher C. NC
    29 Aug 2014 | 7:07 pm
    This will be my last personal garden. It is my intention to stay for the duration. I've made it to higher ground and I am staying put. That means sort of considering my eventual decrepitude and thinking long term. My challenge from the beginning was in creating a garden that fit in, that belonged to the wilderness that it is surrounded by and very much a part of. A manicured suburban
  • At The End Of A Long Day

    Christopher C. NC
    27 Aug 2014 | 7:13 pm
    There was just enough light to get a picture of the tall flower meadow in ever increasing bloom.
  • 9 AM

    Christopher C. NC
    26 Aug 2014 | 6:43 pm
    I'd rather stay home And meditate On the wonders of editing. 7 PM. I went to work of course. An hour or so of gazing and wandering ever so slow twice a day is pretty good. I can sit for a while down on the Great Lawn in the cool of the evening and gaze up. I
  • Seen In A Meadow

    Christopher C. NC
    25 Aug 2014 | 5:15 pm
    Fresh Butterflies And their dark mates. The Great Blue Lobelia And Green Headed Coneflowers White grasses with White Snakeroot And Solomon's Seal
 
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    Growing The Home Garden

  • How to Easily Remove Fall Web Worms from Your Trees Without Chemicals

    30 Aug 2014 | 7:04 am
    Fall web worms appear this time of year but it doesn't have to be a problem. You don't need chemical sprays to remove them, just one simple thing!Check out the video to learn how to remove fall web worms without using any chemical pesticides!Don't forget to follow Growing The Home Garden on Facebook and Google+!Subscribe to read more from The Home Garden Originally written by Dave @ The Home Garden Not to be reproduced or re-blogged without permission. No feed scraping is permitted. All Rights Reserved. Copyright 2007-2011
  • A Few Gardening Tips Before Fall Arrives

    14 Aug 2014 | 6:51 am
    You can feel it in the air can't you? The coolness of an approaching autumn. The each passing day is getting noticeably shorter. We're beginning that transitional period from the hot summer growing season to the fall growing season and that can mean a lot of changes in the garden. The vegetable garden may still be going full speed ahead at the moment but it is time to prepare for the arrival of the fall gardening season. Here are some gardening tips for you to use to prepare for fall gardening:Continue harvesting everything you can from your vegetable garden through the fall. Put away canned…
  • Building a Paving Stone Pathway

    4 Aug 2014 | 6:44 am
    Several years ago I built a patio using paving stones. I intended to complete the patio by adding a sidewalk that would bring the paved surface area all the way around to the garage and driveway. This weekend I finally made major progress on this neglected project. Making a paving stone patio, sidewalk, or pathway is not an easy task. It's not that building a patio is complicated but rather that the stone can be heavy and the work is repetitious with a good deal of digging, bending, and lifting. Excavating a space for the project can be difficult too depending on the soil type but this…
  • Growing for a Farmers Market Part 2

    29 Jul 2014 | 6:03 am
    When growing products for a farmers market you have to keep your eye on what sells. In my last post I mentioned a few of the products that sell well at our local farmers market. Today here are a few more good selling products that you may want to consider selling at your local farmers market!Baked goods and other ready to eat items are very popular at farmers markets. Many people today are looking for gluten free options but often shoppers at farmers markets are more than happy to bring home fresh baked bread for dinner. Our market has a mixture of baked goods including breads, sweets, and…
  • Growing for a Farmers Market

    19 Jul 2014 | 6:43 am
    For 3 years now (it's hard to believe it's been that long!) I've been selling plants at a local farmers market while also helping to manage the market's logistical operations and online presence (Social Media and Webpage). Over that time I've observed quite a few different merchants with a variety of products at a farmers market and what kind of vendors are successful. Many of these products are homegrown items that anyone can grow with a little bit of garden space. Keep in mind though that the best of products will not sell without a little effort!Of all the types of products I've seen the…
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    Sharing Nature's Garden

  • Oh deer...the latest garden challenge...

    Diana
    31 Aug 2014 | 11:40 am
    As if late spring frosts, scorching heat, four summer vacation absences and dought weren't enough.  This morning I can add another garden challenge to my list:  deer.Oh, I know you're thinking - "she's always had deer, this is nothing new."  And you'd be right.  BUT, the plants that were on the buffet last night are plants that have been in the ground since May or June.  And the deer have been through - drinking from the fountain and leaving footprints often.But last night they decided to expand their palate.    This was a lovely hibiscus.  Now…
  • Fall in the garden: In the air and on the ground...

    Diana
    30 Aug 2014 | 7:27 am
    I can't honestly say that fall is in the air.  With temperatures hovering around 100 for the last several weeks, the thought of fall remains a distant longing.But it is coming.Many of the summer-blooming plants are slowing down and taking it easy, done with the hard work of developing flowers.  And waiting in the wings to take their place, the fall bloomers grow stronger with each day. And the trees.  Well, the one tree -- the Burr oak.  A majestic specimen, it decided last week that it was about time for the weather to turn and began dropping its leaves with…
  • Chinese garden is an oasis in the heart of downtown Portland

    Diana
    28 Aug 2014 | 9:26 am
    The second stop on the Portland Garden Bloggers Fling was the city's Chinese garden, located right in the heart of the downtown bustle of Portland.  It encompasses an entire city block.  Entering the garden, you leave behind the bus fumes, honking horns and scads of people click clacking their heels on the way to work. Waiting for the doors to open. I'm not sure if this statue was greeting us or trying to keep us away! Intricate stone work greeted us as we walked into the garden.It takes your breath away.  This pearl nestled among skyscrapers provides a welcome…
  • Children's garden a fantastic wonderland...

    Diana
    18 Aug 2014 | 8:33 pm
    As if tours of Kylee's garden (Our Little Acre) and her mom Louise's garden (Two Girls with a Purpose) weren't enough - I got an added bonus.  After lunch I got to see the amazing Children's Garden that Louise helped design, create and raised the money for it as well.I thought - yeah, yeah, I expected a few raised beds and maybe a birdhouse or two.  Oh my.  Was I in for a treat, and you will be too.With an entrance like this, I knew big surprises lay ahead.Louise and Kylee - ready to lead the tour (with proper rain gear).Welcome - come on in!Just follow the path.Something's not…
  • Colorful foliage for follow up...

    Diana
    16 Aug 2014 | 11:07 am
    I've been too busy traveling and posting about other people's gardens and I haven't been home to photograph my own blooms for Bloom Day. But I do have some photos I took of foliage in my garden last week, so I can contribute to Foliage Follow up, hosted by Pam Penick of Digging. This whale's tongue agave, agave ovatifolia, has taken off in the last year.  It grew very slowly for the first several years I had it but now it's really come into its own. It's flanked by a desert willow, a Texas Mountain laurel and some blooming Jerusalem sage in the distance.My success with euphorbia has…
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    Kiss my Aster!

  • One for the road

    Kiss My Aster!
    25 Aug 2014 | 5:09 pm
  • Working Towards the Wedding

    Kiss My Aster!
    25 Aug 2014 | 9:36 am
    For the first time in weeks, it's quiet around here. The kid is in school and it's too hot to dig, build, mulch, power wash, prune, burn or chop anything down. As my Dad says, "we're polishing a turd over here", but I think it's a lovely and worthy turd.My sister is getting married in THIS TURD!So here I am at my desk, dealing with months' old speaking contracts and changing all my Visa card numbers on all my subscriptions and Amazon because I lost my card someplace in the yard and I don't even have time to look for it.So, about 3 days a week I've been hurling myself at wedding prep,…
  • When the @#$% Hits the Fan: Gardening, Condensed

    Kiss My Aster!
    30 Jul 2014 | 8:15 am
    We have only lived in this house for a little over 2 years. As ambitious as I am about the landscaping, I understand that living someplace for 2 years with a 3 year old, mathematically, is like living here for less than 1 year.I just can't get things done the way I used to, I could crank it out before baby. When we moved in here, I made a 5 year plan and I've been sticking to it. It's a large and wily property. I don't seek to remove all it's wildness, but it was a little neglected for a few years and I seek to reclaim a little order.Well, the 5 year plan has just gone down the…
  • Weeding JACKPOT: Another One Hour Patio!

    Kiss My Aster!
    2 Jul 2014 | 11:54 am
    The Chicago weather has been perfect for weed growth and ice cream. It rains every day. It's so steamy outside that our windows are covered with condensation in the morning. It's New Orleans without the rum and beignets and gumbo and charm.So, I promised myself that once we got a cool day, I'd go out and do some really aggressive weeding. And so I did... but I didn't expect to hit the jackpot.I made a copper teepee here last year but it kept falling over.  This is an area I kept better control of last year, if only because we had less rain. I've been meaning to get out there for…
  • Cluster Luck: A little somethin' in the Earth's darkest kitchen

    Kiss My Aster!
    20 Jun 2014 | 12:26 pm
    A David Austen 'Munstead Wood' rose with a snippet of Borage, Rue and  'Dark Towers' Penstemon in a vintage, thrifted vase covered with sea shells, glitter and whoknowswhatelseDark hole of a kitchen
 
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    Our Little Acre

  • Ames NeverLeak™ Hose Reels: A Review

    Kylee Baumle
    25 Aug 2014 | 8:50 pm
    Since I discovered Ames Tools earlier this year and got to see firsthand how some of them are made and what the company's philosophies are towards their products and their customers, I've become a big fan. I have to tell you when they first contacted me about trying out some of their products, I was hesitant. But I'm very glad I decided to go ahead, because they've become some of my favorite garden tools and products ever.When I visited their headquarters in Camp Hill, Penn., in April, one of the products that caught my attention was a hose reel that was actually attractive (as far as hose…
  • Fuzzy Wuzzy Was a Caterpillar

    Kylee Baumle
    21 Aug 2014 | 10:15 am
    Regardless of what you've been told, the stripes on a woolly bear caterpillar do not predict the severity of an approaching winter, but it may tell you something about the previous winter.  According to Mike Peters, an entomologist at the University of Massachusetts, "There's evidence that the number of brown hairs has to do with the age of the caterpillar—in other words, how late it got going in the spring. The [band] does say something about a heavy winter or an early spring. The only thing is . . . it's telling you about the previous year."¹I've seen a few woolly bear caterpillars…
  • Do Not Disturb! And Other Marital Situations

    Kylee Baumle
    16 Aug 2014 | 10:46 pm
    When you've been married for 39 years like me, you know you'd never make it that long if you didn't learn to practice the art of compromise, right? Some things are worth fussing over and some just aren't.I have been plotting the demise of some old Omaha Steaks styrofoam cooler boxes that have sat behind our pool house for a couple of years now. That entire area is a sore spot around here because it's an embarrassment to anyone who has to look at it.  Mainly me.Oh look! The ASPCA actually advocates using these for guess what? Cats in winter. These boxes were repurposed by my husband for…
  • Ball Celebrates International Can-It-Forward Day + A Giveaway!

    Kylee Baumle
    16 Aug 2014 | 12:50 am
    Last year about this time, I helped Ball and Jarden Home Brands celebrate National Can-It-Forward Day by hosting a giveaway of some of their Limited Edition canning jars. Well, this year the celebration has gone international!  There are all kinds of activities planned to make it a fun day and the giveaway here on my blog is bigger and better than last year!In a special live event today, Saturday, August 16th, renowned chef and Bravo’s Top Chef judge Hugh Acheson will be on hand in Brooklyn Borough Hall Farmers Market, answering questions in real time as canning demos take place on a…
  • Nursery Growers of Lake County, Ohio (NGLCO) Field Day

    Kylee Baumle
    28 Jul 2014 | 8:30 pm
    About this time last summer, I was preparing for one of my various garden-related trips that I take during the year. This particular trip was to a part of northeast Ohio that I've visited a few times before, but it had been awhile and the focus was a little different on previous trips. I'd been invited by Maria Zampini to attend NGLCO's Field Day, held on August 13th at Holden Arboretum.Field Day is a horticultural trade show held each year by the Nursery Growers of Lake County, Ohio, to showcase the numerous businesses concentrated in that part of Ohio.  Lake County is unique in that…
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    The Gardens of Petersonville

  • Wrapping Up Summer

    Sheila
    30 Aug 2014 | 12:01 pm
     If you read my blog for inspiring pictures, you had better stop now and wait for another post! After a busy summer with grandkids and a few weeks on vacation I've returned ready to take inventory and start thinking about what needs to be done in the SJC garden this fall. The list is long as usual. You can see by this picture that the cheap obelisks I had picked up at a big box store years ago have been falling apart for some time now and my garden helper has patiently been trying to save them for the clematis to cling to as best he can. I have already ordered metal ones and they should…
  • Gardening is Hard

    Sheila
    23 Jul 2014 | 10:26 am
    The other day I ran into an acquaintance who asked me if I was still gardening. I was rather caught off guard by her question. I have never thought that I would someday not garden. I'm not saying that it is like eating or breathing, I'm sure that I would still exist if I did not garden, but if given the choice to do it or not, I would always choose to do it, at least in some form or another. My friend had said that she had quit gardening because it was just too hard and time consuming and she had moved to a condo where she didn't have to worry about the yard. Before that she had a beautiful…
  • Summer Fennel Flowers

    Sheila
    20 Jul 2014 | 1:32 pm
    This morning I found lots of things wrong in the gardens to take pictures of that will make good subjects for future posts, but today I'm just going to focus on one thing that is doing really well. My bronze fennel is lovely! I don't like the taste of fennel and don't ever harvest it. I don't really know why I planted it years ago back here when I put a vegetable garden in before I gave up and turned this area back over to the rabbits that rule the domain. Obviously the varmints feel the same way I do about fennel and so it lives on untouched, year after year. It is now about six feet tall…
  • Always Another Aeonium

    Sheila
    18 Jul 2014 | 11:53 am
    There seems to be a distinctive trend around this place that whenever nothing else works, throw in an aeonium. I'm sure I was the one that started this trend by showing my garden helper how easy it was to propagate them by simply breaking off the rosettes and sticking them in the ground. I first tried them planted as a groundcover in the front where the rabbits ate everything I tried and sure enough they left them alone. As they filled in they started to look good and so they became the go-to filler for lots of other spots that nothing else seemed to work. Although they prefer sunny spots and…
  • The Front Lawn

    Sheila
    14 Jul 2014 | 11:50 am
    Because of our drought I do feel a bit of anguish over the front lawn most of the year and it is looking very shabby this summer due to reduced watering, but there are some things that you just need a grassy area for, and playing barefoot baseball with your cousins is one of them. We have our older grandkids stay with us during the summer and whenever they get rambunctious in the house the standing order is "out in the front yard with that!" They spend hours hitting the ball, running bases, planning schemes, collecting treasures, searching for eatables, watching butterflies, making up games,…
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    The Blogging Nurseryman, Trey Pitsenberger

  • Becoming indispensable

    Trey Pitsenberger
    28 Aug 2014 | 9:02 am
    One of the nicest comments to hear from customers is, “we want you to be here for us”. They sometimes preface it with, “we shop here because…we want you to be here for us”. While it may not keep you in … Continue reading →
  • So you want to be a farmer?

    Trey Pitsenberger
    25 Jun 2014 | 8:51 am
    “Roy Skeen is a 32-year-old farmer with a degree in history from Yale University. When he graduated in 2004, he moved to New York to work in investment banking, but he found the work unfulfilling. After a trip to the Caribbean, … Continue reading →
  • What diamonds, gold, and The Carob tree have in common.

    Trey Pitsenberger
    3 Jun 2014 | 9:07 am
    The carob tree is a landscape tree here in California, but in the Mediterranean region it grown as a food crop. Carob is mildly sweet and is used in powdered, chip, or syrup form as an ingredient in cakes and cookies, … Continue reading →
  • Welwitschia, the last of it’s kind

    Trey Pitsenberger
    2 Jun 2014 | 8:24 am
    Found in Namibian desert of Africa, Welwitschia is considered a “living fossil”. It has been around for over 200 million years and while all of the other plants from that time have slowly vanished, it has managed to survive in the empty … Continue reading →
  • A plant that is able to mimic multiple species

    Trey Pitsenberger
    25 Apr 2014 | 8:14 am
    According to Science Magazine, “the woody vine Boquila trifoliolata… transforms its leaves to copy a variety of host trees. Native to Chile and Argentina, B. trifoliolata is the first plant shown to imitate several hosts. It is a rare quality—known … Continue reading →
 
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    Terra Nova Ecological Landscaping blog

  • Help bring back bicycle-powered landscaping DATE HAS CHANGED!

    ken
    16 Aug 2014 | 12:19 pm
    News, special offers and events of interest to our subscribers in a mobile-friendly format. Email not displaying correctly? View it in your browser. Save the new Date Friday, October 17th 2014 6:00 to 9:00 pm Kick-off party for the Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign for the ‘Tread Lightly’ service At the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary Exploration Center 35 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz, CA Apologies for the date change!  We needed more time to prepare an awesome party for the community to help relaunch the ‘Tread Lightly’ service.  The ‘Tread…
  • Terra Nova is Bringing Back Bicycle-Powered Landscaping!

    ken
    5 Aug 2014 | 3:52 pm
     The community is invited to help relaunch Tread Lightly, the pedal-powered landscaping service, with an Indiegogo kickoff party at the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary Exploration Center on Friday October 17th, 2014 6:00 – 9:00 pm. Starting a bicycle-powered landscaping service more than two decades ago, Ken Foster was truly a man ahead of his time. Terra Nova Ecological Landscaping’s “Tread Lightly” service invited the community to think differently about their yards—and more importantly, to act differently. For more than 20 years Terra Nova landscapers…
  • Grey is the New Green! Terra Nova brings 20+ year history with ecological water projects to bear from green landscaping to greywater.

    ken
    18 Feb 2014 | 8:31 am
    Back in 1991 Terra Nova installed it’s first graywater system. The Santa Cruz Sentinel published the article below highlighting Terra Nova’s landscapes to resist cold and drought damage. This article was published before the advent of the internet so no online version is available. As drought visits us again we can recall lessons learned from the past. Time to pull out the stops! Time for graywater, planting drought resistant plants, rainwater catchment, drip systems, rain gardens, bio-swales and plenty of mulch! Another article in the Sentinel from 2004 about being Water Wise.
  • Graywater discount! $50.00 off ‘Laundry to Landscape’ system installed by Terra Nova through the month of March, 2014.

    ken
    31 Jan 2014 | 7:50 am
      News, special offers and events that are of interest to our subscribers, delivered in a mobile-friendly format. Save water and money with a ‘Laundry to Landscape’ graywater system Make your landscape more resilient even with water restrictions Laundry to landscape is exactly what it sounds like, piping the laundry water out to the landscape, using the water twice, once to wash laundry and twice to water your landscape and garden plants. Even though the Governor of California has declared a drought emergency and water restrictions are in place you will still be able to…
  • Terra Nova offers Permaculture Design services.

    ken
    28 Jan 2014 | 5:47 pm
    The owner of Terra Nova, Ken Foster is a certified Permaculture designer and teaches this design science at Cabrillo College in Aptos, California. Ken has been studying Permaculture after first hearing about it while an apprentice at the UCSC Farm and Garden back in 1985. He took his first Permaculture Design Course in 1996 and has since completed two advanced Permaculture courses. Ken has been teaching Permaculture since 2004. He has taught with the Regenerative Design Institute during their ‘Four Seasons Permaculture  Design Course’ and with Larry Santoyo of EarthFlow Design…
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    The Whispering Crane Institute

  • Bloody Ivory

    Rick Anderson
    5 Aug 2014 | 11:50 am
    The real criminals are those “people” in the Asian market who somehow think they “need” ivory , , , the article c&p below Bloody Ivory An unsustainable four elephants are […]
  • Herbs: 10 Favorites for Ohio – Our Ohio

    Rick Anderson
    6 May 2014 | 9:26 am
    Lavender Known as “the queen of herbs,” lavender was Knapke’s research plant for her master’s thesis. She recommends planting this fragrant herb on a slope to encourage good drainage. Her […]
  • Aquascape Goes Wild, Nat Geo Wild

    Rick Anderson
    25 Mar 2014 | 1:15 pm
    “We are extremely excited to be part of the Nat Geo WILD family and look forward to sharing our love for the water feature lifestyle with viewers around the world. […]
  • So You Want to be a Writer?

