Gardening

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  • Beating the Heat: Protect Your Plants From Heat Stress

    Garden Therapy
    Debbie Wolfe
    22 Jul 2015 | 11:00 am
    Hot weather can be hard on your plants. Just like us they need special care in extreme heat. Even with adequate watering and mulching, plants can suffer when the temperatures rise but there are a few things you can do to help protect your plants from heat stress during the hottest part of the summer. Water Correctly Watering is essential when ... The post Beating the Heat: Protect Your Plants From Heat Stress appeared first on Garden Therapy.
  • The Garden as Trickster

    Plant Whatever Brings You Joy
    Kathryn
    23 Jul 2015 | 10:04 am
    Haha! The garden continues to teach me, this time about my powers of observation, and how not all is at it might first appear! Bet you’ve had that experience, too, right? In my last post I wrote about the concept of the seed bank, and, particularly, about the “discovery” that I unexpectedly had lambs ear growing in my garden! Well, guess what? It’s Giant Mullein (Verbascum thapsus). It’s quite a joke on me, as I’d written–extensively–about mullein three years ago. Yet, there were enough differences this time that I convinced myself I was looking…
  • Mid-Summer Garden Update

    Shawna Coronado
    Shawna Coronado
    24 Jul 2015 | 4:23 am
    New Balcony Containers — With all the rain we have had in the Midwest, I have seen a tremendous amount of early growth in my test-garden vegetables. While I usually have to water my container gardens several times a week, this year I am testing out three Garden Well™ Self-Watering Planters and so far they have survived well — I have only had to fill the containers once the entire season due to all the rain. Definitely a time-saver! I’ll do a whole report on how you use the containers in the future. Meanwhile, check out the balcony garden “look” this summer…
  • do home remedies for weeds or garden pests work? ask jeff gillman

    A Way To Garden
    margaret
    26 Jul 2015 | 4:05 am
    GARDENING MAY BE part art and part science, but when it comes to plant health, and especially to preventing and [read more…] The post do home remedies for weeds or garden pests work? ask jeff gillman appeared first on A Way To Garden.
  • Early morning wet garden

    Dirt Therapy
    Phillip Oliver
    7 Jul 2015 | 11:44 am
    I took these photos on Sunday morning following the fourth of July. We got tons of rain on Friday and spotty showers on Saturday. The garden really greened up as a result. Hopefully you can't see the weeds in the photos. I was hoping to get some work done in the garden on Friday and woke up to the rain. It is hard for me to keep it up this time of year - I hate the heat and the humidity and the mosquitoes (although they really don't bite me) are awful this year.  Text and photos by Phillip Oliver, Dirt Therapy
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    You Grow Girl

  • Waste Not: Use Up Tough Garlic Scape Ends

    Gayla Trail
    8 Jul 2015 | 2:04 pm
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  • Gardening Mad

    Gayla Trail
    9 Jun 2015 | 9:36 am
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  • Recipe: Chocolate Cherry Almond Smoothie

    Gayla Trail
    2 Jun 2015 | 9:38 am
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  • D.I.Y Tomato Protection

    Gayla Trail
    20 May 2015 | 11:07 am
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  • The Lost Language of Plants

    Gayla Trail
    6 May 2015 | 2:19 pm
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    Shawna Coronado

  • Mid-Summer Garden Update

    Shawna Coronado
    24 Jul 2015 | 4:23 am
    New Balcony Containers — With all the rain we have had in the Midwest, I have seen a tremendous amount of early growth in my test-garden vegetables. While I usually have to water my container gardens several times a week, this year I am testing out three Garden Well™ Self-Watering Planters and so far they have survived well — I have only had to fill the containers once the entire season due to all the rain. Definitely a time-saver! I’ll do a whole report on how you use the containers in the future. Meanwhile, check out the balcony garden “look” this summer…
  • Rain Barrel Diverter Kit Can Prevent Mosquitoes

    Shawna Coronado
    22 Jul 2015 | 11:48 am
    Rain barrels have been a part of my life for about eight years – I have loved the convenience of having fresh water available for the garden which does not have chlorine, fluoride, or any of the other chemical treatments cities use for drinking water. Rain barrel water can be used to water container gardens, wash cars, water your lawns and clean off tools and boots. With this year’s rainy season, many have asked me, “Why do I need to have a rain barrel?” Why You Need a Rain Barrel An easy answer is that when you collect rainwater from your roof, it reduces the quantity…
  • Calendula-Orange Biscuit Recipe

    Shawna Coronado
    20 Jul 2015 | 4:07 am
    When I first met Teresa O’Connor, garden writer extraordinaire, I knew we would be great garden friends. She has an amazingly informative blog, Seasonal Wisdom, and is a writer, author, speaker and consultant about gardening, fresh foods, and seasonal folklore. She posted the most amazing Calendula-Orange Biscuit Recipe that you absolutely MUST try. (Photo credit for top photo from Judi at Cooking With Aunt JuJu. Photo credit other culinary and flower photos on page Teresa O’Connor of Seasonal Wisdom.) Calendula-Orange Biscuit Recipe   Print Enjoy these flavorful…
  • Learning About Nature at Xel-Ha Eco-Park in Mexico

    Coronado Shawna
    13 Jul 2015 | 4:00 am
    Six years ago my family and I went on an absolutely wonderful adventure in Mexico as a guest of an eco-park in the Yucatan Peninsula. It was such a joy and learning experience that I wanted to rewrite the original story. Touching the environment and learning more about how we connect to it  in an eco park was fascinating. Xel-Ha Eco Park (pronounced “shell-ha”) is a protected inlet set near Playa Del Carmen, Mexico, set in  the Yucatan jungle. It is touted as being a natural aquarium park, and is indeed quite beautiful. Snorkeling in the crystal  clear ocean waters at Xel-Ha is very…
  • White Fish, Swiss Chard, Spinach, and Black Bean Salad Recipe

    Shawna Coronado
    6 Jul 2015 | 4:30 am
    For several years both my daughters had decided they were vegan or vegetarian in one form or another and for the first time ever in my life I really tried to cook more with beans in order to help supplement their health. Ultimately, we all got a great education about healthy eating and I became ABSOLUTELY ADDICTED to beans. I love them. One of the best recipes ever is this white fish with Swiss chard, spinach and black bean salad. You can serve the white fish breaded or not, hot or cold, but the salad should be at room temperature and made fresh – it usually takes me 10 minutes to…
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    Cold Climate Gardening

  • Editing and Tweaking: Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day July 2015

    Kathy Purdy
    16 Jul 2015 | 8:07 pm
    This is my fourth spring in this garden. For three years I have been creating garden beds, but this year I have been editing them: rearranging the furniture, so to speak. I have been having a lot of fun. It is my art; it engages my creative juices, as I seek the most aesthetically pleasing […]
  • Hobblebush, A Native Shrub That’s Easy To Love: Wildflower Wednesday

    Kathy Purdy
    27 Jun 2015 | 7:03 pm
    At first glance, I thought it was a hydrangea. But I don’t know of any hydrangea that blooms with the trilliums. And the large, exquisitely puckered leaves were unlike any hydrangea leaf I’d ever seen. Turns out it was a viburnum–Viburnum lantanoides–to be precise. This native shrub likes it cool and moist–perfect for northern climates. […]
  • Summer Is Here: Garden Bloggers Bloom Day June 2015

    Kathy Purdy
    15 Jun 2015 | 11:08 am
    We know it’s summer when the frost-tender mosaic bird bath (pictured above) takes its rightful place in the front garden. That move from winter storage was delayed because I was attending the Garden Bloggers’ Fling in Toronto. (There’s a good story about the bird bath here.) All the usual suspects are blooming, so I’ll just […]
  • More Than One Kind of Forget-Me-Not: Wildflower Wednesday

    Kathy Purdy
    29 May 2015 | 1:51 pm
    I have grown forget-me-nots for many years. I even got them to naturalize a bit in the secret garden at our old house. At our new house, I noticed some forget-me-nots intermixed with hostas growing alongside the garage. The hostas loved it there in spring but looked pretty sad in summer’s heat, so I dug […]
  • Roadside Yellow Daffodils Brighten My Day

    Kathy Purdy
    10 May 2015 | 7:59 pm
    We’ve been suffering from meteorological whiplash. We had snow on April 23 and a low of 22 (-5C) on April 25 . Thirteen days later it got up to 88F and we’ve been sweltering ever since. The Roadside Yellow daffodils that I planted last fall have been delivering their sunshine almost as soon as the […]
 
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    A Way To Garden

  • do home remedies for weeds or garden pests work? ask jeff gillman

    margaret
    26 Jul 2015 | 4:05 am
    GARDENING MAY BE part art and part science, but when it comes to plant health, and especially to preventing and [read more…] The post do home remedies for weeds or garden pests work? ask jeff gillman appeared first on A Way To Garden.
  • heirloom beans, with steve sando of rancho gordo

    margaret
    18 Jul 2015 | 2:02 pm
    STEVE SANDO and I agree that the saying “a hill of beans”–as in, something is of little or no importance [read more…] The post heirloom beans, with steve sando of rancho gordo appeared first on A Way To Garden.
  • doodle by andre: oh yeah, sure; the weeds are sorry

    margaret
    16 Jul 2015 | 5:55 am
    DO YOU THINK I BELIEVE THIS FOR ONE SECOND? After nearly 30 years of fighting (losing?) the good fight, I [read more…] The post doodle by andre: oh yeah, sure; the weeds are sorry appeared first on A Way To Garden.
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    Plant Whatever Brings You Joy

  • The Garden as Trickster

    Kathryn
    23 Jul 2015 | 10:04 am
    Haha! The garden continues to teach me, this time about my powers of observation, and how not all is at it might first appear! Bet you’ve had that experience, too, right? In my last post I wrote about the concept of the seed bank, and, particularly, about the “discovery” that I unexpectedly had lambs ear growing in my garden! Well, guess what? It’s Giant Mullein (Verbascum thapsus). It’s quite a joke on me, as I’d written–extensively–about mullein three years ago. Yet, there were enough differences this time that I convinced myself I was looking…
  • The Seed Bank

    Kathryn
    15 May 2015 | 11:54 am
    Readers of Plant Whatever Brings You Joy will be familiar with this one of the 52 lessons: “Never pull up and discard what you cannot identify,” a metaphorical invitation to not pre-judge that which enters your life that seems unfamiliar. “The Lord works in mysterious ways,” as we know. The blessings in our lives can show up in many different unexpected packages. So when I planted morning glory seeds in March on a rosy obelisk, well away from the rest of the garden, so it could not overcome whatever was growing nearby, I thought I was so clever both to get a head…
  • The Rustic Quiche

    Kathryn
    17 Apr 2015 | 7:53 am
    rustic quiche with roasted red peppers and kalamata olives Back when Antonia was a little girl a lovely Asian woman in San Francisco gave me a recipe for quiche which I vaguely recall making successfully a couple of times, and then, inexplicably, the recipe failed. I have no idea why. But I concluded that I “didn’t know how to make quiche.” (How many times do we do this one way or another?) I moved on to other endeavors in the kitchen. Making yogurt. Crafting tortillas. Baking bread. Astoundingly it’s taken me decades to get back to making quiches. And even that began…
  • Fire Pits: Part Two

    Kathryn
    19 Mar 2015 | 6:44 pm
    As some of you will recall my last blog post was afire with enthusiasm for fire pits, inspired by gardening author Helen Yoest, who wrote a guest post about her own fire pit in her garden. Kindled in my new found passion was the realization my 72nd birthday was upon me, nearly, and that if I applied myself aptly I might actually combine the two, making a new fire pit the center of my birthday festivities. I began researching fire pits and made the decision to purchase one made by Landman and to purchase it locally. All that was left was to decide which design. I chose the vine pattern since I…
  • Fire Pits: Part One

    Kathryn
    19 Jan 2015 | 1:22 pm
    It is probably fitting that following a post on leaving wild corners in your garden I would be drawn to a recent post I saw on author Helen Yoest’s blog Gardening with Confidence regarding her organic creation of what she calls her Fire Garden. I found I kept thinking of her post and had the occasion to inquire about a possible guest post after she most generously reviewed my book Plant Whatever Brings You Joy! We have some things in common other than writing about our gardens. She’s a Pisces lady living in North Carolina who owns a Border Collie! As many of you know, so much of…
 
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    May Dreams Gardens

  • Dear Mary Ann, Do you remember my tomatoes?

    Carol
    27 Jul 2015 | 6:50 pm
    Dear Mary Ann, I was out in the garden this evening picking more tomatoes and thought of you and your blog Gardens of the Wild, Wild West. Do you remember when you visited me in late summer in 2011 when you were here for the Garden Writers Association symposium?  My vegetable garden was such a mess that summer. Earlier that spring, I had a crew tear out the old raised beds which were made
  • Red Dirt Ramblings, May I Express My Gratitude

    Carol
    25 Jul 2015 | 6:10 am
    Dear Dee, Thank you for your latest lovely blog post on Summer Flowers for Summer Heat.  I know you feel the heat in Oklahoma much more than we do here in Indiana. But we are gardeners and somehow we make the best of it, don't we?  Whether it is too much rain, as is my good-to-have problem this year or not enough rain, which we wouldn't wish on our worst enemies, we figure out what will grow
  • Wildflower Wednesday: May I express my gratitude?

    Carol
    21 Jul 2015 | 9:05 pm
    Bee on Cup Plant flower Dear Gail, I'm writing today to express my thanks to you for coming up with this wonderful meme called Wildflower Wednesday.  Through your garden, which we've all come to enjoy through your blog posts on Clay and Limestone, we've learned so much about the importance of planting wildflowers to attract pollinators. I thought of you when my garden designer sat down with
  • Read the Secret Diary of a Garden Fairy...

    Carol
    19 Jul 2015 | 6:18 am
    Want to know what's been going on around here? I read the Secret Diary of a Garden Fairy to find out. Monday - Dear Secret Diary of a Garden Fairy, What a day we had. First, Carol came out and harvested green beans when she wasn't supposed to be here. Then there was a gigantic thunderstorm that turned the day into night and knocked down the sweet corn.  Granny Gus McGarden was just beside
  • Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day - July 2015

    Carol
    14 Jul 2015 | 9:05 pm
    Zinnia Welcome to Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day for July 2015. Here in my USDA Hardiness Zone 6a garden in central Indiana, the garden season is in full swing and on those days when it isn't raining, it's nice to go out and see bright, cheerful flowers like the common zinnias. I do believe no summer garden is complete without some zinnias. They come in nearly all colors. Zinnias I'm growing
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    Bloomingwriter: Gardening in Nova Scotia

  • Touring our local gardens...

    Jodi DeLong
    12 Jul 2015 | 4:33 am
     The only thing I like better than playing in my own garden? Visiting other people's gardens! The annual Chester Garden Tour is happening next weekend in beautiful seaside Chester, NS, and I'm going to be there!It's going to be a full day of activities, starting with a talk about mid-season plants and planting at Oceanview Garden Centre & Landscaping first thing in the morning, then going from garden to garden, then a Q & A back at Oceanview after the tour wraps up. I can hardly wait! If you haven't been to Chester or even if you have and are wanting to see some…
  • The BEST season for gardeners

    Jodi DeLong
    12 Jun 2015 | 7:14 am
    Life is never boring in my world. It's suddenly nearly the middle of June, almost summer, and I haven't posted here at all of late. There are good reasons for this, none of them alarming--I'm simply so busy with work projects that I haven't had time to do the stuff that doesn't pay me. Plus it is the season for playing in the dirt, so when I'm finished my writing, photo and editing work for the day, I head for the garden; sometimes with camera in hand, of course, so I can catch delights like 'Francesca' primula in bloom!  Tomorrow I'm doing a talk at Louisiana Pacific's East River…
  • Those rare blue flowers

    Jodi DeLong
    1 Apr 2015 | 5:02 am
    For those of you wondering where I've gotten to...I'm here, and I'm fine, just really, really busy as we get ready for our 10th anniversary Saltscapes Expo. Lots to tell you about while we're also still waiting for the 87 feet of snow that fell in the past two months to melt, but for now, a blast from the past....We all know that in flowers, blue is the rarest colour. Which means some of us go koo koo for cocapuffs over it. Quite a few of us, actually. That number would include me, of course. From the glorious of the difficult, divaesque, but oh-so-beautiful blue poppy...To the stately cobalt…
  • End of year roundup--favourites and more

    Jodi DeLong
    28 Dec 2014 | 10:52 am
    Slightly belated Christmas greetings to all--we had not a drop of snow in Nova Scotia, and in fact had record breaking mild temperatures and torrential rains this year. It made travel easy, and we spent a very happy Christmas day with family. Since then I've been on an actual time-off from work, allowing myself a few days of just doing whatever I want, which has mostly been playing with photography, sorting through my image libraries, reading, and catching up with people I care about. We often have end-of-year retrospectives on many topics, including, of course, on gardening. I decided…
  • Gold foliage for brighter gardens

    Jodi DeLong
    15 Dec 2014 | 8:00 am
    Hello, fellow gardeners! Where have I been, you ask? Well, it's been a busy, busy few months, with lots of projects on the go. Now, with only 10 days til Christmas, the main deadlines are under control so I can do some catchup tasks, including updating my neglected blog. It's like that for gardeners, though, so often: during the main gardening months we're outside in our gardens, planting, weeding, harvesting, puttering, designing. Now that frost has come and things have stopped growing and we've gotten our bulbs planted (yes! I did! Before December, even!) we turn to the season of indoor…
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    Digging

  • It’s not hard to enjoy the Big Easy

    Pam/Digging
    29 Jul 2015 | 4:34 am
    If you want to feel that you’ve traveled to a foreign city without leaving the country, visit New Orleans and stay in the historic French Quarter. We made the 8-hour drive from Austin a couple of weeks ago — our first stop on a family road trip across the South — and stayed two nights in this genteel, relaxed, living-easy city. What do you do in New Orleans? Well, you eat good food, admire the lacy ironwork and sunset-hued architecture of the Quarter, and listen to jazz players on every street corner. Doesn’t that sound nice? The first morning we rose early to beat the…
  • Plant This: Turk’s cap

    Pam/Digging
    21 Jul 2015 | 6:01 am
    Death Star-adapted plants tend to be small-leaved and airy, the better to retain precious water. But our native Turk’s cap (Malvaviscus arboreus var. drummondii) defies that expectation with vaguely heart-shaped leaves the size of a napkin scrounged out of your car’s glove box, and just as crinkled. For the foliage alone, which the deer ignore in my garden, Turk’s cap would be worth planting. But the twisted, tomato-red flowers that blaze among the leaves from late spring through fall make Turk’s cap one of my favorite perennials for shade or part sun. Hummingbirds adore…
  • I heart foliage! July Foliage Follow-Up

    Pam/Digging
    15 Jul 2015 | 10:05 pm
    This month for Foliage Follow-Up I’m wearing my heart on my sleeve — well, on my garden anyway. This is one of my favorite combos in the front garden right now: feathery, chartreuse bamboo muhly grass (Muhlenbergia dumosa); spiky, star-shaped ‘Burgundy Ice’ dyckia; and lace-textured white skullcap (Scutellaria suffrutescens ‘White’). My deer show no interest in any of these, but I sure love them. So what leafy love is going on in your July garden? Please join me for Foliage Follow-Up, giving foliage its due on the day after Bloom Day. Leave a link to your post in a…
  • Read This: Garden Design magazine

    Pam/Digging
    14 Jul 2015 | 1:36 pm
    Little did I know when the Garden Bloggers Fling kicked off in 2008 with 37 attendees that a few years later the publisher of one of the most respected gardening magazines in the U.S. would be a regular Fling attendee. Garden Design publisher Jim Peterson (pictured above at the Portland Fling) purchased the magazine in 2014, a year after it abruptly ceased publication — one more casualty of the all-too-familiar publishing downturn. Undeterred, Jim moved the magazine’s headquarters from New York to Southern California, and he and new editor-in-chief Thad Orr completely overhauled…
  • Candy lily crush

    Pam/Digging
    13 Jul 2015 | 7:16 am
    I’m sweet on you, candy lily (xPardancanda norrisii)! I’ve had this iris hybrid for a year, and it’s sweetening my summer garden with a daily unfurling of freckled flowers. The candy lilies in my front garden bloom better than those in the back thanks to a bit more afternoon sun. And deer have so far left them completely alone, just as they do bearded iris. Sweet, huh? All material © 2006-2015 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.
 
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    Blithewold Blogs

  • Lily days

    Kristin Green
    27 Jul 2015 | 9:29 am
    Lily has to be one of the most overused descriptors in horticulture. Go figure, given how aptly it defines so many flowers: the word itself has a trumpeting flare and and if I use my imagination, a sweet fragrance too… Spring is plenty-lily-ful with trout lily, lily of the valley, checkered lilies, and lily-flowering tulips doing their thing, but starting […]
  • North Garden inventory

    Kristin Green
    17 Jul 2015 | 8:14 am
    I’m asked often enough to name my favorite plant and season that it’s a little strange that hardly anyone* ever asks which is my favorite garden. Not that I could possibly pick a favorite (the pollinator garden). But since I featured the Rose Garden (my other favorite) last week, I can’t let this week go by without giving Blithewold’s pièce de […]
  • Rose Garden inventory

    Kristin Green
    10 Jul 2015 | 7:40 am
    Thank goodness for rainy days. Without them, we stay outside and never get around to tidying the potting shed, defrosting the fridge, or keeping up with the paperwork. (Not to mention how happy the gardens are after a good downpour.) I’m grateful too that Betsy worked on the blog last week because aside from the pleasure of seeing Blithewold’s gardens […]
  • Prune it up

    Betsy Ekholm
    1 Jul 2015 | 11:11 am
    I am really excited to introduce my fellow horticulturist, Betsy Ekholm to the blogosphere. Betsy started working with Gail and me in 2013 as our gardens intern and we couldn’t let her go. Had to make her an official member of the garden crew — though you wouldn’t be wrong to think after reading this post […]
  • Transition into summer

    Kristin Green
    26 Jun 2015 | 7:25 am
    The to-plant list is getting shorter and we are beginning to transition into a summer-full of deadheading/staking/weeding/enjoying. Right on schedule too: we always aim to be *done by July 4th. (*No garden is ever done.) This week we got the last of the plants out of the greenhouse, tucked in a few final packs of seedlings here and […]
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    Flatbush Gardener

  • Meet Cher

    Flatbush Gardener
    23 Jul 2015 | 6:37 pm
    This past Saturday we brought home another cat. On the heels of New Encounter's Pluto flyby, I thought "Charon" would make a good cat name. "Cher", for short, but also because my husband, Cher, is a fan. (Typical.) Our little Annie is still... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Garden Insect Species Records 2015

    Flatbush Gardener
    7 Jul 2015 | 5:18 am
    2015-07-12: Added two I'd forgotten about: Orius insidiosus, and Anthrenus verbasci. Since I wrote this post, I discovered a new species of bee: . That brings the number of species to 18. These are the insect species I've discovered or identified in... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Pyrrhalta viburni, viburnum leaf beetle (VLB)

    Flatbush Gardener
    1 Jul 2015 | 5:24 am
    Pyrrhalta viburni, the viburnum leaf beetle, or VLB for short, is native to Europe. It was first discovered in North America barely two decades ago, in Maine in 1994. Both larvae and adults eat leaves. Our native Viburnum species are extremely... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • What I'm About

    Flatbush Gardener
    22 Jun 2015 | 6:40 pm
    Notice anything different about me? Until a few minutes ago, the by-line at the header of this blog read: Adventures in Neo-Victorian, Wild, Shade, Organic and Native Plant Gardening, Garden Design, and Garden Restoration.It now reads: Urban... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Native Plant Acquisitions: LINPI 2015 Plant Sale

    Flatbush Gardener
    14 Jun 2015 | 3:30 pm
    Saturday, June 13 was the last open day in 2015 for the Long Island Native Plant Initiative (LINPI) Plant Sale. I picked up another 13 species to add to my list, which has already grown this Spring to over 200 species of plants native to eastern... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
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    A Leafy Indulgence

  • High Line Impressions

    Swimray
    21 Jul 2015 | 3:19 pm
    While on a trip to New York City, a visit to the High Line was high on my list. This is the old elevated railroad that was preserved and turned into a park. Overgrown with weeds and plants, it was 'rehabilitated' into a walking landscape; transformed from a rusting eyesore to an urban park and walkway with views. Watering systems, soil, stairs, elevators, and of course vegetation were installed on the old structure. I imagine the steel structure had to be beefed up in some spots, too.It is a phenomenal success story. I have a link to the High Line blog (on the right sidebar.) I read that it…
  • July Bloom Day