    Rick Anderson
    19 Jan 2014 | 9:56 am
    so you want to be a writer? by Charles Bukowski if it doesn’t come bursting out of you in spite of everything, don’t do it. unless it comes unasked out […]
  • December 7th, 1941

    Rick Anderson
    7 Dec 2013 | 12:28 pm
    “Reflections on Pearl Harbor” by Admiral Chester Nimitz. Sunday, December 7th, 1941–Admiral Chester Nimitz was attending a concert in Washington D.C. He was paged and told there was a phone […]
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    Skippy's Vegetable Garden

  • so happy about Ecotulips

    kathy
    1 Sep 2014 | 7:33 am
    I got the checkout to work at Ecotulips!! I placed a nice order - its making me think about Spring. I even got a 10% off coupon code to work. Yippee. Their shipping rate for my big order was only $5, pretty good. And I feel good that I am saving the bees and buying tulips grown without chemicals. I think I was probably just too tired last night to type an order form properly.
  • so annoyed

    kathy
    31 Aug 2014 | 9:00 pm
    EcoTulips made the cover of Organic Gardenng Magazine and I loved the article and photos ... BUT then I spent a hour tonight trying to place an order and I can't get the website to work... Can't even find an email to ask for help. Too bad, as the article looked nice, it's time to order tulip bulbs, and I love organic. I'll probably buy locally, but not organic, tomorrow.
  • new winter harvest calendar

    kathy
    31 Aug 2014 | 11:06 am
    To improve on my timing for winter harvest crops, I've added a Winter Planting Calendar to my online planting calendar. I added a link on the sidebar and here too: Winter Planting Calendar. I was reading on the Johnny's Seeds website: Winter harvest crops are planted in late summer or early fall for harvest throughout the winter. ... for harvest before and during the "Persephone Period," when day length is less than 10 hours and plant growth essentially reaches a standstill. You can look up when daylight falls below 10 hours in your town using this site: USNO Duration of Daylight Calculator.
  • making pickles!

    kathy
    30 Aug 2014 | 10:27 am
    I don't have much experience making pickles, but I'm putting up as much as I can this year. I got the Ball Home Preserving Book (edited by Judi Kingry & Lauren Devine). In the past couple weeks I've made: Dilled BeansEnd of the Garden Pickles Grandma's Dill Pickles Not from this book, I've also made:Blue Ribbon Dill PicklesAnnie's SalsaHalf Sour Pickles Deli Style, these were too salty for us and went to the compost My favorite pickle recipe so far: NY Times Sour Pickles, a fantastic, simple deli half sour dill pickle. Yumm! I plan to make a few more recipes from the Ball book: Cucumber…
  • hen pecked pullets

    kathy
    30 Aug 2014 | 10:27 am
    My two new pullets still aren't getting on so well with the big hens. I've had the pullets two weeks now. They've been staying in a dog crate next to my coop. I let all four hens out to forage for several hours on most days. The big hens will tolerate the small ones at about 5 feet away. They also tend to keep them away from food bowls and the coop area once they're out. The pullets like to forage in the woods and they can escape the big hens there and scratch in peace. After one week, I tried putting the pullets in with the big hens overnight. It turned out to be a one night experiment. The…
 
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    Ilona's Garden Journal

  • The Down And Dirty Weeding Tool List

    Ilona Erwin
    9 Aug 2014 | 9:45 am
    The Bare Essentials Some essentials when brand newI've done a lot of tweeting and writing about weeding this season. There are a couple of reasons for that including the unusually wonderful weather (from my perspective, anyway), and my desire to have my yard look like I actually garden, despite many trips to visit the children and grandchildren.The weather: It has been a cool summer with plenty of rain. That means everything stayed in growth mode and I was able to continue working outside. When heat and humidity skyrocket I hide in my airconditioned room ( we have 1) and write. The…
  • Winding Up July

    Ilona Erwin
    31 Jul 2014 | 7:11 pm
    I didn't say "Hot enough for you?" once this month. Not that I am given to using that phrase, anyway, but the weather in Ohio could not have been more beautiful. We had "Polar vortex" in July. Normally I write off this month in terms of garden work. Only mad dogs and Midwesterners work in the heat and humidity, but the so-called "fall temperatures" (the weatherman's terms, not mine) allowed for plenty of garden grooming this year. I called it a bonus of the "rare days of June": with blues skies white puffy clouds, summer zephyrs, jade green grass, and blissful 70's temperatures.Of…
  • What I'm Weeding Out

    Ilona Erwin
    1 Jul 2014 | 8:50 am
    Catching Up With SummerWorking Away At the FrontlineI swore to myself I wouldn't do this, but I miscalculated how much I wanted to spend time with grandkids (even though it meant numerous 9 hr. trips). I am now playing catch up with the garden weeds, long grass, and a veritable jungle out there.So in the spirit of "making lemonade", I thought I would let you know the status of the weeds around here. Maybe you have some of them, too. I'm pretty sure you do.I make piles to gather up after weeding session is done.What are the main weeds of July in my Ohio garden? It will take a list.Poison…
  • Instagram Walk

    Ilona Erwin
    7 Jun 2014 | 2:20 am
    I took a walk in the garden yesterday and shot some photos in the Instagram app. Most of my peonies are on the wane, but caught a pic or two of them along with some old roses. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ // ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Visit Ilona's Garden Journal on facebook: Click here © 2014 written for Ilona's Garden Journal by Ilona E. An excellent blog.
  • June Garden Report

    Ilona Erwin
    4 Jun 2014 | 11:44 am
    More Of  What's Happening In My GardenProof that there is hope for the Sweetgum treeI learned that I can't judge a winter's toll until June, and even then it remains to be seen what a tough summer may inflict on the garden in general and shrubs and trees in particular.Here is what I have observed about my Central Ohio garden so far. > I thought two of the Sweet Gum trees were goners when I checked them last month. I was ready to mourn them and have my husband get out his chainsaw. However, it appears that they had only been grievously delayed by the winter blasts of this past…
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    Bananas.org

  • hello!

    Olivia
    1 Sep 2014 | 8:51 am
    Hi I just registered to this site! Nice to meet you all! :goteam:
  • Hello from Annapolis, MD

    frodo69
    1 Sep 2014 | 6:32 am
    Need some input concerning a cutting from a cold hardy banana I recently planted. It was about 4 ft. tall when I cut it from the main tree. It looked good until the 2nd day when it began to droop. 3rd day and it is still drooping. It is located in an area where it gets sun about 6 to 8 hours a day while the mother plant is in an area where it gets sun for nearly 12 hours. Could that be the reason?
  • Hello from Annapolis, MD

    frodo69
    1 Sep 2014 | 6:29 am
    Need some input concerning cutting from a cold hardy banana I recently planted. It was about 4 ft. tall when I cut from the main tree. It looked good until the 2nd day when it began to droop. 3rd day and it is still drooping. It is located in an area where it gets sun about 6 to 8 hours a day while the mother plant is in an where it gets sun for nearly 12 hours. Could that be the reason?
  • Musa Umq Bir

    boffcheck
    1 Sep 2014 | 3:14 am
    Hey :08: I just watched a docu about a very rare Nana called Umq Bir. Have you ever heared about it? I only know that there will be small Fruits like 10cm length and about 3 to 4 cm in diameter. They taste good. Thats it. Is there anyone with informations about that type? Greetings form Germany (read it with german slang ;)
  • Summer fruit haul!

    bananimal
    31 Aug 2014 | 6:27 am
    Went to visit Dave in Stuart yesterday and took home some of his bounty.
 
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    Ewa in the Garden

  • Urginea maritime Life-Death-Life dance

    31 Aug 2014 | 6:42 am
    The flowering bulbs you can see in the pictures, were dug out and forgotten in the garden. Kept dry in shade for few months. Nobody bothered them. They didn’t ask for anything. But let’s admire Life  stronger than Death. Look at those impressive flowers growing  randomly in different directions, trying to reach the light. They don’t care what we think about them. Just bloom profoundly. When
  • 8 photos of impossible cactus gardening outdoor in temperate climate, Szczecin, Poland

    21 Aug 2014 | 9:46 pm
    In fact I want to share with you the concept of impossible is nothing. We are surrounded with  mystery, wildness and immanence. You may not believe me. 'Cactus gardening outdoor in Poland' - I know. Still remember that recently I was also saying pretty often 'I don’t believe you' – and although that was rather teasing trials, time has shown I shouldn’t have – but who knows in advance? This
  • 17 Excellent Uses of Lavender

    2 Aug 2014 | 11:30 pm
    We are in love with lavender scent and taste. Sweet, floral, with slight citrus undertone. I have decided first to make and then to share with you today the list of lavender uses – try them. Some might be really surprising, like the absolutely delicious apricot lavender confiture. Usually I make more of them and have unique gifts for friends. Gift especially appreciated in winter time.   Don’t
  • 17 Photos of Provençal Garden designed by Ewa Szulc

    8 Jul 2014 | 4:21 am
    Let me present you today the garden I have made in 2012, this is how it looks today. The owners wanted Provençal style for the garden, which complements beautifully the interior. Client is still happy :) Enjoy! If you don’t want to miss my next posts subscribe to Ewa in the Garden by Email and don’t forget to click the confirmation link you
  • Celebrate Nature’s Larder at The Wildlife Garden RHS Hampton Court Palace Flower Show, 8-13 July 2014

    3 Jul 2014 | 5:43 am
    ‘The Jordan Wildlife Garden’ has been created by award winning garden designer, Selina Botham. With a colourful variety of features from edible wild flowers, trees and hedges to oats, fruit and nuts – all of which can be foraged from the countryside – the garden provides a natural 'larder' to share as a shelter for birds, bees and butterflies. Its unveiling celebrates the belief that great
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    The Manic Gardener

  • Leaning Tower of Potatoes

    The Manic Gardener
    8 Aug 2014 | 1:17 pm
    Okay, so when most people say (write, text, etc.) “potato tower,” they’re referring to some variation on that time-honored tower-of-tires method, in which one continues to heap earth or straw around a growing spud, using a mounting stack of tires to hold said earth or straw in place, thus allowing more and more new spuds to form along the original’s ever-lengthening stem. That method is not the subject of this post. It isn’t that I have nothing to say about the tire-tower; I do, oh, I do. In fact, I have a rant building on the near-ubiquitous nature of this method and its variations…
  • Return of the Shaggy Parasols

    The Manic Gardener
    11 Jul 2014 | 10:02 am
    Chlorophyllum rachodes Last year, when I was at first too sick, then too discouraged, to do much in the garden, something magical happened: a second variety of edible mushrooms joined my dependable fairy ring crop, the Marasmius oreadesI wrote about four (four!) years ago in “Back Yard Mushrooms” (July 6, 2014). The Marasmius oreades come up in two places in the yard, each in a wide curve that follows the arch of a tree root, each year that curve a bit wider, a few inches displaced from where it was the year before. They’re a small mushroom, delicate in appearance, in color, in flavor,…
  • Buried in the Garden

    The Manic Gardener
    26 Jun 2014 | 11:07 am
    Well, if this year in the garden doesn’t kill me, it will probably cripple me. I’m trying to come back after multiple surgeries and other medical anomaly (I’m beginning to feel like a medical anomaly myself) and bring the garden(s) back after years of neglect, and oy, but it’s a lot of work. Especially since the whole project (multiple projects, really) seemed so overwhelming that I couldn’t face it (them) and therefore got a late start in an early spring. However, progress is being made. An important point to remember, as I gaze at the mountain of incomplete and unstarted tasks,…
  • Dandelion Pesto

    The Manic Gardener
    25 Jun 2014 | 12:12 pm
    It’s amazing what you can make from the garden, even before it gets going. Yes, I know, pesto is made from basil. (Also pine nuts, butter, parmesan, garlic, and sometimes parsley.) But years ago an Italian friend confided to me that only Americans were so hidebound as to think that it had to be made from those ingredients and nothing else. In Italy, she told me, pesto was made from all sorts of things. At the time, I looked at her askance. She and pesto might both be Italian, and I might pride myself on being openminded, but there were limits. Over time, however, I’ve gradually…
  • The blog breathes again…

    The Manic Gardener
    24 Jun 2014 | 11:43 am
    Gasps, at least. The Manic was hacked and re-hacked; down for almost two years, it’s been only recently revived. There are multiple issues, I know, including a plethora of broken links. I’ll get to them, but it’ll take a while, so I depend on your patience. Thanks!
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    Your Small Kitchen Garden

  • Grow Marjoram! Seriously, Grow It

    Daniel Gasteiger
    6 Aug 2014 | 1:51 pm
    After stopping to photograph a nicely-planted boulevard, I got an invite to the back yard where a small farm was well on its way to harvest. The bushy clump in front of the gas grill (front-left) is the out-of-control marjoram from which I received a rooted stem. On a trip to Ithaca last spring, I happened through a neighborhood in which people tended their boulevards as gardens rather than as barren rectangles of useless grass. I parked and walked so I could take pictures and was capturing a particularly engaging scene when its gardener walked out from behind the house. We became friends and…
  • Pears, Squirrels, and Woodchucks. Rats!

    Daniel Gasteiger
    3 Aug 2014 | 3:31 pm
    Until the end of June, everywhere I looked on my pear tree there were pears… and most were in excellent shape. Things changed in July when a squirrel decided to take charge. What a year for pears! My tree exploded with blossoms after the crazy cold winter and it seems every one of the blossoms produced fruit. I’ve never seen so many pears on the tree in any season. I’ve tried not to get excited; you never know how a season will turn. Any honest gardener should be willing to acknowledge things go wrong; if you haven’t had a crop fail, you’re still a beginner. My pear crop is failing…
  • Cultivate ’14: Horticulture Conference for Industry Geeks

    Daniel Gasteiger
    30 Jul 2014 | 11:04 pm
    The Cultivate Conference draws many plant breeders to show off their latest varieties: petunias, chrysanthemums, coleus, roses, heucheras, gomphrena… there were even new varieties of vegetables and herbs. Tables holding the new introductions filled corridors outside of the main show floor. If I lived farther south, my garden would include gomphrena. Go to a garden or horticulture industry conference! You can learn all kinds of great things by talking to vendors on the show floor—and you can examine their products and marketing literature first-hand! If that’s not enough, most…
  • Daniel and Stacy Built a Wall

    Daniel Gasteiger
    19 Jul 2014 | 11:15 pm
    It has been no secret that my dad moved out of our family home of 50+ years and I’ve spent a very long time emptying the house and getting it ready to rent. It’s a departure from the gardening content this blog’s title promises, but this is my life these days: My wife has accompanied me to Ithaca for a final, crazy push to finish work on my dad’s house. She has cleaned most of the rooms I emptied, we have removed a bunch of recyclables and even more for the trash, and we’ve done some construction & maintenance. The most obvious building project was building a…
  • Wordless Wednesday at Cornell’s Herb Garden

    Daniel Gasteiger
    24 Jun 2014 | 10:02 pm
     
 
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    Dirt Du Jour Daily Blog

  • Playing favorites

    cindymcnatt@gmail.com
    28 Aug 2014 | 9:04 am
    The American Horticultural Society has honored horticultural heroes since 1953 and is looking for your nominations for Great American Gardeners 2015 in 15 categories from landscape design to teaching. Who is your Garden Hero? Someone who teaches kids to garden? Someone who does horticultural therapy? The owners and staff at your favorite nursery or garden business? Nominate the people, companies or organizations who exemplify the art, science, environmental and communications aspects of gardening and who make an impact in their efforts, here. whatever Independent.co.uk —Under 35s rated…
  • Four ways to help plants survive drought

    cindymcnatt@gmail.com
    21 Aug 2014 | 9:49 am
    No doubt that as the drought drags on in the West, plants are suffering, especially if you’re seriously saving water. But don’t splash it around the landscape willy-nilly, use it on the plants that really need it. Here are four ways to save your landscape during drought: Established plants more than four years old can live on less water. A slow drip once a month is all trees and established shrubs need to survive. Mulch like you really mean it. Mulch prevents moisture from evaporating from the soil and keeps root environments cool. Two to three inches works best. Stop watering your lawn.
  • Behold the Stumpery

    cindymcnatt@gmail.com
    20 Aug 2014 | 10:02 am
    Where a Victorian garden aesthetic called Stumpery meets wood-log permaculture called Hugelkultur. The plants benefit from the nutrients released from decaying logs and the gardener benefits from the design aspects. Plus, those tree cuttings are put to use. Here’s another example of Hugelkultur illustrated. whatever New York Times —Sad but true: firefly populations are dwindling
  • Ditch the flowers

    cindymcnatt@gmail.com
    13 Aug 2014 | 4:32 am
    Tired of staring at zinnias? Refresh your garden with leafy combos, and find your inspiration in Fine Foliage (St. Lynn’s Press). Just awarded the Gold Medal for Overall Book by the Garden Writers Association, the book by Northwest garden designers Karen Chapman and Christina Salwitz is a delight. whatever Boston.com—-Cops at the Arnold Arboretum. Charlotte
  • Best blueberry ice cream recipe

    cindymcnatt@gmail.com
    6 Aug 2014 | 1:47 am
    That’s what food pro, Food Gal Carolyn Jung says—so whether you’re in East Coast humidity or West Coast fire danger, scoop up some fresh blueberries and start cooking. Find the ice cream recipe here. After you’ve scraped the last blue traces from your bowl, drop us a comment and let us know what you thought. whatever NBCChicago—-City workers sued for not recognizing native plants. Charlotte  
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    Native Sons - Plant of the Week

  • Agapanthus 'Gold Strike' (Patented)

    Melissa Berard
    29 Aug 2014 | 11:02 am
    Agapanthus ‘Gold Strike’ is a colorfully variegated compact evergreen with clusters of green and gold foliage, one to two feet tall and wide, topped with twenty four inch tall dark stems holding deep blue buds that open to blue and pale blue striped blooms. This plant is a very striking plant in or out of bloom and would be great in a mass planting, a border, as a groundcover, or a specimen container plant. As with other Agapanthus this plant is fairly care free and relatively drought tolerant. Plant in full sun to light shade and irrigate occasionally to regularly for best performance.
  • Trichostema lanatum

    Melissa Berard
    8 Aug 2014 | 9:18 am
    Trichostema lanatum or woolly blue curls is a branching evergreen shrub up to four feet tall and six feet wide, with narrow, 2” long leaves that emit a wonderfully pungent aroma when bruised. Foliage is shiny, dark green on top, white and woolly beneath with leaf edges rolled under. Blue flowers appear in clusters along a stalk and show arching stamens from April to June, longer if spent flowers are removed. Stalks and parts of flowers are covered with blue, pink or white wool giving an appearance of tight curls. Requires full sun, excellent drainage, and little or no irrigation once…
  • Calluna vulgaris 'Kerstin'

    Melissa Berard
    3 Jul 2014 | 2:13 pm
    Calluna vulgaris ‘Kerstin' is a multi-stemmed, dwarf evergreen shrub with a mounded form. It lends an extremely fine and delicate texture to the landscape composition with stems clothed in tiny overlapping grey green leaves and short spikes of mauve flowers in the late summer and autumn. A slow grower, Kerstin Heather will grow to be about 8 inches tall at maturity extending to 12 inches tall with the flowers, with a spread of 18 inches. This shrub should only be grown in full sunlight. It requires an evenly moist well-drained soil for optimal growth, but will die in standing water. It is…
  • The Salvia Heatwave™ Series

    Melissa Berard
    27 Jun 2014 | 1:22 pm
    The showy, sun loving and drought tolerant Salvia Heatwave™ series is perfect for water-wise gardens! A cross of microphylla and greggii varieties, this carefree, shrubby perennial blooms all summer, attracting hummingbirds and butterflies with vibrant colors and aromatic foliage. The compact habit, eighteen to twenty four inches tall and wide, is ideal for containers or in a border where you can appreciate the show. Give them a place in full sun with average to dry soil, while providing adequate winter drainage. ‘Blast’ produces abundant salmon pink flowers with soft white throats,…
  • Gaillardia aristata 'Gallo Fire'

    Melissa Berard
    20 Jun 2014 | 11:08 am
    Blanket flower. Forms a low mound of light green leaves, bearing upright stems of daisy-type flowers. 'Gallo Fire' is a compact selection, growing up to 12" with an 18" spread. Bicolor petals of flame red and gold, surround a rust-coloured button eye from Summer through Fall. 'Gallo Fire’ prefers full sunlight and is a good choice for perennial borders and container plantings. The long flowering season also make it a good choice for attracting bees, butterflies, and birds. Hardy to 0F. 'Gallo Fire' is available this week in one gallon containers.
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    Veggie Gardener: Organic Vegetable Gardening Tips

  • Tips for the Lazy Gardener

    Lauren M
    18 Aug 2014 | 6:18 am
    I’m ashamed to admit that sometimes I play the role of the lazy gardener. When I first started gardening, I pictured myself spending evenings and weekends tending to my garden, creating pristine and perfect plots. But the longer I actually gardened, the more I realized that not only is a perfect garden nearly unattainable, but […]
  • A Guide to Second Season Planting

    Lauren M
    15 Aug 2014 | 11:54 am
    Summer has flown by and it’s time to start thinking about your fall harvest plans. Unlike spring planting, which is dominated by tomatoes and summer squash, late-summer is a great time to focus on root vegetables, lettuces, and herbs. It’s important to note that before you plant your second season vegetables, you should refresh the […]
  • Ten Amazing Summer Tomato Recipes

    Chris
    28 Jul 2014 | 7:07 am
    As we talked about in our last post, it’s tomato season! So, in order to provide you with some inspiration for using your produce, I decided it was time to turn to some of my favorite recipe sites. Here is a list of some of the best ways to incorporate tomatoes into you summer meals. […]
  • Recipe: Homemade Pico de Gallo

    Lauren M
    24 Jul 2014 | 9:17 am
    If you planted tomatoes this season, chances are you’re beginning to see high yields. Though it’s satisfying to see your plants teeming with the juicy, red bulbs, if you are like most gardeners, your joy may have turned to panic when trying to figure out just how to utilize the large harvest of tomatoes that […]
  • Gardening on a Budget

    Lauren M
    15 Jul 2014 | 7:13 am
    Many people get into gardening because they are hoping to save some money. After all, growing your own produce not only saves you a few trips to the grocery store, it’s also a much more cost effective way to have all your favorite vegetables on hand. But, as many new gardeners may discover, creating and […]
 
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    Miss Rumphius' Rules

  • Garden Visits: Princeton

    Susan aka Miss. R
    13 Aug 2014 | 6:35 am
    I visited gardens yesterday in Princeton, New Jersey. The tour was arranged by the New Jersey Landscape and Nursery Association (NJNLA) and featured four very different gardens by designer Bill Kucas. What struck me about these outdoor spaces was that their details is what really made them interesting. In each space the features beyond plants were detailed beautifully, but when I asked about what made the spaces personal, that had been left up to the clients. In each space, with the exception of the one still being built, the choice of furniture and accessories beyond what the landscape…
  • Riding in the Backseat around a Curve

    Susan aka Miss. R
    31 Jul 2014 | 8:55 am
    Miss R has been in the backseat all summer. Pretend you are on a roadtrip and listening to a story on the radio…the pictures will come after we reach our destination. In a twist of weather related events and wonder, my landscape design business and my commitment to being the national President of APLD has taken all of my time, leaving little extra for regular blog posts.  Although I feel a nagging sense of ‘it’s been too long’, I’m happy to have my priorities straight and to be able to see my garden and landscape design work come alive. I always feel that the…
  • Garden Color Inspiration: Green

    Susan aka Miss. R
    25 Jun 2014 | 6:51 am
    It might seem counterintuitive to add more green to a garden, but lately to my landscape designer’s eyes, green looks like it should, fresh and new.  (Go ahead, groan at that word use!) Two years ago, a version of green was the color of the year, but it was largely ignored by outdoor designers–perhaps we think we have the corner on green with our plant palettes. Via Veranda These greens aren’t the citrus based hues that have been screaming at us for several seasons as both accents and plants, but the deeper and more complex matte greens of the forest floor and canopy. via…
  • Travel Inspiration for gardens in The Designer

    Susan aka Miss. R
    16 Jun 2014 | 3:39 am
    The summer issue of The Designer, APLD’s quarterly design magazine is out.  In the editorial is a piece I wrote about my trip to Morocco last winter and how the patterned surfaces found everywhere there have continued to influence my landscape design work. What isn’t included there are some of the detail images of that still come to mind when I start to design a garden or, specifically a planting plan, so I decided to share them here. I take dozens of detail images for future reference where ever I go, but seldom share them. They’re my reference material and often…
  • The Revived Garden Design Magazine

    Susan aka Miss. R
    27 May 2014 | 3:26 am
    Sometimes I almost get what I wish for. When it folded two years ago, I lamented the demise of Garden Design magazine. In that piece, I also made a wish of sorts – If we, as a design discipline and community, want to be taken seriously, then we need to support publications at all levels of the marketplace, not just those that cater to the weekend warriors who relegate us to the DIY sector. Landscape design and landscape architecture are serious, complex disciplines that can inspire within and without.  Well, Garden Design is back in a new version, as a quarterly book-a-zine.  In the…
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    Garden Therapy

  • Mason Jar Recipes: Awesome Food in Jars

    Stephanie
    28 Aug 2014 | 3:34 pm
    Remember way back when I wrote that I was addicted to mason jars? I showed this round up of 20+ Mason Jar Crafts and Gardening in Jars. That was just the first installment of my mason jar posts. If you thought that one had a lot of unique ideas for using mason jars, check out this list of recipes made in jars, none of which is a canning recipe! Pssst: the canning recipes can be found here: Garden Therapy’s Most Amazing Canning Recipes   Recipes in Jars Lemon Pudding Cakes in Jars Portable Caprese Salad in a Mason Jar Recipe Spinach, Blueberry, and Blue Cheese Salad in a Mason Jar!
  • Top 7 Tips for Getting Kids into the Garden

    Guest
    24 Aug 2014 | 4:40 am
    Gardening with children is a very rewarding experience, as long as you can get them out there! Melinda Myers, the author of Can’t Miss Small Space Gardening, joins us today to share her top 7 tips for getting kids out into the garden! Growing Memories Keep kids busy as you improve their health and focus with the help of gardening. Research has shown that kids connected to nature and gardens are more focused, suffer less problems with ADHD and score better on tests. Furthermore, girls who are raised in a landscaped environment are more confident.   Get your kids into the garden by…
  • Beet and Carrot Salad with Red Wine Vinaigrette

    Guest
    21 Aug 2014 | 2:06 pm
    This hearty mason jar lunch is packed full of nutrition recipe comes to us from the author of Mason Jar Salads and More: 50 Layered Lunches to Grab and Go, Julia Mirabella. You may remember that Julia has dropped by before to share her recipe for a Caprese Salad in a Mason jar and a Spinach, Blueberry, and Blue Cheese Salad in a Mason Jar! Check out this post for instructions on layering a mason jar salad. Beet and Carrot Salad Earthy beets, crunchy carrots, salty pistachios, and soft goat cheese? Bring it on! As summer gives way to fall, it’s good to know there are still Mason jar…
  • Pineapple Mint Chutney

    Stephanie
    20 Aug 2014 | 4:07 am
    Do your recipes need a little kick of something new? This refreshing pineapple mint chutney is sure to do the trick! The recipe comes to us from the Best of Bridge Home Preserving recipe book so you know that it’s a good one! Pineapple Mint Chutney (page 178) Pineapple and mint are two flavors that just seem natural together. 6 cups chopped fresh pineapple 1.5 L 11⁄2 cups finely chopped sweet onion 375 mL 1 cup finely chopped red bell pepper 250 mL 2 cloves garlic, minced 2 13⁄4 cups granulated sugar 425 mL 11⁄2 tsp pickling or canning salt 7 mL 1⁄4 tsp hot pepper flakes 1 mL…
  • Garden Twine in a Can

    Stephanie
    17 Aug 2014 | 5:36 am
    Ok, all you jute twine lovers (yes, jute twine has quite the following from gardeners and the crafty crowds): you loved the twine in a jar project but some of you said, “that glass jar would break in my garden!” Well, I still love my mason jar twine dispenser (I have it on my desk right now!) but for those of you who wanted another option, voila! Twine in a can! Certainly this isn’t the most complex project we have ever published here on garden therapy. But does everything have to be challenging? Can’t we just make soup then use the can to store our twine? I say,…
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    Urban Organic Gardener

  • How to Build a Sustainable Grow Tower [VID] – for under $10

    UOG
    29 Aug 2014 | 9:56 am
    “Grow 40 plants in 4 Sq. Ft. Find out how to make an organic, sustainable, cheap, easy, and efficient grow tower. I built this for $6 and will grow 40 plants in 4 square feet. With the power of vermicomposting, this is a self fertilizing, and semi-self watering system. Great for patio gardeners or People tight on space.” MIgardener
  • 5 Ways To Grow Organic Food In Small Spaces For Preppers, Survivalists And Every Day Folks

    UOG
    26 Aug 2014 | 8:38 am
    Just came across this post over at jbbardot.com I think everyone should read.  You can read the full article here.  With the constant onslaught of GMOs, pesticides, and chemicals making their way into the food supply, growing food in your home garden has become less of a hobby and more of a necessity. Many people have now begun to grow a large portion of the fruits and vegetables they consume at home, and an increasing number do so without the luxury of vast amounts of land. Food can be grown in just about anything, and all it takes is a little knowledge and effort. Even if you only have an…
  • Grow Food, Not Lawns [Photo Gallery]

    UOG
    15 Aug 2014 | 9:09 am
    This is a collection of images we’ve found floating around the Urban Organic Gardener facebook page. Hopefully this will give you some motivation to transform your yards into something like this. d   wqwq Grow your own food! Everywhere! Urban Gardening Masterpiece! Photo Credit: crustyroll35
  • How to Store Your Seeds For the Long-Term… in the Freezer?

    UOG
    4 Aug 2014 | 11:37 am
    The strangest posts wind up causing some controversy. It doesn’t make sense to me. When I wrote about why having an emergency seed bank is important, I didn’t quite get the reaction that I’d expect. I received emails, Facebook comments and Tweets saying that I couldn’t be more wrong about storing the seeds and that freezing them was a horrible idea. I’ll admit that I have never frozen seeds before and then used them. It is a recommendation that I’ve seen countless time before. So I did a bit of research and here’s some excerpts from sites: Last year…
  • Make watermelon smoothies, like a boss!

    UOG
    31 Jul 2014 | 7:46 pm
    Here is a simple trick to make you the boss of the picnic. Create a refreshing watermelon smoothie with essentially no mess in 2 minutes.
 
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    Ecosystem Gardening

  • Water Taxi Ecotour

    Carole Sevilla Brown
    14 Aug 2014 | 12:02 pm
    Snowy Egret Marine ecosystem tour with Cape Water Taxi in Indian River Bay, Delaware. Thanks to my dear friends Linda and Donna who invited us to spend a long weekend with them at their home in Lewes, Delaware–a retreat they fondly call the Redneck Riviera. We got to celebrate Linda’s birthday by joining her on The Cape Water Taxi ecotour through Indian River Bay in southern Delaware: Schedule a 90-minute tour with us and find out where the Fiddler Crab got its name, if the Glossy Ibis is really glossy or where the term “crazy as a loon” came from. You will have an opportunity…
  • Late Summer Birds At An Urban Oasis

    Carole Sevilla Brown
    5 Aug 2014 | 7:05 pm
    Birds of late summer at the urban oasis of John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge near the Philadelphia, PA airport 6:30 am alarm clock on a drizzly Sunday morning. Sounds like a great reason to stay in bed, snug as a bug under the covers. But this morning I have a wonderful reason to drag my buns out of bed. It’s time to see what birds can be found on this August morning at my local wildlife refuge near the Philadelphia airport. John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge is a welcome natural respite from the concrete jungle that is the city of Philadelphia, providing habitat for many birds and a…
  • What’s All the Fuss About Neonicotinoids?