    Swimray
    15 Jul 2015 | 8:38 pm
    It has been a month since the last post. No excuses are offered but another rush out the door after work today to snap a few photos hopefully makes up.Echinacea is very thick and the goldfinches are probably drooling waiting for the seeds to be ready.One flower finally opened on this particular zinnia, 'Oriole'. I was expecting more of an orange hue.Pollinator-magnet liatris is nearing the end of its bloom. Funny, as it blooms from top down each stem.Rudbeckia 'Irish Eyes' reseeded after blooming early this year. This result grew up and bloomed already - without green eyes.This Rudbeckia…
  • June 2015 Bloom Day

    Swimray
    15 Jun 2015 | 4:52 am
    Lots of things are popping out of the gardens - 'Never Looked So Good' should be the theme applied to many garden inhabitants this month. Onion and green beans comprise the bounty to date, and go well together in a three bean salad. Fresh basil and oregano work wonders on a grilled pizza. More hot weather is on the way, though.The datura is off to a great start and has never looked so large this early. This is the second time I have grown this moonflower, and hope it does better than the first which was in a more shady spot.'Night of Passion' is what I think this daylily is called, after…
  • Skyscrapers of Poppies

    Swimray
    7 Jun 2015 | 5:54 am
    The purple poppy towers are blooming. Papaver somniferum have transformed the front garden, with pop-up poppy skyscrapers sprouting randomly: tall, slender, and crowded together.These are opium poppies, single flowering in a strong magenta. They are not really tall, but their habit of springing up all over and their slender appearance remind me of a skyscraper skyline. They are also not really good for making opium or heroin, since these do not produce the large seed pods that are needed. There are cultivars bred for that purpose.Some internet sources identified something like these as…
  • Green-Eyed Monsters

    Swimray
    1 Jun 2015 | 5:59 am
    Their eyes do not stay green. After a few weeks, they begin turning brown and go completely black - just like vampires in horror films. They do not, however, glow red, at least not yet.Green-eyed susans are what I call them in the presence of my neighbors, allowing them to understand this plant as a form of black-eyes susans. Rudbeckia Hirti - Irish Eyes concluded my second attempt at growing from seed, and a successful lesson in persistence. In the first attempt, all seeds were sown directly in the ground, some germinated, and all passed on for no apparent reason. (Apparent to me.)I thought…
 
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    A Leafy Indulgence

  • High Line Impressions

    Swimray
    21 Jul 2015 | 3:19 pm
    While on a trip to New York City, a visit to the High Line was high on my list. This is the old elevated railroad that was preserved and turned into a park. Overgrown with weeds and plants, it was 'rehabilitated' into a walking landscape; transformed from a rusting eyesore to an urban park and walkway with views. Watering systems, soil, stairs, elevators, and of course vegetation were installed on the old structure. I imagine the steel structure had to be beefed up in some spots, too.It is a phenomenal success story. I have a link to the High Line blog (on the right sidebar.) I read that it…
  • July Bloom Day

    Swimray
    15 Jul 2015 | 8:38 pm
    It has been a month since the last post. No excuses are offered but another rush out the door after work today to snap a few photos hopefully makes up.Echinacea is very thick and the goldfinches are probably drooling waiting for the seeds to be ready.One flower finally opened on this particular zinnia, 'Oriole'. I was expecting more of an orange hue.Pollinator-magnet liatris is nearing the end of its bloom. Funny, as it blooms from top down each stem.Rudbeckia 'Irish Eyes' reseeded after blooming early this year. This result grew up and bloomed already - without green eyes.This Rudbeckia…
  • June 2015 Bloom Day

    Swimray
    15 Jun 2015 | 4:52 am
    Lots of things are popping out of the gardens - 'Never Looked So Good' should be the theme applied to many garden inhabitants this month. Onion and green beans comprise the bounty to date, and go well together in a three bean salad. Fresh basil and oregano work wonders on a grilled pizza. More hot weather is on the way, though.The datura is off to a great start and has never looked so large this early. This is the second time I have grown this moonflower, and hope it does better than the first which was in a more shady spot.'Night of Passion' is what I think this daylily is called, after…
  • Skyscrapers of Poppies

    Swimray
    7 Jun 2015 | 5:54 am
    The purple poppy towers are blooming. Papaver somniferum have transformed the front garden, with pop-up poppy skyscrapers sprouting randomly: tall, slender, and crowded together.These are opium poppies, single flowering in a strong magenta. They are not really tall, but their habit of springing up all over and their slender appearance remind me of a skyscraper skyline. They are also not really good for making opium or heroin, since these do not produce the large seed pods that are needed. There are cultivars bred for that purpose.Some internet sources identified something like these as…
  • Green-Eyed Monsters

    Swimray
    1 Jun 2015 | 5:59 am
    Their eyes do not stay green. After a few weeks, they begin turning brown and go completely black - just like vampires in horror films. They do not, however, glow red, at least not yet.Green-eyed susans are what I call them in the presence of my neighbors, allowing them to understand this plant as a form of black-eyes susans. Rudbeckia Hirti - Irish Eyes concluded my second attempt at growing from seed, and a successful lesson in persistence. In the first attempt, all seeds were sown directly in the ground, some germinated, and all passed on for no apparent reason. (Apparent to me.)I thought…
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    Bumblebee Blog Bumblebee Blog

  • Behind the Hedge–Garden Work Areas

    Robin
    23 Jul 2015 | 12:12 pm
    Unless you count the jungle of house plants in my childhood and later college dorm rooms, I started gardening as a vegetable gardener rather than a flower or ornamentals gardener. After all, I do love food. I also come from a family in which practical and useful activities—such as fixing your own car, building a   Read more… The post Behind the Hedge–Garden Work Areas appeared first on Bumblebee Blog Bumblebee Blog.
  • About Those English Gardens

    Robin Ripley
    6 Jul 2015 | 5:32 pm
    There is no place like an English garden. And as a gardener, there was no better way to spend a week away from my own garden than visiting gardens in England. So in June, off I went on—of all things—an organized bus tour. As a practicing semi-hermit, I’m not usually enthusiastic about organized group activities.   Read more… The post About Those English Gardens appeared first on Bumblebee Blog Bumblebee Blog.
  • Lessons from Miss P

    Robin
    1 Mar 2015 | 1:39 pm
    We lost our 18-year-old cat Miss P a couple of months ago. It was a very sad time around here. But I still think I see her shadow out of the corner of my eye from time to time. Two months later I’m pretty sure some of the pet hair I see on my coat   Read more… The post Lessons from Miss P appeared first on Bumblebee Blog Bumblebee Blog.
  • The Story of Little Man or Don’t Push Robin Too Far

    Robin
    12 Jan 2015 | 9:47 am
    The story I’m about to tell may make you think differently about me. I feel differently about myself. It started this past spring. To fill out my coop I ordered six female chicks from My Pet Chicken—two Appenzeller Spitzhaubens and four Polish chicks. If you’ve never ordered chicks before, you may be surprised to learn   Read more… The post The Story of Little Man or Don’t Push Robin Too Far appeared first on Bumblebee Blog Bumblebee Blog.
  • The Totally Real Dangers of Rural Living

    Robin
    30 Nov 2014 | 11:15 am
    Living here in a fairly rural part of Maryland, I see things that the average suburbanite wouldn’t encounter in a year living in a sanitized and manicured neighborhood. I can sit in my favorite chair and watch red foxes play fight in the back field. In spring, the tulip trees look like Christmas trees with   Read more… The post The Totally Real Dangers of Rural Living appeared first on Bumblebee Blog Bumblebee Blog.
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    Garden Rant

  • A Dark Place by Ivette Soler

    Ivette Soler
    28 Jul 2015 | 10:51 pm
    Sentinals, standing guard, making shade, protecting the dark spaces I’m vacationing in Northern California this week, on the Russian River, enjoying a break from the bleak, scorching brightness of LA. It is very hot here as well, but the heat is mitigated by the deep, nearly mystical shade from the redwood trees. Driving into Guerneville, I couldn’t help but feel apprehensive, frightened – like little red riding hood venturing into the woods, I felt something scary would happen under the gloomy  canopy of the impossibly tall trees. It’s a matter of psychogeography.
  • Another reason to avoid turfgrass? by Elizabeth Licata

    Elizabeth Licata
    28 Jul 2015 | 4:47 am
    This orienpet, Saltarello, is a strong butterscotch color. It’s in a container. Conversations over the Garden Walk Buffalo weekend lead me to believe that—knock on wood—my lack of turfgrass may also be a reason for my lack of plant-destroying and other pests. I know that Japanese beetle grubs feed on grass and I rarely see any of the adults—maybe one or two a year in recent summers. It’s not just my yard; very few houses on my shady block have even a small patch of grass and all of our backyards are too small for lawns. We specialize in courtyards, patios, and containers. It…
  • Attracting July Visitors with Photos by Susan Harris

    Susan Harris
    27 Jul 2015 | 9:19 am
    Tom Stovall, the resident photographer at Meadowlark Botanical Gardens in Northern Virginia, is donating his images to my campaign promoting DC-area public gardens.  His photos of nature, especially of wildlife, are beyond anything I can or ever will achieve, but garden photography is new to him so he’s taking suggestions about what photos might succeed at enticing people to visit. Here’s his lovely video of July, and your suggestions are welcome.  Additional garden photos follow. Click here to view the embedded video. (Or here’s the link to Youtube.) Below are just a…
  • The Plastic Pot Dilemma by Susan Harris

    Susan Harris
    24 Jul 2015 | 4:33 am
    These are just some of the plastic pots I reluctantly acquired in April in my yearly fit of plant-buying.  I gathered them here to wash them before looking for the least bad way to deal with them, feeling heartsick that plants come with plastic. Is there really no better way to package them? But assuming for now that we’re stuck with them, what to do with the damn things? Fortunately, they’re accepted by my town’s recycling program, but apparently that’s unusual.  NC State acknowledges that most recycling programs in the state don’t pick up this type of…
  • Rock Star Garden by Allen Bush

    Allen Bush
    22 Jul 2015 | 4:38 am
    I had no idea what to expect from the Hartman Rock Garden. Richie Steffen pitched it to me as a garden like no other. I was in Columbus, OH, a few weeks ago for the Cultivate ’15 trade show and had some time to kill.  The Cultivate ‘15 is a huge international gathering of hundreds of horticultural vendors peddling seeds, plants and garden doodads. Thousands of green industry folks came to see what’s new. I worked the show for three days, with Mary Vaananen, my Jelitto Perennial Seeds colleague. Mary set up the Jelitto Perennial Seeds booth the day before the show opened. I drove that…
 
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    Future House Farm

  • Weeding

    6 Jul 2015 | 7:53 pm
    With the intense amount of rain came an intense amount of weeds. This took me the better part of a day and it was gratifying to say the least. 
  • The Bean Pickers

    6 Jul 2015 | 7:36 pm
    They do need the occasional reminder to be gentle with the plants, but otherwise I have found picking beans with the kids to be a very relaxing and almost meditative activity.
  • Dwarf Cherry

    23 May 2015 | 10:15 am
    Today we added a dwarf cherry tree to our community garden plot. I can't remember the variety at this moment; but we chose it because it was good for eating (the other varieties said "pie cherries") and at full maturity it will be relatively small, 8'-10'. In regards to the size, we figured it would be good for a community garden plot. Ours is in the northern corner so we won't have to worry about shading out our neighboring gardeners. We will use the dirt around the base of the tree to plant shade loving greens. The catalogue said that we can expect fruit in 4-7 years. The dwarf plum in…
  • Preparing our Community Garden Plot

    7 May 2015 | 5:43 pm
    Last year we let our community garden plot get a little out of control. Typically we try to go no-till, but this time I needed the help.
  • Planting Beans

    5 May 2015 | 7:32 pm
    Jude has grown into an incredible garden helper. 
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    Life In Sugar Hollow

  • Keeping Up With Summer

    Tracey
    7 Jul 2015 | 8:54 am
    How is it early July already? I am not liking how quickly time can pass, especially with the chitlins growing so quickly.But first grade is finished (again, already?!) and we got away to the Finger Lakes last month (see the bottom four pictures). The water at the lake was high and things were mossy and damp and in the 70s the whole week. We got out on the boats twice a day, Willa learned how to fish and we enjoyed the pace of life on the water. There is so much I miss about New York and I loved our time in our rustic cabin. Last week, we also got to Lynchburg for playtime at Amazement Square…
  • In Full Swing/Spring

    Tracey
    26 May 2015 | 6:43 am
      Getting ALL of the gardening things done. Found a fragrant mock orange (second photo up from bottom). Bought some cleome and tomatoes and they are all planted. Phew. My brother has some peonies he wants me to transplant and then, I should really be finished for the season. I finally treated myself to a big, yellow TubTrug and for some reason, it makes weeding that much easier/nicer. (Also, I was able to wash the dogs in it.)This spring, I have had to become a master rose slug spotter. For years, I thought it was leaf miners decimating my roses. But a pair of reading glasses…
  • Well, Well, Well

    Tracey
    11 May 2015 | 12:09 pm
    Celebrating the sun, the rain, new plants and seeds that have been scattered. So many plant sales! I am trying out many new things this year - as a result of the generosity of other gardeners and their divisions. Forget-me-nots, blackberry lilies, asters, lamb's ears, 'Man in the Moon' marigolds, hollyhocks, lenten roses, obedient plants and foxgloves. I have also added a few more boxwoods and sowed seeds for four different zinnia varieties ('Blue Point,' 'Granny's Bouquet,' 'Cut and Come Again' and a diminutive variety - 'Pinwheel').There was also the transplanting of a very old…
  • When The Going Gets Great

    Tracey
    20 Apr 2015 | 6:38 am
    Hot damn, spring is here! And as a former girl from the North, I would say we earned it this go around. But all of that precipitation and those frigid temperatures were, actually, fantastic for the garden. My winter daphne is blooming and all of the bulbs appreciated their winter-time. That photo at the bottom is actually a tulip. 'Angelique.' They look like peonies. Amazing-amazing. And the bluebells are spreading more and more each year (top photo). Inside for a rainstorm yesterday, Willa and I worked on botanical letters (via The Postman's Knock's tutorial - second photo from top), after…
  • 9 Mar 2015 | 1:39 pm

    Tracey
    9 Mar 2015 | 1:39 pm
    We've been hit by several eleventh-hour snowstorms here in Virginia over the past few weeks. And we discovered a few things - one of which is that we have a perfect sledding hill right next to our house, and that sledding under a full moon is something everyone should do in their lifetime. Our little tri-colored terrier, Pearly, even hopped on for a ride. She knew what was good for her. Nothing shakes off cabin fever like flying down a slope into the dark and screaming your head off. Also, if snowed-in, blood oranges work nicely for a whisky sour.And, honestly, the rest of it is a blur. Lots…
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    WashingtonGardener

  • Win RESCUE!® Fly Traps in Washington Gardener Magazine Reader Contest

    WashingtonGardener
    28 Jul 2015 | 8:58 am
    For our July 2015 Washington Gardener Reader Contest, Washington Gardener Magazine is giving away the RESCUE!® POP! Fly Trap and the RESCUE!® Disposable Fly Trap (prize value: $12).   The RESCUE! POP! Fly Trap catches common nuisance or filth flies around the home and in agricultural settings. This trap is formulated to lure hundreds of the most prevalent fly species, including house flies, false stable flies, blow flies, blue and green bottle flies, flesh flies, face flies, and many others. The RESCUE! POP! Fly Trap comes with one packet of water-soluble attractant packaged…
  • Fenton Friday: Stew Fixin's?

    WashingtonGardener
    24 Jul 2015 | 2:34 pm
      This week at my community garden plot, the heat broke and the humidity left. That made gardening do-able again! The downside of that cool front moving is that we are dry-dry-dry and no real rain in sight this coming week either. So looks like we are back to our usual July-August drought period with most of my precious gardening time being allotted to watering enough just to keep things alive and not getting much else done. I did participate in one communal weeding session of our shared pathways earlier this week - no big surprise that only one other gardener showed up for it...In…
  • ADVERTISER OF THE WEEK: Carex Tours

    WashingtonGardener
    23 Jul 2015 | 12:43 pm
    Experience contemporary and classic gardens with a professional garden designer as your host. Our thoughtfully arranged tours present an opportunity to experience the work of the world’s most influential designers through an impressive variety of public and private gardens. Tours are planned to provide a leisurely pace in the spirited company of other garden enthusiasts. Piet Oudolf & Dutch Wave GardensSeptember 17 – 24, 2015This tour explores the gardens of the highly respected designers and plantsman who contributed to the Dutch Wave movement. These experimental designers favored…
  • Video Wednesday: Garden Photo Show 2015

    WashingtonGardener
    22 Jul 2015 | 1:51 pm
    Here is a short video from the 9th annual Washington Gardener Photo Contest at an art show opening reception at Meadowlark Botanical Gardens in Vienna, VA. In the video, 9 of the 11 winning photographers describe how and where they took their winning images. All 17 stunning photos were taken in DC-area gardens. Both inspirational and educational, this show represents the best of garden photography in the greater DC metropolitan region. You may come by and view the photos any time during the normal Meadowlark Visitor Center's lobby hours (10am-7pm daily). The photo show runs through September…
  • Washington Gardener Magazine July 2015 features Stunning Stewartia, 20 Herb Drying and Preserving Tips, Perennial Container Creations, and much more...

    WashingtonGardener
    20 Jul 2015 | 4:07 pm
    The July 2015 issue of Washington Gardener Magazine is now out and is posted at: http://issuu.com/washingtongardener/docs/washingtongardenerjuly15This issue includes:~ Stunning Stewartia: A Tree to Bridge the Seasons    ~ Meet Barbara Faust of Smithsonian Gardens~ July-August Garden Tasks~ 20 Herb Drying and Preserving Tips~ Local Garden Events Listing~ 5 Flower Photography Hot Spots in our Region~ Perennial Container Creations~ Top 2015 Landscaping Trends~ New Blueberry for Home Growersand much more...Note that any submissions, event listings, and advertisements for the…
 
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    A Tidewater Gardener

  • Land, Sea, and Sky

    Les
    23 Jul 2015 | 7:41 am
         What follows is an assortment of photos taken this past weekend on the Eastern Shore of Virginia. The first few were taken during a morning walk along the edge of Metompkin Bay near my parents' house. The remaining photos were taken later in the day when we took the boat to Cedar Island, where the black skimmers were busy tending to their chicks. This part of the world is very special to me,
  • Eighth Annual Citywide Bloom Day

    Les
    15 Jul 2015 | 2:00 am
         If you have ever visited here for July's Garden Bloggers Bloom Day, then you may remember that I use the occasion to celebrate the crapemyrtle (Lagerstroemia species and hybrids). You can get the backstory on the relationship between the city of Norfolk and this particular tree from my first July GBBD. Recently I came across a breakdown of street trees in the city by species, and crapemytles
  • Open Garden in Carrollton

    Les
    11 Jul 2015 | 8:23 am
         Back in June I was invited to an Open Garden event at the home of Bill and Linda Pinkham. This was not my first time here (nor this blog's), and I always enjoy visiting. The Pinkhams are consummate plant people, and over the years have designed some of the best residential landscapes in southeastern Virginia, introduced new plants to area gardeners, mentored many in horticulture (including
  • Biking at the Beach in Three Parts

    Les
    27 Jun 2015 | 7:39 am
         One of my favorite weekend activities is to take my bike to nearby Virginia Beach. I usually follow the same route, more or less, and the trip can be anywhere from 15-20 miles, but it is broken into three very distinct parts. The first leg of my journey begins appropriately enough at First Landing State Park. This is Virginia's oldest state park, and probably due to its beachfront campsites,
  • Bloom Day - Garden, Gardener, and Blogger are Still Here

    Les
    15 Jun 2015 | 2:00 am
         I've been a bad blogger. I missed May's Bloom Day, it's been more than a month since my last post, and there are over 500 new posts from other bloggers waiting for me to read at Feedly. The problem is that my actual life is interfering with my virtual life. It's still spring, and I come home from work drained (in a good way), both mentally and physically and want nothing more than to sit and
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    clay and limestone

  • Wildflower Wednesday: Summer Phlox

    Gail
    21 Jul 2015 | 11:00 pm
    I count on the different species of Phlox for several seasons of delightful color starting in early spring. Right now Summer Phlox is blooming in various shades of pink and magenta. There are even a few of the white flowered 'David',a lovely striped 'Peppermint Twist' that wants to revert to a favorite parent color, anda newer cultivar, 'Jeana' that is an absolute delight. I am not alone in thinking she's a marvelous addition to the garden, every Swallowtail in the neighborhood has stopped by for nectar. The first Phloxes in this garden were here when I arrived. They were the offspring of…
  • Feel the Mercury Rising

    Gail
    16 Jul 2015 | 6:00 am
    Summer is sizzling in Middle Tennessee and the newest Coreopsis are hot, hot, hot! C 'Mercury Rising' is blooming a velvety claret in my garden, some with white tips that I find quite striking. 'Mercury Rising’ is one of the new introductions by Darrell Probst in his ‘Big Bang’ series of hybrid coreopsis. I am crazy about them!Yes, you heard me say I was crazy about Coreopsis hybrids and I am. Of course, my go to plants will almost always be species plants, but, there's plenty of room in my heart and garden for flowers that are attractive to pollinators, whether they are the straight…
  • Wildflower Wednesday: Embrace imperfection in your garden!

    Gail
    23 Jun 2015 | 11:00 pm
    That's what I've done!When you commit to a pesticide free garden you have to be prepared for chewed on petals and foliage.Are you ready to embrace imperfection?You won't be sorry when you do.  Bees, butterflies, skippers, beetles and hoverflies will move into your garden. It will be alive with critters. Your garden will not be magazine perfect, but, pollinators don't care if your flower petals are chewed on.  They need flowers bursting with pollen and nectar. Your garden will be teeming with life. Spiders will build webs; the beneficial insects will keep aphids in check; pollinators…
  • Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day-June 2015

    Gail
    16 Jun 2015 | 3:02 pm
    Garden Bloggers Bloom Day with a nod to our pollinator friends for Pollinator Week!Butterflyweed/Asclepias tuberosaConsolida ambiguaHypericum frondosumHydrangea arborescens 'Ryan Gainey'Verbena bonariensisMagnolia grandiflora 'Little Gem'Just a few of the beauties in my garden that are beloved of the pollinators. Thank you for stopping by!xoxogailInspired by the words of Elizabeth Lawrence, “We can have flowers nearly every month of the year,” Carol of May Dreams Gardens started Garden Bloggers Bloom Day. On the 15th of every month, garden bloggers from all over the blogosphere celebrate…
  • Pollinator Week: Xylocopa virginica

    Gail
    15 Jun 2015 | 5:53 am
     Pollinator Week  has been proclaimed throughout the land! Here to help us celebrate is one of my favorite pollinators, the Eastern carpenter bee. Five interesting facts about this gentle giant.1. These big beautiful, noisy bees are excellent pollinators. In fact, they are being studied across the globe for pollinating green house crops like passionflower, blueberries, greenhouse tomatoes and greenhouse melons.2. They are generalist foragers and are known to pollinate garden crops and garden plants. Like eggplant (Solanum melongena), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), passion fruit…
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    Dirt Therapy

  • Lilies in pots - "Muskadet"

    Phillip Oliver
    9 Jul 2015 | 7:52 am
    Lily "Muskadet" growing in a pot on the patio. I have found that lilies do quite well in pots and they even bloom in shady locations. It is wise to select varieties that do not get too tall - "Muskadet" is only about 2 feet tall. I have had this one for years. I just put it in our unheated basement during the winter where it goes dormant.  Text and photos by Phillip Oliver, Dirt Therapy
  • Early morning wet garden

    Phillip Oliver
    7 Jul 2015 | 11:44 am
    I took these photos on Sunday morning following the fourth of July. We got tons of rain on Friday and spotty showers on Saturday. The garden really greened up as a result. Hopefully you can't see the weeds in the photos. I was hoping to get some work done in the garden on Friday and woke up to the rain. It is hard for me to keep it up this time of year - I hate the heat and the humidity and the mosquitoes (although they really don't bite me) are awful this year.  Text and photos by Phillip Oliver, Dirt Therapy
  • Frozen Lemonade Pie

    Phillip Oliver
    4 Jul 2015 | 5:39 pm
    As much as we needed the rain, I was bummed out that it came on Friday and today. I had tons of work to do in the garden and got very little accomplished. Couldn't the rain have waited until tomorrow?I made Michael one of his all-time favorite desserts - Frozen Lemonade Pie. It is one of the easiest things in the world to make. We embellished it a few years ago and added more graham cracker crumbs.Frozen Lemonade Pie(Makes 2 pies)3 Graham Cracker Crusts14 oz. sweetened condensed milk (chilled)8 oz. Cool Whip (thawed)12 oz. frozen lemonade (unthawed)Fold the condensed milk and Cool Whip…
  • Lily 'Caravan" and "Silk Road"