    Carole Sevilla Brown
    14 Jul 2014 | 1:49 pm
    Neonicotinoids are systemic pesticides that will kill the very pollinators you’re trying to attract to your wildlife garden. A systemic pesticide is absorbed into all parts of the plant: leaves, flowers, pollen, and nectar which means that any caterpillar feeding on that plant, any butterfly sipping some nectar, or any native bee collecting pollen are often killed simply by visiting plants treated with neonicontinoids. Neonicotinoids affect the central nervous system of insects resulting in paralysis and death, which is surely not your goal if you’re goal is to create a pollinator garden!
  • Growing for Pollinators 10th Annual Garden Symposium, with Carole Sevilla Brown, William Cullina, and Dr. Frank Drummond

    Carole Sevilla Brown
    5 Jun 2014 | 11:39 am
    Growing for Pollinators: 10th Annual Garden Symposium, with Carole Sevilla Brown, William Cullina, and Dr. Frank Drummond at Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens On Friday June 20 I’ll be speaking at the Growing for Pollinators symposium at Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens with William Cullina and Frank Drummond: Maine’s bird and insect pollinators are crucial to the life cycle of most flowering plants – in the wild, in our home gardens, and in agriculture. In Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens’ 10th annual symposium, you’ll discover the intricate interdependencies between flowers and…
  • Kill The Bishops Weed

    Carole Sevilla Brown
    30 May 2014 | 1:13 pm
    Bishop’s Weed swallowing up my front garden The Agony of Bishop’s Weed I’ve been doing battle for 14 years now with an invasive insidious persistent thug called Bishop’s Weed, also known as Goutweed or Snow On The Mountain (Aegopodium podagraria). Every year I swear I’m going to get the Bishop’s Weed all pulled out in early spring, and well before the time that it flowers because Bishop’s Weed, a highly invasive plant can produce a prodigious amount of seeds, and you really don’t want this plant reproducing anywhere near your wildlife garden!
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    The Garden Plot

  • Make the Most of Labor Day with Gardening Tips from Garden Media

    Garden Media Group
    29 Aug 2014 | 6:00 am
    Labor Day marks the end of summer and time to prepare the yard and garden for Old Man Winter. “Spending time outside in your garden this Labor Day weekend while the weather is nice is the perfect time to get a jumpstart on spring,” says Suzi McCoy, president of Garden Media Group, a public relations and marketing firm specializing in the garden industry. Put gardens on the fast track to success this fall with these Labor Day gardening projects from Garden Media Group: Plan Which Flower Bulbs to Plant This Fall One of the most relaxing Labor Day activities is walking around the garden and…
  • It's "Last Call" to Trap Stink Bugs Outdoors

    Garden Media Group
    28 Aug 2014 | 7:00 am
    For an increasing number of homeowners across North America, brown marmorated stink bugs are another sign of the changing seasons. The National Pest Management Association (NPMA) says these smelly pests are likely to be found congregating in attics and hanging on curtains, lampshades, screens and other objects inside homes in the coming months."If you don’t want stink bugs in your house this winter, you need to be proactive now and set up traps in your yard by Labor Day." says Rod Schneidmiller, president of Sterling International Inc.With no effective natural insect enemies in the U.S.,…
  • Enter to Win a Fall Flower Bulb Giveaway this Labor Day

    Garden Media Group
    27 Aug 2014 | 12:19 pm
    When warm summer nights transition to cool autumn ones, it’s the perfect time to plant fall flower bulbs. To celebrate, Longfield Gardens wants to help gardeners grow their gardens with a $100 gift card to its website. Beginning August 25, fans of Longfield Gardens’ flower bulbs can enter the Fall Bulb Gift Card Giveaway for a chance to win a $100 gift card.“A $100 gift card can really go far when you’re talking about flower bulbs,” says Hans Langeveld, co-owner and bulb enthusiast at Longfield Gardens.“Plus, investing a bit more in bulbs is a budget-friendly way to add a sea of…
  • Garden Media Group Catches Rising Star in Jourdan Cole

    Garden Media Group
    26 Aug 2014 | 5:15 am
    Jourdan Cole, a rising star in the world of journalism, has joined Garden Media Group as an assistant account executive. Cole brings a wealth of award-winning writing experience and national recognition to GMG.  Before joining Garden Media, Cole was edited and oversaw the production of 25 monthly community magazines. She managed a team of writers and interfaced with community leaders across the country. While studying at Penn State University, Cole wrote and edited for The Daily Collegian. She received both the national and regional Mark of Excellence Awards for editorial writing by the…
  • Get Creative and Brew Up Something Good

    Garden Media Group
    22 Aug 2014 | 7:00 am
    We've done a lot of talking about super foods and "drinking your garden", two trends detailed in our 2014 Garden Trends Report. Surely you know there's a whole world of ingredients out there just ripe for the picking so to speak. So why aren't you getting out there and experimenting?You've decided you want to break into this growing trend of DIY beverages, but where do you start? What ingredients should you look for and what do you do once you have them? You've heard about foraging for food, but what items are good to pick and which should you avoid? Are you even skilled enough to create…
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    Annie's Gardening Corner

  • Relax Before the Labor

    29 Aug 2014 | 7:38 am
    What are your plans for this Labor Day weekend? Make sure you find a quiet spot to relax before the labor. Relax before the labor - Landscape Design by Bilowz Associates Inc.And if you need a few chores to labor over, you can always check back. Here's this month’sAugust Must Do’s or like always, you can just Enjoy the View. Enjoy this other ocean view - Landscape Design By Bilowz Associates Inc. On this holiday weekend, make time to relax before the labor. Remember, there are always beautiful spaces in nature. Need it instantaneously? Take a peak back at Nature’s Wayand…
  • Enjoy the View

    27 Aug 2014 | 6:26 am
    On this #WordlessWednesday, it’s another angle; a different view. Landscape Design by Bilowz Associates Inc. Compare it to last Friday’s image from our post, ‘Secret of the Sea’.  Although you can detect some of the same components and design elements, it’s another angle; a different view.  A different angle; a different view. As Mary Schmich points out, “Good art is art that allows you to enter it from a variety of angles and to emerge with a variety of views.” The same can be stated about good design. On this #WordlessWednesday, enjoy the view. © Copyright…
  • #DYK + best bean & recipe attached

    26 Aug 2014 | 7:50 am
    Did you know (#DYK) that Garden Design Magazine (@GardenDesignMag) reinvented itself. Taken over by a new publisher, Jim Peterson, the first summer edition just hit our doorstep. At a quick glance, we’re quite impressed. I can’t wait to dig into the articles; plus no advertisers so it’s all straight garden design talk. As Fine Gardening mentioned at last September’s Garden Blogger Conference (@GardenBlogConf), when the original Garden Design Magazine went by the wayside, there was a huge gap in the market. For the design industry, it’s great to see an empty space filling up. Log on…
  • Nature’s Way

    25 Aug 2014 | 7:23 am
    It’s Monday morning #InTheMoment imagery. #InTheMoment Sunflower (Twitter followers already got a sneak peek.)But this is a 'just in case'. If nature did not find its way into your weekend, feel free to sit back and take a glimpse. A contemplative place by the lake.Garden Moments (FYI - Be on the lookout for a bean recipe later this week.)And what's in season? It's U-Pick it time - Peaches! Who doesn't love a fresh Peach? For anyone who missed out  this weekend, it’s a quick glimpse at nature's daily performance of harmony and balance. It makes it easier to breathe in…
  • The Secret of the Sea

    22 Aug 2014 | 6:37 am
    When developing a coastal property, understanding the dynamics of the site is critical to a successful concept and final end result - creating harmony and balance with the sea.  The coastline offers a natural setting and beauty indescribable to most. To describe the indescribable, let’s share Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s poetic outlook from many years ago. “My soul is full of longing for the secret of the sea, and the heart of the great ocean sends a thrilling pulse through me.” Longfellow’s observation touches upon the emotional tug; that indescribable reason properties along…
 
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    Serenity in the Garden

  • A Tuscan Garden - Garden Photo of the Day

    Jan Johnsen
    29 Aug 2014 | 7:13 am
    Federico Forquet Garden  - click here Federico Forquet has spent his long life in the fashion industry and in design of all kinds. Here is his garden in the Tuscan hills in Italy. It is a serene sanctuary.Forquet says that creative fulfillment is a personal quest, not a public endeavor. “If you create an Empire you become an Emperor. But I prefer being a private and happy citizen of the world.”
  • Lazy Days of Summer - Garden Photo of the Day

    Jan Johnsen
    25 Aug 2014 | 11:07 am
    mediterranean-landscape ken lindsteadtKen Lindsteadt, architect, includes this in his page on Houzz... So alluring! wish I was there right now.....
  • Oakhurst Pineapple Lily - Garden Photo of the Day

    Jan Johnsen
    24 Aug 2014 | 6:08 pm
    Pineapple Lily - by Jan JohnsenOakhurst Pineapple Lily (Eucomis 'Oakhurst') has pineapple-like stalks of creamy flowers and strap like foliage. A summer stunner, 20" tall!This deep-purple leafed lily loves sun and has a tropical look. It holds its color when the weather gets extremely hot. This bulbous perennial also exhibits excellent cold hardiness. Looks great in planters, especially with silver foliage. Lasts 21 days as a cut flower!Give it a year after planting before you expect flowers.USDA Zones:6b-9
  • Take a Seat! Stone benches in the Landscape

    Jan Johnsen
    20 Aug 2014 | 9:37 am
    stone bench by Johnsen Landscapes & Pools Stone Bench by Johnsen Landscapes & Pools In August, gardens in my part of the world, are a tangle of foliage, flowers and dense tree canopies.We know we should start cutting back, limbing up or clearing out the overgrowth but what we really want to do is sit in the cool shade and drink a tall glass of iced tea.Antique sandstone Bench from English Garden AntiquesAh, a place to sit in the cool leafy shade! What better contrast to the soft green lushness that surrounds you than a stone seat or bench, immutable, grounded and…
  • The Enchanting 'August Lily' Hosta

    Jan Johnsen
    19 Aug 2014 | 6:13 am
    Hosta plantaginea 'Aphrodite' at The Mount in Lenox, Ma.photo by Jan Johnsen.  The old fashioned 'August Lily' (Hosta plataginea) is a magnificent fragrant, white flowered Hosta that deserves to be rediscovered. Perfect for an evening fragrance garden. It needs sun to bloom.First imported to England from China in 1790, Hosta plantaginea came to the United States a short time later. Since this species is from a more southern clime than other Hostas, it is more heat loving than most. It also blooms later in the year and features a honeysuckle like fragrance!The large…
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    MySecretGarden

  • August Garden and Garden Creatures

    27 Aug 2014 | 9:27 am
    Well, let's start with some creatures. Gardeners are sharing people, and so are their dogs. I know what you think, and some measures have been taken. Now, straight to the garden. Perennial phlox, roses and fuchsia are the brightest flowers in my garden right now. Fuchsia 'Double Otto': But, red and bright pink colors are not
  • Potager. Wordless Wednesday

    20 Aug 2014 | 8:55 am
    ***Copyright 2014 TatyanaS
  • Garden of the Villa del Balbianello (Lake Como, Northern Italy)

    18 Aug 2014 | 6:38 am
     I loved this panoramic terraced garden on Lake Como the moment I saw it.  As a lover of the color green, I appreciated its color minimalism: it doesn't have a palette of vivid bright colors, extravagant plantings  and luscious flowerbeds.  What it has are the dominance of green and the structure, the rhythm created by rows of trees, garden urns and statues.  The garden invokes a feeling of
  • Romneya coulteri. Wordless Wednesday

    6 Aug 2014 | 7:41 am
    ***Copyright 2014 TatyanaS
  • Gardens of Villa Melzi, Northern Italy

    4 Aug 2014 | 7:26 am
    Tree lovers' paradise, this garden in Bellagio  (Northern Italy) was one of my favorites during our last trip to Europe.  If you remember the garden of Villa Carlotta in Mennagio (post Villa Carlotta Garden in Northern Italy), you might recall that there was a rivalry between its owner and the owner of the villa across the lake. Here it is, the place which belonged to Melzi D'Eril. Count
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    Veg Plotting

  • GBMD: Flowers, Cold From the Dew

    VP
    1 Sep 2014 | 12:30 am
    Early morning Cosmos astrosanguineus 'Chocamocha'If you're not reading this on vegplotting.blogspot.com, Blotanical or your own web reader such as Bloglovin' or Feedly, then the website you're using is a blogpost feed scraper. Why not go straight to the source instead? That's vegplotting.blogspot.com
  • Book Review: Out This Week

    VP
    31 Aug 2014 | 3:00 am
    I've been lucky to receive 2 books from Frances Lincoln ahead of their release this week. They cover two completely different subjects; one is a practical volume and the other reviews an aspect of garden history which is often overlooked. Scroll down to the end for a couple of great reader offers.-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Sarah Raven's Cutting Garden Journal is a reworking of her previous book Sarah Raven's Cutting Garden. Inside is a month by month guide to growing cut flowers, with a few pages for the reader to jot…
  • Portland Inspiration: Raindrops on Rhone Street

    VP
    29 Aug 2014 | 12:30 am
    If the embedded video doesn't work, you can view it here (opens in a new window).One of the main reasons I wanted to go to Portland was to find out more about their pioneering rain gardens I'd heard about on Nigel Dunnet's study day a few years ago.I didn't dream I'd actually get to see a rain garden in action. The high 90s weather we had on our visit broke on the final day to give us some much needed respite from the heat. Luckily the thunderstorm delivered itself in 15-30 minute chunks with long pauses in between, so we still had plenty of time to explore the gardens on our itinerary.The…
  • Plant Profile: Echinacea purpurea

    VP
    27 Aug 2014 | 12:30 am
    Gatekeeper butterfly on Echinacea purpurea in my sunny single terrace bedI've been growing Echinacea - aka coneflower - almost as long as I've been at VP Gardens. It replaced the Pyrethrum I grew from seed when it gave up the ghost a couple of years into the garden. I still wanted a dusky, daisy-like flower for that spot and finding Echinacea is loved by bees clinched the deal.As I was on a tight budget, I bought a couple of those basic bare rooted Echinacea found at various stores and garden centres in the spring. This is usually marked up as Echinacea purpurea, though some outlets…
  • Seasonal Recipe: Spicy Chicken and Peanut Soup

    VP
    25 Aug 2014 | 12:30 am
    Last week the weather turned a little cooler so NAH and I had the following conversation:Me: I think I'll make some soup for lunch - I can use up that chicken carcass for starters.NAH: (Pulling a face) Er, not for me please, I like the homemade bread we've been having lately.Me: Why that face?NAH: Well, haven't you noticed I give you most of the carrots when we have it? I'm not that keen. (The soup he's referring to is similar to the turkey leftovers soup I blogged about years ago)Me: (Surprised face) So I've been making this soup for 30 years and it's only now you tell me you don't really…
 
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    GardenDesk

  • Raised Bed Garden Harvesting!

    5 Aug 2014 | 6:08 pm
    We have been eating well from the garden this summer. We've harvested squash, zucchini, cucumbers, peppers, green beans, and now plenty of tomatoes from our new Cedar Raised Bed Garden Kits.Here are a few updated pictures of our raised beds: My version of a three sisters garden - squash, pole beans and tomatoes instead of corn. Here, looking into the sun, you can see both Raised Beds and my half finished water tower.I've already cleaned out the green bean plants in the front and put them in the compost bin. This is where we will plant our fall garden - hopefully lettuce, spinach, more carrots…
  • A Much Needed Update on the New Raised Garden Beds

    11 Jun 2014 | 6:21 pm
    Wow, this spring has flown by and now it's nearly Summer! I can't believe its been so long since I posted here at GardenDesk. I have been busy out in the garden at least, and it's high time to give you the grand tour. First of all, this is our view of the back yard from our deck: See the garden up there between the peach tree on the left and the chicken coop on the right. It actually looks like the garden is connected to the small chicken yard, but it is just past the chicken coop. Here it is a little closer: These are the new raised beds made from the Greenes Cedar Raised Bed Garden Kits…
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    Cultivating Dinner

  • Aronia harvest

    11 Aug 2014 | 2:56 pm
    I am estimating around 23 lbs from our 4 bushes.  I had pruned them back this year thinking we wouldn't get as many.  I was wrong. I will work on making some syrup and jelly.  Whatever I can't get too will be frozen and tossed into smoothies throughout the year.
  • Growing Winecap Mushrooms in the Home Garden

    6 Aug 2014 | 11:15 am
    Winecap Mushroom SporesI have always thought it would be cool to get mushrooms from the backyard.  I bought some winecap mushroom spores from Field and Forest Products and built a box with the salvageable wood from an old garden bed.  I filled it with free municipal woodchips and followed the instructions from the company.  Hopefully I will see some mushrooms in the fall!
  • How to Braid Garlic

    29 Jul 2014 | 9:18 am
    How to Braid GarlicI pulled all my garlic a few weeks ago, because the last few years I have had issues with the cloves starting to separate and not storing well.  I had enough that I wanted to try making a few garlic braids to see if that would also help prolong the storage.I found this nice video tutorial from Gardenerd.com and watched it several times before I got started.First, I sorted my garlic into small and large piles and found some yarn and a piece of garden wire for each braid.I trimmed the roots and brushed off any dirt.I twisted wire around one large and two small…
  • And the winner is...

    22 Jul 2014 | 6:16 am
    Buckbee's 50 Day...I started all my tomatoes the week of March 8 and planted them out the week of May 12.  The first red tomatoes showed up this week which was closer to 70 days from transplant, but easily the earliest tomato in my zone 5 garden.It is a medium sized tomato and has a tart, fresh tomato taste and a thicker skin.Seeds for Buckbee's New 50 Day and lots of others are available at Tomato Fest(affiliate link).
  • Bugs in my Garden

    18 Jul 2014 | 6:22 am
    I have been seeing a lot of different bugs and insects in the garden lately.  A lot of the herbs and Umbelliferae are in bloom bringing lots of flying insects.  I haven't seen too many honeybees this year, but a few have been buzzing around my oregano this week.I noticed a bee that wasn't moving at all on a daylilly and I looked closer...Look closer...Poor bee probably never saw it coming.  The spider is the exact same color as the flower.Add captionThe milkweed is covered with milkweed bugs.  I haven't seen any monarch caterpillars since I took some pictures a few weeks…
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    GrowBlog

  • Curing and Storing Potatoes

    28 Aug 2014 | 4:11 pm
    Potatoes are one of my favorite crops, and each year I grow a selection of different varieties. I do well enough growing great potatoes, but potato storage stumped me for years. The house is too warm and the refrigerator is too cold, plus you're fighting Mother Nature. The natural dormancy period for most potatoes is only two to three months, so storing potatoes through winter involves a bit of botanical trickery.
  • Cordon Fruit Trees: How to Get the Best Harvest From a Small Garden

    22 Aug 2014 | 9:15 am
    The most frequently cited reason for not growing fruit trees is 'I don't have the space'. Well, my green-fingered friends, this excuse no longer passes! Modern dwarfing and semi-dwarfing rootstocks have helped to limit the final size of fruit trees, and when these rootstocks are combined with training the trees as cordons the outcome is an impeccably behaved orchard that packs flavoursome variety into a remarkably tight space.
  • How to Grow Stevia for Sweeter Teas

    15 Aug 2014 | 1:32 pm
  • How to Grow and Harvest Lavender

    8 Aug 2014 | 4:36 am
    Lavender is one of the best-loved herbs in the garden, and for good reason. Not only is it attractive and scented, this versatile plant thrives in some of the toughest of garden conditions.
  • How to Grow Your Own Delicious Cherries

    24 Jul 2014 | 10:44 am
    Of all tree fruits it is the cherry that stands head and shoulders above the rest for sheer juicy indulgence and lip-staining goodness. These tempting teasers fill the mouth with their moreish aroma, an almost addictive experience that's led to many a sugar rush!
 