    Phillip Oliver
    2 Jul 2015 | 7:46 am
    The lilies are beginning to bloom. I think they are spectacular plants. They struggle to reach for the sun in our garden and the stalks aways flop over and have to be staked, otherwise the beautiful flowers end up nodding towards the ground. This is one of my favorites - "Caravan" - which I purchased many years ago from The Lily Garden in Vancouver, Washington.Another good one is "Silk Road" (pictured below).Text and photos by Phillip Oliver, Dirt Therapy
  • Aralia cordata "Sun King"

    Phillip Oliver
    15 Jun 2015 | 1:11 pm
    Text and photos by Phillip Oliver, Dirt Therapy
 
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    Natural Gardening

  • A robust tromboncino squash (and other squash musings)

    Lisa Wagner
    29 Jul 2015 | 6:24 pm
    An exuberant squash patchI've been growing tromboncino squash for many years as an alternative to summer squash, which always seem to succumb to squash vine borers both in the Piedmont and in the mountains.  Not to mention squash bugs.The C. moschata varieties (which include tromboncino) are somewhat hairy, and resistant to the moth that lays the eggs that become the squash vine borers (its larvae). I even resorted this year (in my front beds) to growing butternuts (in addition to the tromboncino and another Mexican variety - Tatume) as an experiment.  I don't have room for…
  • A gutter box planting

    Lisa Wagner
    28 Jul 2015 | 6:50 pm
    I walked down Haywood Street in West Asheville a couple of times today and yesterday, while getting my car window shield replaced (a chip morphed into a long crack on either side).A high point were these "gutter" plantings, in ordinary galvanized gutters, filled with attractive sedums.In the front, the owners had faced the gutters with brick. On the side, they were just suspended like miniature window boxes.sedums in a window gutter
  • Rudbeckia triloba and Ceratostigma (Plumago)

    Lisa Wagner
    27 Jul 2015 | 5:25 pm
    After the second season, the Rudbeckia triloba plants in front were unceremoniously moved to the back, above the wall.  It's a short-lived perennial species, but self-sows freely, in quantities not well-behaved in the full-sun conditions in front of my raised bed vegetables.They don't flourish quite so well in partial shade, but that seems to be a good thing, and they're looking quite nice as the backdrop to the hardy plumbago (Ceratostigma plumbaginoides) that's also in flower right now.Rudbeckia triloba and Ceratostigma plumbaginoides
  • Brooklyn Bridge Park (in NYC)

    Lisa Wagner
    26 Jul 2015 | 6:03 pm
    It's always inspiring to read about new urban parks like this one; this article in the New York Times describes a vibrant, naturalistically-planted park full of meadows and other plantings. Bringing nature to the city is a good thing.  And large scale plantings make a distinct difference in places where concrete is the norm.It's inspiration for our smaller cities and towns, too, where perhaps we don't always value the green spaces that we have, and access to everyday nature, too.
  • Sunflowers in the morning

    Lisa Wagner
    25 Jul 2015 | 6:36 pm
    Sunflowers at Biltmore
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    Outside Clyde

  • A Minimal Amount Of Order

    Christopher C. NC
    29 Jul 2015 | 8:24 pm
    It only takes one thin strip of mowed grass to prevent the look of abandonment. I can't have the place giving that impression with all the traffic passing by on the scenic byway. I did stop mowing where the sign said to. On the other side of the rickety split rail fence held together with hope and some baling wire, it is the same story. One thin strip mowed through the wild
  • What She Saw

    Christopher C. NC
    27 Jul 2015 | 7:38 pm
    It was short and sweet and now it's over until they both return in mid October. I think of the future when the Sisters are retired and can spend more time in the mountains. The first order of business will be lessons in editing. What stays and what goes? How does the idea of definition work in tandem with chaos? There will need to be some picture book learning to go along
  • A Walk In The Park

    Christopher C. NC
    26 Jul 2015 | 9:36 pm
    Sister #1 is visiting for a quick three day weekend. We went to see the Inn and had a bonus garden tour of the Posh Estate. Then it was time for a short walk in the park. We stopped to see the elk along the way. The elk were a bit of a surprise. We were way up high on a side road off the Blue Ridge parkway, far above Cataloochee valley where the elk are supposed to roam.
  • Inhale

    Christopher C. NC
    23 Jul 2015 | 5:23 pm
    There has been a sweet stench in the warm still air. I am tempted to order me a sack full of bulbs. I might not make it through the night without it happening. I think I need some camassia too. That scent is drawing things in as intended. I am not immune. A few lilies in a scene like this couldn't hurt. Some
  • In A Wild Meadow

    Christopher C. NC
    21 Jul 2015 | 8:28 pm
    It is easier to overlook the mess when there is a lot of bloom happening. The sunny utility meadow is the tidiest it has ever been. That tidy has made for more bloom. So have all the new day lilies Bulbarella has been planting. My maintenance gardener eye never rests. It is already plotting next year's editing for more definition and more flowers.
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    Growing The Home Garden

  • Of Birdnetting, Lawnmowing, and Mistakes in the Garden

    17 Jul 2015 | 5:48 am
    We all make mistakes in the garden on occaission. In fact I do it on a regular basis. Usually my mistakes are those where I forget to do something or I intend to come back and finish something but run out of time to get back to it. My biggest mistake is typically taking on too much for what my time allows. Last night when I was out mowing I made a couple of mistakes that led to a lot of frustration with my mower. Let me be clear, the blame is on me and not on my mower!I noticed my issue while beginning to mow the front yard. I turned the mower to go up hill when all of a sudden everything…
  • Troy-Bilt Bronco Axis VTT Vertical Tine Tiller Review

    2 Jul 2015 | 12:12 pm
    Recently I had the pleasure to try out the new Troy-Bilt Bronco VTT Vertical Tine Tiller which they sent me to test and use in my garden. I've used tillers periodically before in my garden and I was very curious to see how this one functioned. It's design is significantly different from traditional tillers. The tines extend down like a cake mixer and spin. It's a very interesting idea but the question is: does the vertical tine tiller work better than a normal tiller? I tested it in the backyard in a spot that was overgrown with grass and weeds. I like using tillers to start new garden areas…
  • Daylilies in Bloom

    19 Jun 2015 | 6:51 am
    It's that time of year where the daylilies are becoming the showoffs of the garden. Daylilies (Hemerocallis) area very common collectable perennial here in the south. They propagate very easily through division and are a prime starter plant for people interested in learning how to hybridize plants. Here's a look at a little of what is blooming in our garden this summer:Daylily HybridizationThe first two photos are results of my hybridization attempts. While they are pretty, they never developed into a must have daylily. Hybridizing is fairly simple, just take pollen from the stamen and dab it…
  • Propagating Grape Vines Through Greenwood Cuttings - Video

    15 May 2015 | 3:43 pm
    I took a short video today of some grape vine cuttings I'm attempting to root. Grape vines root easily from greenwood cuttings or from hardwood cuttings. I prefer the greenwood cutting method just because they seem to root a lot faster and I get the pleasure of faster gratification! Hopefully in about 6 weeks I'll have some rooted grape vine cuttings that I can pot up then plant this fall. Here's the video, thanks for watching!Rooting Grape Vines from Greenwood CuttingsSubscribe to read more from The Home Garden Originally written by Dave @ The Home Garden Not to be reproduced or re-blogged…
  • Greenworks Pro 80V 18 Inch Chainsaw Review

    22 Apr 2015 | 6:44 am
    When you think about power tools do you think electric? Maybe it's time you should! Recently Greenworks sent me their battery powered Greeworks Pro 80Volt 18" Chainsaw to test. I had some doubts. Could a battery powered chainsaw actually cut through well enough to be a part of my arsenal of power tools? Would a charge last long enough to get through all the jobs I would need to attack in one day? Would the chainsaw be able to be recharged fast enough to get back to work when it did run out of energy? Those were the questions in my head and probably the questions anyone wanting to purchase a…
 
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    Kiss my Aster!

  • New Plant: Kaveri Lily

    Kiss My Aster!
    9 Jul 2015 | 12:22 pm
    The fine folks at Longfield Gardens sent me a few of these 'Kaveri' hybrid lily bulbs to try. I almost said "no" because I'm not that into lilies, honestly, but the color and height intrigued me. So they sent them, I stuck them in the ground and LOW AND BEHOLD... I did not expect to love them this much. I took these photos with my iPhone so you can imagine what they are like IRL!The color: Ok, I don't even know how to describe it other than.... It does not look like it IS those colors. It looks like someone has painted these Cheetos/Flaming Hot Cheetos colors onto white bisque…
  • Pants off! Plants off!

    Kiss My Aster!
    18 Jun 2015 | 6:01 pm
    I don't do a lot of landscaping installs, although I like to design them and micromanage them to the end. Sometimes I do an install, here and there, if it's something I think I can hack.Recently I thought I could hack an install for a customer I've worked for for years setting up new planters at a new residence. It was really, really raining the day I set for the install. I was already there with all these plants, a local garden center had delivered 75 bags of compost (way too much compost, but that's another story) and I was determined to get the work done. However, I didn't realize that all…
  • Raising the Pink Flag

    Kiss My Aster!
    5 Jun 2015 | 8:27 am
    A long time ago, when I lived in Chicago's Avondale 'hood, there was a woman that had a "famous" native front yard and absolutely no grass. Famous/notorious, take your pick. Half the neighborhood thought it was gorgeous and half thought it was a rat-inducing nightmare. I liked it, but was consistently annoyed by the white landscape flag marking each and every plant. Also, she wore a black bathing suit to work in her garden every day and she looked like Mrs Claus. Those things were not annoying, just totally worth mentioning, for some reason. So, fast forward 10 years and I've got every…
  • Plant of Last Week: Dame's Rocket

    Kiss My Aster!
    26 May 2015 | 10:14 am
    I just spent a week winding through the weird back roads of Wisconsin and this plant, Hesperis matronalis, ruled the roadsides. You can call her Dame's Rocket. She screams at you to notice her in ditches and roadsides in bitchin' shades of neon violet. Invasive? Maybe. Depends on where you live so none of your sass.TRUTHS:1. Smells great2. Butterflies and bees love it3. I can't get over the color/height for this time of yearSo, yes, it's a crazy reseeder. So be the boss, deadhead or pull the whole plant, or stand back with your hands up. I sprinkled 30000000 Hesperis seeds on the borders of…
  • (Keep Feeling) Fasciation

    Kiss My Aster!
    6 May 2015 | 1:31 pm
    I remember seeing some seriously messed-up-by-Mother-Nature mutant dandelions when I was a kid, sometimes they looked like 15 stems melted together, sometimes just one giant tube. Although, I'm sure I saw them all the time because I took the time to study dandelions like it was my job when I was 6. Now that I've grown up (physically and not mentally) and actually made it my job, I see these super-sized dandelions less often (again, because I spend less time looking) but I've learned that the correct term for them is "fasciated" or "fasciation". I saw one in my yard today:In recent years, as…
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    Our Little Acre

  • A Living Room Divider: Define Your Space With Plants

    Kylee Baumle
    9 Jul 2015 | 10:12 am
    When Jenny Peterson and I were writing our book, Indoor Plant Decor: The Design Stylebook for Houseplants, one of the ideas we shared for using houseplants as a design element was as a room divider.From Indoor Plant Decor: The Design Stylebook for HouseplantsThe photo on page 83 of the Traditional Mix chapter shows how I used this concept in my own entry/living room. Our house was built in 1975 and when we bought it in 1977, we never gave the spindled half-wall a second thought. It's just how things were traditionally done back then.Over the years, I came to hate those spindles. First of all,…
  • I Bought it For the Foliage

    Kylee Baumle
    7 Jul 2015 | 8:30 pm
    This spring, I was walking around the garden centers, in search of petunias to fill lots of spots in the garden, since I had declared this year to be The Year of the Petunia here at Our Little Acre. I found an orange one that I decided I needed, and not too far away on the bench was a plant with foliage that looked like it was just made to go with that petunia.I can imagine all kinds of wonderful things this would complement!I bought them both and potted them up in a hanging container for the gazebo:Even though I knew full well that the beautiful-foliaged plant was a Fuchsia, for some reason…
  • Update on the Cedar Waxwing

    Kylee Baumle
    5 Jul 2015 | 11:16 am
    The young cedar waxwing I saved from the jaws of death last week is doing fine in The Berry Barn. I took some strawberries out to it and it wasn't too long before those disappeared. I also put a little dish of water with the berries but I don't know if it's drinking much of that.The other day, I noticed another cedar waxwing hanging around and I assumed it was a relative - mom or dad, perhaps?  A concerned mama?Well, today, we got confirmation that it is - Romie found the nest.We have a huge old oak tree that overlooks The Berry Barn and high up in it sits the nest.We observed several…
  • I Saved a Life Today

    Kylee Baumle
    29 Jun 2015 | 7:24 pm
    I was mulching this afternoon, in a fine mist, thankful that we weren't getting a downpour of rain AGAIN. We've already set a new record for the most rainfall in a single month ever. (We're currently at just under 12" for the month.)There's still one more day left and it's supposed to...wait for it...RAIN. *sigh*But anyway, as I was mulching, I noticed OhNo, one of our outside cats, a short distance away, under the Japanese maple tree, being quite attentive. A little too attentive. That could only mean one thing, and after last week's rabbit parts being strewn all over the yard, I didn't want…
  • Fiskars PowerGear2: A Review and a Giveaway!

    Kylee Baumle
    22 Jun 2015 | 8:30 pm
    I love to prune. I mean LOVE it. Ask my husband and his face will cloud over, because he hates pruning. He gets ouchy about it not because he actually hates the act of pruning; he hates that I love it so much. He isn't convinced that pruning trees and shrubs is altogether good for them. It's one of the Top Ten Things We Argue About. (I know you have silly things that you argue about with your significant other too, so stop laughing.)When Fiskars, a company who has been in business for 365 years now (!!!), asked me if I wanted to try out some of their PowerGear2™ products, I got all giddy.
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    Gardening into Thin Air

  • 25 Jul 2015 | 6:22 am

    Vee
    25 Jul 2015 | 6:22 am
    Our lot has a ditch between us and the road that has been mostly dry for the last 30 years. Ever since the Great Flood of 2013 there has mostly been a steady stream of water throughout the year (except in the dead of winter).  I like the changes that the flood brought - a higher water table, little streams that were never there before, constant sump pumping by my neighbors who built basements.  Everything is lush and bigger and flowering like never before.  The air feels fuller and carries scents, unlike the dry air that I've lived with for years.Love the water.
  • Let it grow

    Vee
    22 Jul 2015 | 9:37 am
    OK, I went to a lot of trouble a few years ago to dig a garden area in the front yard, but it was waaaay to much work.  I'm into fence flowers these days for that area:Hollyhocks, chicory, and sweet peas - whatever wants to find it's way in that protected area along the fence can stay and grow.  
  • Summer

    Vee
    25 Jul 2009 | 8:14 am
    Well, I've been out of town for several weeks and I'm just now getting back to the gardening, or rather the extensive weeding. The year that I choose to leave in early summer is the year that has the most rainfall (ever?). The chicory is 5 feet high, the hollyhock finally bloomed, the grape actually has a few little balls of fruit, the scrub oak added a couple of feet of branches.We have a nightly deer visitor who is sporting a line of christmas tree lights in his antlers and I fear he has a broken leg. But he seems fine otherwise, munching on the greenery. The baby goat up the street has…
  • After the Boulder County Fire

    Vee
    28 Mar 2009 | 7:40 am
    Here are some photos of the area north of town that was burned a couple of months ago. It's really greening up, even with the dryish winter we had.  After this 2 feet of snow melts, it's going to grow like crazy!
  • Everybody's Hungry!

    Vee
    14 Mar 2009 | 3:01 pm
    Go for it.  I put it there for you anyway.  Just leave the seeds alone, ok?
 
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    The Gardens of Petersonville

  • Finally Ripening!

    Sheila
    25 Jul 2015 | 11:10 am
     Into the later half of July and we still have overcast mornings, some much needed but unexpected rain, and it is finally starting to get hot enough to turn the tomatoes ripe. I even picked my first fig this morning and will savor it in a couple days with some cheese and honey. The tomatoes finally got staked by my son who stopped by a couple weekends ago and made a run to the nursery for me.  I have tried to make it as inconvenient as possible for the dogs to get to them and enjoy them before we do.   The red among all the foliage is a welcome sight! Along…
  • A Corner of Color

    Sheila
    15 Jul 2015 | 4:27 pm
    With the water regulations in play, most of the flowering perennials that would be in bloom now are laying low. It hasn't been terribly warm yet, so there are still some corners of the garden in the shade that hint at what the garden used to be during years when there was adequate rainfall. I'm surprised to see the baby tears since most of the other tiny groundcovers have disappeared, but this little corner near the front door sits in the shade and must get a good dose from the sprinkler nearby a couple times a week. Other plants a few feet away are shrinking and shriveling. Sometimes I am…
  • Sago Palms

    Sheila
    8 Jul 2015 | 9:51 am
    Female Sago PalmMale Sago PalmAny questions?
  • Blooming

    Sheila
    5 Jul 2015 | 12:41 pm
    Iochroma I have to admit that my garden is looking pretty pathetic right now. Even though most of the plants are rather drought tolerant and I don't think it is necessarily the water restrictions that are causing the havoc as much as the erratic summer weather combined with my lack of attention. It is cool and overcast for a few days, then hot and humid for a while, then dry and windy. Asiatic lily I have very few things in bloom when this should be the peak season for things like roses and lilies. Most of my lilies have disappeared over the years and I still have the new bulbs…
  • Succulents Are Not Cactus, (But Cactus Are Succulents)!

    Sheila
    4 Jul 2015 | 10:49 am
     I use aeoniums as ground cover in a number of spots for the simple reason that they are so easy to propagate. Just take a rosette and stick it in the ground and you have a new plant.They do best in bright areas or filtered sun. But they are not fool proof in that they do need some regular water. They are not cactus! The picture above is a spot that they are quite happy in, a neglected corner with just the right amount of sun and water. This picture is a spot they are not too happy with, along the curb in the front yard. My garden helper put them in on his own when the creeping thyme…
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    Blog the blogging nurseryman- The Golden Gecko Garden Center

  • What did we harvest today?

    Trey Pitsenberger
    24 Jul 2015 | 9:49 am
    Here is the latest harvest from our small farm behind the nursery. The peppers are really coming along strong. Jalapeno, Padrone, Fresno Chili, and more. Rattlesnake and purple beans are ready. "Rattlesnake Beans" are a tender, refreshing edible podded bean. Beautiful, 7 inch long, purple striped green beans appear on tall plants in summer. When pods are left on the plant to mature and dry, they reveal auburn and brown speckled seeds that are scrumptious in warming winter soups and stews. "Purple Podded Beans", are a delicious heirloom discovered in the Ozark mountains by Henry Fields in the…
  • Lavender today

    Trey Pitsenberger
    23 Jul 2015 | 2:21 pm
    "cottage garden with   lavender and rich roses -   heavenly scented."       Linda JacksonYou don't have to have a cottage to enjoy the heavenly scented lavender. Our 2015 Lavender is ready for sale. Lavender is very popular here in the foothills since it blooms so nicely, but is also deer resistant. So you don't have to hide it behind the garden fence.Available in 4" size pots. "Dutch Mill", "Provence", "Grosso", and "Munstead". are the four types  we carry. $4.99 per pot.   The above is a sample of the nice size plants available. Ceramic pot…
  • Today's vegetable selection

    Trey Pitsenberger
    19 Jul 2015 | 10:50 am
    Organic vegetables from our farm are starting to come with more frequently. Tomatoes are still a week out, but as you can see we have loads of other summer fruits. Pickling and slicing cucumbers,  garlic, "Gold Bar" squash, "Black Beauty" zucchini, and peppers. In peppers we have "Black Hungarian", "Gypsy", "Jalapeno", "Padrone" , and "Fresno Chili". Potatoes and "Rattlesnake" beans round out today selection. Oh, and lots of picked daily Basil!Remember, we are closed on Mondays!
  • New summer hours

    Trey Pitsenberger
    1 Jul 2015 | 11:50 am
    Please make note of our summer hours. Tuesday - Friday 10am to 5pmSaturday - Sunday 10am to 3pmClosed on Mondays.
  • Blossom end rot, a common problem

    Trey Pitsenberger
    29 Jun 2015 | 1:12 pm
    Starting to see Blossom End Rot on samples of tomatoes brought in by customers. We even have it on some of our tomatoes. It also occurs on squash, and peppers. Usually the "blossom end" of the fruit develops a black spot that eventually destroys the fruit. It's very common, and fortunately an easy cure. The number one reason for it is a "calcium deficiency". Calcium is an important nutrient, that is sometimes lacking in our soil, or in the soilless mixes we use. We use a product called, Foli-Cal, which when mixed with water and applied will quickly remedy the situation. The fruit that is…
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    The Whispering Crane Institute

  • Honeybee Populations Are Growing Again!

    Rick Anderson
    29 Jul 2015 | 10:42 am
    More Evidence of Bees on the rise!!! There has recently been some good news about the honeybee populations, after several years of alarming reports that their numbers have been making […]
  • Call off the Bee-pocalypse

    Rick Anderson
    27 Jul 2015 | 5:08 pm
    From the Washington Post. Seems like we are more in danger now of losing bee-keepers than bees-maybe. Another story of how a free-market economy is the driving engine to successful […]
  • 6 Plants That Beat Butterfly Bush for the Wildlife Draw

    Rick Anderson
    26 Jun 2015 | 8:38 am
    Here’s a very interesting take on alternatives to the very popular “Butterfly Bush” that is/has become a go-to plant for many gardener’s. I am a big fan of finding a […]
  • The Xerces Society » Milkweed Seed Finder

    Rick Anderson
    17 Jun 2015 | 5:17 am
    Remember to check for plants native to your region and state. The Xerces Society » Milkweed Seed Finder.Filed under: animals, gardendesign Tagged: Asclepias, asclepias sp, common milkweed, milkweed, monarch butterflies, […]
  • Maxims and Mottoes from Masters of One-liners

    Rick Anderson
    30 Jan 2015 | 4:35 pm
    A list of great books, it’s a reading list but one worth taking a look at. Maxims and mottoes from masters of one-liners: A reading list | ideas.ted.com.Filed under: Einstein […]
 
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    Skippy's Vegetable Garden

  • seems like not a good year for cucumbers

    kathy
    25 Jul 2015 | 6:38 pm
    Today I harvested a very nice cucumber. a pretty Corinto cuke. But Sadly, i don't think it'll be a great year (or even a good year) for cukes. Not sure what's going on but the leaves on most of my vines are shriveling and vines are dying. I have about 20 plants, 6 or 8 varieties, and they're in the back of three different beds, growing up the fence. A virus maybe? Some leaves have a lot of beetle-like damage, but I'm not seeing any beetles. I did see some grubs and wimpy roots when I pulled up one plant. I don't know. Last year, cucumbers were my over-and-above crop. I will look up when the…
  • today's harvest

    kathy
    19 Jul 2015 | 10:57 am
    I pulled 25 heads of garlic and cut most of my broccoli today. The upper photo is what I collected at my community plot. The lower one from, my home garden (and the chicken coop). I haven't been to my community plot in a while I guess as those zucchini are enormous! Fortunately another gardener was glad to take three of them.
  • no queen!

    kathy
    19 Jul 2015 | 9:51 am
    I checked my hives today. 3 weeks since I last looked inside. I didn't do a complete check because its 95F and 12 noon. I think not the best time to check. (more ... )
  • today's harvest

    kathy
    30 Jun 2015 | 7:46 pm
  • me first bee sting

    kathy
    30 Jun 2015 | 7:23 pm
    I got stung by one of my bees last Saturday. Ouch. It really hurt. It made me hurry to finish the hive inspection. (more ...)
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    Home Garden Companion

  • Nature Will Have Her Way

    Ilona Erwin
    22 Jul 2015 | 7:11 am
    Nature takes no halfway measures. When in balance, with the sure and languorous change of seasons, we are lulled into the belief that our regimes and schemes hold sway, that humanity is all powerful in its display of dominance and power. Our technologies collude in the illusion of control and eminent domain over earths terrain, climate and creatures. But in its circuit through time, Nature will reassert the truth that our human powers are indeed very small in this domain of climate, weather patterns, and impending descent of ancient phases of drought or cold, or flood. And the temporary cloud…
  • Daylilies Grow On You

    Ilona Erwin
    8 Jul 2015 | 12:03 am
    I just wrote a page about Daylilies, and then saw Kathy Purdy’s post on Facebook with a delightful portrait of  a variety called “Going Bananas”. It got me thinking about what colors of Hemerocallis I like best. Time For Daylilies, on Ilona’s Garden Advertised as “peach”, it certainly is, with a ruby red marking. ‘Paper Butterfly’ has performed well for me. From earliest memory when visiting old fashioned gardens that often had a circle of daylilies somewhere in the yard, it was the “Lemon lily” that I always liked best. That might…
  • It worked, but…

    Ilona Erwin
    7 Jul 2015 | 6:42 am
    Robin’s Nest blog photo by RobinL … I forgot to put in the photos (there were choices with a little plus sign), so I pulled them in here, and then added them (one the features of her site that I was trying to share with readers, so they could be forgotten.) I also didn’t have the tags added and didn’t see where the post area was for that in the press this window. I do like the convenience, though. This blog used to share lots of other bloggers as a way of supporting them and giving readers a curated view of the garden blogging that I found most enjoyable, interesting,…
 
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    Bananas.org

  • Potting mix

    RedBanana02
    29 Jul 2015 | 12:37 pm
    hey guys, Does anyone know if Miracle gro potting mix is good and well draining for bananas? thks:0519:
  • good afternoon

    easye001
    29 Jul 2015 | 10:46 am
    Joined to learn about my banana colony in my back yard. Thanks for the invite! No bananas just beautiful décor. Timely freezes the last two years is probably why but my main goal is to learn how to make them produce bananas! Still learning if I need to fertilize and if I do, with what type. Anyways thanks for the add! will enjoy browsing the site. E Attached Images 11692636_10203656352564171_3822936959792779500_n.jpg (135.5 KB) 11141185_10203753458391756_3146562616803770154_n.jpg (148.5 KB) 11218168_10203753458111749_4864070563713996322_n.jpg (107.3 KB)
  • Growing Bananas Video>>>Check it Out!

    Going Bananas
    29 Jul 2015 | 9:31 am
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cigy...ature=youtu.be I was going to resurrect an old thread 10 pages long... but lost it. Heres the video. :lurk:Check it out!:lurk:
  • efect of nitrogen on puping

    obdiah
    29 Jul 2015 | 8:53 am
    Has any one noticed an increase of pups after high N applactions? I fertlize with amonium nitrate 30-0-0 and it seems that after fertlizing everything pups like crazy or is it just coincidence ?
  • Manini at four weeks and Truly Tiny

    a.hulva@coxinet.net
    28 Jul 2015 | 8:49 pm
    https://40.media.tumblr.com/1c2938b0...8if5o1_540.jpg :2738:
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    Ewa in the Garden

  • Algarve - vegetable garden - Day 29

    29 Jul 2015 | 11:48 pm
    And on the hot and dusty day 29, my vegetable garden looked like this. I was harvesting lettuce every, just for one person. Just waiting 4 weeks and you may have your own chlorophyll and other precious nutrients to heal your body. Tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers and courgettes were flowering promising good produce. But then my doctor said no tomatoes and no peppers, as they are inflammatory
  • Hackers can overtake your car while you drive it

    24 Jul 2015 | 9:02 pm
    This is really scary. Just see it. I think I will stick to the old car :) What about you?
  • 37 Photos of the Absolutely Most Stunning Cactus Garden in Europe

    23 Jul 2015 | 10:11 am
    Most stunning xeriscaping cactus garden in Europe has roots deep in the past, when little Jacob was used to seat for hours and stare at his grandmother cactus collection… When I was a kid, my grandmother used to have a windowsill filled with cactus plants. I loved it! I have spend a  lot of time just looking at them…   So, give me your hand and let me take you today for a bewildering stroll
  • Algarve - Vegetable garden - Day 15

    17 Jun 2015 | 7:27 am
    This little vegetable garden in Algarve seems to be growing, but at its own pace. I am not sure how, in this heat, the veggies will be doing, but so far it seems that some of them do better, some of them not so excellent. I see that tomatoes and peppers are adjusting longer than expected – probably because when I bought them they were pretty big in size, but roots were kept small. They were sown
  • Searching for a missing doggie in Algarve!!!

    11 Jun 2015 | 12:59 pm
    Her name is Misia, she got missing few days ago. Owners in tears!!! If you see her somewhere around Loule or Frankeada, let me know by mail ewamariasz [at] gmail.com.
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    Your Small Kitchen Garden

  • Sweet Pepper Roulette

    Daniel Gasteiger
    25 Jul 2015 | 11:06 pm
    The first peppers to form on my “roulette” pepper plants were obviously bell peppers. These will eventually ripen to a gorgeous bright orange. Last season I grew sweet orange bell peppers, and sweet Italian peppers. I collected seeds from both and included them in a giveaway mid-winter. Unfortunately, I lost track of which seeds were which, so I described the giveaway as “roulette.” I told participants they might receive orange bell pepper seeds, they might receive sweet Italian pepper seeds, or they might receive some combination of both. I faced the same uncertainty, so I started a…
  • Marjoram in Bloom and Pollinators

    Daniel Gasteiger
    20 Jul 2015 | 5:29 pm
    It’s hard for a single photograph to do justice to the pollinator population in my marjoram. This one reveals two revelers: a honeybee and a fritillary butterfly—probably a Meadow Fritillary, but what I know about fritillaries I learned in the last five minutes using Google and The Butterfly Site. Two years ago, marjoram got its own place in my garden and last year it found a place in my heart. I wrote about it here. The stalks flowered for about two months and attracted pollinators more than any other plant. It’s back! My marjoram busted out blossoms last week while I was out of town.
  • Baby Finch Disaster Averted

    Daniel Gasteiger
    9 Jul 2015 | 6:21 pm
    I heard a spongy thud behind me and turned to find this little bird on the lawn weeds. I put the last rock in place and leveled soil in my rock garden. As I stepped back to take photos I heard a meaty thud; something, it seemed, had fallen from the sky. It didn’t take long to find a tiny bird baby on the lawn. I looked up and spotted a nest about 12 feet up in the branches of our blue spruce tree; the same tree that had housed a robin’s nest in a post I wrote in April titled Grubs and Birds. I’d need a stepladder… and I’d need a camera. How could I not take photos of this…
  • Finally, Almost a Rock Garden!

    Daniel Gasteiger
    6 Jul 2015 | 5:24 pm
    Until a few weeks ago, this was an unruly compost heap next to a pit I had dug on my way to creating a rain garden. The pit is dry 98% of the year, so my enthusiasm for planting wet-tolerant plants has been low. Finally, last autumn, I stocked up on succulents and decided the compost heap would become a rock garden. My wife got the ball rolling by clearing the compost, mounding soil along the back, planting elephant ears and calla lilies, and hauling a few rocks from the driveway. Some years ago (2011), crazy, biblical rains made my vegetable plants very sad. I decided to reduce the…
  • Eastern Bluebird on Wordless Wednesday

    Daniel Gasteiger
    1 Jul 2015 | 8:36 pm
 
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    Veggie Gardener: Organic Vegetable Gardening Tips

  • Regrowing Veggies with Water Alone

    Chris Eger
    26 Jul 2015 | 5:21 pm
    Getting down in the dirt and planting a veggie garden is not always the easiest thing. If you’ve got a bad back, knees that ache, or arthritic hands, you may not look forward to planting time. In order to get a delicious, plentiful veggie garden going, however, we do what we must, even when it doesn’t come easy. Despite the fact that there are veggies you have to work harder to grow than others, some veggies do fall on the more flexible side. In fact, so flexible are they that you can grow them in water alone without even the addition of dirt or soil of any kind. In addition to being an…
  • The Dangers of Deer Waste in the Garden

    Chris Eger
    18 Jul 2015 | 9:50 pm
    Cultivating a vegetable garden results in a plentiful bounty for all to eat. Chances are that if you have one, your friends and family will also enjoy the products of your efforts. Sometimes sharing is a welcome activity, but in other cases it might not be. No one likes those uninvited guests that always take but never give back, coming over without your permission and leaving a mess in their wake. One such garden guest that fits exactly this description is the deer. Vegetable gardens are an extremely attractive food source to in the eyes of deer. The temptation to feast on your veggies is so…
  • Battling the Tomato Hornworm

    Chris Eger
    9 Jul 2015 | 9:59 am
    Enjoying a delicious tomato sandwich is high on the list of priorities for many of us this summer. As we painstakingly grow and care for our tomato plants, it is only natural to look forward to the reward that comes when we are surrounded by vibrant tomatoes. Though we humans enjoy these tomatoes immensely, we are not the only ones; unfortunately tomatoes are tasty to pests as well. One pest in particular is driven to consume and destroy the tomatoes we work so hard to produce. That pest is the tomato hornworm. The tomato hornworm is a caterpillar that goes on to become a five-spotted…
  • Crafting Cucumbers in Your Veggie Garden

    veggiegardener
    14 Jun 2015 | 9:12 pm
    Biting into a piece of crisp cucumber is sure to make any summer just that much brighter. No matter how you eat cucumbers, enjoyment is sure to be part of the package. Cucumbers are also fairly easy to grow, much to the delight of veggie gardeners everywhere, as they thrive in hardiness zones 4-11 and can be grown quickly in about any location regardless of space due to the plant’s tendency to climb upwards. If this is something you desire, a trellis is a good way to achieve such growth. Cucumbers like warm weather and should be planted outdoors in temperatures no lower than 70 degrees (65…
  • Pruning Tomatoes to Enhance Growth

    veggiegardener
    7 Jun 2015 | 12:24 pm
    Commonly seen in the veggie garden is the tomato. In addition to being delicious and having a place alongside or inside of many meals, tomato plants and seeds are widely available. Most everyone can appreciate a crisp tomato on their burger, in their salad, or as part of a pasta dish, and as a result tomatoes are usually the first plant people invest in when they decide to start growing their own food. Despite the popularity of the tomato, they do not always come easy. Depending on your climate, certain varieties may thrive while others do not. Sometimes your best, most determined efforts are…
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    Miss Rumphius' Rules

  • Narrow Fence Line Planting

    Susan aka Miss. R
    7 Jul 2015 | 4:21 am
    In the suburban New York/New Jersey gardens where I do much of my landscape design work, fences are a part of the landscape. They become, by virtue of the height and length, a major landscape feature–whether intended or not. Creating a planting scheme to complement them depends on the fence and the homeowner’s intent for their yard and the shade sun patterns created by the fence itself.  The two examples below are stylistically different, but both are created in a very narrow space and require minimal care. A hot, small space between a fence and a driveway can become a lush…
  • Re-Making an Old Garden for a New Family

    Susan aka Miss. R
    27 Jun 2015 | 12:25 pm
    Often my landscape design clients I ask me to insert some contemporary flavor into an existing landscape. These renovation projects are similar to interior updates in that the new has to dovetail seamlessly with the existing. This family had a very traditional, overgrown and poorly maintained landscape that had no place for three active, young girls to be outside except the driveway, an in need of repair pool, and a too small patio. The house sits on generous lot that is also promontory with a steep slope up to the front door and an even steeper slope back to the rear property line. Most…
  • Garden Design Details: Container Planting

    Susan aka Miss. R
    30 May 2015 | 8:00 am
    For me, it’s the end of container season.  I only plant them for a few clients. Planter design is not a core service of my landscape design practice because I find them to take as much time to prepare for and execute as any other planting design. In reality, that’s what a container is, a planting design executed in a very small, seasonal space. I do have clients who specifically ask me to design their containers and I say yes, but I just don’t overtly offer to do it.   Nobody ever taught me the rules of containers so I approach them in the same way I would any…
  • Contemporary Tiles and the Middle Ages

    Susan aka Miss. R
    19 May 2015 | 4:25 am
    Sometimes my mind connects the dots in unexpected ways.  I visited ICFF (International Contemporary Furniture Fair) in New York over the weekend.  You would think I’d be all mid-mod and forward thinking. But no. I fell for these concrete tiles from Grow House Grow.  They are a new product for the company, frost proof and come a a wide variety of colors. My mind immediately went to the Middle Ages and the floor at Sainte-Chapelle in Paris. Since my images of that were lost in an iPhone debacle, I borrowed this one from Wikimedia to illustrate the point. Now to find a place to use the…
  • Magnolia Lust

    Susan aka Miss. R
    26 Apr 2015 | 6:24 am
    As part of my job as a landscape designer, I regularly walk the growers and nurseries to see what is new and what looks good.  I learn about plants new to me that I may want to trial and try. Like many other designers, I get on a plant jag and have a love affair with a group of plants for a while and then move on to flirt with something else that catches my rather short plant attention span.  Today I have plant lust.  I was at the fabulous NJ wholesale grower, Pleasant Run Nursery yesterday and fell for Magnolia x brooklynensis ‘Black Beauty’ that is just now…
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    Garden Therapy

  • Sunshine in a Bowl: Watermelon Peach Banana Vegan Ice Cream

    Stephanie
    25 Jul 2015 | 7:09 am
    ***Scroll down to the bottom of this post for a giveaway!!**** Healthy ice cream! Healthy, no sugar added, dairy-free, vegan, all-fruit ice cream! Now that I have your attention can I also say that it’s smooth, creamy, and tastes delicious too? Does this seem too good to be true? It’s not, and here is how to make it. I volunteer ... The post Sunshine in a Bowl: Watermelon Peach Banana Vegan Ice Cream appeared first on Garden Therapy.
  • Beating the Heat: Protect Your Plants From Heat Stress

    Debbie Wolfe
    22 Jul 2015 | 11:00 am
    Hot weather can be hard on your plants. Just like us they need special care in extreme heat. Even with adequate watering and mulching, plants can suffer when the temperatures rise but there are a few things you can do to help protect your plants from heat stress during the hottest part of the summer. Water Correctly Watering is essential when ... The post Beating the Heat: Protect Your Plants From Heat Stress appeared first on Garden Therapy.
  • Insect Bite Roll On Remedy

    Stephanie
    20 Jul 2015 | 7:04 am
    This insect bite roll-on is great to have on hand when you least expect that you’ll get attacked by mosquitoes, flies, or other annoying pests. If you’ve ever been caught outside at dusk without bug spray you may also know the frustration of trying to enjoy time with friends while getting eaten alive by mosquitoes or swarmed by flies. This handy ... The post Insect Bite Roll On Remedy appeared first on Garden Therapy.
  • Sunscreen Lip Balm Recipe

    Stephanie
    19 Jul 2015 | 7:43 am
    Before you head out in the sun do you make sure that you cover your skin with sunscreen? What about your lips? Applying sunscreen meant for your skin directly to your lips doesn’t taste very good. Plus it is dries out your lips and dulls the shine. Instead, try this homemade sun protection lip balm, it will protect your lips, ... The post Sunscreen Lip Balm Recipe appeared first on Garden Therapy.
  • Three Ways to Make Herbal Oils for Natural Beauty Recipes

    Stephanie
    17 Jul 2015 | 3:56 pm
    Infusing oil with herbs is a great way to add colour, scent, and healing properties to the raw ingredients you will be using in natural beauty recipes. Simply soaking herbs in oil isn’t enough to infuse the oil; it needs to be heated. Luckily, there are a few ways of doing this so you are sure to find one that ... The post Three Ways to Make Herbal Oils for Natural Beauty Recipes appeared first on Garden Therapy.
 
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    Urban Organic Gardener

  • FOR SALE- Urban Farm…Make your Homesteading Dreams Come True!

    Sariann Irvin
    29 Jul 2015 | 8:53 am
    Looking to escape the rat race? Wanting to re-locate somewhere and start a full or part time homestead? This Urban Rustic Homestead/Farm is located in a desirable location in Bremerton, Washington.  Close to military bases, shopping, parks and plenty of recreation…not to mention the beautiful Puget Sound. Recently remodeled with new flooring, updated appliances, fixtures, wood ceilings, plumbing, & wiring, this charming home offers a farmhouse feel on the inside and out! Move in now and harvest your first crop – all the work has been done! 15 fruit trees, a variety of…
  • St. Luke’s Hospital sends all new moms home from the hospital with a basket of fresh produce …

    UOG
    23 Jul 2015 | 6:23 am
    Post/content/images are from CivilEats.com – and – anderson.slhn.org Are Hospital Farms the Next Big Thing in Healthcare Reform? When it comes to improving the food on today’s hospital trays, some medical institutions are finding that onsite farms are the next logical step. By Jodi Helmer on July 21, 2015 St. Luke’s Rodale Institute Organic Farm This summer, St. Luke’s Hospital started sending all new moms home from the hospital with a basket of fresh produce, recipes and literature about the importance of a healthy diet. All of the produce in the basket was grown on…
  • Chicken Keeper. Urban Organic Gardener. Advocate of REAL food. Meet Kati, the Urban Lady Bug!

    UOG
    21 Jul 2015 | 9:48 am
    This post/content/images are from www.SeedsNow.com How did you get started with your blog? How I got started with my blog, The Urban Lady Bug, was through Facebook originally, I posted pictures of our garden on my personal page almost everyday and had dozens of my friends and their friends, comment, tag and ask a bunch of questions. So I figured I should create a page where people who might not know me or be my friend on fb, would still “like” my page and gain gardening information or advice from me! Once Instagram took off (follow The Urban Lady Bug on Instagram), I decided to…
  • UC Berkeley’s student-run garden offers urban oasis

    UOG
    19 Jul 2015 | 9:24 am
    This post/content/images are from berkeleyside.com A sign outside the garden tells when there’s produce being given away. Photo: Alix Wall by Alix Wall/Bay Area Bites Whenever UC Berkeley student Sara Cate Jones has felt the blues coming on, she’s relied on the same remedy: she goes to the student garden on the corner of Walnut and Virginia streets and picks herself a bouquet of flowers. “The garden is always here for you,” said Kate Kaplan. Jones and Kaplan are two of several student garden managers for the SOGA (Student Organic Garden Association) garden. Established in 1971 by a…
  • Super Creative Organic Urban Gardens Around the World: Who Needs Biotech?

    UOG
    15 Jul 2015 | 3:46 pm
    NationofChange.org is the original source of this post/images. Not only are people around the world capable of growing nutrient-dense, nourishing food that will feed their communities, even if they live in an urban setting, but they can also do it with élan. Some of the most creative urban gardening projects around the globe can inspire us to create our own green space in the city, or add luster to a space that’s already underway which just needs a little oomph. Here are some off-the-(biotech)-chain gardens that will get our creative juices flowing so that we can carry the dream of living…
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    Gardener's Journal

  • When Blight Strikes, it’s Time for Tough Love

    gscadmin
    27 Jul 2015 | 7:08 am
    An empty pot, brought about by Early Girl’s early demise. How do you become a better gardener? Practice. That’s the secret. In my practice this season, I planted two tomatoes in our front-yard vegetable garden, showcasing them in shiny red pots (from our Viva line) that flank the front entrance. They looked so nice. Front yard vegetable gardens can be beautiful. But then it rained. And it rained. I sprayed proactively with Serenade because I knew — based on lots of practice — that tomatoes get blight easily. Especially when rainfall is abundant. Despite my best efforts, one…
  • Peony Lovers: Who Was Sarah Bernhardt?

    gscadmin
    17 Jun 2015 | 7:57 am
    A rain-soaked Sarah Bernhardt blossom gets a new place to shine as a floater in a lily pool. Ever wonder how some plants get their names? The romantically fragrant, pink peony Sarah Bernhardt was named more than 100 years ago and remains a garden favorite. The beloved French actress, known as Madame Sarah (born in Paris 1844-1923), is still considered the most famous actress of the 19th century. The peony that bears her name was introduced in 1906. Among the first actors of her time to take movie acting seriously, Sarah Bernhardt played the role of Queen Elizabeth in her most famous film…
  • Dish it Out. Succulents Can Take the Heat

    gscadmin
    9 Jun 2015 | 11:41 am
    If you’re looking for a simple, easy-care planter that can endure heat and dry spells, consider filling a pot with succulents. I start with an old concrete urn that makes most any plant look good. To ensure good drainage, I add some sand to the potting soil, mounding the soil slightly to show off a mix of low-growing, cold-hardy succulents. In a couple seasons, the plants will fill the allotted space, giving the urn a bejeweled effect. A local nursery offers “variety packs” of succulents — sempervivums and sedums — making it easy to create create varied texture and…
  • Invite Mason Bees into Your Backyard

    gscadmin
    1 Jun 2015 | 4:50 am
    A mason bee makes her way into a bamboo tube to lay an egg. Bees have been in the news lately because of the important role they play in pollinating crops. Even President Obama has gotten involved by launching a new strategy to help honeybees and other pollinators. Although I’d like to do more to help pollinators, I’m not ready to put a hive in my city backyard. Instead, I bought mason bees. These blue-black bees don’t make honey, but they are prolific pollinators that rarely sting. And, like many good things in life, they come in the mail. (To learn more, read About Mason…
  • An Allium You Can Plant Anytime: Summer Beauty

    gscadmin
    26 May 2015 | 5:23 am
    A drift of Summer Beauty alliums harmonizes with a clump of echinacea. Photo by Jill Selinger. Taken from The Know Maintenance Perennial Garden© Copyright 2014 by Roy Diblik. Published by Timber Press, Portland, OR. Used by permission of the publisher. All rights reserved. Upon seeing globe alliums for the first time, many a gardener will say, “Gotta have some of those in my garden.” And then she learns that globe alliums are bulbs — and must be planted in fall. Sadly, it’s too late for this year, but put it on the list for fall: “Buy allium bulbs. Lots of…
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    Annie's Gardening Corner

  • Maximizing Coastal Beauty

    24 Jul 2015 | 2:27 am
    A recent Bilowz Associates Inc. Landscape Design Project. One of our specialties - coastal properties. Exterior spaces tell a powerful story.  At first glance, what might immediately catch your eye is this breathtaking setting. There's no denying this exquisite point surrounded by open water with its own boat dock would be a perfect dream spot for most. But can you guess what that raised grass area is on the right? Follow our design story in the coming weeks to find out this and more. A close up image with details of this area will be revealed to give you a sense of how unique this truly…
  • Flower Break Message

    22 Jul 2015 | 8:22 am
     When the Daylily blossoms begin to fade...Replace them with Dahlias. Adore Dahlias in the garden or cut them for your summer flower vases. © All Images – Property of Bilowz Associates Inc.    If you like this blog, check in for your daily share's worth of garden inspiration, landscape architecture and design tips; always original, not cookie cutter and copied. Just like our design work, we strive for unique! We invite you to contact Bilowz Associates, Inc., or to browse our portfolios. Like ourFacebook follow on Twitter or subscribe to the blog to receive posts daily via…
  • Hot Monday Tropics

    20 Jul 2015 | 7:21 am
    With the weather feeling quite tropical, the title is just a play on words. But there is a hot Monday topic to discuss and it's worth a repeat summer performance. Before the segue into microclimates and why it's important to understand them as they relate to garden and design, there's another quick message - pay attention to the nature of things. What's the best way to do that? Expose yourself to nature everyday if you can and pay attention to the process occurring as you take it all in. Where did your paths lead you this weekend?  Somewhere in nature? To beautiful and contemplative…
  • Where Quiet Meets Creative

    15 Jul 2015 | 9:29 am
    Completing the finishing touches on a quiet garden space - designed by Bilowz Associates Inc. Longing for a contemplative outdoor garden space? The most intimate of garden rooms aren't necessarily large and expansive but small and quaint. Plus, garden rooms offer the best of both worlds - it's where quiet meets creative yet this contemplative space above can easily be party overflow and entertainment area. So always make your outdoor rooms functional - not just aesthetic. Similar to your indoor living space, creating that perfect size room can often be the biggest challenge. One tip - make…
  • Hot Weather Sizzling Garden Tips

    13 Jul 2015 | 6:34 am
    The color of the sunrise this morning - red hot over the lake, not a ripple or wake At 5:20 AM, (the only time to take in a quick cycle) this red hot sunrise over the lake is more than a telltale sign of a sizzling day in store. It's also an alert to what can raise havoc in the landscape.  Hot weather has a way of bringing out the worst diseases and insects. These buggers can adversely affect the home and garden. Best way to stay on top of it all - sign up for alerts from your local extension program or check the homepage of the American Phytopathological Society (APS).  Top on…
 
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    Serenity in the Garden

  • Millennium Allium flowers-deer resistant!

    Jan Johnsen
    27 Jul 2015 | 8:22 pm
    My current favorite. They are starting to bloom now at end of July. So beautiful when contrasted with 'Victoria Blue' Salvia in a planter.I took this a little while ago by my front walk.
  • 3 Simple Garden Design Tips

    Jan Johnsen
    27 Jul 2015 | 4:57 am
    Jan Johnsen garden and photo - Heaven is a Garden     Jill Sell of the Cleveland Plain Dealer just wrote a lovely review of my book,  'Heaven is a Garden': "As life gets more hectic, we seek homes and gardens that are refuges from the chaos. It doesn't matter if we have a five-acre property, suburban half acre or a balcony off our apartment; a garden that provides serenity is a treasure. Jan Johnsen's Heaven is a Garden (St. Lynn's Press) is a gem of a little book that provides both inspiration and practical suggestions for creating our own garden…
  • Before and After - Garden Photo of the Day

    Jan Johnsen
    26 Jul 2015 | 11:18 am
    This is a great reminder of how fast plants grow -Golden Majoram is planted in the squares at the base of this Grape Arbor.The photo at top is taken from one end while the after photo is looking toward the other end...
  • T. Jefferson's Amazing Vegetable Garden

    Jan Johnsen
    25 Jul 2015 | 5:06 am
    Vegetable Garden at Monticello Thomas Jefferson, the third president, was an ardent plant lover and a pioneer plant distributor. He collected exotic trees and shrubs and investigated new crops to grow in the United States. He was instrumental in introducing many vegetables into the young American culture.For example, he smuggled rice in a tea canister from his tour in Italy and sent it to South Carolina and Georgia as a possible crop. His attempts to have farmers in those areas sow various varieties of foreign rice, were finally successful  and, in time, it became a…
  • Nature has a reminder for you....