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    The Enduring Gardener

  • A Walk on the Wildside

    The Enduring Gardener
    28 Aug 2014 | 7:49 am
    Keith Whiley is a remarkable man. I first saw his work at The Garden House in Buckland Monachorum where he began his experiments with reshaping the land to recreate the natural plant habitats that he has observed around the world.  His methods have not been without controversy, partly because they are so labour intensive and partly because his approach is so uncompromising.  So when he had the opportunity to buy and develop his own piece of land ten years ago it was the perfect opportunity for him to stretch his ideas and theories to the limit – without the need to please anyone…
  • Dianella (very) caerulea

    The Enduring Gardener
    21 Aug 2014 | 11:34 pm
    This blue flax lily is useful in a very dry spot at the foot of a wall where it usually remains pretty inconspicuous amongst its showier companions, but this year’s conditions must really suit it because it has produced these fabulous, intensely blue berries. Some sources report that they are edible, but I’m certainly not going to try them!
  • A Good Solution for Mildewy Acanthus

    The Enduring Gardener
    20 Aug 2014 | 5:28 am
    I gave up growing acanthus some years ago because the leaves become so ugly in late summer when mildew takes hold and finishes of the job started by slugs and snails. On my recent visit to Glyndebourne I was very taken with gardener Dawn Aldridge’s in the Exotic Garden – she cuts off all the leaves and transforms the flowering stems into something much more interesting. This treatment also allows the new foliage to come through unimpeded.
  • It’s in the Bag

    The Enduring Gardener
    16 Aug 2014 | 1:44 am
    Thompson & Morgan have been doing some research on growing potatoes in containers and have discovered that the deep bags that have been the standard method in recent years (and in my experience rather unsatisfactory) are far less productive than growing a single potato in an 8 litre bag. The confined quarters seem to stimulate many more tubers and save a lot of unnecessary compost. Their vegetable expert Colin Randall took me to see the trial where the bulging bags reminded me of tiny body builders in too tight t-shirts! He obligingly cut a bag open so that I could see the size of the…
  • Stowasis Sheer Descent

    The Enduring Gardener
    11 Aug 2014 | 11:44 pm
    I’ve somehow never got around to running water to any point in the garden where we could have a proper water feature. In the meantime I make do with several pot ponds, but they are not the same. I do have a fantasy of transforming the lower part of the garden into an Italianate Garden with splashing water and formal planting but with the garage still waiting to be rebuilt and the vegetable garden in need of re-landscaping, it’s still very much a fantasy. In the meantime I might consider something closer to the house that could bring the sound of water to the garden for a more modest sum…
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    Gardening with Cheryl

  • New Bush Cinquefoil – Happy Face Yellow Flowering Potentilla

    Cheryl Jones
    24 Aug 2014 | 6:45 pm
    Plant the Happy Face Potentilla fruticosa for the bright yellow flowers. Adore this bush cinquefoil because it’s so easy to grow and very low maintenance. Happy Face Potentilla is a small compact growing shrub that is deer resistant and also a North America native. Growing only 2 to 3 feet tall, the large yellow flowers during spring to late summer on theHappy Face bush cinquefoil will pop against the darker green […]
  • Yuki Cherry Blossom Deutzia is new small growing flowering shrub

    Cheryl Jones
    17 Aug 2014 | 8:54 am
    The Yuki Cherry Blossom Deutzia is the first Nikko type Deutzia with pink flowers. This small growing flowering shrub can also be used as a deciduous ground cover. Plant your Yuki Cherry Blossom Deutzia where it can easily be appreciated. In fall you will certainly want to witness the colorful foliage as it changes from dark green to amazing purple burgundy shades. […]
  • Fragrant Flowering Shrub | Calycanthus Aphrodite Sweetshrub

    Cheryl Jones
    17 Aug 2014 | 2:57 am
    Calycanthus Aphrodite Sweetshrub will quickly become your favorite flowering shrubs. From mid summer to fall, the Calycanthus Aphrodite will adorn your garden with large red magnolia like flowers. Living up to its name of sweetshrub, this deer resistant shrub will fill the air with sweet apple scented fragrance. The Calycanthus Aphrodite Sweetshrub blooms on old wood, so be sure to prune only for shaping (if needed) after flowering. The […]
  • Vinca Minor Best Value in Ground Cover Plants

    Cheryl Jones
    17 Aug 2014 | 2:17 am
    Vinca Minor ground cover is one of the more versatile and best value in ground cover plants. This fast growing ground cover grows in either sun or shade. The dark green evergreen leaves provide a lovely backdrop for the periwinkle blue blooms in spring. The hardy strong growing Vinca Minor is a good choice groundcover for hillsides, in shaded areas, poor soil, and other […]
  • The OSO Easy Double Red Shrub Roses Now Available

    Cheryl Jones
    30 Jun 2014 | 8:22 pm
    OSO Easy Double Red Shrub Roses grows in full sun planted in moist, well drained soil. Thesmaller growing shrub rose matures in the 36 to 48 inch height and width range. Space approximately 3 feet apart for a magnificent continual blooming low hedge. Oso Easy® Double Red Rosa ‘Meipeporia’ PPAF
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    Urban Gardens

  • A Plug and Play Modern Outbuilding

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    18 Aug 2014 | 2:24 pm
    Sometimes you see a product, structure, or piece of technology that makes you realize you are living in the future you imagined as a child. The Tetra Shed is one of those things. Hailing from the UK, this modular garden outbuilding… Read More...The post A Plug and Play Modern Outbuilding appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Clever Storage Ideas That Include a Kitchen Garden

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    11 Aug 2014 | 2:31 pm
    I am still unpacking my mental treasure trove of the beautiful designs I spied while on the Modenus BlogTour to Italy for Milan Design Week. While the hub of Design Week is Salone del Mobile (or Milan Furniture Fair for … Read More...The post Clever Storage Ideas That Include a Kitchen Garden appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • The Power of Moss: Biophotovoltaic

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    18 Jul 2014 | 11:52 am
    A modern designed table that incorporates the bright green life of moss is as urban-garden-chic as you can get. But wait there’s more. The moss on this table has a job to do—and that job is to generate power. That’s … Read More...The post The Power of Moss: Biophotovoltaic appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Using MRI Brain Scans to Co-Design Everyday Objects

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    5 Jul 2014 | 6:23 pm
    Expanding on the idea of the sharing economy where we crowdsource ideas and designs then crowdfund them into production, Dutch artist Merel Bekking brings high technology into the fold adding another dimension to this human process. Unveiled at FuoriSalone’sVentura Lombrate at Milan’s Salone de … Read More...The post Using MRI Brain Scans to Co-Design Everyday Objects appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Five Overlooked Plants In the Landscape

    Nicole Brait
    2 Jul 2014 | 3:47 pm
    Calochortus venustus, photo by Don M. Davis Some plants are familiar to almost everyone. But then there are those that, no matter how many great characteristics they have or how easy they are to grow, they never quite catch on. Here are five … Read More...The post Five Overlooked Plants In the Landscape appeared first on Urban Gardens.
 
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    Busch Gardens in Virginia Blog

  • A Slow-Motion Recap of the Summer

    Emily Bea
    1 Sep 2014 | 6:57 am
    As we wind down from the summer, we often like to look back and think about some of our memorable experiences. So, in an effort to have you re-experience some of the awesome attractions we have at Busch Gardens, we decided to create a video montage and let you see them in a way you have not seen them before. So how did we do this? Taking a number of the cool attractions we have here, we brought in a Phantom Flex camera and delivered 2,500 frames per second of video goodness. From areas like Highland Stables, Escape from Pompeii, Celtic Fyre, Oktoberfest games, and the high dive at Water…
  • How Not to Be THAT Mom at a Theme Park

    Emily Bea
    29 Aug 2014 | 10:40 am
    One of our Thrill Chasers ambassador bloggers, the hilarious Jenny S. from Holdin’ Holden, has agreed to share her sage advice on how not to be THAT Mom (you know the one) at a theme park.  We’ve all seen her. It’s a lovely day at the theme park, everyone is happy and having an amazing time; in the distance are the happy screams of people on rollercoasters, and there is one mom standing in the middle of a walkway looking like her head is about to launch into outer space while her kids have a full-on stage 5 meltdown. We try to look away, but we just can’t.
  • Ripper Row®: A Terror-tory® Terror-story

    Emily Bea
    26 Aug 2014 | 8:15 am
      It's Terror-Story Tuesday and this week we present for your reading dis-pleasure the disturbing tale of Ripper Row: Tendrils of fog curl lazily around those who walk the dark streets and cling to tattered bits of black parasols, forlorn reminders that the denizens of this forsaken place are in mourning. The wailing keens of those who’ve lost someone dear punctuate the air of a city shrouded in darkness and despair. Shadows lurk everywhere.  Everyone is a stranger and no one can be trusted. The yellowed newspapers plastered on sides of buildings shout the dire news in bold…
  • One Last Hoorah Before Summer Ends

    Emily Bea
    25 Aug 2014 | 12:25 pm
    Behind the scenes at Busch Gardens we are deep in the throes of Howl-O-Scream planning.  To us, summer is already over and all we can think about are pumpkins, demons, and fiends.  But in reality, the summer is not over.  There is still about a week left before the kiddos go back to school and life at your house returns to “normal”.  Why not take this opportunity to head over to Busch Gardens where the ice cream is cold?  There is not much time left before the ghouls and goblins take over our park.  Book a Dine with Elmo and Friends experience before…
  • Which Terror-tory are you most excited to travel through during Howl-O-Scream

    Emily Bea
    25 Aug 2014 | 11:31 am
    Demon Street Wendigo Woods Ripper Row Ports of Skull Vampire Point
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    Fence Fanatics

  • Hello world!

    Ryan
    9 Aug 2014 | 3:24 pm
    Welcome to WordPress. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, then start blogging!
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    A Charlotte Garden

  • Hungry Writing Spiders

    Daricia McKnight
    27 Aug 2014 | 12:09 pm
    Writing spiders (Argiope aurantia) seem to be active in everyone's gardens right now. Are you finding them in yours? I've seen several posts identifying or otherwise mentioning them on Facebook.There was a time when I would have killed spiders like these if they got in the house, but now I just catch and relocate them.It's amazing, isn't it, how observing and becoming familiar with the wild creatures around you makes you more compassionate toward them. It's one of the great benefits of having a garden.*
  • Clematis at Joy Creek

    Daricia McKnight
    15 Aug 2014 | 5:31 pm
    A Garden Blogger's Fling* is a fast and furious affair, with lots of new people to meet, things to do, places to see—everything is fun and exciting and lovely…and over in the blink of an eye!Since some of us might have a little bit of jet lag to deal with, or motion sickness, or some worries from home that came along, or maybe simply a touch of introvert's overwhelm (IO), we tend to lag behind the crowd, at least for a while. **The wonderful thing about a Fling is that there is Fabulous to spare, so even if you're slow coming up to speed, thanks to wonderful hosts and superb planning***,…
  • Away we go!!!

    Daricia McKnight
    9 Jul 2014 | 12:10 pm
    Well hello readers, old and new! I wanted to drop by to say hello quickly before leaving for the airport to join the other garden bloggers "flinging" in Portland, Oregon. I've been terrible in the past about getting up pictures from these whirlwind trips, so this time I'm going to try tweeting them as I'm seeing them. Follow me on Twitter (@aCLTgarden) and see the beautiful PNW gardens as I do!I hear thunder just now which is normally welcome when it's so dry outside, but since I'm about to board a plane, not so much! Prayers and good thoughts for an event-free flight appreciated! See you on…
  • Intense Cherry

    Daricia McKnight
    4 Apr 2014 | 6:41 am
    April cherry blossoms in Charlotte, NCA little too saturated, huh? It's just hard to get the petal edges to show up, and I wanted to keep the photo as bright as possible, so this is the way I decided to go with it. Sometimes the feeling you get from a plant is better represented with these tweaks added than from the photo straight out of the camera. Especially my camera. ;)Happy Friday!~ Daricia
  • Beautiful Bulbs

    Daricia McKnight
    27 Mar 2014 | 4:58 pm
    During some of the coldest, most miserable days of winter this year, I had this little bulb garden to keep an eye on, and all these beautiful blooms to look forward to.Living Gardens sent it to me with instructions to water it and keep it in a cool room. I had just the place, I thought, and put it on my enclosed porch. The temperatures there are always above freezing, but sometimes not much—it took weeks longer to bloom than had been indicated.Maybe 45 degrees was a little cooler room than they had in mind, but it has helped the blooms last a long time and kept the heavy scent of the…
 
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    Lead up the Garden Path

  • August EOM View.

    Pauline
    31 Aug 2014 | 4:42 am
    Looking back over last month’s EOM view, there has been a subtle change in the way the garden looks, it is a much softer light which makes everything appear more mellow with hints of yellow to be seen everywhere, summer is slipping away. I have taken my usual wander round the garden but there don’t seem to be any highlights this month. I will have to go searching for some for you, I just hope I can find some! The Bee and butterfly border is still flowering, but only just. At the back of the border, wild Evening Primrose is allowed to seed around. The seeds are left on because I…
  • Is Summer slipping away? GBFD August.

    Pauline
    22 Aug 2014 | 8:01 am
    Even though we don’t want to think about it, the evidence is there for all to see. The fresh green colours of spring and summer are gradually being overtaken by a few colours of autumn. This is a white peony which I really must plant soon, it has been in a pot for far too long. Roses are still putting out new growth, but with other leaves taking on a red tinge, it makes them look autumnal. The leaves on Viburnum plicatum Lanarth are starting to colour up. Viburnum plicatum Maresii are not far behind, these will end up all purple in a few weeks. This fern looks autumnal but is the…
  • Butterflies flutter by.

    Pauline
    18 Aug 2014 | 12:27 am
    At the risk of boring you,  the butterflies only flutter by after they have had a pit stop at the nectar bar in the front garden. The nectar bar I’m referring to is Eupatorium purpureum atropurpureum given to me by a friend as it grew too big for her garden,  thank you Jill ! Right from it’s first year here it has been a magnet for bees and butterflies. Each year now it puts up more stems topped off with the huge pink flowers, at least 10 inches across, far larger than the ordinary Joe Pye Weed,  opening from deep pink buds. When I got out of the car the other day, I stood…
  • Summer is slipping away. GBBD August.

    Pauline
    15 Aug 2014 | 8:18 am
    There are too many signs of autumn, I feel that summer is slipping away fast. With all the heat that we had over the summer, the flowers are over almost before they have opened up. Thank goodness the temperatures are now lower and that we have been having lots of rain, which the garden certainly needed. Starting in the front by the bee and butterfly border, the butterflies are busy every day on the Eupatorium purpureum atropurpureum, this grows to about 8ft tall and at least 6ft wide and is a magnet for the bees and butterflies. Still in the front, the Agapanthus have been visited by lots of…
  • Beans, Butterflies and Bertha update!

    Pauline
    11 Aug 2014 | 3:30 am
    I thought it was too good to be true. I thought we had escaped any damage as the remains of hurricane Bertha passed through, but on going up to the fruit and veggie garden this morning, we found that the runner beans had been toppled. Thank goodness the fence was in the way to stop them going any further. I have to admit, it was rather top heavy, so many beans were being produced, but I would have thought they were protected by the fences, the wind must have circled round doing its damage. We have loads of beans in the freezer already, so its not too disastrous.After having a good look at the…
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    Garden Walk Garden Talk

  • Open Gardens a Treat for the Public

    Donna Brok
    29 Aug 2014 | 4:00 pm
    What does that mean to you? Here in Western New York it pretty much means a summer-long string of gardens open to the public, where gardeners invite in the public on designated days to view their private gardens. Many times … Continue reading →
  • Garden Bloggers Fling – Toronto – What Will Be Blooming? Let’s See.

    Donna Brok
    26 Aug 2014 | 4:00 pm
    I wish I knew the answer to that question. Living here in Niagara Falls, NY, it is 80 miles driving and about 1 hour and 26 minutes to Toronto. They are North and a slight bit West of us around … Continue reading →
  • Bees on Blooms – Garden Thoughts at the End of August

    Donna Brok
    24 Aug 2014 | 4:00 pm
    You might think these images belong on my other blog, Nature and Wildlife Pics, but I assure you, there are many bees there. There is a few important points I want to make in this post on gardening, which I … Continue reading →
  • What Makes Garden Walk Buffalo Gardens So Successful?

    Donna Brok
    22 Aug 2014 | 4:00 am
    Pull up a comfy seat, relax and as a designer, I will tell you. It is not the design per say, but rather the love that goes into each garden creation. It is trial and error and decades of experience. … Continue reading →
  • Reflective Gardening – Mirroring a View

    Donna Brok
    19 Aug 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Reflection in the garden, mirrors - a power packed post of garden color along with reflective spaces using water in the landscape. Continue reading →
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    Gardenerd

  • Field Trip: Little Farm in Encino, CA

    Christy
    26 Aug 2014 | 7:15 am
    We’re about to take you on a journey to a magical place; a place where tropical and rare fruits grow in abundance, where grapevines climb arbors, where goats, chickens, rabbits and birds live in comfort, all in the middle of … Continue reading →The post Field Trip: Little Farm in Encino, CA appeared first on Gardenerd.
  • Harvesting Sage

    Christy
    20 Aug 2014 | 11:30 pm
    I have a confession to make. I’ve never really been able to keep culinary sage alive, even though it’s a perennial. Therefore I’ve had very little experience with harvesting sage, aside from picking individual leaves, because it usually dies in … Continue reading →The post Harvesting Sage appeared first on Gardenerd.
  • Recipe: Zucchini Quinoa Lasagna

    Christy
    19 Aug 2014 | 9:05 am
    This week, we continue our efforts to provide interesting meal ideas with the abundance of zucchini coming in from the garden. Are you sick of it yet? Hopefully not, because this zucchini quinoa lasagna (technically lasagne, because we’re using more … Continue reading →The post Recipe: Zucchini Quinoa Lasagna appeared first on Gardenerd.
  • Ask Gardenerd: Tree Roots in my Garden

    Christy
    12 Aug 2014 | 11:19 pm
    A great question came in this week to Ask Gardenerd: “It’s Yvette from Mar Vista!!! I have a BURNING QUESTION!!! We have a big big rainbow eucalyptus tree in our front yard that is causing big, big problems with our … Continue reading →The post Ask Gardenerd: Tree Roots in my Garden appeared first on Gardenerd.
  • An Entirely Flattering Open Letter To Steve Martin

    Christy
    12 Aug 2014 | 9:20 am
    (Fellow gardenerd, forgive my use of this platform to express what appears to be unrelated subject matter, but it’s something I have to do. We will return to our regularly scheduled programming shortly.) An Entirely Flattering Open Letter to Steve … Continue reading →The post An Entirely Flattering Open Letter To Steve Martin appeared first on Gardenerd.
 