    Jan Johnsen
    24 Jul 2015 | 12:11 pm
    Love is everywhere
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    MySecretGarden

  • Sequim Lavender Festival 2015

    29 Jul 2015 | 8:04 am
    They call it Lavender Capital of North America! These are some of my pictures from the Lavender Farm Tour which was a part of  the 19th  Sequim Lavender Festival. Location: Washington state, Olympic Peninsula, Sequim-Dungeness Valley. We visited Blackberry Forest Farm, Purple Haze Lavender Farm, Graysmarsh Farm, Creek Side Lavender Farm, Jardin du Soleil Farm, Olympic Lavender Heritage
  • Fairytale Garden of Marion and Steve

    24 Jul 2015 | 5:56 am
    When you see such a bench on the way to a garden, you start suspecting that there is something magical ahead. When, after the bench, you come to such a shed, you are already sure that you are in for a special treat: Knock-knock! Who lives here? Marion and Steve have lived here since 1972, in the house built in 1900. A former elementary school teacher, Marion is gardening,
  • End of Month View - My Garden, June 2015

    3 Jul 2015 | 5:24 am
    My garden helper was going to show and tell you about my garden before falling asleep.  Fortunately, he kept notes, and they'll be helpful when I try to do that by myself.  Thank you, Amur! This is my main sitting area in summer.  Western side of the house, it is shady for most of the day,  and when the sun appears here, two palms in containers provide protection. Green
  • Arundel Castle Gardens - May 2015

    26 Jun 2015 | 7:53 am
    I can certainly say that these Gardens are among my all-time favorites. I knew nothing about them. They were recommended to us by my husband's colleague when we planned our May trip to Europe.  Hidcote Manor Garden was already on the list, and I needed one more garden to visit while we were in London. Now, thinking back, I believe that an absence of any expectations was one of
  • To the Garden! La Torretta Hotel in Manarola, Cinque Terre, Italy

    13 Jun 2015 | 5:44 am
    Our May trip to Cinque-Terre in Italy, besides all the beauties of the five villages with stunning views, had an unexpected treat. As you may guess, it was a garden! Not a public garden or a botanical garden, and not a garden included into some type of garden tour, but a private, authentic garden located on one of those terraced hills, which we, as tourists, used to admire. I'd never have seen
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    Veg Plotting

  • (Almost) Wordless Wednesday: A Bit of a Mouthful

    VP
    29 Jul 2015 | 12:30 am
    Acer palmatum var. dissectum Dissectum Atropurpureum Group is a bit of a mouthful, so it's good to see it's a synonym now for the slightly snappier Acer palmatum 'Dissectum Atropurpureum'.Whatever its name, it's still one of my favourite plants.If you're not reading this on vegplotting.blogspot.com, Blotanical or your own web reader such as Bloglovin' or Feedly, then the website you're using is a blogpost feed scraper. Why not go straight to the source instead? That's vegplotting.blogspot.com
  • Singing in the Rain... Again

    VP
    27 Jul 2015 | 12:30 am
    The garden's enjoyed the rain we've had over the past few days and I took advantage of a brief lull over lunchtime yesterday to grab a few photos. Raindrops have a great way of accentuating the form of flowers and vegetation, and some plants like Alchemilla mollis and lupins are positively made for the vagaries of our English weather.An overcast day means there's even lighting to play with and no need to get up so early as there's a good light to be found in the middle of the day. This kind of weather is great for blooms with richer colours, or for yellows and whites to add highlights to the…
  • Another Visitor to the Plot

    VP
    17 Jul 2015 | 12:30 am
    As well as the welcome garden visitors I blogged about on Monday, I also spotted this unusual looking ladybird on my Knautia 'Red Ensign'. I thought it might be the dreaded harlequin ladybird, but was reassured to find a similar looking one in a downloadable ID guide; our native 2 spot ladybird also has a reversed red on black form.However, Dave Kilbey on Twitter told me:@Malvernmeet @KellyTunley @ChippenhamNow It is a harlequin (alas). Form conspicua. They can be quite variable in size.— Dave Kilbey (@kilbey252) July 13, 2015 He went on to say: @Malvernmeet @KellyTunley @ChippenhamNow if…
  • GBBD: Sultry

    VP
    15 Jul 2015 | 12:30 am
    Victoria once remarked my garden is very purple. Today's view is quite different. This is Monarda 'Fireball', which is a more mildew resistant form of  bergamot from what I've seen so far. I particularly like how its blooms add a fiery air to the garden, especially at dusk. I planted 3 9cm pots last year which have grown to form a satisfyingly large clump this summer. Bees love it and a brush past the foliage releases a wonderful scent. It's definitely one of my summer favourites.However, if you stay on the spot, then look in the opposite direction and take another photograph......
  • Of Garden Visitors and Butterfly Counts

    VP
    13 Jul 2015 | 12:30 am
    The hot weather's bought all kinds of new visitors to the garden lately. The most notable I've managed to photograph is this Scarlet Tiger moth. It looks a little the worse for wear which leads me to wonder whether it's an over wintered specimen. A wonderful Hummingbird Hawk moth did zoom by just moments after I'd taken the above photo. It was far too quick for me though!Getting an ID for my new friend allowed me to spend some delightful time on Butterfly Conservation's website, where they have lots of information to help visitors identify common day flying moths seen in the garden.As a thank…
 
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    The Enduring Gardener

  • 21st Century Plantagenets

    Stephanie Donaldson
    29 Jul 2015 | 8:02 am
    Seventeen years ago a pair of BBC reporters, Bella and David Gordon, gave up their London life and moved to a small village in the Loire Valley where they established a specialist plant nursery growing the dry-garden plants that the French didn’t realise they needed until the serious droughts of 2003-2005. At that point the chateaux, communes and municipalities started to give up their thirsty annuals and turned to Plantagenet Plants for the perennials that would transform the public gardens, parks and even the roundabouts of France. Their own garden is the testing ground for many of the…
  • Apricots – it’s been worth the wait

    The Enduring Gardener
    25 Jul 2015 | 11:22 am
    There have been times in the past several years since I planted the apricot tree that I have seriously considered chopping it down. It has produced very few fruit and I did wonder why I gave it space in the garden.  Not this year though.  Last month I had to thin the fruit, so laden were the branches  and now the remaining fruit have swelled and are weighing down the branches with hundreds of glorious golden fruit. As far as possible, I have covered the most laden branches with Tendamesh (a very fine net) to keep the birds and squirrels at bay and so far it seems to be working.  As the…
  • Rosebie Morton knows her Roses

    The Enduring Gardener
    16 Jul 2015 | 6:01 pm
    I recently had a wonderful day at one of Rosebie Morton’s Rose Days at her farm in a deeply rural part of Hampshire. She is best known as the founder of The Real Flower Company – the company that sends out the loveliest and most indulgent of handmade bouquets of fragrant roses and flowers – all grown on their own farms. Behind that public face is the wholesale business she has evolved to supply the roses, other flowers and foliage for her own company and the wholesale floristry market. The courses are run from her own house and garden next door to the flower farm. Her story is very…
  • Grounds for Soil Improvement

    The Enduring Gardener
    15 Jul 2015 | 11:25 pm
    If you call into Costa Coffee and pick up a free recycled coffee bean bag of used coffee grounds to use as a soil improver and you may find that you can give giant vegetable grower Kevin Fortey a run for his money. He has been using the coffee grounds this year and has noticed a significant improvement in the quality of his vegetables. The coffee grounds slow-release nitrogen, calcium and magnesium and add organic matter to the soil. They are also said to deter slugs and snails, but this has been questioned in the past. The grounds can also be added to your compost heap.
  • Berchigranges

    The Enduring Gardener
    14 Jul 2015 | 2:08 am
    One of the ironies of Berchigranges is that there are so many wonderful places to sit down and enjoy your surroundings, but Thierry and Monique seldom (if ever) find the time to do so. They are well aware of this and acknowledge it with a pair of seatless chair backs positioned at one of the loveliest views which they have called ‘The Dream of a Gardener’. Thierry uses the natural materials that surround Berchigranges in so many different and creative ways – I was very envious of the wealth of stone and wood so near at hand, but also awestruck by the amount of work that has been…
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    Urban Gardens

  • Five Designs That Put the Fun in Functional

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    23 Jul 2015 | 6:34 pm
    With designs that put the fun in functional, some designers are creating works which elicit both an aha and a haha. Here are five pieces with a sense of humor: 1. Killing Time I met designer Weng Xinyu at Ambiente … Read More... The post Five Designs That Put the Fun in Functional appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Plantus Please: Modular Indoor Vertical Gardens

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    17 Jul 2015 | 9:55 am
    Budapest-based designer Judit Zita Boros designed Plantus Planters, a system of modular indoor vertical gardens, with indoor urban gardeners in mind. Planted Walls and Living Curtains These modular indoor vertical gardens are double-duty systems which not only offers the … Read More... The post Plantus Please: Modular Indoor Vertical Gardens appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • In Harmony With Nature: Francis Benincà’s Environmental Sculptures

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    14 Jul 2015 | 10:41 am
    You might say that French sculptor Francis Benincà was ahead of the curve. As a teenager Benincà worked alongside his father building sculptural “bubble houses” which strongly influenced the designs of the environmental sculptures Benincà creates today. His father, Antonio … Read More... The post In Harmony With Nature: Francis Benincà’s Environmental Sculptures appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Five Lust-Worthy Rooftop Gardens

    Tierney VanderVoort
    10 Jul 2015 | 1:24 pm
    Pulltab Design.Photography by Bilyana Dimitrova Summer is here and that means plenty of barbecuing and cocktail sipping out in the back yard! Or, if you’re very lucky, you have a rooftop garden to lounge on. We’ve rounded up some … Read More... The post Five Lust-Worthy Rooftop Gardens appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • How to Grow a Book Into a Tree

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    6 Jul 2015 | 9:00 am
    Even a single child can contribute to saving the planet. After reading a book from the Tree Book Tree program, a child can plant it and watch it to grow into a tree. It’s a wonderful way to teach … Read More... The post How to Grow a Book Into a Tree appeared first on Urban Gardens.
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    Lead up the Garden Path

  • Lackadaisical Lucifer!

    Pauline
    25 Jul 2015 | 3:14 am
    Crocosmia Lucifer is playing his usual game in the month of July. In the spring, his foliage bursts through the soil and makes quite a statement with its sword shaped spears. But this doesn’t give you any indication of what will follow in July. Up come the flowers and it is the main focal point of the garden for about a month. It seems that no matter where you are in the garden, no matter what you are doing, it is this beast that draws the eye. Crocosmia Lucifer I keep saying that I must divide the corms, but never seem to get round to it, so the clump is getting bigger and bigger. To…
  • July GBFD. We need rain!

    Pauline
    22 Jul 2015 | 1:38 am
    Rain keeps getting forecast, but it seems to miss us most of the time, we can see the rain clouds over Dartmoor, but they hardly ever reach our village! The garden is looking a bit dry in places, but we are  holding  back on watering because once we start, the plants will expect it. Hydrangeas and Rhododendrons are still looking just about ok, these are usually the first ones to show a lack of water. Acer palmatum Shindeshojo My new little Acer (yes, this does get watered once a week as it is new!) now has a variety of coloured foliage. Most of the leaves have now turned green, or are in…
  • Great Weston Ride.

    Pauline
    19 Jul 2015 | 11:34 am
    Today was the day that the family has been working towards for some time now. The Great Weston Ride is from Bristol to Weston Super Mare,  57 miles,  raising funds for Prostate Cancer UK.  Our daughter and family between them have raised over £890 in sponsorship and when tax from Gift Aid is added, it will be well over £1,000, well done guys, fantastic effort! At the finish line! Gold medal ! Unknown to them, the undergardener and I decided to travel to Weston Super Mare and wait for them on the finishing line. While waiting for them we cheered and clapped everyone who finished, there…
  • July is busting out all over! GBBD .

    Pauline
    14 Jul 2015 | 11:51 pm
    With all the hot weather that we have been having, everything seems to be flowering at once, but in the heat, plants are going over faster than normal and I seem to spend most of my time deadheading to keep the borders looking presentable. Thank goodness the weather this week is cooler for the plants and me. Clematis Pagoda This clematis has done ever so well this year, I’ve never known it to have so many flowers before. Trachelospermum asiaticum. This was bought as T. jasminoides. but the flowers are cream rather than white, the perfume is still absolutely fantastic though. This is…
  • Lilies for a Day.

    Pauline
    11 Jul 2015 | 7:33 am
    Or if you prefer, daylilies aka Hemerocallis. They do only flower for a day, but there are so many buds on each clump now, that we can now say that they flower for a month. I find that they look a lot better if they are deadheaded every day or couple of days, a chore I know, but they do look a lot better for it. H. Stafford Hemerocallis Stafford was one of the first ones I bought as my parents were living in Stafford at the time. I’m afraid the names of my day lilies have gone, lost in the mist of time and old age! I like this small peachy one. Oh, I missed a dead head there! Another…
 
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    leavesnbloom

  • Light up your garden with Candelabras

    Rosie Nixon
    3 Jul 2015 | 2:33 pm
    photo taken at a friends garden Primulas were once just flowers that I associated with late winter / early spring.  When I was growing up primroses and polyanthus grew prolifically in my grandad's garden.  They were one of the first flowers I grew myself as a child; the first plants that I learned how to divide and transplant ...with great results; with very forgiving leaves and roots around a gardener with little fingers.   Little did I realise back then how diverse the Primula family really was! Years later I grew them from seed after giving the seeds 'a taste of winter'…
  • Do you Grow Pollinator Friendly Plants?

    Rosie Nixon
    2 Jun 2015 | 12:10 am
    If you received the Heartland Buzz through your letterbox or picked up a copy through one of the Highland Perthshire outlets then you'd have seen that I wrote about Limnanthes douglasii -Poached Egg plants in the May edition. I think that this is one of the very best hardy annuals for encouraging beneficial insects into your garden and Bob Flowerdew has probably provided the greatest PR campaign for this little plant ... On my bookshelf I've quite of few of Bob's books and if you've ever read one of them you'll already know how passionate he is about them.  His…
  • How to Create a Small Ecosystem in Your Garden with Bee-flies

    Rosie Nixon
    26 Apr 2015 | 1:41 pm
    Ferocious looking little insects fly about in my Perthshire garden at this time of year. Seriously they really do strike a touch of fear in you the very first time you encounter them. They look so intimidating with their large proboscis that looks just like a sharp sewing needle.  They also have a thick hairy body like a small bumble bee along with a high pitch buzz.  They look and sound so threatening but honestly they're no threat to anyone ...that isunless you're a ground nesting solitary wasp or bee Read more »
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    Garden Walk Garden Talk

  • Are Bumblebees Back in My Garden?

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    29 Jul 2015 | 4:00 pm
    I hope so, and thank the zinnia for feeding those fuzzy-butt bees. I think this is a female Common Eastern Bumblebee, Bombus impatiens. It is big and fuzzy. I was noticing the lack of bumblebees in the garden the last … Continue reading →
  • Do You Specialize?

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    27 Jul 2015 | 4:00 pm
    I got asked if I do. Hmm… I need a moment. I was at the Niagara Falls Air Show last weekend and enjoyed every second of the two days. It was free, exciting, a bit scary for the non-flying crowd … Continue reading →
  • Rabbits’ Eye View

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    24 Jul 2015 | 4:00 am
    Did you ever notice… your garden the way a rabbit might view it? Not in the rub the tummy sort of way, but rather way down low, at rabbit height. The garden really looks a whole lot different generally speaking … Continue reading →
  • Have You Met Your Blogging Goals?

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    21 Jul 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Goals When I started blogging, I set a time frame, not in years, but in numbers. It seemed sensible at the time so my life didn’t become all about blogging. I enjoy much more than just gardening at home. So … Continue reading →
  • When Will You Stop Blogging?

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    19 Jul 2015 | 4:00 pm
    I have been thinking about this question for some time now. If a blog is successful is there a cut off time when it isn’t? Will blogging just die out eventually? Do readers get tired of reading blogs and lose … Continue reading →
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    Gardenerd

  • Ask Gardenerd: When to Spray to Avoid Bees

    Christy
    29 Jul 2015 | 6:34 am
    Another great question to share with you this week from Melody Girard: “Are there certain times of the day that bees and other pollinators in our area routinely forage? If so, when would that be? I’ve read that if you … Continue reading → The post Ask Gardenerd: When to Spray to Avoid Bees appeared first on Gardenerd.
  • Revisiting the Huntington Ranch

    Christy
    28 Jul 2015 | 9:55 am
    Back in 2010 we attended the grand opening of the Huntington Ranch, a secret garden of sorts outside the normal sites to see at the Huntington Library and Gardens. In its infancy, the Huntington Ranch promised to bring back the … Continue reading → The post Revisiting the Huntington Ranch appeared first on Gardenerd.
  • Growing and Harvesting Ground Cherries

    Christy
    23 Jul 2015 | 6:44 am
    It’s always great to discover you can grow something in  your climate that you didn’t think was possible before. This is true of ground cherries for me. Until this spring, they were a mystery to me, relegated to northern climates, … Continue reading → The post Growing and Harvesting Ground Cherries appeared first on Gardenerd.
  • Ask Gardenerd: Make my Hydrangea Blue

    Christy
    15 Jul 2015 | 6:38 am
    I think we’ve all asked this question at least once in our gardening lives: “What do I have to do to make our light pink hydrangea to blossom blue. Everyone has different opinion on this subject, your help is very … Continue reading → The post Ask Gardenerd: Make my Hydrangea Blue appeared first on Gardenerd.
  • Where’s Gardenerd: Golden Isles, Georgia

    Christy
    14 Jul 2015 | 7:38 am
    We’ve received our first report from Where’s Gardenerd on the road. He’s in Golden Isles, Georgia, and has been spending time at the headquarters of Modern Mia Gardening. It seems Modern Mia and the Wonder Kids have been showing Gardenerd … Continue reading → The post Where’s Gardenerd: Golden Isles, Georgia appeared first on Gardenerd.
 
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    Veggie Gardening Tips

  • Burpee’s Early Season Garden Writer’s Gathering

    Kenny Point
    2 Jul 2015 | 5:40 am
    Last Friday I was invited to Burpee’s Fordhook Farm to participate in an Early Season Garden Writer’s Gathering. This event was an opportunity to tour the farm and trial gardens, explore an organic kitchen garden, attend gardening presentations, mingle with other garden writers and members of Burpee’s team, indulge in some great food, and other interesting activities. Part of the day’s focus was on the state of insect pollinators and the things that can be done to encourage and protect these important garden allies. Burpee has partnered on a nationwide project with the White…
  • How to Simplify Growing Mushrooms

    Kenny Point
    19 Jun 2015 | 5:37 am
    Most people get it backwards! They love mushrooms, and think Chanterelles are wonderful, so they look for Chanterelle spawn. If they manage to find it, they are disappointed to learn that Chanterelles require conditions which are not present in their own back yard or home. They sigh, and give up, because they are just too hard to grow! If you start with the mushroom, growing mushrooms can be very difficult. You are required to produce conditions which the mushroom you want to grow, actually thrives in. This can be problematic for many kinds of mushrooms. To make it simpler, start with the…
  • At Home with FLEX, Troy-Bilt’s New Yard Care System

    Kenny Point
    3 Jun 2015 | 5:25 am
    I shared previously about my participation in Troy-Bilt’s Saturday6 Program and that I would be writing and conducting product reviews for the company. Well the next step was making the tough decision of selecting one product from their line up for my first review. I went back and forth before finally choosing the brand new FLEX to trial in my own yard! In case you haven’t heard about Troy-Bilt’s new FLEX, it is an innovative set of power equipment created to help manage a range of outdoor tasks including mowing, leaf blowing, power washing, and even clearing snow. The FLEX…
  • Growing Edible Perennials in the Backyard Vegetable Garden

    Kenny Point
    27 May 2015 | 7:29 pm
    There is nothing like raising edible perennials to get a big jump on the growing season and to help reduce your planting chores in early spring. I incorporate traditional perennial vegetables as well as those that are more common in permaculture gardening circles. It’s great to enjoy a lush, green garden and early harvests without putting much effort into producing it. Just like with ornamental perennials, once planted those perennial edibles will return year after year with a fraction of the effort required to raise an annual crop. Long Lasting Benefits of Raising Perennial Vegetables In…
  • Introducing the Troy-Bilt Saturday 6

    Kenny Point
    30 Mar 2015 | 6:52 pm
    My recent getaway to Charleston, SC wasn’t simply an escape from the long and cold winter, but the result of an invitation to participate in Troy-Bilt’s Saturday 6 program. I have had very positive experiences with the Troy-Bilt brand so it didn’t take long for me to accept the invitation, join the new Saturday 6 team, and head to South Carolina. Before I share the details about the program I’d like to introduce the other members of the group: Rochelle Greayer is the founder of Pith + Vigor and author of “Cultivating Garden Style.” She gardens in Massachusetts, is a…
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    Perennial Meadows

  • Looking good after 6 years – one perennial meadow example – 2015

    Michael
    26 Jul 2015 | 1:54 am
    Six years ago I planted eleven demonstration borders at Lianne’s Siergrassen; a nursery specialised in ornamental grasses, in the north of the Netherlands. I returned this month after a three year gap to see how they were faring and came away satisfied and informed from what I had seen. Lianne Pot is the perfect client who has maintained the borders well and only made minor changes to the various schemes over the six years. Perennial meadow schemes are developed as simplified plant communities in the hope that they will develop as a whole and evolve over time. Looking at the schemes…
  • Is Texture a Garden Theme?

    Michael
    23 Jul 2015 | 12:41 am
    Like any good story the plot is revealed one step at a time; my garden is the same. Different seasons have different themes as steadily the plants grow up and express themselves like actors in a drama. By late summer I look forward to waving grasses and sheets of yellow blossom, in early summer the colour pallet is all blues, purples and crimsons, but in July the forms and patterns of stems, leaves and flowers of varied hues mixes together to create a single image or theme I would term texture. In late summer ornamental grasses are clearly the theme, but in July grasses are only a small part…
  • Early Summer Theme Plants – Roses and Hardy Geraniums

    Michael
    22 Jun 2015 | 11:55 am
    In a small garden you need to carefully choose a number of theme plants that you can use in sufficient quantities to have a bold impact and which, each in their turn, play a role in a sequence stretching from spring through summer, autumn and on into winter. I have been exploring my ideas for theme plants in my perennial meadow garden in a series of earlier posts and will continue to point out the star performers as this year progresses. It is June and roses have to be considered. Over the years I have tried many, but steadily the bushes have tended to disappear from my borders while the…
  • Theme Plants

    Michael
    17 May 2015 | 2:16 am
    Snowdrops, hellebores, daffodils and lots of tulips: these are the plants that flower in sequence to bring my gardens to life each spring. But now that Tulipa sprengeri is coming into flower the end of spring has been signalled and I must look forward to the next group of theme plants to take the show forward into summer. Theme plants in my perennial meadows are the key plants that dominate the schemes in their season and carry the banner forward. Together they grow happily together to create a coherent block of vegetation that functions as one of the design elements in the garden’s…
  • Tulips from Amsterdam

    Michael
    15 May 2015 | 2:49 am
    Plants in their season can bring spectacle to the garden when used boldly. I search for such players in my gardens and use them repeatedly, at numerous intervals throughout the planting  – I call them the theme plants in my perennial meadows. In my recent posts I suggested mid-season daffodils as the leading theme plants for late spring to be followed by tulips before the arrival of summer. The city of Amsterdam has in recent years started to celebrate the tulip by placing pots filled with them throughout the main tourist areas. At one level this pleases me as the flower is…
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    Beautiful Wildlife Garden

  • National Moth Week 2015: Central Florida

    Loret T. Setters
    24 Jul 2015 | 9:02 am
    Well, another year has passed and we are in the midst of National Moth Week. It started back in 2012 and I have reported on moths I find at my place each year. In keeping with that tradition, I am reporting this year on some different moths that have made an appearance at my place […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Island Comeback

    Loret T. Setters
    17 Jul 2015 | 10:30 am
    I have a tussock; that is a floating island in my pond.  The tussock appeared on its own in September 2011 and has sometimes disappeared at the start of winter, such as back in 2013 and again in 2014. Thankfully my floating island has reappeared as spring turns to summer each year.  I am grateful […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Unplanting for the Pollinators

    Ellen Honeycutt
    16 Jul 2015 | 5:00 am
    We focus so much on “planting” for pollinators, but there are times when we should be removing plants in order to support our pollinators. You ask, “How could removing plants possibly help our pollinators, don’t they need the plants to survive?” The answer is “Yes, they do need plants to survive.” They need specific plants […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • The Dizzying World of Hummingbirds

    Brenda Clements Jones
    14 Jul 2015 | 4:42 am
    During the summer, I get the gleeful feeling my cabin is part of a huge merry-go-round. The innermost portion of the revolving machine, where the calliope is housed, is the cabin, which stays still. Normally the portion of the merry-go-round that small children and those young at heart, ride, is filled with lions, tigers, bears and horses, […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Garden Royalty, Dragonfly Style

    Loret T. Setters
    10 Jul 2015 | 9:24 am
    Always on the hunt for new encounters in my beautiful wildlife garden to blog about, I was down in the pond area peeking under leaves and flowers to see if I could find any new-to-me species of interest.  I noticed a big dragonfly swooping over the pond.  Because of the large size, I automatically figured […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
 
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    Vegetable Gardener - All featured posts

  • Fish Peppers are Edible and Ornamental

    29 Jul 2015 | 9:22 am
    Posted by WesternGardener Whether you have to be a small-space gardener or garden on a small scale by choice, it makes sense to grow plants with more than one feature. An heirloom hot pepper plant with a funny name offers at least two beautiful reasons to appreciate it.
  • Purslane in the Kitchen

    26 Jul 2015 | 10:48 pm
    Posted by cookinwithherbs Last week, I wrote about purslane and the benefit of having it in one's garden. For those of you new to portulaca, here are a few recipe ideas using purslane.
  • Vegetable Gardening with Container Eggplants

    20 Jul 2015 | 1:36 pm
    Posted by WesternGardener Would you like to change your vegetable viewpoint when it comes to eggplant? These miniature fruits will certainly add new interest to your small-space vegetable garden.
  • Purslane (Portulaca oleracea)

    19 Jul 2015 | 3:04 pm
    Posted by cookinwithherbs I decided to do this blog on one of my favorite naturalized garden weeds since it has been in the news lately. https://www.facebook.com/TheEdenPrescription/photos/a.201474409907598.64598.130965870291786/820695717985461/?type=1&fref=nf&pnref=story Did you know that Portulaca oleracea contains the highest amount of omega-3s of any plant in the vegetable kingdom, not to mention it is full of minerals and vitamins A and C?
  • Online Cooking Classes for Vegetable Gardeners

    13 Jul 2015 | 12:10 pm
    Posted by WesternGardener If you grow herbs, greens and assorted vegetables, chances are you’re always looking for fresh and easy recipes to help make the most of them. A new set of online cooking classes, priced at a reasonable $5 each, will surely inspire you to try something new.
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    Tsubo-en Zen-garden diary « Tsubo-en Zen-garden diary

  • Second Abundant bloom of our Wisteria sinensis

    Karesansui
    20 Jul 2015 | 12:01 pm
    In my previous post,' Recovery of our solitary Wisteria-sinensis', I wrote about the blooming of the Wisteria-sinensis. Now, after almost three months, we have a second, relative abundant blooming, and this time with the leafs developed.   Although blooming is seen during the whole summer, we have never seen so many flowers at the same [...]
  • Recovery of our solitary Wisteria-sinensis

    Karesansui
    24 May 2015 | 10:27 am
      This frost-damage was particularly sad with regard to our garden pride, the solitary Wisteria-sinensis (see: Resurrection of our Wisteria sinensis). In 2015 we had a very late spring. Temperatures have not been very low, with average rainfall and average sunshine. Although the shape of the Wisteria sinensis is no longer solitary as it [...]
  • Midoritsumi, ‘green picking’ and Momiage ‘thinning’, combined

    Karesansui
    9 May 2015 | 6:56 am
          Due to my health status during 2014 (see: A forced recess: Infective or bacterial Endocarditis) for the first time ever, my wife (on here own initiative) had done Midoritsumi, the ‘green picking’ of our Pinus- densiflora. This must have been a hell of a job, because it was done with a [...]
  • Pilgrimage: Ofuda (御札 charm, talisman), a shrine or a temple seal

    Karesansui
    2 Jan 2015 | 12:12 pm
    A popular custom is to buy a blank booklet at the beginning of the pilgrimage and have a calligraphy named 'Ofuda', painted in it, at each of the temples (1). It is believed that one after one's death, when one can show this booklet to the deity at the gate of heaven, one obtains permission to [...]
  • A forced recess: Infective or bacterial Endocarditis

    Karesansui
    23 Dec 2014 | 2:40 am
    The garden has seen one of its poorest years ever. Initially. At the end of the year all looks good again. During the first half year of 2014 my wife had to do the maintenance on here own. During the second half of the year I gradually gained control again. Not only about the garden [...]
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    Miss Rumphius' Rules

  • Narrow Fence Line Planting

    Susan aka Miss. R
    7 Jul 2015 | 4:21 am
    In the suburban New York/New Jersey gardens where I do much of my landscape design work, fences are a part of the landscape. They become, by virtue of the height and length, a major landscape feature–whether intended or not. Creating a planting scheme to complement them depends on the fence and the homeowner’s intent for their yard and the shade sun patterns created by the fence itself.  The two examples below are stylistically different, but both are created in a very narrow space and require minimal care. A hot, small space between a fence and a driveway can become a lush…
  • Re-Making an Old Garden for a New Family

    Susan aka Miss. R
    27 Jun 2015 | 12:25 pm
    Often my landscape design clients I ask me to insert some contemporary flavor into an existing landscape. These renovation projects are similar to interior updates in that the new has to dovetail seamlessly with the existing. This family had a very traditional, overgrown and poorly maintained landscape that had no place for three active, young girls to be outside except the driveway, an in need of repair pool, and a too small patio. The house sits on generous lot that is also promontory with a steep slope up to the front door and an even steeper slope back to the rear property line. Most…
  • Garden Design Details: Container Planting

    Susan aka Miss. R
    30 May 2015 | 8:00 am
    For me, it’s the end of container season.  I only plant them for a few clients. Planter design is not a core service of my landscape design practice because I find them to take as much time to prepare for and execute as any other planting design. In reality, that’s what a container is, a planting design executed in a very small, seasonal space. I do have clients who specifically ask me to design their containers and I say yes, but I just don’t overtly offer to do it.   Nobody ever taught me the rules of containers so I approach them in the same way I would any…
  • Contemporary Tiles and the Middle Ages

    Susan aka Miss. R
    19 May 2015 | 4:25 am
    Sometimes my mind connects the dots in unexpected ways.  I visited ICFF (International Contemporary Furniture Fair) in New York over the weekend.  You would think I’d be all mid-mod and forward thinking. But no. I fell for these concrete tiles from Grow House Grow.  They are a new product for the company, frost proof and come a a wide variety of colors. My mind immediately went to the Middle Ages and the floor at Sainte-Chapelle in Paris. Since my images of that were lost in an iPhone debacle, I borrowed this one from Wikimedia to illustrate the point. Now to find a place to use the…
  • Magnolia Lust

    Susan aka Miss. R
    26 Apr 2015 | 6:24 am
    As part of my job as a landscape designer, I regularly walk the growers and nurseries to see what is new and what looks good.  I learn about plants new to me that I may want to trial and try. Like many other designers, I get on a plant jag and have a love affair with a group of plants for a while and then move on to flirt with something else that catches my rather short plant attention span.  Today I have plant lust.  I was at the fabulous NJ wholesale grower, Pleasant Run Nursery yesterday and fell for Magnolia x brooklynensis ‘Black Beauty’ that is just now…
 
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    The Gardening Blog

  • Flourishing in my winter garden

    Barbara
    27 Jul 2015 | 2:20 pm
    I am so pleased to say that there is so much happening in my winter garden. Lots to harvest and even more thriving! Let me show you whats going on……. Lots flowering….  Lots to eat …  What is on its way… What herbs do we have… Composting pals… I hope you are having as much fun in your garden as I am!! Happy gardening xxxx
  • Gutter Garden

    Barbara
    22 Jun 2015 | 12:18 pm
    I have heard the saying, “Weeds are flowers that don’t know that they have to grow in a row”. Well, I have found a new respect for this common plant – my new name for a weed. The Dictionary defines a weed: weed |wiːd|noun: “a wild plant growing where it is not wanted and in competition with cultivated plants.” Well, that is not always true. I have a place for “weeds” in my garden and they are very [...]
  • Essence of my Winter Garden

    Barbara
    11 Jun 2015 | 2:45 pm
    I love the softness and the coolness of a winter garden. After a harsh summer, it is a pleasure to see so much green. The mist envelopes the mornings and everything looks magical – the spiders webs look like jewellery. I hope you enjoy the walk through my June garden…….. Lets see whats happening in the front garden My beautiful Leopard Tree! Lets see whats growing in the winter veggie garden Another [...]
  • My Greywater System

    Barbara
    31 May 2015 | 10:34 am
    We have been planning this simple Grey Water System for quite sometime. It needed to be simple and cheap to do! So today was the day!! I will take you through the process with the photo DIY. We decided to use a collection box to trap the grey water and direct it to the veggie patch through a system of pipes. These pipes are the average plumbing pipes you get at any hardware [...]
  • A Bokmakierie in my Garden

    Barbara
    31 May 2015 | 8:41 am
    I have never see this bird before!! What a surprise when I saw him in my garden!! I quickly looked up in my Bird Book (Sasol Southern African Birds – a photographic guide: Ian Sinclair/Ian Davidson) This beautiful bird, the bokmakierie, kept us entertained while he played with his reflection in the car window! This bird is not common in gardens, so what a pleasure that he graced ours and that my [...]
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    Native Plants and Wildlife Gardens

  • Native Mini Garden Gets Edits

    Suzanne Dingwell
    23 Jul 2015 | 2:26 am
    It’s a fact. Plants want to grow up, become mature, and raise a family; and that’s exactly what they do unless we make it impossible for them. Which can definitely happen. However, in this mini garden, things did grow. They really grew. And, true confessions; things  didn’t turn out the way I envisioned them – […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Front Porch Prothonotaries — Part TWO

    Pat Sutton
    19 Jul 2015 | 8:21 am
    In mid-June we proudly related the exciting story of Prothonotary Warblers nesting on our front porch. Now, in mid-July we are bursting as the “proud parents” of four successfully-fledged chicks! As we wrote in July, the parents were feeding the rapidly growing young every few minutes with all the insects and caterpillars they were finding […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Christmas in July: Wild Poinsettia

    Loret T. Setters
    13 Jul 2015 | 10:31 am
    Next to the patio I have a patch of Paintedleaf a.k.a. Fire-On-The-Mountain a.k.a. Wild Poinsettia (Poinsettia cyathophora;  synonym: Euphorbia cyathophora).  This area gets morning sun and begins to move into the shadow of the carport in early afternoon.  It is amazing the amount of activity that takes place each day at this beautiful native plant […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • A Bestiary: Part Forty-Two ~ Songbirds: Northern Cardinal

    Carol Duke
    11 Jul 2015 | 8:06 am
    The male Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinals) is the last but more easily recognized bird of the Cardinalidae family found here at Flower Hill Farm. My Bestiary continues with the namesake of this family. Cardinals, long after most birds have migrated, contently rest upon naked branches outside our heated homes and visit bird feeders, especially those filled with […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • 5 Ways to Keep Your Wildlife Garden in Bloom

    Kathy Settevendemie
    8 Jul 2015 | 2:09 pm
    Keeping your wildlife garden blooming through the summer can be a challenge especially during periods of drought and high temperatures. The colors of the spring garden rapidly fade but there are ways to keep plants attractive and blooming all season long. First, your garden should include a variety of plant species that bloom in different […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
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    Nigel Gnome grows a vegetable

  • Crispy frosty

    Nigel Gnome
    13 Jul 2015 | 1:55 am
    We are in the middle of a fosty patch, the last few mornings the car has been white and patches of lawn have been dusted.The lovely tender stem broccoli have been loving itquick pick of broccoli bitsFrosty broccoliLettuce and parlsey under wire to keep the blackbirds off the compost
  • Shortest day!

    Nigel Gnome
    20 Jun 2015 | 10:41 pm
    Nine hours of daylight, not a lot of time but enough to do a few tasks in the garden.I planted some heritage purple broccoli we bought from a great organics store in Napier last weekend. They bring our broccoli plantings to 25, should keep us happy I'd say.Lemons looking goodThe parsnips, carrots and beetroot are all doing well, though the shadow line needs to retreat now and give the iceberg lettuces some sun. That should happen quite quickly now we have reached winter solstice.A cute fantail with only one tail feather was flitting about this afternoon
  • Carrots are up!

    Nigel Gnome
    27 Apr 2015 | 11:06 pm
    My lovely prepared soil must work, the carrot seedlings are just peeping out, the recent rain hasn't harmed them at all even though it has been quite heavy at times.A lovely gift from friend, a handsome grey pupkin, the best. :)Lovely grey pumpkin detailThe forest pansy tree has been dropping it's leaves very quickly in the last few days, they look lovely on the lawnAutumn is definetely here.Forest pansy whirlI have been sent a link to an interesting website to encourage people to let their gardens go wild, well sort of. :)It's an American site but the ideas would aply anywhere.Garden Gone…
  • Beanless but there is hope of carrot

    Nigel Gnome
    20 Apr 2015 | 12:57 am
    Poor old beans met their fate this weekend, they were looking like they were suffering. It was surprising to find how many pods they were still hiding deep under the leaves. These palnts have produced so many beans, many bags full. At times the yellow ones would be flourishing, then the greens ones seem to respond and grow a whole new crop, then the yellows would do it back. They were planed 6th January I cut the stems leaving the roots in the ground enabling them to add nitrogen to the soil over winter.last beans and more chilliesI wanted to plant some more carrots and have another go at the…
  • Mad March

    Nigel Gnome
    15 Mar 2015 | 10:28 pm
    Cyclone Pam is supposed to be thrashing us at the moment, but luckily so far there has only been a bit of rain and some huge swell at the Heads. Hopefully that will be it. I did take down the back yard shade sails in case they were going to be blown away. Pruned all the young inward growing plum branches to keep the tree open. New zucchini seedlings are growing well and all the seeds planted recently have come up. The limes look good.Lovely limesPulled the last of the carrots to make way for winter plantings, not a bad lotHup Holland Took a panorama from the roof as I was up there getting the…
 
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    Flowerona

  • ‘Dinner Plate’ Peonies…such an amazing peony variety!

    Rona
    29 Jul 2015 | 4:01 pm
    When I went to New Covent Garden Flower Market in London on Monday morning, there were lots of peonies still available. But unfortunately their season is shortly coming to an end for us here in the UK. Before they disappear though, I thought you may like to see an amazing variety called ‘Dinner Plate’, from Zest Flowers at the Market. I love their enormous soft pink silky petals, which are slightly paler along their edges and their delicate rose scent! So, if you’re a peony fan too, do make sure that you make the most of these breath-taking blooms before they become less…
  • Wedding Wednesday : On Trend – Floral Arches

    Rona
    28 Jul 2015 | 4:01 pm
    Floral arches…oh, I wish they’d been a trend when I got married over a decade ago! If they had been, this stunning design above is the one that I’d have chosen. I love its simplicity with a white and green colour palette, rustic frame and, to top it all off, the hanging candle holders. Not only ‘over the pond’ but also here in the UK, floral arches are very on trend at the moment for weddings. They add a real ‘wow’ factor to your special day! So, I thought I’d share a few more beautiful examples with you, which I’ve come across recently.
  • Book now for our next Social Media for Florists workshop – October 20th 2015

    Rona
    27 Jul 2015 | 4:01 pm
    We’re so thrilled to be running our fourth Social Media for Florists workshop on October 20th 2015 at Brixton East in London! If you’re a florist and would like to find your focus, build your floral following and grow your business through social media, then please do join us. I’ve mentioned the date briefly before on Flowerona and bookings are already coming in. Here are the details: Background Join us for our fun and inspirational Social Media for Florists workshop away from the demands of your shop or studio and together let’s spend a productive day working on your business…
  • Florist Robbie Honey’s Debut Scented Candle Collection

    Rona
    26 Jul 2015 | 4:01 pm
    I hope you had a lovely weekend. Yesterday afternoon, whilst outside it was teeming with rain, I was very happily ensconced in my office with a cup of tea and florist Robbie Honey’s lit new Tuberose candle keeping me company, whilst I compiled today’s blog post. Its scent is absolutely stunning! If you watch my weekly videos on YouTube, you may remember that I went to Robbie’s Press Launch for his debut scented candle collection last month? He said: ‘Creating a scent that is a true and believable reconstruction of a flower is a joy.’ And I can honestly say…
  • Flowerona Links : With peonies, tennis & a rose installation…

    Rona
    25 Jul 2015 | 4:01 pm
    I hope you’re having a lovely weekend. Flowerona Links is back after a little break whilst I was away. Now it’s time once again to escape into the world of flowers… General Film & Flora Workshop at Rose Story Farm Stunning images of Coral Charm peonies by Georgianna Lane McQueens, Flowers in Fashion @ London by Leslie Tsang via Elle The Making of our Rose Installation by Neill Strain Diving in, Doing it yourself, Staying authentic Weddings Golden early summer bridal portrait inspiration  Q & A with florist Natalie Bowen Luxe jewel-toned wedding ideas Santa Barbara…
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    Your Easy Garden

  • Great Nature and Gardening Quotes

    Judie Brower
    27 Jul 2015 | 1:58 pm
    As we move into mid summer and gardens are reaching their peak, we thought it would be a good time to stop and reflect a bit on nature’s incredible gifts. Enjoy! This lovely photo was submitted by Kathy Skarr of Milwaukee, Wisconsin.   Lovely inspiration from Maya Angelou   Aaron from Vermont submitted this gorgeous photo of a bee enjoying a Tropicanna blossom.   How true! This photo was submitted by Jocelyn in southern Vermont.   We love this quote so much you might have seen it on an earlier post!   We look forward to seeing the Volcano phlox explode into…
  • 8 Mistakes People Make When Planting Tomatoes

    Guest Bloggers
    27 Jul 2015 | 8:22 am
    Nothing beats a ripe homegrown tomato! Photo courtesy of Harris Seeds There’s nothing like fresh tomatoes. It’s a flavor that just can’t be replicated by the store-bought variety. While a fruitful garden comes easily to some people, not all of us have been blessed with a green thumb. My first year I lost every single tomato I planted. I made the mistake of moving my seedlings outside too soon — losing half of them to the unforgiving heat and the other half to hungry birds. But there is hope. For those out there who tend to kill more plants than they can grow, never fear. Avoiding…
  • Creating a Low Maintenance Vacation Home Garden

    Guest Bloggers
    22 Jul 2015 | 5:35 pm
    Even though you may already enjoying your stay in your seaside summer house, why not enjoy it even more? You can spend your days in a dreamy garden. Garden furniture and particular plants can determine the incredible atmosphere of the garden, and create a refreshing place to relax, even when you’re not at the beach. Green mazes and cobbled paths, ponds, fountains, colorful flowers and small round trees – these are all elements that can create a delightful ambiance. After all, there is nothing like enjoying a well-deserved vacation in your seaside retreat. Still, what to do with…
  • It’s Not Easy Being Green – Gardeners in Danger

    Phillip Townshend
    13 Jul 2015 | 9:07 am
    In the famous words of someone we can all learn from (Kermit the frog) “it’s not easy being green” and it seems that, in this fast-paced environment and with the consolidation of retail outlets for garden products, one of the key items of our horticulture lifestyle is in danger. When it comes to endangered species most people’s minds immediately leap to things like Pandas, Whales, Bald Eagles and many more exotic options than what I am thinking, and that is choice in the plants available for our gardens. We all rely on the staple or proven products, such as our Flower Carpet® roses…
  • Creating Your Own Balcony Garden

    Guest Bloggers
    7 Jul 2015 | 10:31 am
    You’re flipping through your favorite home design magazine and notice a balcony garden. The fruit trees, lush vegetable beds, and potted herbs look beautiful and impressive. Before you have time to reconsider, you run out to your local garden center to buy a few beginner plants for your own balcony. After hauling them up three flights of stairs to your flat you realize you don’t know a thing about gardening…and just spent your latte budget for the month. Don’t fret! Instead, read on to find out how to create your own balcony garden without hassle. You’ll be bringing homemade…
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    The Mini Garden Guru - Your Miniature Garden Source

  • 10 Steps to Renovate a 10 Year Old Miniature Garden in 10 Minutes

    Janit Calvo
    24 Jul 2015 | 5:30 pm
      10 Steps to Renovate a 10 Year Old Miniature Garden in 10 Minutes “Don’t just sit there, grow a tree!” is my first thought whenever I see the box that’s been kicking around the office since 2005. I’ve kept it for reference because this is – so far – the only tree seed that […]
  • Keep Calm and Make a Miniature Garden

    Janit Calvo
    17 Jul 2015 | 11:59 am
    Keep Calm and Make a Miniature Garden There will be a slight pause in the program as we put the final touches on the new members-only Miniature Garden Society website. Interested? Your membership will not start until the website officially opens. Get on board today and join us now. We only have one beginning and you […]
  • How to Get the Garden Into Your Fairy Garden

    Janit Calvo
    10 Jul 2015 | 1:20 pm
    How to Get the Garden Into Your Fairy Garden So there is was, a huge box full of soil with toys scattered about, a plant in one corner and a house in the other. I looked up and took in the gorgeous view of Lake Washington. Did she know who I was? Should I tell […]
 
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    Lunar Home and Garden

  • Passion Flower, Flower of Leo and the Sun

    CJ Wright
    24 Jul 2015 | 7:33 am
    When I first started outdoor gardening ~ after many years of being confined to a window box ~ I ferociously cut back every vine I couldn’t identify. Living next to a woody area invites all kinds of evil creepers so I just whacked away. I had no idea then that I was cheating myself out […]
  • The Leo Garden

    CJ Wright
    19 Jul 2015 | 9:00 am
    What gives the Leo garden the attention it deserves? Flowers in jewel tones, trees and herbs ruled by the Sun and Leo, and lions at the garden gate. A simple way to note a garden devoted to Leo is to attach a lion doorknocker to a post at the garden entrance or centered in a […]
  • Moon in Cancer ~ Food, Glorious Food!

    CJ Wright
    13 Jul 2015 | 8:03 am
    Food, glorious food! From mother’s breast to our last meal, with or without teeth, the sign of Cancer will tempt us with the freshest of garden delights, the juiciest of fruits, the scent of hot-out-of-the-oven bread, aromatic herbs, exotic spices, a magnificent glass of wine, robust sauces, sumptuous shellfish, and delectable desserts. We eat to nurture not […]
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    Organic Gardening Tips - Smiling Gardener

  • Biointensive Composting To Improve Soil Fertility

    17 Jul 2015 | 9:00 pm
    Link to my other composting video The main biointensive method for improving soil fertility is to use compost. The purpose of compost is to bring beneficial organisms and nutrients into the soil, as well as improving water-holding capacity, drainage and aeration, among other things.
  • Double Digging Garden Beds To Improve Soil Health

    3 Jul 2015 | 9:00 pm
    Link to my other double digging video When following biointensive gardening principles, the way to relieve compaction, improve drainage and promote deeper root growth is by double digging garden beds. If you’re on especially sandy soil, you might be able to skip it. I’m on clay, which is why I double dig a couple of beds each spring for my potatoes. By moving my potatoes every year, it ensures each part of my garden will get double dug at some point. It's hard work, but it makes a nice bed. Here's how to do it (Academy members, we cover this in month 1 along with many other aspects of…
  • How To Grow MORE Food In LESS Space With Biointensive

    20 Jun 2015 | 9:00 pm
    If you want to grow a lot of food, in a small space, using not too many resources... And are willing to put in some work in order to accomplish that... Biointensive gardening may be for you.
  • Going Beyond The 80-20 Rule In The Garden

    7 Jun 2015 | 9:00 pm
    If you can give your soil the right amount of air, water and food, you can grow healthy plants. But what makes gardening a challenge is that it can be difficult to get all of those factors right. The single best ‘ingredient’ to bring into the garden that helps moderate air, water and food is organic matter in the form of mulch and compost ( part 1 ), and cover crops and perhaps biochar ( part 2 ). Yet sometimes you’re starting with rather poor soil that’s been:
  • 2 Less-Known Methods To Improve Soil Fertility

    5 Jun 2015 | 9:00 pm
    In part 1, I talked about how organic matter is the most important ingredient for many gardens, and how mulch and compost are two of my favorite ways of using it. But there are two other ways of using organic matter. The first is in some ways the most powerful of all, and the second may play an important role in reversing climate change. Let’s get into them...
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    Sow and So

  • Rats at the Villas – an update!