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    Perennial Meadows

  • Perennials Prevent Weeds

    Michael
    30 Aug 2014 | 9:50 am
    Late Summer Sensations In the Perennial Meadow Garden Although I have had to neglect my trial gardens on the edge of Amsterdam this year following a decision to move house and all that involved, it is surprising just how well they have grown and how little work it has been to keep them looking good. The key to successful perennial planting is not only choosing the right plants but planting enough of them. My borders were planted densely in the first instance as these gardens are where I trial the plants I write about and design with, but as the borders mature the planting densities become…
  • Maintaining Perennial Meadow Plantings

    Michael
    28 Aug 2014 | 12:39 am
    My trial gardens on the edge of the city of Amsterdam have taken a back seat in my life this year following the decision to move house. After months of viewing properties, packing and unpacking boxes of possessions and endless trips to furniture showrooms it is finally time to return to gardening and assess how well, or not, things have faired. Gardening this summer has taken on more the form of a series of kamikaze raids than the leisurely pursuit that the hobby magazines would have us believe in. Visits to the gardens have involved a dash around with the watering can followed by frenzied…
  • Grasses – the current state of play

    Michael
    30 May 2014 | 1:55 am
    The introduction of ornamental grasses into planting plans was one of the most significant changes to occur within garden design in the past twenty years. Through their inclusion amidst an evolving planting pallet of perennials, contemporary gardens took on a naturalistic feel, far removed from the stiff block plantings of traditional herbaceous borders; grasses introduced an informal air with strong associations with wild nature. The distinctive characteristics that set grasses apart from the other plants that we grow in our gardens results in them having a powerful influence wherever they…
  • Chelsea Show Gardens – teach us nothing

    Michael
    25 May 2014 | 1:38 am
    I have just finished watching the BBC’s daily reports on the Chelsea Flower Show 2014 and I must say that the new presenter, Monty Don, has significantly improved the standard of debate and analysis of the various plants and gardens featured. The one interview he conducted with Thomas Heatherwick really struck home with me when they discussed the need to curate the show garden exhibits. The point Thomas Heatherwick made was that individually they had merit but together they offered no message or theme. I have visited the Chelsea Flower Show on and off for more than thirty years and can…
  • Colours Gather Strength in the Perennial Meadows Garden

    Michael
    13 May 2014 | 3:32 am
    In my previous post I celebrate the colour green; now others are challenging its supremacy. Here and there shrubs now rise above my perennial meadows bringing exciting new forms and contrasts to the looser plant material that surrounds them. Complementary plants form part of my perennial meadow planting schemes and are there to serve an number of important functions; one of these is Geranium tuberosum which covers the ground in early spring with low, finely divided foliage and then a few weeks later adds a wash of blue to the borders. It vanishes shortly after flowering, but by then it has…
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    Beautiful Wildlife Garden

  • In the Garden: Cloudy with a Chance of Confusion

    Loret T. Setters
    29 Aug 2014 | 12:48 pm
    I met a new butterfly this week.  This particular butterfly is one of the skippers. Skippers are in the Superfamily Hesperioidea, as opposed to say, Swallowtails or Milkweed Butterflies that are in the Papilionoidea Superfamily encompassing Butterflies (excluding skippers). Skippers are a diverse bunch and often hard to identify. This skipper was rather large, dull […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Native Plants Beyond the Garden

    Ellen Honeycutt
    28 Aug 2014 | 5:00 am
    I love having native plants in my garden. Every moment that I can do so finds me slipping into the garden to find a beautiful flower, a hummingbird sipping on cardinal flower (Lobelia cardinalis), an insect collecting food or collecting prey, and to listen to the sweet song of birds. As much as I love […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • When a Tree Falls in the Schoolyard

    Stacey Evers
    25 Aug 2014 | 5:00 am
    We had only one shade tree at our suburban DC elementary school, a 50ish-year-old pin oak, and it was cut down over the summer without notice. After the shock and swearing wore off, I started thinking about how we could use what remained. Almost anything can be turned into a lesson, including a prominently placed […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • The Worms Crawl In but Do They Swim?

    Loret T. Setters
    22 Aug 2014 | 7:37 am
    This week I noticed that there was some webbing on a Baldcypress tree I planted a while back. At some point my property was likely home to many of these trees as is evident by decaying knees I see when the pond level gets low.  These majestic trees require wet conditions during part of the year […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Native Shrubs for Small Gardens

    Karyl Seppala
    19 Aug 2014 | 4:53 am
    For those with small wildlife gardens, gardening with native plants has always been a challenge. Natives tend to be not just large size but absolutely huge. Fortunately the nursery industry is responding to the growing demand for wildlife friendly native plants for the small space garden. Plant breeders have come out with some outstanding dwarf […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
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    Vegetable Gardener - All featured posts

  • Garden Bounty: Late Summer Garden Happenings

    30 Aug 2014 | 7:20 pm
    Posted by cookinwithherbs What's going on in your garden? As the harvest season is peaking and some of our summer vegetable and herb plants are winding down, it is time for preserving, tidying up and getting ready to plant a few fall crops.
  • Catalog Review: Pepper Joe's

    30 Aug 2014 | 11:50 am
    Posted by yourownvictorygarden Pepper Joe's offers a great variety of pepper seeds, including the Guinness Book of World Records' hottest pepper variety, the Carolina Reaper.
  • Summer Corn & Avocado Salsa

    28 Aug 2014 | 5:46 pm
    Posted by ChrisMcLaughlin I'm a freak for all kinds of salsas. I've got to share with you one such refreshing recipe that my bestie and me came up with this summer.
  • Garden Fresh Ratatouille

    28 Aug 2014 | 5:28 pm
    Posted by ChrisMcLaughlin Our own spin on Ratatouille is the perfect compliment for your garden bounty!
  • Corn

    27 Aug 2014 | 1:51 pm
    Posted by cookinwithherbs When I think of favorite summer produce--tomatoes, corn and peaches top my list. I eat tomatoes and peaches every single day--and corn almost daily. Though we enjoy them most now--it is time to preserve some for this winter. Recently my local farmer called and said the corn is ready, so I grabbed my knife and freezer zip-lock bags and headed over to shuck and jive...
 
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    Miss Rumphius' Rules

  • Garden Visits: Princeton

    Susan aka Miss. R
    13 Aug 2014 | 6:35 am
    I visited gardens yesterday in Princeton, New Jersey. The tour was arranged by the New Jersey Landscape and Nursery Association (NJNLA) and featured four very different gardens by designer Bill Kucas. What struck me about these outdoor spaces was that their details is what really made them interesting. In each space the features beyond plants were detailed beautifully, but when I asked about what made the spaces personal, that had been left up to the clients. In each space, with the exception of the one still being built, the choice of furniture and accessories beyond what the landscape…
  • Riding in the Backseat around a Curve

    Susan aka Miss. R
    31 Jul 2014 | 8:55 am
    Miss R has been in the backseat all summer. Pretend you are on a roadtrip and listening to a story on the radio…the pictures will come after we reach our destination. In a twist of weather related events and wonder, my landscape design business and my commitment to being the national President of APLD has taken all of my time, leaving little extra for regular blog posts.  Although I feel a nagging sense of ‘it’s been too long’, I’m happy to have my priorities straight and to be able to see my garden and landscape design work come alive. I always feel that the…
  • Garden Color Inspiration: Green

    Susan aka Miss. R
    25 Jun 2014 | 6:51 am
    It might seem counterintuitive to add more green to a garden, but lately to my landscape designer’s eyes, green looks like it should, fresh and new.  (Go ahead, groan at that word use!) Two years ago, a version of green was the color of the year, but it was largely ignored by outdoor designers–perhaps we think we have the corner on green with our plant palettes. Via Veranda These greens aren’t the citrus based hues that have been screaming at us for several seasons as both accents and plants, but the deeper and more complex matte greens of the forest floor and canopy. via…
  • Travel Inspiration for gardens in The Designer

    Susan aka Miss. R
    16 Jun 2014 | 3:39 am
    The summer issue of The Designer, APLD’s quarterly design magazine is out.  In the editorial is a piece I wrote about my trip to Morocco last winter and how the patterned surfaces found everywhere there have continued to influence my landscape design work. What isn’t included there are some of the detail images of that still come to mind when I start to design a garden or, specifically a planting plan, so I decided to share them here. I take dozens of detail images for future reference where ever I go, but seldom share them. They’re my reference material and often…
  • The Revived Garden Design Magazine

    Susan aka Miss. R
    27 May 2014 | 3:26 am
    Sometimes I almost get what I wish for. When it folded two years ago, I lamented the demise of Garden Design magazine. In that piece, I also made a wish of sorts – If we, as a design discipline and community, want to be taken seriously, then we need to support publications at all levels of the marketplace, not just those that cater to the weekend warriors who relegate us to the DIY sector. Landscape design and landscape architecture are serious, complex disciplines that can inspire within and without.  Well, Garden Design is back in a new version, as a quarterly book-a-zine.  In the…
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    Native Plants and Wildlife Gardens

  • I Want a Front Yard Meadow

    Mark Turner
    1 Sep 2014 | 6:00 am
    There’s an area on our new property that’s been nagging at me since we moved in. It had standing water periodically last winter, is baked by the afternoon sun in the summer, will be seen by everyone driving by, and leads up to my new portrait photography studio. From April through July it was trashed […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Patience and Native Restoration

    Steven Paulsen
    25 Aug 2014 | 5:00 am
    Stream Restoration on Silver Creek, Idaho Instant rebates, iPhones, weight loss programs, and drive-through weddings are all part of the American experience. These and many more instantly gratifying measures are now part of the American way of life and the American expectation. Everywhere one looks you can find almost anything you need in the timeline […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • NYC’s High Line Park: a community restoration

    Ginny Stibolt
    23 Aug 2014 | 3:38 am
    NYC’s High Line Park is maintained by a non-profit, Friends of the High Line,” which hires the gardeners and organizes the many activities. After a long wait… I’d been wanting to visit the High Line Park in Manhattan (a public park built on an abandoned elevated train platform) since I first heard about it back […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Native Plantings in Public Spaces: Beautiful and Functional

    Heather Holm
    20 Aug 2014 | 7:12 am
    Last night I attended an organized native plant landscape tour by the local Wild Ones chapter. The tour included three different public sites: a prairie maintained by local volunteers, a business and municipality. We often tour residences to see how individual homeowners are using native plants in their landscapes so this was especially interesting to see that public […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Deadly Beauty

    Jennifer Baker
    16 Aug 2014 | 5:00 am
    I’ve been checking in daily with the ambush bugs that live in the yellow coneflowers that line my driveway, as  they both fascinate and creep me out…kinda like watching reruns of The Twilight Zone. I can see why they inspired the creation of a comic book character that aspires to be both villain and superhero. I watch […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
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    Big Blog Of Gardening

  • The Greatest Multi-Purpose Garden Tool? A Machete.

    Todd Heft
    23 Aug 2014 | 9:05 am
    Big Blog Of Gardening Nothing is better for relieving tension after a long, difficult day than an hour with a machete. You might do spinning classes, pedal a bike 10 miles, or run a 5K, but I work out with my trusty machete. Raising the machete far overhead, feeling the pull in my shoulder, back, and arm muscles, I bring the machete down at full velocity, it’s sharp blade smashing into and laying waste … Continue reading → The Greatest Multi-Purpose Garden Tool? A Machete.
  • Brewing Compost Tea Benefits Your Garden and Lawn

    Todd Heft
    3 Aug 2014 | 5:55 pm
    Big Blog Of Gardening Compost tea is a perfect lawn and garden feed for those who want a liquid supplement for their plants and soil. Includes easy to make recipe. Continue reading → Brewing Compost Tea Benefits Your Garden and Lawn
  • Garden Pond Plants: Which are Best?

    Guest Author
    15 Jul 2014 | 8:02 am
    Big Blog Of Gardening How to choose the right aquatic flora to not only enhance the look of your garden pond, but its bio-functionality too! Continue reading → Garden Pond Plants: Which are Best?
  • My Favorite Garden Herbs and How To Grow Them

    Dr. Leonard Perry
    7 Jul 2014 | 10:34 am
    Big Blog Of Gardening The best and most useful herbs to grow in your garden, from Dr. Leonard Perry, University of Vermont. Continue reading → My Favorite Garden Herbs and How To Grow Them
 
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    Nigel Gnome grows a vegetable

  • Change is underway

    Nigel Gnome
    18 Aug 2014 | 1:25 am
    There is a nice gentle confirmation of the coming summer in the garden now. Small buds are forming on the fortune plum tree, the sulking lettuces have come to life as have all the onions and leeks. Still picking lots of tender stem broccoli and the normal broccoli is ready for picking as well.Broccoli headsThe vege beds have all had some more lime applied as well as lots of compost and a good sprinkling of sheep pellets. Stand clear!Garden overviewFortune plum flower budsWe have a dwarf nectarine tree to grace the front part of the flower/vegetable garden, hopefully it lives up to it's name…
  • July, it's all upward and onward from here

    Nigel Gnome
    3 Jul 2014 | 10:49 pm
    The shortest day has been and gone, I always feel happier knowing that the days will start to grow longer and soon things will be popping and bursting all over the place! :)The tender stem broccoli plants have been producing very well, once the main head is removed the side shoots need almost daily harvesting.Main head still smallishThe side shoots after an earlier decapitation.Each and every garlic clove has sprouted and are growing well, I'll wait till September/October before adding a good layer of sheep pellets to give them a strong growth burst for…
  • Jumping into June!

    Nigel Gnome
    7 Jun 2014 | 11:17 pm
    That went fast, one minute May, next minute June. Still surprisingly mild, so far only one frost. Tenderstem broccoli are forming small middles, the plants look nice and sturdy.I had prepared a bed for the garlic last weekend with compost and granular Thrive fertilizer. I laid a pattern of sticks to space the cloves just nicely, 45 nice fat ones (bought from Mitre 10) in all. Trellis bits marking out the planting gaps, cloves happily in bed :)There are beautiful lemons on the tree, and it also has flowersLemon flower after rain
  • Gently moving toward winter

    Nigel Gnome
    7 May 2014 | 3:19 am
    Nice late autumn changes in the forest pansy tree and a sudden dearth of cabbage white butterflies seem to be making winter's coming real. Have committed to a Valencia orange tree in the front lawn to provide privacy as well as something useful. Started having a small fire a few nights ago and from now it will become a daily ritual. Nice.Have planted 36 odd red onion seedlings and a handfull of coriander, the beans have been flowering really well and beetroots/broccoli/leeks are growing strongly, all good before the cold really comes. The theory is that it's s'posed to be a mild warm winter,…
  • Marching to an end

    Nigel Gnome
    29 Mar 2014 | 10:40 pm
    Yes another month gone and another summer also passing. The tomato plants are gone and the big bean climbing frame too. I poked a hole through the water mains again, so this time we had the plumber put in a tap at the repair point. And to make sure I never poke another hole again I have made a small path extension to cover it over.New garden pathA very good tree person came to remove the rest of the poor Titoki tree in the front yard, still not used to the amount of extra sky we see now. There's a great pile of very good firewood to be sorted though. There is now room for serious…
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    Flowerona

  • Flowerona Links: With corsages, teepees & a demo…

    Rona
    30 Aug 2014 | 4:01 pm
    I hope you’re having a lovely weekend. Here are this week’s floral links for you to enjoy and be inspired by. General Great interview with Studio Choo via Floret 11 Influential florists you should know Beautiful floral headdresses in this post via Bouquets & Blooms Fabulous burgundy bouquet created by Tulipina Floral Design DIY silk flower corsages New trend…teepees, adorned with floral garlands 10 Beautiful flower projects via Design Sponge Wonderful garden inspired floral designs by Vo Floral Design Weddings A perfectly chic London wedding with florals by Wild…
  • Flowerona Tips: Upload photos with your tweets on Twitter to increase engagement

    Rona
    29 Aug 2014 | 4:15 am
    How often do you upload a photo to your tweets when you’re on Twitter?  It’s very easy to do. You just click on the camera icon when you’re typing, as shown below, and select a photo from your computer. When you see the photo in your Twitter feed, there will be a preview of the image: And when you click on the photo, it’ll open up in full as seen below: Many commenters on social media feel that adding images to your tweets increases engagement and in particular the number of retweets, which I’ve definitely found. So, why not try it out and see for yourself?
  • Flowers@Oxford : Bridal Bouquet Demo by Claire Cowling – Part 1

    Rona
    28 Aug 2014 | 4:01 pm
    Last Friday, I went to Flowers@Oxford, an international floral extravaganza organised by Judith Blacklock and Lieven Hemschoote. And today, I thought I’d share with you my first post from the event…a bridal bouquet demo by Claire Cowling from Thrive Floristry. It took place in the British Flowers Wedding Marquee and Claire used a selection of beautiful flowers supplied by The Garden Gate in Suffolk. In advance, she had prepared a bouquet, which included dahlias, scabious, Verbena bonariensis, senecio and rosemary, which you can see immediately below. Then she showed us how to…
  • A visit to the wonderful gardens at Glyndebourne

    Rona
    27 Aug 2014 | 4:01 pm
    Earlier this month, I was delighted to be invited to a Garden Bloggers Event at Glyndebourne in East Sussex. Garden Adviser John Hoyland, together with gardeners Kevin, Steve and Dawn gave us a guided tour of the beautiful gardens, which surround the opera house. Then, we were fortunate enough to watch a dress rehearsal of Rinaldo. (Pictured below left to right: Steve, Kevin, Dawn & John) Yes…there is an opera house there. I’m not sure where I’d got the idea into my head, but I’d always thought the opera actually took place outside! Here’s a picture I took…
  • Wedding Wednesday: Wonderful floral headpieces by Amy Swann

    Rona
    26 Aug 2014 | 4:01 pm
    You may remember earlier in the year I featured an interview with very talented cake designer, Amy Swann? Well, Amy contacted me this month to let me know that, as well as making stunning wedding cakes, she now has a new range of floral headpieces called Bandeau d’Amour by Amy Swann. Amy says: “The idea for my new range of floral headpieces and garlands evolved very organically out of my love for sculpting flowers for my cakes. I wanted to experiment with another medium that would result in the same effect, but would be everlasting as a way of expanding the business.I use my…
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    Sprinkler Juice

  • Don't Dig Up the Sprinkler System

    25 Aug 2014 | 12:13 pm
    If you are planning on doing some landscaping, either this fall or next spring, there is plenty to think about. Here’s one good tip: Avoid digging up the lawn sprinkler system. This might sound... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Fall is Planting Time

    18 Aug 2014 | 1:04 pm
    Summer is the time to enjoy fun in the sun. Fall is the time for planting. Why fall? Many of you might think spring is the best time to plant. That’s not entirely untrue. There are plenty of things... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • A Sprinkler Audit

    12 Aug 2014 | 8:41 am
    August is here and lawns will be feeling the summer heat for at least one more month. Now is as good a time as any to perform your own irrigation audit on your lawn sprinkler system. One good place... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • No Brown Lawn Fines

    6 Aug 2014 | 6:24 am
    Used to be if you lived in California and let your lawn dry out and get brown, you could have been looking at a fine. That’s no longer the case. California governor Jerry Brown is now ok with... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Curbing Fast Grass

    28 Jul 2014 | 10:28 am
    Is your grass growing too fast? It’s not a silly question (well, not usually). Grass that grows too fast can be difficult, but not impossible, to maintain. First thing first: If your grass does seem... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
 
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    Your Easy Garden

  • Great Plants Up Close

    Elizabeth DeFriest
    29 Aug 2014 | 11:41 am
    Maybe we’re getting too caught up with landscaping and we’ve forgotten to look at the plants? Which wouldn’t be surprising given there’s so much on TV, in magazines and online: all offering fantastic ideas ready for us to put into place in our own gardens. Of course this is fantastic – anything that helps people enjoy their gardens more is fantastic – but maybe we’re thinking so much about the paving, fencing, the water features, fire pits and furniture that we’ve forgotten about the living component. So I’d like to do my bit to remind us all of how connected plants make us…
  • Hens at Home

    Elizabeth DeFriest
    19 Aug 2014 | 7:18 am
    When people discover that I keep chickens, they are seriously surprised. The reaction I get is almost as if I’d announced I could ride a broomstick. (I can’t.) Of course the real reason is partly that it’s a resurrection of home arts; a rediscovering simple food production technology. But it could also be because I keep hens in a tiny inner urban garden and get enough eggs to make the family regularly complain, “Not omelets again?” If you’re interested, here’s how I do it. It’s incredibly simple and it’s a super fabulous fit in any garden because chook poo is a brilliant…
  • Choosing the Right Plant for the Right Conditions, including Drought!