    Bridget Elahcene
    29 Jul 2015 | 9:30 pm
    Back at the beginning of June I told you about a rat problem that had developed here at the Villas (see post poultry+food+water=rats …fact! ). No eggs Their visitations had reached a hiatus and I was virtually tearing my hair out with frustration at losing much needed eggs, not to mention fear of the diseases that rats carry, such as Weil’s, Salmonella, Tuberculosis, Cryptosporidiosis, E.Coli and Foot and Mouth. The chooks were stressed too – they clearly resented the intruders dashing around the run and in and out of the hen house. They were constantly on alert and had all but…
  • Orange Zinnia – Wordless Wednesday

    Bridget Elahcene
    28 Jul 2015 | 11:11 pm
    The post Orange Zinnia – Wordless Wednesday appeared first on Sow and So.
  • What is soil?

    Laila Noort
    26 Jul 2015 | 9:40 pm
    Last week I started an online course about SOILS! It is all so very interesting that I want to share with you what I have learnt so far. We gardeners are always digging into our soils, planting new seedlings and pulling up dead plants or weeds,  but do we really know what kind of soil we have in our garden or allotment …or even what soil is actually made of? What is soil? Soil is made of solids, organic matter, liquids and gasses. The solids are a mixture of organic matter and minerals and these minerals come from weathered rock fragments and these rock fragments come from larger…
  • M is for Mesophyte – Word Up!

    Bridget Elahcene
    23 Jul 2015 | 9:28 pm
    Mesophyte \ˈmɛsə(ʊ)fʌɪt\ Plants that live on land and require water when in growth, intermediate between a xerophyte (plants which live in drought conditions) and a hydrophyte (plants which live in water). The post M is for Mesophyte – Word Up! appeared first on Sow and So.
  • Aramis: The Real French Bean – Wordless Wednesday

    Laila Noort
    22 Jul 2015 | 12:14 am
    The post Aramis: The Real French Bean – Wordless Wednesday appeared first on Sow and So.
 
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    The Hortiholic

  • Plant Buzz Words

    Tony Fulmer
    29 Jul 2015 | 4:37 am
    I recently attended a great horticultural conference in Columbus, Ohio. I was fascinated with some dry erase boards that had been put up for passers-by to graffiti their response to several questions. To be sure, the attendees were all plant geeks enthusiasts. Anyway, the responses were totally positive and some almost spiritual. "Plants make me feel: complete/at peace/connected to God" and "Plants are important because: they transform me." Pretty moving stuff, wouldn't you agree?I started thinking about how some people new to gardening might fill in those blanks. I know people that…
  • Plant Life-Saving 101

    Tony Fulmer
    25 Jun 2015 | 8:52 pm
    Soggy soil and rotting rootsIt's an understatement to say that spring rainfall has been more than adequate. This year even the River birches and willows are looking longingly toward higher, drier soil. While you can't stop Mother Nature there are actions to take to save plants after the recent downpours:1) It seems obvious, but do override the in-ground sprinkler system. When air spaces in soil are full of water rather than oxygen, roots become stressed, roots may die. Even lawns, with their comparatively shallow root systems, have had enough for the time being. Save the water, save the…
  • Dahlia Do's and Don'ts

    Tony Fulmer
    2 May 2015 | 6:56 pm
    Flowers, like celebrities, can have cyclical popularity. Based on the volume of customer questions, dahlias are the smokin' hot plant right now. Never grown them? Check them out at your local garden center and prepare to be dazzled.   A wealth of choicesHybridizers have expanded the range of flower and plant sizes, colors and flower forms so there's a dahlia for every taste. It's pretty darned cool to watch a quarter-sized bud open into an 8" (or larger) flower later in the summer! Yep, I'm in awe of big ole' dinnerplate dahlias.Here are a few tips for success from my experience growing…
  • Timely Tips for Spring Garden Cleanup

    Tony Fulmer
    24 Mar 2015 | 2:43 pm
    Are you itching to get out and start playing in your garden? Me too. It's time to: prune, mulch, stake and most important - plant! Here are a few things to consider as you head out in Slogger-shod feet and West County Rose gloved-hands armed with Felco pruners. Snow Mold1. Lawns - Check turf for this winter's gift - snow mold! You can't miss it (see picture). Symptoms look worse than their long term effect. Snow mold will disappear with fertilization and light raking once the ground warms and dries a bit more. Don't rake in deep shade where shallow-rooted fescues reside. You may pull them up…
  • Off to the Amaryllis Races

    Tony Fulmer
    23 Dec 2014 | 1:03 pm
    'Elvas'It's really easy to understand why amaryllis are so wildly popular. They grow quickly once awakened from dormancy, have flowers that are the epitome of spectacular, are practically maintenance-free (can be grown in water or soil) and are just plain fun to watch! I heard people are even having amaryllis races - they all pot them the same day, then keep track of whose grows fastest, tallest, or has the most flowers. But they're so-oo-o-o easy even a tot could grow them.Big bulbs!My first memory of amaryllis was shopping with Mom at the florist for an azalea. I saw a box on the counter…
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    guzmansgreenhouse.com

  • Plants that Bloom in Mid Summer

    Paul Guzman
    7 Jul 2015 | 6:46 am
    The Tuscorora Crape Myrtle. Is this gorgeous or what?  Bright, dark pink blooms that will last about 4-6 weeks.  Dead head the expired blooms during the summer season for an extra shot of blooms again.  Plants that Bloom in Mid Summer   Red Verbena – Bright red blooms that will last all summer long.  They … Continue reading Plants that Bloom in Mid Summer The post Plants that Bloom in Mid Summer appeared first on .
  • The Difference Between Bird of Paradise Plants

    Paul Guzman
    22 May 2015 | 5:22 am
    Recently many folks have been asking our staff and myself what the difference between the following Bird of Paradise Plants. Red Bird of Paradise Yellow Bird of Paradise Mexican Bird of Paradise Bird of Paradise So…without further ado here are those differences Red Bird of Paradise Botanical name – Caesalpinia pulcherrima: The Red bird of … Continue reading The Difference Between Bird of Paradise Plants The post The Difference Between Bird of Paradise Plants appeared first on .
  • Plants to help clean and filter indoor pollution

    Paul Guzman
    27 Apr 2015 | 9:38 am
    Is your home or office environment void of indoor plants?  Did you know there are hundreds of plants that help clean and filter out indoor pollution.  The EPA blog says plants can help reduce chemical toxins indoors. Materials such as treated wood, glues, paints, varnishes and a multitude of other household materials give out a … Continue reading Plants to help clean and filter indoor pollution The post Plants to help clean and filter indoor pollution appeared first on .
  • Unusual Indoor Houseplants

    Paul Guzman
    8 Feb 2015 | 1:39 pm
    Fabian Aralia – Polyscias scutellaria This is a great plant for small sized pots.  The root system is small thus only needs occasional watering.  It resembles a stump with round foliage. Use a bonsai pot for a great looking Bonsai indoor plant. I would suggest water once maybe twice per month.  Make sure to keep … Continue reading Unusual Indoor Houseplants The post Unusual Indoor Houseplants appeared first on .
  • What is composting and how does it work

    Paul Guzman
    24 Jan 2015 | 12:29 pm
    So what the heck is compost anyway?  Good question…and I’ll try my best to answer that question on this post. Compost is decomposing matter that turns into nutrients that all plants need in order for them to maintain healthy growth.  This matter is what all plants need to survive. You can use chemically made fertilizers … Continue reading What is composting and how does it work The post What is composting and how does it work appeared first on .
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    Primrose Blog

  • How to Clean Copper – The Natural Way

    Primrose
    28 Jul 2015 | 2:28 am
    From that small copper planter right up to the water feature you bought last summer, is your copper starting to look a little dull? Here is the natural and easy way to polish up copper. This method uses only two ingredients. Both are nontoxic and can be found at almost any supermarket.      What you will need:        1 lemon        1 tablespoon of salt     Step 1: Cut lemon in half. Step 2: Take ½ tablespoon of salt and pour it onto one half of the lemon. Pour onto the side that has been cut. Step 3: Rub the lemon salt mix onto the copper that needs to be polished. I…
  • Pictures of the Week: Dogs in the Garden

    Primrose
    24 Jul 2015 | 5:20 am
    We are bringing you a selection of the pictures we love the most as posted by you on Primrose Gardens. This week we saw how many of you have fluffy, fuzzy bundles of fun to help you out in the garden so we have picked a few of our personal favourites that have been posted on the site so far. So if you’ve been having a ‘ruff’ day take a look at some of the photos we really dig: Teddie showing off his beautiful garden furniture. Sophie’s enjoying her new garden. Mya and Chester enjoying the afternoon sun in Leadhall’s garden. Love Gardens‘ pups are…
  • Delivering Dream Gardens: Our New TV Advert

    Primrose
    23 Jul 2015 | 1:06 am
    Here at Primrose, we’re celebrating 12 years of delivering dream gardens with our new video advert. We believe that anyone can find exactly what they’re imagining for their perfect garden right here on our website. Our film tells the story of a family planning the garden of their dreams, which Primrose delivers… with some fantastic results! We’re incredibly proud of our new advert and really hope you enjoy it! Visit our website and start creating your dream garden today. As seen in our latest video… Pond in a Pot Bring instant wildlife to your outdoor space with…
  • Primrose Shade Sails Make an Appearance on Love Your Garden

    Primrose
    22 Jul 2015 | 6:48 am
    Another week and another fantastic episode of ITV’s Love Your Garden to hit our screens. Last night we adored watching the inspiring Sabina Iqbal and her husband Asif get treated to a gorgeous garden makeover, featuring a pair of our very own shade sails! The couple were hugely deserving of the garden treatment, both active in doing outstanding charity work in the deaf community, as well as raising three small children. The Iqbals’ huge garden was spacious but the couple lacked the time to make it into the relaxing space they deserved, so Alan Titchmarsh and his team totally…
  • 5 Easy Steps to Making the Most of a Primrose Gardens Profile

    Primrose
    20 Jul 2015 | 1:08 am
    We all know the amount of hard work that goes into creating your dream garden, but did you know that there’s a very easy way to share the results? In 5 minutes or less you can create your very own Primrose Gardens profile – it’s absolutely free and gives you a great space where your photos can be seen by friends, family, and even the world! Not only that, but you can easily browse, follow, and comment on other gardens, giving you a never ending source of outdoor inspiration. Want to get started? Here’s what to do!   1. Make Your Profile Simply go to gardens.primrose.co.uk and…
 
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    Chicken Waterer

  • Backyard Flocks & Salmonella: Our Perspective on the CDC's Warning

    ChickenWaterer
    16 Jul 2015 | 5:50 pm
    "Hey Myrtle, we're safer than the press is reporting"The CDC recently issued guidance to backyard flock owners encouraging them to wash their hands after handling chickens and advising against cuddling or kissing poultry. The reminder comes in response to related data showing that 181 people have sickened with Salmonella poisoning this year as a result of exposure to backyard flocks. The CDC's data and guidance has been been widely reported by the press including NBC, Reuters, NPR and others.While we support the CDC's guidance, we believe the widespread media attention leads to a…
  • Top Feed Supplements For Chickens

    ChickenWaterer
    16 Jul 2015 | 5:48 pm
    To stay healthy and laying, chickens need a balanced diet that gives them the protein, carbohydrates and vitamins they need to sustain themselves. In a prior article on choosing a feed, we discussed chicken feed formulas and provided guidance on when to switch from one feed formula to another.  In this posting, we focus on feed supplements. These are food items that complement or enhance your chickens basic diet. You'll find these below grouped by dry and liquid supplements.Dry Supplements Scratch - scratch is a mixture of whole, rolled and cracked grains including corn, oats, and…
  • Chicken Waterer Hot Summer

    ChickenWaterer
    3 Jul 2015 | 6:03 pm
    Wow is it getting hot this time of year!  Check out the BriteTap chicken waterer. This waterer attaches to an Igloo or Rubbermaid beverage cooler that acts as the water supply. Keeps your chicken's water nice and cool so they stay happy, healthy, and laying plenty of delicious eggs.  ChickenWaterer.com BriteTap chicken waterer. Clean water made simple! Visit us at ChickenWaterer.com.
  • Deflate Gate Investigation

    ChickenWaterer
    7 May 2015 | 6:07 am
    Blossom, ChickenWaterer.com's favorite hen, has concluded her investigation of the New England Patriots. According to Blossom, it is more than likely that Equipment Assistant John Jastremski intentionally deflated the team's breakfast during the AFC champion game. The scandal has rocked professional football and left some yolk on the face of quarterback Tom Brady. When asked to comment, coach Bill Belichick said "We just like our eggs soft boiled. Nothing wrong with that." BriteTap chicken waterer. Clean water made simple! Visit us at ChickenWaterer.com.
  • How We Manufacture The BriteTap Chicken Feeder

    ChickenWaterer
    26 Apr 2015 | 7:12 am
    BriteTap Convertible Chick & Chicken FeederCheck out this two minute video that shows how we manufacture our new chick and chicken feeder.The threaded feeder tube is unique because it lets backyard chicken owners raise the shield the same way that a nut moves up a bolt.  The shield prevents chicks from standing on the feed tray and pooping in their food. When the chicks grow up and leave the brooder, the shield prevents rain and snow from spoiling the food and is a perfect feeder for scratch, grit, mealworms and oyster shells.The mold used to make the feeder tube is complicated…
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    Balcony in Berlin

  • vegetable matters

    sophos
    11 Jul 2015 | 11:01 pm
    The balcony has survived a spell of heat, thunderstorms and rain. Blauhilde, the purple runner bean, is now about three metres tall with weather damage on the leaves – or at least that’s what I think it is, as it’s supposed to be mosaic virus-resistant. It might not be getting enough water either in its 20L compost bag, though I try my best to keep it saturated. But underneath the crispy foliage there are pretty purple stalks and flowers and, as you can see, it’s already setting pods. The dwarf cherry tomatoes are producing fruit too, particularly the small plant, whose…
  • bavarian rhapsody

    sophos
    11 Jul 2015 | 10:59 pm
    I was invited to a wedding outside Regensburg in Bavaria at the end of June, and a few of us were tasked with the floral decorations for the reception. I take credit for the ram above and some of the meadow style flower arrangements on display below. I also visited the garden show at the beautiful Schloss Thurn und Taxis. Too much tat and not enough garden for my liking, but one vendor had a big selection of roses for sale, so I did some window shopping and sniffing.
  • rose absolute

    sophos
    30 Jun 2015 | 11:29 am
    The first bloom on my climbing rose, and it’s a beauty.
  • guerilla gardening

    sophos
    24 Jun 2015 | 12:30 pm
    During a somnambulist Saturday morning supermarket sweep, I came across a consignment of little pelargonium plants at 1€ a pop. Since it was time to fill the balcony boxes, and the garden centre is a long way away, I impulse-bought a bunch of them in various colourways. When I got home I realised I didn’t want that kind of two-tone mix after all, and the plants were left for weeks in a cardboard box getting dry and manky, dropping all the flowerbuds. Just as things were starting to look dire, I noticed two flower pots outside the Späti on the corner below, containing only a sorry…
  • balcony roses

    sophos
    13 Jun 2015 | 9:01 am
    My rose experiment is starting to show results! The cubana is producing little cream puff roses, 6-7cm in diameter, blushing in apricot and pink. The climber, I’ve unceremoniously trained towards an old curtain pole in the corner of the balcony, without consulting the internet about how and when, I’m afraid. I’m sure it’s sturdy enough though. And there are a few rosebuds appearing now, too:
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    Urban Gardens

  • Five Designs That Put the Fun in Functional

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    23 Jul 2015 | 6:34 pm
    With designs that put the fun in functional, some designers are creating works which elicit both an aha and a haha. Here are five pieces with a sense of humor: 1. Killing Time I met designer Weng Xinyu at Ambiente … Read More... The post Five Designs That Put the Fun in Functional appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Plantus Please: Modular Indoor Vertical Gardens

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    17 Jul 2015 | 9:55 am
    Budapest-based designer Judit Zita Boros designed Plantus Planters, a system of modular indoor vertical gardens, with indoor urban gardeners in mind. Planted Walls and Living Curtains These modular indoor vertical gardens are double-duty systems which not only offers the … Read More... The post Plantus Please: Modular Indoor Vertical Gardens appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • In Harmony With Nature: Francis Benincà’s Environmental Sculptures

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    14 Jul 2015 | 10:41 am
    You might say that French sculptor Francis Benincà was ahead of the curve. As a teenager Benincà worked alongside his father building sculptural “bubble houses” which strongly influenced the designs of the environmental sculptures Benincà creates today. His father, Antonio … Read More... The post In Harmony With Nature: Francis Benincà’s Environmental Sculptures appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Five Lust-Worthy Rooftop Gardens

    Tierney VanderVoort
    10 Jul 2015 | 1:24 pm
    Pulltab Design.Photography by Bilyana Dimitrova Summer is here and that means plenty of barbecuing and cocktail sipping out in the back yard! Or, if you’re very lucky, you have a rooftop garden to lounge on. We’ve rounded up some … Read More... The post Five Lust-Worthy Rooftop Gardens appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • How to Grow a Book Into a Tree

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    6 Jul 2015 | 9:00 am
    Even a single child can contribute to saving the planet. After reading a book from the Tree Book Tree program, a child can plant it and watch it to grow into a tree. It’s a wonderful way to teach … Read More... The post How to Grow a Book Into a Tree appeared first on Urban Gardens.
 
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    Grow Our Way

  • 24 Amazing Benefits and Uses of Neem Oil for Plants

    Safer® Brand
    29 Jul 2015 | 4:15 am
    When searching for a safe and effective product to control insects and disease in your lawn and garden, look no further than neem oil. It’s a powerful organic solution to your most difficult-to-manage infestations. What is neem oil? Neem oil is a natural byproduct of the neem tree. The oil is harvested from the trees’ seeds and leaves. While it has been used as natural pesticide for hundreds of years, you’ll also find it in many products you use in your home, including: -Cosmetics -Toothpastes -Dog shampoo -Soaps People in India have been using the neem leaf for its medicinal properties…
  • 20 Common Tomato Plant Problems and How to Fix Them

    Safer® Brand
    14 Jul 2015 | 12:30 pm
    If you’re one of the three million people who planted a home garden this year, you’re most likely growing tomatoes. Nine out of 10 gardeners grow tomatoes, and that number would be 10 out of 10 if the holdouts would taste a fresh garden tomato and compare it to a grocery store purchase. Nothing beats the taste of a fresh home-grown tomato! Many gardeners who grow tomatoes, however, are frustrated with the progress of their plants. The plant may not set fruit. Or your tomatoes may ripen, but have ugly, spongy black spots at the bottom. Worse still, your plants may look great in the evening…
  • What Do Moths Eat and How to Keep Moths Away

    Safer® Brand
    1 Jul 2015 | 8:09 am
    If you’ve ever pulled your favorite wool sweater out of storage only to find it riddled with holes, you know the aggravation that a tiny little moth can generate. Clothes moths and their cousins, the household pest known as the pantry moth, can infest even the cleanest homes and create untold damage. The key to eliminating both pantry and clothes moths is understanding their life cycle and taking steps to kill them based on where they live, breed, feed and hide.  What Do Moths Eat? There are actually two types of clothes moths distributed worldwide: the webbing clothes moth (Tineola…
  • How to Get Rid of Crabgrass the Easy Way

    Safer® Brand
    26 Jun 2015 | 5:03 am
    Throughout North America, homeowners confront an annual scourge that can turn a lush, smooth emerald carpet into a weedy mess: crabgrass. Specifically, large crabgrass (Digitaria sanguinalis) — which also goes by the name hairy crabgrass — and smooth crabgrass (Digitaria ischaemum) can invade lawns, flower beds and vegetable gardens, rapidly becoming a nuisance. When one plant can produce an estimated 150,000 new crabgrass seeds from each plant, you know it’s trying to take over your yard! What is Crabgrass and Why Not Just Let it Grow? Crabgrass and other unwanted weeds steal valuable…
  • How to Get Rid of Black Spot on Roses

    Safer® Brand
    23 Jun 2015 | 5:53 am
    It starts gradually — a few yellowed leaves dropped to the ground, a few dark brown or black spots on the leaves you can easily attribute to just natural aging. Then suddenly, your rose bush looks terrible! Leaves are falling off at a rapid clip. Before tumbling to the ground, the leaves are dotted with black spots or splotches that fade into the leaf itself. As the days progress, nearly all the leaves yellow and fall from your prized roses, leaving a thorny skeleton behind. What happened? Was it an insect that attacked over night or something else? Black Spot on Roses If this scenario…
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    The Horticult

  • Makes Scents: Visit Eric Buterbaugh’s Perfumed New L.A. Digs

    Chantal Aida Gordon
    30 Jul 2015 | 3:00 am
    Florist Eric Buterbaugh is the man who keeps Hollywood in stems. Rich and rosy, his designs are how fashion and entertainment’s top names (Valentino, Gwyneth, Vuitton) say things like thank you, congrats and let’s party.… ► The post Makes Scents: Visit Eric Buterbaugh’s Perfumed New L.A. Digs appeared first on The Horticult.
  • Garden Gadgets: The Solar-Powered Edyn Sensor Is Now Monitoring Our Raised Beds

    Ryan Benoit
    22 Jul 2015 | 3:00 am
    It’s pretty clear that we enjoy teching out our terrain. Exhibit A: Our screen-filled Super Bowl garden party. Exhibit B, our outdoor robot heater.… ► The post Garden Gadgets: The Solar-Powered Edyn Sensor Is Now Monitoring Our Raised Beds appeared first on The Horticult.
  • Breathless: An Air Plant Update, and Our eHow Tutorial

    Chantal Aida Gordon
    16 Jul 2015 | 3:00 am
    So…how’s everyone’s air plants doing? Healthwise, we’ve seen them run the gamut. At friends’ places and on our own homestead, we’ve seen tillandsias range from tormented, thirsty, spidery things to ecstatic emerald crowns.… ► The post Breathless: An Air Plant Update, and Our eHow Tutorial appeared first on The Horticult.
  • The Bougainvillea on Beverly: Showy Bract Season Is in Full Swing

    Chantal Aida Gordon
    8 Jul 2015 | 3:00 am
    On a hot afternoon in L.A., great tufts of bougainvillea were blooming in three sorbet colors — soft pink, golden orange and screeching fuchsia.… ► The post The Bougainvillea on Beverly: Showy Bract Season Is in Full Swing appeared first on The Horticult.
  • Monday Motivation: June Gloom Goes Turquoise, Garnishing With Pride, and a Grow-Light Herb Garden (From Paris, Y’all!)

    Chantal Aida Gordon
    29 Jun 2015 | 3:00 am
    With vacation in the air (insert multi-star emoji), the food is sweeter, the bubbly is bubblier, and Monday feels less Mondayish.… ► The post Monday Motivation: June Gloom Goes Turquoise, Garnishing With Pride, and a Grow-Light Herb Garden (From Paris, Y’all!) appeared first on The Horticult.
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    Grow Up Hydrogarden

  • Hydroponics vs. Aquaponics? Does One Triumph the Other?