    Phillip Townshend
    11 Aug 2014 | 12:15 pm
    Drought tolerant gardens don’t have to be boring! Photo is from Lambley Nursery and Gardens in Victoria, Australia; photo via Gardenista.com As I travelled through much of the USA this summer (in fact I have logged about 3,000 miles with my colleague Justin visiting growers, retailers and gardens), one of the key topics that has been in the news is the drought conditions which much of California and Texas are experiencing. I have blogged previously on gardening in drought conditions and speak from experience in coming from a country like Australia where cyclical droughts are the norm. I…
  • Favorite Gardening Quotes

    Your Easy Garden Team
    3 Aug 2014 | 10:45 am
    A few of our readers have submitted some of their favorite gardening quotes and sayings, so we thought it would be nice to share them. Enjoy and if you have a favorite quote, please send it along!              
  • Five Hot Ways to Firescape Your Landscape

    judieyeg
    3 Aug 2014 | 5:00 am
      With wildfires and record-high temperatures the cause of so much damage, we went to the experts for tips on how to beat the heat in the garden and help prevent wildfires. This trend is also known as “firescaping.”  The fire-safe garden can be a rich and colorful landscape, offering year-round interest and beauty while doubling as an important tool in the fight against wildfires. This lovely Colorado garden is filled with fire-safe plants and still boasts plenty of color. 1. Remove Fire Hazards While it may seem like a no-brainer, it’s important to continually check for and…
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    The Mini Garden Guru - Your Miniature Garden Source

  • Miniature Gardening News From Around the World

    Janit Calvo
    27 Aug 2014 | 4:45 pm
    Miniature Gardening News From Around the World Geez, I take a week-off from blogging and miniature gardening goes on a world tour. Lol! Just in case you missed what’s been happening in the ever-growing world of The Little Hobby That Could, it’s making some serious headway throughout the world. Here is your update! But First, Clarification for […]
  • Tried, Trusted and True: Miniature Garden Accessories, Part 1

    Janit Calvo
    14 Aug 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Trusted, Tried and True: Miniature Garden Accessories, Part 1 I’m a tree-hugger. With just about everything I do, see, hear or read, I try to think about the environment and impact our decisions make upon the earth. Yea, sometimes that makes me the rain on the parade but if “it” is permanent landfill after it […]
  • Get Ready Now for the Great Annual Miniature Garden Contest!

    Janit Calvo
    8 Aug 2014 | 1:13 pm
    Get Ready Now for the Great Annual Miniature Garden Contest! We’re moving the contest!! Come one, come all and prepare for the great annual miniature garden contest! We are rearranging things this year and we’re moving the contest to next February. Holding the contest during the busy Holidays was just too confusing and chaotic for everyone […]
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    Garden Landscaping Ideas

  • Small Backyard Landscaping Ideas On A Budget

    admin
    17 Aug 2014 | 9:05 am
    Many families have been found to spend most of their time in either front or backyards, while at home. Yards should then be well designed and decorated to offer a conducive and friendly spaces for kids and their parents. Although landscaping design and implementation might require a lot of funds allocation, a simple small backyard landscaping ideas can be applied to achieve the desired aesthetic value of the yards. There are a number of simple landscaping ideas for backyard that if put in use while designing backyard improvement, they can help home owners save on their budgets and at the…
  • Top 10 Unique Container Gardening Ideas

    admin
    8 May 2014 | 7:11 am
    Top 10 Unique Container Gardening Ideas Container gardening is a brilliant way when talking about front or backyard gardening aspecially if in a small space. Back to the basic container gardening can be defined as the practice of growing plants in containers instead of in the ground.Lets enjoy those brilliant and unique container gardening Ideas below: The post Top 10 Unique Container Gardening Ideas appeared first on Garden Landscaping Ideas.
  • Modern Landscape Design Ideas

    admin
    11 Feb 2014 | 6:35 am
    modern landscape design ideas pictures collection. Download modern landscape design ideas Pictures  | Designs ideas about Pre-Designed modern landscape design ideas pictures | modern landscape design ideas pictures 2014. Browse our gallery for more modern landscape design ideas pictures. modern landscape design ideas pictures Uploaded by Garden Landscaping Ideas  on Tuesday, February 11th, 2014. Here 6 awesome pictures of Modern Landscape Design Ideas. See another Cool Pictures Of Modern Landscape Design Ideas articles or browse pictures about Modern Landscape Design Ideas for more…
  • Japanese Container Gardening Ideas

    admin
    20 Jan 2014 | 7:11 am
    Do you love Japanese design but don’t have the space? Why not try growing them in containers! Japanese Container Gardening is becoming more popular as garden space gets smaller and smaller. The Japanese container gardening help make outdoor features more attractive and useful especially in limited space. The post Japanese Container Gardening Ideas appeared first on Garden Landscaping Ideas.
  • Garden Retaining Wall Design Ideas

    admin
    19 Jan 2014 | 7:09 am
    If you are looking for retaining wall ideas? Check out these designs of different types of retaining walls, to enhance your garden.Let get started on yours with our these retaining wall design ideas.There are various types of retaining walls for you to choose.   The post Garden Retaining Wall Design Ideas appeared first on Garden Landscaping Ideas.
 
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    Sow and So

  • V is for Venation – Word Up!

    Bridget Elahcene
    29 Aug 2014 | 8:32 am
    Venation \vɪˈneɪʃ(ə)n\ A botanical term used to describe the arrangement of veins within a leaf.
  • Rain on Curly Kale – Wordless Wednesday

    Laila Noort
    27 Aug 2014 | 3:15 am
  • Farewell Rosa Rugosa… Hello Daphne Odora

    Bridget Elahcene
    25 Aug 2014 | 9:04 am
    Just when we thought we had finally finished garden design at the Villas, I had a change of heart about Zone 2 (previously known as the Secret Garden). Zone by Zone So, a little bit of background information to set the scene… When we moved to the Villas seven years ago we were faced with 400 square metres of amenity land which we proceeded to landscape zone by zone, year by year. Zone 1, nearest the house, consists of the sunken garden and the wall supporting the trained fig and peach trees; Zone 2 the Secret Garden with the Poplar tremula in the middle; Zone 3 with the fruit cage,…
  • U is for Union – Word Up!

    Bridget Elahcene
    21 Aug 2014 | 11:05 pm
    Union \’juːnjən\ This refers to the join on a grafted plant where the ‘stock’ and ‘scion’ have bonded together. “Geißfußveredelung“. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.5 via Wikimedia Commons.
  • Sunflower Competition 2014 WINNER!

    Laila Noort
    20 Aug 2014 | 10:49 pm
    The sunflowers have all grown to their highest peak so it is time to announce this year”s winner of the Sowandso Sunflower competition 2014. The Perfect Spot We all started out enthusiastically enough. I was sure that I had found the perfect spot, on the south west side of the house. But then I started sowing rather late. I planted out very small seedlings while I was getting reports of others who already had decent plants going. The spot I had chosen was a bit out of my regular way and the sunflowers were sometimes forgotten during watering. To cut a long story short, I am not even…
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    The Hortiholic

  • "High" on 'Drangeas

    Tony Fulmer
    29 Aug 2014 | 9:21 pm
    Hydrangea macrophylla 'Endless Summer'If plant popularity is directly proportional to the number of new varieties debuting annually, Hydrangeas are HOT, HOT, HOT. Exciting new varieties are popping up like mushrooms after a summer rain.Why all the Hydrangea excitement?Something-for-everyone range of flower forms including mophead (softball), panicle (cone-shaped) and lacecap (flat-topped donut with a lacy, open center). Flowers not only last a long time, but many develop interesting seed heads for winter interest.Sun or partial shade tolerance. If you're putting them in sun in hot summer…
  • Garden Training for Excess Raining

    Tony Fulmer
    17 Jul 2014 | 10:42 am
    I thought I had a handle on just how wet the summer has been. My rain gauge (that measures 100ths of an inch, I'm proud to say) recorded 9.30" for June. I just spoke with a fellow horticulturist who was telling me that she was pruning and found gangs of slugs hiding in yew branches four feet off the ground. We've revealed a new definition of saturation point: So wet that even slugs seek higher ground!Short of dragging water-soaked containers under overhangs or setting up umbrellas over drought-tolerant perennials, there's only so much a person can do to stem the flood waters. Here are a…
  • Japanese (Maple) Spoken Here

    Tony Fulmer
    8 May 2014 | 5:33 am
    'Koto-No-Ito'. 'Osakazuki'. 'Asahi zuru'. 'Beni maiko'. 'Shishigashira'. 'Oridono nishiki'. 'Seiryu'. 'Inaba shidare'. These Japanese maple (Acer palmatum) names are, of course, beautiful in their own right. The beauty of the trees exceeds even the elegance of their names.Feel the thickness of a Japanese maple leaf, especially a cutleaf (dissectum) type, and it doesn't take much imagination to understand how they might sunburn or get wind-tattered if planted in the wrong place. For that reason I'm especially happy when someone says they want a Japanese maple and have an east-facing exposure.
  • Winter, Bunnies & Ice - Not So Nice

    Tony Fulmer
    15 Apr 2014 | 5:53 pm
    I wish I had never ended the last post with, "Here's hoping the spring thaw brings you a garden unfazed by winter weather." Talk about a jinx- geez! If your garden escaped without burned evergreens, a moldy lawn, broken branches, shrubs girdled by rabbits, roses that appear dead... Well, run and get a lottery ticket, 'cause you're one of the lucky ones.Let's not dwell on how our plants got in this fix. We know how it happened. Let's get to solutions. There are some symptoms that we can be proactive about. Other damage is going to require patience and a wait-and-see-what-happens…
  • What to Know about Plants and Snow

    Tony Fulmer
    20 Jan 2014 | 10:08 am
    Recent snowfall and record-shattering temperatures are impossible to ignore. Can you imagine being a plant out in those conditions 24/7 with your roots in wet, frozen ground, snow knee high, and the rest of your "body" exposed to brutal winds? It certainly goes beyond my definition of chilling.What's a plant to do? There is good news. Snow is an incredible insulator. So, things like perennials and shrubs that are buried under snow are really safer than tender stems that are above the snowline exposed to the full force of below-zero temperatures and wind. Further, plants recognize real air…
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    guzmansgreenhouse.com Blog

  • Yuccas Agave and Bear Grass for Southwest Landscaping

    Gary Guzman
    24 Aug 2014 | 6:41 am
    Yuccas, Agave, and Bear Grass: Southwest Landscaping Here are a few drought tolerant plants that can be used just about anywhere the sun shines. They can be used as mass plantings, single specimen, and some in containers. First we start … Continue reading → The post Yuccas Agave and Bear Grass for Southwest Landscaping appeared first on guzmansgreenhouse.com Blog.
  • Ornamental Grasses for the Southwest

    Paul Guzman
    30 Jul 2014 | 5:16 am
    Photo by PublicDomainPictures Depending on where you live many ornamental grasses for the southwest will go dormant during the winter (Herbaceous). You can cut them down low to the ground, and they will vigorously grow back during spring. These grasses are … Continue reading → The post Ornamental Grasses for the Southwest appeared first on guzmansgreenhouse.com Blog.
  • The Mexican Bird of Paradise Plant

    Paul Guzman
    12 Jul 2014 | 12:19 pm
      Photo by wallygrom  The Mexican Bird of Paradise Plant (Caesalpinia Mexicana).  Has a yellow flower and is considered a large shrub.  Its actually pretty easy to make it grow as a small tree.  So it would be perfect for a … Continue reading → The post The Mexican Bird of Paradise Plant appeared first on guzmansgreenhouse.com Blog.
  • The Yellow Bird of Paradise Plant

    Paul Guzman
    12 Jul 2014 | 12:11 pm
      The Yellow Bird of Paradise (caespalpinia gilliesii) is very drought tolerant, hardy plant for the southwest.  It has large yellow flowers and striking long red stamens.  Its great for rock, or xeriscaping gardens.  It will grow to about 5 maybe … Continue reading → The post The Yellow Bird of Paradise Plant appeared first on guzmansgreenhouse.com Blog.
  • Red Bird of Paradise for Bright Orange blooms

    Paul Guzman
    12 Jul 2014 | 9:02 am
    Red Bird of Paradise The Red bird of paradise (Caesalpinia mexicana) also called the Mexican red bird of paradise is a beautiful bright orange flowering plant that thrives in hot warm climates.  It’s fern like small sized foliage resembles a Mesquite … Continue reading → The post Red Bird of Paradise for Bright Orange blooms appeared first on guzmansgreenhouse.com Blog.
 
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    Chicken Waterer

  • A Chicken's Labor Day

    ChickenWaterer
    31 Aug 2014 | 7:50 am
    BriteTap chicken waterer. Clean water made simple! Visit us at ChickenWaterer.com.
  • Make the Perfect Perch For Your Chickens

    ChickenWaterer
    31 Aug 2014 | 6:23 am
    Sitting PrettyPerches provide a secure place for your chickens to rest at night and they have the added benefit of keeping chickens off the floor where they can be soiled by droppings.Mabel, my feet are killing me!Most books on coop design tell poultry owners to provide at least 10 inches of perch space for each bird in the flock. However, books generally don't specify the diameter or the shape of the perch. This isn't too surprising because there hasn't been any research done on the subject until very recently.  In 2011, a group of poultry researchers in Germany conducted a series of…
  • Rhode Island Red Chicken History & Breed Profile

    ChickenWaterer
    24 Aug 2014 | 8:37 am
    "Practical, Prolific, Profitable" that's how the Rhode Island Red (RIR) was described in the 1890's by Isaac Champlin Wilbour, an important early promoter of the breed. Wilbour's description of the breed is as true today as it was back then; RIR's are wonderful dual purpose chickens that lays 200-300 large brown eggs per year.History of the Rhode Island RedThe chicken that we are familiar with today resulted from a series of breeding experiments begun by William Tripp in 1854. Tripp was a sea captain and made routine visits to the coastal town of New Bedford, Rhode Island. Captain…
  • California Girls

    ChickenWaterer
    24 Aug 2014 | 8:36 am
    BriteTap chicken waterer. Clean water made simple! Visit us at ChickenWaterer.com.
  • Bacon Lettuce Tomato Sandwich Recipe

    ChickenWaterer
    28 Jul 2014 | 9:23 pm
    Cook will tell you that the secret to making delicious food is to use the best and freshest ingredients you can get.  A BLT is no exception to this general rule.  Our family converts a typical bacon lettuce and tomato sandwich to the "Ultimate BLT" by kicking the ingredients up a notch. Now you can too...Tomatoes - Let's be candid, most tomatoes from the supermarket are hard and tasteless; they don't add much to a BLT.  But if you use a homegrown tomato, you have an entirely different experience because the sweet of the tomato compliments and balances the salty-fatty…
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    The Foodie Gardener™

  • Recycled Wood Tree Box As Raised Vegetable Planter

    Shirley Bovshow
    12 Aug 2014 | 10:18 am
    Here’s a clever idea using recycled wood landscape tree boxes as raised vegetable planters. I was on a garden tour in Mar Vista California  when I stumbled across designer, Mary Lee Kuhlman’s practical idea.   Keep an eye open for landscaping projects in your neighborhood where tree boxes are found in abundance.   Some landscape companies will give them to you for free or at a nominal price if you ask. Chances are, the landscape company  has to haul the boxes back to the garden center for a small credit or to their office, where they are piling up.   Great For…
  • Grow Hot Peppers: Spiciness Rated by Scoville Heat Chart

    Shirley Bovshow
    7 Aug 2014 | 1:05 pm
    I’m growing peppers at the Home & Family show vegetable garden now that warm temperatures during the day and cooler nights are trending in Los Angeles. Peppers, both sweet and hot ones  can put up a fuss and drop fruit, or not set fruit at all, if the climate is not right. They are temperamental like that. If peppers weren’t so delicious, I wouldn’t put up with their fussiness!       I introduced co-hosts, Mark Steines and Cristine Ferrare  to the Scoville Pepper Heat Chart that rates  spiciness or “hotness” in peppers. As heads of the…
  • Video: How To Grow Vegetables on Your Patio

    Shirley Bovshow
    1 Aug 2014 | 2:06 pm
    Watch my garden segment from Home & Family show on how to grow food in any small space. You can grow lots of food in your patio, balcony or porch!   Visit FoodieGardener.com to learn how to grow food with style!
  • Foodie Gardener Design Tip: Strawberry Planters

    Shirley Bovshow
    6 Jul 2014 | 10:41 am
    Do you crave clean, modern design as much as you crave sweet, mouth-watering strawberries in the summer?     Plant your June-bearing strawberries in a  creamy white container that’s at least 18″inches in diameter. Place the strawberries around the perimeter of your white container and plant flowers or some basil in the middle! Beautiful, edible design.   Want more ideas? See my “vertical strawberry post!”  
  • Crab-Hatch Chile Jalapeño Poppers Recipe

    Shirley Bovshow
    4 Jul 2014 | 3:56 pm
    How are your peppers growing this summer? Mine have had a difficult time taking off and I’m not happy about it, especially when I see recipes like this one!   Do you have some  home-grown jalapenos for this recipe?   Crab-Hatch Chile Jalapeño Poppers   This delicious, “Crab-Hatch Chile Jalapeño Poppers” recipe is from my friends at  Melissa’s World Produce and is featured in their book,  “The Great Pepper Cookbook.”   Carefully pick through crabmeat to clean it, gently feeling for any bits of shell with fingertips to avoid…
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    Urban Gardens

  • A Plug and Play Modern Outbuilding

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    18 Aug 2014 | 2:24 pm
    Sometimes you see a product, structure, or piece of technology that makes you realize you are living in the future you imagined as a child. The Tetra Shed is one of those things. Hailing from the UK, this modular garden outbuilding… Read More...The post A Plug and Play Modern Outbuilding appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Clever Storage Ideas That Include a Kitchen Garden

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    11 Aug 2014 | 2:31 pm
    I am still unpacking my mental treasure trove of the beautiful designs I spied while on the Modenus BlogTour to Italy for Milan Design Week. While the hub of Design Week is Salone del Mobile (or Milan Furniture Fair for … Read More...The post Clever Storage Ideas That Include a Kitchen Garden appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • The Power of Moss: Biophotovoltaic

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    18 Jul 2014 | 11:52 am
    A modern designed table that incorporates the bright green life of moss is as urban-garden-chic as you can get. But wait there’s more. The moss on this table has a job to do—and that job is to generate power. That’s … Read More...The post The Power of Moss: Biophotovoltaic appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Using MRI Brain Scans to Co-Design Everyday Objects

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    5 Jul 2014 | 6:23 pm
    Expanding on the idea of the sharing economy where we crowdsource ideas and designs then crowdfund them into production, Dutch artist Merel Bekking brings high technology into the fold adding another dimension to this human process. Unveiled at FuoriSalone’sVentura Lombrate at Milan’s Salone de … Read More...The post Using MRI Brain Scans to Co-Design Everyday Objects appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Five Overlooked Plants In the Landscape

    Nicole Brait
    2 Jul 2014 | 3:47 pm
    Calochortus venustus, photo by Don M. Davis Some plants are familiar to almost everyone. But then there are those that, no matter how many great characteristics they have or how easy they are to grow, they never quite catch on. Here are five … Read More...The post Five Overlooked Plants In the Landscape appeared first on Urban Gardens.
 
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    Epic Gardening

  • 8 Vegetables You Can Regrow Over and Over Again

    Kevin
    11 Aug 2014 | 6:27 pm
    The post 8 Vegetables You Can Regrow Over and Over Again is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog. The popularity of the post on 16 invasive species that are sold at most garden centers prompted me to do some digging and find more cool facts about plants that most of us (including me) don’t know!  Most of us have grown at least one of the veggies on this list, but I’d venture a guess that you didn’t know that you could regrow these eight veggies endlessly.  Talk about sustainable. One of…
  • Back To The Roots Mushroom Kit Review

    Kevin
    10 Aug 2014 | 6:00 pm
    The post Back To The Roots Mushroom Kit Review is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog. It’s Shroom Time, Baby! No, not that type of shroom.  Oyster mushrooms!  A lot of gardeners haven’t ever delved into the wonderful world of mushroom farming, and it’s a shame…because it’s a lot of fun! I’ve found that mushrooms are a “love it or hate it” type of food – and I’m squarely in the love it camp.  They’re absolutely delicious in omelettes,…
  • 16 Invasive Species Sold at Garden Centers You Should Never Buy

    Kevin
    28 Jul 2014 | 6:44 pm
    The post 16 Invasive Species Sold at Garden Centers You Should Never Buy is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog. Most of us gardeners assume that the people that run our local garden center are knowledgeable and know exactly what they're selling - and for the most part, that's true.  But what happens when some of the most commonly sold plants also happen to be some of the most invasive?Due to the globalization of our society, it's become very easy to get plants from different areas of the world, grow…
  • Square Foot Gardening Giveaway

    Kevin
    21 Jan 2014 | 3:07 pm
    The post Square Foot Gardening Giveaway is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog. If you’re a gardener and you’ve never heard of Square Foot Gardening…you’re missing out!  I can say with full confidence that Square Foot Gardening was the REASON I got into gardening in the first place.  It’s one of the best ways to get into gardening for beginners…but a lot of advanced and master gardeners also grow using the system year after year. It’s one of the simplest and…
  • Bluelab pH Pen Review by Epic Gardening

    Kevin
    18 Dec 2013 | 8:11 pm
    The post Bluelab pH Pen Review by Epic Gardening is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog. When I started out in hydroponics, I wanted to start out cheap. I didn’t feel like blowing a lot of money on fancy gadgets or equipment – I was much more interested in hacking together components and making a system that would produce awesome plants, all for under 100 bucks. I’m still interested in that, but as time went on I became more experienced with my grows and quickly found out that there were…
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    Grow Our Way

  • The GMO Bio

    Safer® Brand
    26 Aug 2014 | 8:43 am
    How much do you really know about the foods you and your family consume on a daily basis? Many foods now contain ingredients that come from genetically modified organisms (GMOs), which are plants or vegetables that have been genetically engineered to achieve a specific result, such as larger-sized produce. This process is sometimes referred to as “gene splicing.” In gene splicing, genes from one plant may be inserted into the cells of an unrelated species in order to increase nutrients, develop a resistance against certain types of insects, or in most cases, increase herbicide tolerance.
  • Pesky Pests

    Safer® Brand
    21 Aug 2014 | 8:47 am
    Whether they have two wings or six legs, insects can be a menace to your organic gardening efforts. While some bugs are beneficial — killing harmful insects, pollinating flowers and cleaning up debris — many insect species are nothing but trouble. Let’s take a closer look at a few of the more common harmful insects you may come across in your garden: Aphids – Aphids are tiny and blend in so well with the surrounding foliage that they are extremely difficult to see. However, these soft-bodied, pear-shaped pests can cause damage by latching onto plant leaves in clusters or by sucking…
  • Do Good, Feel Good

    Safer® Brand
    7 Aug 2014 | 4:00 am
    There are many good reasons to start an organic garden. Many gardeners view organic gardening as a two-way street: they’re helping themselves as well as the environment. By engaging in growing practices that are beneficial to the ecosystem and avoiding the use of chemical pesticides, organic gardeners can “do good and feel good” at the same time. So what exactly are the health and environmental benefits associated with organic gardening? Let’s take a closer look at some interesting facts and figures you might not be aware of: Getting Adequate Sunshine – Did you know that most…
  • TWITTER CONTEST: AUGUST 2014

    Safer® Brand
    1 Aug 2014 | 4:00 am
    ENTER THE SAFER® BRAND TWITTER CONTEST…IT’S EASY! Want a $25 Amazon gift card? Now’s your chance! Here’s how to enter: 1. Follow Safer® Brand on Twitter! 2. Tweet this entire message (re-tweeting Safer Brand does NOT count): I love growing _____ in my organic garden! #SaferGrowsOrganic cc @SaferBrand http://bit.ly/saferaug14 3. When you tweet the message, replace the blank space with the plant, crop, or flower you love growing in your organic garden. 4. Remember to include #SaferGrowsOrganic in your tweet, or else your entry will not count! The contest will run…
  • Organic Gardening: Why It’s Worth Your Time

    Safer® Brand
    29 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    Let’s face it: growing an organic garden isn’t always easy. It takes time, effort and know-how to produce an abundant garden year after year, and dealing with factors such as unpredictable weather and insect invasions can be frustrating. Growing a successful organic garden also requires a great deal of planning, as well as knowledge of certain gardening techniques, including crop rotation, composting and soil management. While gardening organically can involve a great deal of work, most experienced organic gardeners will tell you that it’s a labor of love – and absolutely worth it. As…
 
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    Ten Minute Gardener

  • The Greener Gardener: Best Horticulture Tips And Ideas

    Chris
    30 Aug 2014 | 12:13 am
    Horticulture may seem very involved and confusing, but if you put in a little study and a lot of practice, you can get started today. Now you know what you need to do, you can hopefully be more knowledgeable about horticulture, so you can hone your skills and turn into a wonderful gardener. Make sure that your sod properly. Pull all the weeds and break up any clods of soil.Make sure your soil is flat and even. Make sure the soil is moist soil. Lay the sod in rows, keeping the joints set off from one another. Your plants need to adapt and must be gradually introduced to changes of environment.
  • Solid Advice For The Aspiring Organic Gardener

    Chris
    29 Aug 2014 | 3:56 pm
    Organic gardening is a goal many families want to do but never actually try to accomplish. Your children will enjoy being involved with your garden. A garden can provide a wonderful learning experience for children, and it gives you a chance to bond while producing healthy food. Plant ever-bearing strawberries for your children. Children will be more willing to eat other foods you’ve planted as well. Top Tip! Get your children interested in helping with your organic garden. Gardens are terrific teaching tools for kids, and provide great opportunities for interaction, growth, and…
  • Great Guide On How To Make The Most Out Of Your Landscape

    Chris
    29 Aug 2014 | 12:58 pm
    As you go out your door, do you sigh with amazement or cringe in fear? A lot of people do not think they have a beautiful garden. Before you begin your new landscaping project, consider sketching out how you would like it to look first. It’s way easier to do a drawing than it is to change what you’ve already done in your yard. Curved beds are more contemporary and up-to-date than sharp corners and straight borders of the past. Top Tip! Create a sketch of what you want your finished product to look like before starting a project. By sketching out the details first, you can have a…
  • The Best Organic Gardening Advice You Will Ever Read

    Chris
    26 Aug 2014 | 10:56 pm
    An organic garden is a fascinating thing that also requires your most astute and attentive care to thrive. That is where smart organic horticulture tips are important. This can help you cultivating healthier and better tasting results from your organic garden. Use this information to make the following tips to create a flourishing and very rewarding organic garden that you can. Pick the proper soil to get the best results. You can also make an artificial area with only one kind of soil. Plant bulbs in your garden if you want spring and summer flowers. Different bulbs bloom at various times,…
  • Basic Steps For Growing Your Organic Garden

    Chris
    26 Aug 2014 | 10:43 am
    You want to create a fresh and healthy organic garden. Below are some excellent ideas to help you begin down the road to an exceptional organic garden of your own. Your children will enjoy being involved with you in the organic gardening endeavors. A garden can provide a wonderful learning experience for children, and it gives you a chance to bond while producing healthy food. Plant strawberries for your children in the organic garden.Children love to snap up these sweet juicy fruits for themselves and will be more willing to help you if they can pluck their own fruit from the garden. Top…
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    Grow Up Hydrogarden

  • Caring for your Pump

    Erika Raia
    26 Aug 2014 | 2:44 pm
    PERFORMANCE To maximize the performance of your Deluxe Pump, we encourage you to follow these 5 simple tips: 1. A clogged or dirty intake screen will greatly reduce performance. If the pump is used on a dirty surface, raise it slightly to reduce the amount of debris contacting the intake. 2. If slower flow is desired, adjust the flow control lever on the side ofRead More
  • Are all organic labels created equal?

    Erika Raia
    19 Aug 2014 | 6:47 am
    If you are like me, you buy and grow organic vegetables and fruits because you don’t mind paying a little more for the benefit of eating food that has been grown without synthetic fertilizers or pesticides or GMO’s. Let’s face it: they taste better, they are better for your health and they are better for the environment. Over the last several years though, there hasRead More
  • In the Garden with Neil: sprouting from seeds, vine plants and more!

    Erika Raia
    15 Aug 2014 | 7:08 am
    A few weeks ago, we received an email from Neil in South Carolina who purchased a Grow Up Hydrogarden Deluxe Unit and it was filled with so many helpful gardening tips that we printed it as a Blog here. He is an experienced gardener and his simple tips make gardening fun for people of all ages. Here is the second installment of what we like toRead More
  • Assembling your Hydrogarden

    Erika Raia
    13 Aug 2014 | 6:45 am
    There is nothing more rewarding than connecting with nature and growing your own vegetables and fruits. In just 10 simple steps, you will learn how to assemble your hydrogarden and plant your starter plants: 10 Simple Steps to Assembling and Planting  1. Place reservoir in a sunny location on level ground or flooring near a power source. The Grow Up Hydrogarden is perfect for aRead More
  • In the Garden with Neil: Tips on Perlite, Timers and More!

    Erika Raia
    8 Aug 2014 | 12:08 pm
    Last week, we received an email from Neil in South Carolina who recently purchased a Grow Up Hydrogarden Deluxe Unit from us. We have quickly embraced Neil’s enthusiasm for gardening and insight into hydroponics. He is an experienced soil gardener and has some great ideas on how to make our system easier to assemble and/or maintain. We think his ideas could be very helpful toRead More
 
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    No Soil Solutions

  • Drip Hydroponics

    admin
    24 Aug 2014 | 4:07 pm
    Many say that drip hydroponics is the most used systems in the world. I don’t know if that’s true or who/how they came up with their results, but drip hydroponics is a pretty popular method of hydroponic growing. This is probably because drip hydroponics can work well for many different types of hydroponic gardeners. Since drip hydroponics can be so versatile it’s used from beginners on up to commercial growers. The process is simple and allows you the ability to control exactly how much nutrients your plants are getting with the flexibility of growing just one or many plants. With drip…
  • Wick Hydroponics

    admin
    14 Aug 2014 | 10:41 pm
    The wick hydroponics are the most simplistic hydroponic systems there are. It can is a completely passive system and there are no pumps or electricity needed. Some do choose to aerate the nutrient solution but it’s not necessary. Since you don’t have to use any moving parts there is no need to worry about any system failures or parts breaking. As long as your keep your reservoir full of nutrient solution your plants ready to grow. The picture below shows the workings of a simple wick hydroponic system. I’ve taken a 2 liter bottle and cut it in half, turning the top upside down. I placed…
  • Ebb And Flow Hydroponics

    admin
    12 Aug 2014 | 8:44 pm
    The ebb and flow, also called “flood and drain”, hydroponic system is more of an intermediate level system that gives you excellent results. For beginners ebb and flow hydroponics may seem complex due to several different parts but the concept is still pretty simple. Even with some extra parts to it, an ebb and flow system is pretty use to set up and afterwards super easy to maintain. The plant sits separate from the nutrient solution which is pumped into your grow bed submerging the roots, the system drains allowing oxygen to reach the root system, then the process is repeated again.
  • Deep Water Culture Hydroponics

    admin
    12 Aug 2014 | 5:12 pm
    Deep water culture is a very popular hydroponic method for at home gardeners. Not only is it effective, but it’s an extremely easy concept to assemble and maintain. For those that are new to hydroponics, using deep water culture is a great place to start. Don’t let the ease of use fool you. Deep water culture hydroponics will make those water based plants like tomatoes, watermelon, and cucumbers turn out to be exactly what you’re gardening hydroponically for. For the simplest deep water culture systems you can look at the bucket or tub systems. I’ve had great success growing…
  • Hydroponic Nutrients

    admin
    1 Jul 2014 | 7:32 pm
    As with all living things plants need nutrients to survive. Since hydroponics doesn’t involve using dirt which plants normally receive their nutrients from, hydroponic nutrients need to be added to the water on the hydroponic system. At first glance using hydroponic nutrients may seem a little complex, but when diving a little deeper into it you learn that most of the work is done for you. Companies that make hydroponic nutrients often have feeding schedules that they provide with exact measurements of what hydroponic nutrients to add and when to add them. By doing a little bit of homework…
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    Your Hub of Garden Creativity | Garden Buildings Direct Blog

  • How to Select Proper Wood Storage Sheds

    Garden Buildings Direct
    18 Aug 2014 | 11:11 pm
    Choosing the right type of storage space for your logs is a relatively straightforward process, provided that you are aware of the most important things to be on the lookout for when making your selection. There are many companies and stores out there that sell wood storage sheds, so you need to know how to navigate the sea of special deals and offer available for you. This guide is meant to help you in that regard. The first thing you need to decide upon is the type of material you want for wood storage sheds. Timber and metal are the most common selection, because both are very durable, and…
  • 7 Tasty Vegetables To Plant In August Ready For Eating This Winter

    Shaun Wheatcroft
    15 Aug 2014 | 4:23 am
    Growing vegetables is something many people don’t consider because they are unaware of exactly when to plant certain vegetables during the year to get the best results. The variety of new meal ideas and healthy supermarket alternatives offered to your family from growing vegetables in the garden is fantastic. With autumn already creeping up on us, this month is the perfect time to start growing if you want to bring home-grown food to your kitchen table this winter. And of course once you’ve grown this amazing veg, make sure you take action to stop it going to waste. According to…
  • Garden Buildings Direct: A Social Company

    Garden Buildings Direct
    8 Aug 2014 | 9:10 am
      You can find Garden Buildings Direct on various social media websites In recent years social media has revolutionised the way that people connect, talk and interact with each other and their favourite brands. Here at Garden Buildings Direct we’ve made ourselves available to you in several ways across various social media sites. Whether you’re a Liker, a Pinner, or you enjoy the occasional Retweet, you’ll find Garden Buildings Direct on your preferred site.  Facebook Our Garden Buildings Direct Facebook page is all about fun and inspiration. We post customer pictures, videos and…
  • Why Gardening is Great for Children

    Jordan Piano
    6 Aug 2014 | 2:30 am
    Why gardening is great for children In recent years, gardening with children in schools has become more and more popular. But does taking kids outside and teaching them how to grow vegetables and how to weed really benefit them and teach them valuable life skills? Here are three very good reasons why gardening is great for your children. 1: Cognitive Benefits In a study by the Royal Horticultural Society it was found that gardening increases children’s alertness, concentration levels and can even help to prevent Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Being able to react to change…
  • How to Build a Shed Base

    Shaun Wheatcroft
    5 Aug 2014 | 3:46 am
      Building a shed may seem like a daunting task to a DIY novice, but fear no more, because by following these simple steps you’ll have a level and sturdy base for your new shed in no time… Constructing the foundation for your garden building is a fairly hassle-free task for a single person to complete, but when it comes to actually building the shed, we do recommend an extra person is on hand for lifting and placing roof and wall panels in place. Note: Planning permission is normally not required for a garden building, however, if you live in a conservation area or the…
 
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