    Amanda Kuhn
    22 Jul 2015 | 4:52 am
    Sustainable farming is one in the same, but the question remains between which method is actually better. Hydroponics or Aquaponics? Hydroponics, which essentially means “water works”, is the process of growing plants in sand, gravel or liquid with added nutrients but without soil. Aquaponics essentially integrates the technology used in hydroponics but uses the method of growing crops and fish together in re-circulating systems. BothRead More
  • DIY Home Remedies Grown In Your Hydrogarden

    Amanda Kuhn
    30 Jun 2015 | 9:27 am
    Nowadays, women are all about the “do it yourself” movement. If you can do it why can’t we? This is a question that women in particular have been asking for years. Daily beauty remedies have reached a peak in pricing in todays society now more than ever. But thanks to outlets such as Pinterest, Women’s Day and Instagram, women have now been blessed with theRead More
  • Take a Trip With Your Hydrogarden

    Amanda Kuhn
    2 Jun 2015 | 10:40 am
    With summer right around the corner its easy to get distracted by all the fun activities going on around you. I find that I am much more prone to forgetting or thinking about what to plant in my hydrogarden. If you’re feeling adventurous, why not embrace a culture change and plant culturally specific produce that compliments particular ethnic cuisines? You can try an Italian gardenRead More
  • Growing Hydroponic Lettuce

    Erika Raia
    25 May 2015 | 1:38 pm
      We received this email this morning from Neil (one of our favorite master hydrogardeners) about growing and harvesting lettuce in the Grow Up Hydrogarden and wanted to share it with you! It is amazing how resilent lettuce and other plants are. And, Neil’s story speaks to that strength so just when you think you can’t grow a veggie, think again, plants want to thrive andRead More
  • Q&A Help! Roots Are Taking Over My Garden

    Erika Raia
    21 May 2015 | 8:37 am
    Do you have roots that are taking over your garden? Are your pots overflowing because the roots are clogging the drainage holes? One of our favorite hydrogardeners, Neil from South Carolina wrote us this morning about that very issue that he is having with overgrown roots clogging the drainage holes in his Grow Up unit. One of the solutions we offered was to switch hisRead More
 
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    No Soil Solutions

  • Making A Hydroponic Reservoir Drain

    nosoilsolutions
    14 Jul 2015 | 9:39 pm
    There’s are a couple good reasons why it’s good idea to make a drain for your hydroponic reservoir. Since light produces algae growth, the hydroponic reservoir should be dark so no light will penetrate through. This creates the problem of not being able to able to see the water level of the nutrient solution. You will have The post Making A Hydroponic Reservoir Drain appeared first on No Soil Solutions.
  • 6 Ways To Keep Your Hydroponic Nutrient Solution Cool

    nosoilsolutions
    3 Apr 2015 | 7:53 pm
    The temperature of your hydroponic nutrient solution is not something that should be overlooked. Too cold and roots will not form, the plant will grow slow and maybe die. Hydroponic nutrient solution that is too hot does not hold oxygen your plants need and can cause stress to your garden. Hydroponic nutrient solution should be The post 6 Ways To Keep Your Hydroponic Nutrient Solution Cool appeared first on No Soil Solutions.
  • Choosing Quality Seeds for Your Garden

    nosoilsolutions
    8 Feb 2015 | 2:26 pm
    Often times the importance of using quality seeds are overlooked when gardening. Choosing quality seed for your garden may be one of the least expensive aspects of your hydroponic garden but is just as important as quality nutrients and grow environment. Many gardeners are gardening for the fun, for more healthy produce, and also quality. The post Choosing Quality Seeds for Your Garden appeared first on No Soil Solutions.
  • Using Rockwool For Seed Germination

    nosoilsolutions
    7 Dec 2014 | 10:44 pm
    Rockwool is a popular starter medium that has been used a long time with hydroponics. Smaller rockwool cubes are used for cuttings or seed germination and then transplanted into hydroponic systems. Larger cubes or slabs can be used to grow larger plants. It works well as a grow medium because it’s great at both maintaining The post Using Rockwool For Seed Germination appeared first on No Soil Solutions.
  • Nutrient Lockout

    nosoilsolutions
    22 Nov 2014 | 8:43 pm
    If you notice your hydroponic plants becoming stunted or showing odd colors resembling nutrient deficiency your plants may be experiencing nutrient lockout. It’s easier to diagnose nutrient lockout with hydroponic gardens because nutrients are measured to the exact amount (or should be) to supply the plants with enough nutrients. Nutrient lock out is exactly what The post Nutrient Lockout appeared first on No Soil Solutions.
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    Garden Buildings Direct Blog

  • 15 Crazy Things That Happened In A Garden Shed

    Lennard Canilao
    29 Jul 2015 | 11:58 pm
    Most people use their garden sheds to store tools and equipment. But some people decide to use their sheds for unusual purposes as the following examples show: 1. Man Cave • Josh Carr fitted a bar, pool table, TV and dart board in his “man cave”. • It has uPVC doors and windows and features a decked patio area outside. 2. Nuclear Reactor • At 17, David Hahn built a homemade nuclear reactor in his parents’ garden shed. • The EPA had to clean up his home and car as it contained a lot of radioactive material. 3. Micro Shed on Wheels • Colin Edmondson built a “micro” shed…
  • 5 Tips For Protecting Your Wood Shed From Pests

    Maria Karla Salinas
    23 Apr 2015 | 5:53 am
    A wooden shed in a garden can give awesome storage room to putting away wood and different materials. Consequently, wood is the most favored material for building sheds since it improves the greenhouse environment. Nevertheless, a wooden shed can get to be home to a considerable measure of nuisances and termites which sustain themselves from the wood inside the shed winding up harming the wood. Along these lines, here are a few tips to help you shield your wood shed from vermin and other undesirable visitors. 1. Use Insecticides The most fundamental approach to shield your wood shed from…
  • Most Effective Methods to Check your Garden Shed for Leaks

    Maria Karla Salinas
    15 Apr 2015 | 12:58 am
    While puddles and wet supplies may tip you off to the way that your shed has a hole, it is regularly not that simple to recognize a break. On the off chance that you aren’t consistently utilizing the shed it can be barely noticeable a hole, so it’s a smart thought to check occasionally to check whether water is getting in any place. Over the long haul, water inside a shed will harm whatever is inside it and can likewise cause harm to the shed itself. Strategy 1: Checking for Leaks 1. Look out for staining. To check for holes, you’ll have to pay special mind to staining within…
  • How to Prevent your Shed from Rotting

    Maria Karla Salinas
    6 Apr 2015 | 4:58 am
    Sheds are an essential part of everyone’s garden especially those who have tools or equipment to store. Sheds can make any scene look complete and they can even match the style of the home they are placed with. However, you must take proper care of the sheds if you are expecting them to last. One of the main problems people deal with is rotting wood. How to Prevent Rotting: • Place the shed off the ground on a strong sturdy foundation along with pavers if possible. With the shed above the ground, rain water will not sit against the outside walls which would cause possible rotting. • Use…
  • How to Prepare your Shed for Strong Winds

    Garden Buildings Direct
    29 Mar 2015 | 5:01 am
    Strong winds and gales are very common in the UK and when these storms hit, you need to make sure your home and sheds are prepared. Plan Ahead Making sure your sheds are in strong condition and you are keeping on top of repair work is essential for preparing against strong winds. Roofing The roof is very vulnerable with these types of conditions. Strong winds put a lot of pressure on the roof with the high spends and the quick changing of directions. The roof must be secure to prevent any type of damage. The main thing you must do is always check the status of the roof, both from inside and…
 
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    A Garden for All

  • Harkness Memorial State Park

    Kathy
    29 Jul 2015 | 6:00 am
    The mansion roof peeks from above the treetops (photo by: Kathy Diemer) In celebration of our anniversary, my husband, Ged, and I visited a gorgeous park overlooking the ocean in Waterford, Connecticut. Well worth the visit, my post will hardly be able to cover all the wonderful aspects worthy of mention on this beautiful estate. Between the stands of ancient beeches, maples and chestnuts, the expansive and lushly planted grounds and the breathtaking views, I hardly know where to start. Did I mention the mansion was being prepared for a wedding that day A stone pergola looks out over the West…
  • Purple Passion

    Kathy
    22 Jul 2015 | 6:00 am
    Dating back to the Roman emperors, the color purple has long been considered the shade most associated with royalty and nobility, as well as symbolizing magic, mystery, passion and romance.  The combination of fiery red and serene blue; a culmination of warmest and coolest shades blended together, is said to emote feelings of peace and is often used in meditation practices.  So why not incorporate more of it in the garden?  And not just in flower form, instead using long lasting deciduous shrubs to add charm and charisma throughout the landscape.  Here are a few of my favorites: Cotinus…
  • The Other Stachys

    Kathy
    15 Jul 2015 | 6:00 am
    Stachys and Friend (photo: Kathy Diemer) We’re all familiar with the popular lamb’s ears or stachys byzantina, but not as many know about its distant cousin, purple betony (or bishop’s wort) or stachys officinalis.  Actually, other than the name, they look nothing alike.  Where byzantina has soft, frosty grey leaves (especially attractive with ‘Helen Von Stein’) officinalis has smaller, dark green oval shaped leaves with scalloped edges.  And it’s those interesting leaves, with rounded edges like an embroidered collar, that I find so attractive at…
  • The Clematis Perspective

    Kathy
    8 Jul 2015 | 6:00 am
    Clematis jackmanii climbing rose trellis (photo: Kathy Diemer) The word perspective has several translations, one meaning the way objects appear visually.  And clematis is a perspective changer, it’s as simple as that.  When a clematis vine is added to the landscape it adds height, dimension, and drama, all of which help to create a different perspective.  A visual feast for the eye, so to speak.  With ambitious cultivars that climb to twenty feet and modest types that stay around six, available in an unbelievable array of colors and bloom sizes, there is sure to be a vine that…
  • Orange Crush

    Kathy
    1 Jul 2015 | 6:00 am
    Eastern Tiger Swallowtail inside a Lily (photo by: Kathy Diemer) A day without orange . . . is like a day without sunshine. Indeed. The color orange simply radiates warmth and happiness by combining two dynamic hues: vibrant red and cheery yellow. Orange is an optimistic shade that can uplift and rejuvenate our spirits. Words like motivation, spontaneity and enthusiasm for life are associated with the color orange, as well as adventurous, inspirational, and confident.  Orange is extroverted and uninhibited, quite the show off in fact, always helping us to focus on the bright side of life.
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    Photography Pro

  • Best Digital Camera Brands: Things You Should Know

    admin
    15 Jul 2015 | 12:12 pm
    Digital cameras can be really expensive. It’s also not easy to change your camera once you get one. That’s why it’s important that you make the right decision when it comes to choosing a camera brand. Here, we will help you to learn about some of the best digital camera brands and which one will be perfect for you. Samsung If you don’t have a specific requirement and want a camera that can fulfill all your purpose, it’s a Samsung camera you want. Samsung offers a wide range of cameras which ensures that there is a camera for all sorts of people and in all price range. Recently, the…
  • Online Career Training in Digital Media Production

    admin
    2 Jul 2015 | 12:12 pm
    Choosing photography as a hobby is one thing and making a career out of it is completely different. Most of us know a thing or two about taking images and digital photography. However, it’s like a water drop in the sea when you are thinking about becoming a professional photographer. Here, we will help you to learn about different online training programs can help you with your career. There are different levels of degrees in digital media and we will discuss that here as well. Different Training Programs There are thousands of training options online which allows you to complete a course…
  • Top Image Storage Online 2015

    admin
    20 Jun 2015 | 9:17 am
    If photography is one of your hobbies, it’s possible that you get out of storage every now and then. While it’s possible to increase your internal storage, that is not always a valid option for everyone. Here, we will help you to find some great image storage online and give you a list of online storage options to choose from. Apple iCloud This is one of the best image storage online options if you are an iPhone or iOS user. There are two different services to choose from. You can either store 1,000 images that you have recently captured for free or choose to store the images you have…
  • Top Digital Photography Tips for Beginners

    admin
    15 Jun 2015 | 9:16 am
    Nowadays, capturing images is as popular as sharing them online. While some people depends on their smartphone for taking images, it’s still not good enough to compete with digital cameras when it comes to capturing top-notch images. Here, we will share some tips and tricks for digital photography which can be also useful if you are thinking about joining photography schools. Keep your camera with you, always! You never know when a precious moment is waiting for you to capture. So, it is you who have to wait for these moments with your camera. These moments usually show up when you expect…
  • Starting Your Digital Photography Degree – All You Need to Know

    admin
    10 Jun 2015 | 9:16 am
    Bachelor of Science in Digital Photography degree will help you direct your vision and creativity toward establishing yourself in the photography field. Depending on your career goals, you have several options, if you are interested in earning a bachelor degree in digital photography. The bachelor degree program generally emphasizes technical and business coursework, while the BFA or A.B.A. program stresses developing creative and design skills. Vital Information Digital photography programs are frequently found as Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) or Bachelor of Arts (B.A.). A number of B.S. in…
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    Tree Service Portland - Northwest Arbor-Culture » Blog

  • 10 Ways to Decorate With Tree Branches

    Jon Nash
    8 Jul 2015 | 10:36 am
      It’s summertime, and plants are growing. That means many of our trees need trimming. Find out why trimming is so important. Once the trimming is done, it’s always a challenge to figure out what to do with the branches that get removed. If being environmentally conscious is important to you (or you just like the look of rustic home decor) you can recycle tree branches as decorations for your home. Here are a few ideas for doing just that. 1. Put Branches on the Mantel A photo posted by Jessica Fordice (@hope_full_mom) on Apr 18, 2015 at 7:05pm PDT Difficulty: Beginner The easiest…
  • 6 of the World’s Most Tranquil Trees

    Jon Nash
    25 Jun 2015 | 2:01 pm
      Hurried cities, fast trains, responsibilities that never end. It’s no surprise many of us are stressed. What might surprise you is that something as simple as spending time in a forest can reduce stress, lower your blood pressure, and even help you sleep. Even just a five-minute walk through the trees can make a difference. I wish I could bring the forest to you, but sadly I can’t. So I’ll give you the next best thing: a virtual tour through six of the most tranquil and soothing trees in the world. Before we get started, here’s some calming music to listen to as you read.
  • 10 Crazy Tree Photos from Around the World

    Jon Nash
    15 May 2015 | 1:36 pm
    Trees are beautiful and purify the air we breathe, but they can also be breathtaking, funny, and just plain weird. Get ready to see infrared trees and trees with faces, 1,000-year-old trees and trees from the future. Let’s take a trip around the world to look at 10 crazy tree photos from four different continents! 1. Great Banyan Tree – India This looks like a forest, but believe it or not, it’s just one tree. In 1925 the central trunk had to be removed due to rot, but the rest of the tree is still alive and well. It lives in a botanical garden near Kolkata, India. Photo: McKay…
  • How to Build a Treehouse

    Jon Nash
    11 Mar 2015 | 1:18 pm
    Building a treehouse is a fun and time-consuming process—especially if you’ve never built one before. They come in all shapes and sizes, from small tree forts to giant luxury hideaways. In this post, I’ll show you how to build one type of simple backyard treehouse, but I’ll offer plenty of resources along the way for those of you with more ambitious plans. Source: M S No matter what kind of treehouse you want, safety is your first priority. If you’re not confident with your building skills or you want an elaborate design, consult a professional treehouse builder, such as Nelson…
  • 5 Tree Pruning Tools You Need

    Jon Nash
    16 Feb 2015 | 2:18 pm
    Are branches blocking your windows or walkways? Are you tired of that overgrown tree dropping twigs all over the yard? Or is an old tree simply growing out of control? Residents of the Pacific Northwest are no strangers to tree woes. With the right tools, you can solve many small tree problems with a little DIY pruning. (Save major tree issues for us professionals.) Trimming can keep trees healthy, add value to your property, and make you the envy of your neighbors. But which tree pruning tools should you use? The best tree pruning tool for any job depends on how thick and high up the…
 
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    Mill Race Garden Centre Blog

  • 11 Activities for Under £10 That Will Make Your Kids Happy This Summer

    28 Jul 2015 | 8:56 am
    Already dreading the cries of “I’m bored!” from your children this summer? We know the feeling. The summer holidays are fantastic for getting to spend time with your little ones, but those trips to theme parks and zoos can soon add up. Fear not! We have some brilliant ideas for keeping kids occupied all summer long that won’t cost the Earth. In fact, many of these ideas involve typical household items that you probably already have at home. Bring on the summer! 1. Make a water blob Image Credit: Paging Fun Mums Though this tutorial was written by Louise at PagingFunMums over in the…
  • 21 Quick & Easy Summer BBQ Recipes That Will Impress Your Friends

    2 Jul 2015 | 3:07 am
    Are you itching to get the barbecue out of the shed? Us too! The arrival of the Great British Summer inevitably leads to gardens being filled with the delicious scent of grilled food, so even if you’re not planning a barbecue yet, you’re bound to get grilling once you’ve been tempted by the smell of sausages wafting into your garden! Our mouths are watering already… But before you rush off to the supermarket to stock up on frozen burgers, take a look at our round up of impressive, yet easy to make, homemade options. These summer bbq recipes are bound to wow your guests, but they’re…
  • 8 Things That Will Keep Pests Out of Your Garden

    19 Jun 2015 | 9:21 am
    Are you fed up with bad bugs blighting your garden? We know the feeling. After you’ve spent so much time, effort and cash on making your garden the best it can possibly be, the last thing you want is for your plants to be eaten by insects. Or worse – for the insects to eat you! We’ve gathered together a few helpful tips to keep bad bugs at bay, so hopefully this summer you won’t have to suffer your plants being turned into lace by caterpillars, or mosquitoes feasting on your bare skin when you’re trying to enjoy your lovely garden. Let the battle commence! 1. Plant garlic Garlic…
  • 18 Beautiful, Easy to Maintain Flowers & Plants for Lazy Gardeners (PLUS: Tips for a Low Maintenance Garden!)

    3 Jun 2015 | 2:23 am
    If watching Ground Force as a child led you to believe that gardening is a terribly difficult pastime that involves lots of heavy lifting and a flagrant disregard for underwear, chances are you've been put off the pursuit for life (and also regularly have nightmares about water features). However, it needn't be as tricky as you might think. There are lots of low maintenance plants that will look gorgeous with little to no effort required. Plus, believe it or not, the world of gardening advice is filled with myths that make it appear harder than it really is. For instance, water droplets will…
  • 21 Signs You’re at a Quintessentially British BBQ

    22 May 2015 | 4:33 am
    Come rain or shine, nobody does a BBQ quite like us Brits. And while we can't always rely on good weather, the UK has its own list of well-established BBQ traditions that we can all relate to. To celebrate the 19th National BBQ Week and the Bank Holiday weekend, we have compiled a list of 21 signs you might be in attendance at a quintessentially British BBQ. And if you've never been to one before, you're in for a treat! 1. Someone cut the lawn for the first time all year Image credit: F_A This is always a sign that somebody is about to cook something outdoors. 2. It’s a bank holiday Image…
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    Back To My Garden

  • Learning How To Garden with Megan Cain

    gardentips
    27 Jul 2015 | 11:42 pm
      Megan Cain is a passionate gardener, an author and a brilliant teacher of gardening.  Do you know someone who loves learning about the soil and growing things?  Then you need to introduce them to Megan!  I got to interview her and learn about her exciting new 7 Day Challenge that’s she is organizing.   […]
  • Discovering Heirloom Seeds with The Tyrant Farmer

    gardentips
    16 Jul 2015 | 6:09 am
      Aaron von Frank is the cofounder and CEO of GrowJourney, a USDA certified organic Seeds of the Month Club.  GrowJourney members get new and interesting varieties of organic heirloom seeds each month, plus exclusive access to the company’s online educational resources that help them learn how to grow each seed variety using organic/permaculture methods.  Aaron […]
  • This Week In Gardening – How To Grow Gargantuan Vegetables

    gardentips
    1 Jul 2015 | 12:42 am
    Home-grown vegetables taste better than store bought. Your friends and family are secretly envious of your garden. I’m just curious….what’s the biggest, most outrageous thing you’ve ever grown in your garden? When I was a wee lad I went the to the Austin Thresherman’s Reunion.  It was a end of summer festival in the village […]
  • Gardening in the UK with Jane Perrone

    gardentips
    28 Jun 2015 | 11:14 pm
    Jane Perrone loves being outside, experiencing first hand the infinite intricacies and fascinations.  She loves growing her own delicious, fresh food.  She blogs about gardening at www.Perone.blogs.com  Jane is a journalist and gardening editor at The Guardian, one of the biggest newspapers in England.     In This Episode You’ll Discover … Water conservation in […]
  • Starting Your Own Vegetable Garden with Kirsten Lints

    gardentips
    25 Jun 2015 | 10:52 pm
    Kirsten Lints loves growing veggies, starting seeds, and cooking with fresh, delicious ingredients from her garden.  She is a talented designer and loves the connection between her satisfied clients and their new landscapes.  Kirsten is a certified Professional Horticulturist and a Master Gardener.  www.GardensAliveDesign.com     In This Episode You’ll Discover … Starting seeds indoors […]
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    Grow Our Way

  • 24 Amazing Benefits and Uses of Neem Oil for Plants

    Safer® Brand
    29 Jul 2015 | 4:15 am
    When searching for a safe and effective product to control insects and disease in your lawn and garden, look no further than neem oil. It’s a powerful organic solution to your most difficult-to-manage infestations. What is neem oil? Neem oil is a natural byproduct of the neem tree. The oil is harvested from the trees’ seeds and leaves. While it has been used as natural pesticide for hundreds of years, you’ll also find it in many products you use in your home, including: -Cosmetics -Toothpastes -Dog shampoo -Soaps People in India have been using the neem leaf for its medicinal properties…
  • 20 Common Tomato Plant Problems and How to Fix Them

    Safer® Brand
    14 Jul 2015 | 12:30 pm
    If you’re one of the three million people who planted a home garden this year, you’re most likely growing tomatoes. Nine out of 10 gardeners grow tomatoes, and that number would be 10 out of 10 if the holdouts would taste a fresh garden tomato and compare it to a grocery store purchase. Nothing beats the taste of a fresh home-grown tomato! Many gardeners who grow tomatoes, however, are frustrated with the progress of their plants. The plant may not set fruit. Or your tomatoes may ripen, but have ugly, spongy black spots at the bottom. Worse still, your plants may look great in the evening…
  • What Do Moths Eat and How to Keep Moths Away

    Safer® Brand
    1 Jul 2015 | 8:09 am
    If you’ve ever pulled your favorite wool sweater out of storage only to find it riddled with holes, you know the aggravation that a tiny little moth can generate. Clothes moths and their cousins, the household pest known as the pantry moth, can infest even the cleanest homes and create untold damage. The key to eliminating both pantry and clothes moths is understanding their life cycle and taking steps to kill them based on where they live, breed, feed and hide.  What Do Moths Eat? There are actually two types of clothes moths distributed worldwide: the webbing clothes moth (Tineola…
  • How to Get Rid of Crabgrass the Easy Way

    Safer® Brand
    26 Jun 2015 | 5:03 am
    Throughout North America, homeowners confront an annual scourge that can turn a lush, smooth emerald carpet into a weedy mess: crabgrass. Specifically, large crabgrass (Digitaria sanguinalis) — which also goes by the name hairy crabgrass — and smooth crabgrass (Digitaria ischaemum) can invade lawns, flower beds and vegetable gardens, rapidly becoming a nuisance. When one plant can produce an estimated 150,000 new crabgrass seeds from each plant, you know it’s trying to take over your yard! What is Crabgrass and Why Not Just Let it Grow? Crabgrass and other unwanted weeds steal valuable…
  • How to Get Rid of Black Spot on Roses

    Safer® Brand
    23 Jun 2015 | 5:53 am
    It starts gradually — a few yellowed leaves dropped to the ground, a few dark brown or black spots on the leaves you can easily attribute to just natural aging. Then suddenly, your rose bush looks terrible! Leaves are falling off at a rapid clip. Before tumbling to the ground, the leaves are dotted with black spots or splotches that fade into the leaf itself. As the days progress, nearly all the leaves yellow and fall from your prized roses, leaving a thorny skeleton behind. What happened? Was it an insect that attacked over night or something else? Black Spot on Roses If this scenario…
 
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    In the Garden...with Mariani Landscape

  • Revisiting Northwind Perennial Farm

    Gina Iliopoulos
    29 Jul 2015 | 4:00 am
    Last year introduced you to the Northwind Perennial Farm, and we wanted to take you back to see the farm again.  The farm was that, a farm, and now it is 10 acres of joy for partners Steve Coster, Colleen … Continue reading →
  • Downers Grove Organic Gardeners

    Gina Iliopoulos
    24 Jul 2015 | 4:00 am
    You may know that Mariani Landscape is headquartered in Lake Bluff, but we have been serving the Western Suburbs for over 20 years from our Westmont office.  So in continuation of our garden club series we feature a club from … Continue reading →
  • The History of Garden Clubs

    Gina Iliopoulos
    22 Jul 2015 | 4:00 am
    Last time we talked to you about the Lincolnshire Garden Club, its works, and some of its members. We were so impressed with the members who have been affiliated for over 50 years we thought some history might be interesting. … Continue reading →
  • The Lincolnshire Garden Club

    Gina Iliopoulos
    20 Jul 2015 | 4:00 am
    This week we spend some time in different gardens as we introduce you to a few of the garden clubs we work with.  We start with The Lincolnshire Garden Club since we just had them out to Old Mill Farm … Continue reading →
  • The Hottest Pepper

    Gina Iliopoulos
    17 Jul 2015 | 4:00 am
    Last time we moved up the Scoville scale to peppers with medium heat intensity.  Today we take you to the upper limit with really HOT peppers, like ‘Habanero’, pictured to the right and below.  A cultivar of Capsicum chinense, this … Continue reading →
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    Harmony Gardens Landscaping

  • Xeriscaping, not Zeroscaping

    HGadmin
    24 Jul 2015 | 10:27 am
    Xeriscaping, not Zeroscaping After dry years and low water table the word xeriscape became a buzzword. Many wrongly assume it means growing cacti and covering soil with gravel. Xeriscape means lush dry garden of which plants classified as xerophytic are planted. These plants require less water or have better methods of obtaining water thru long taproots or retaining water thru waxy leaves that retard transpiration. Xeriscaping is a way of planting in areas where water is scarce. In Ottawa it means planting low maintenance water-wise perennials and shrubs. There are several reasons to consider…
  • Efficient Watering

    HGadmin
    15 Jul 2015 | 10:23 am
    Efficient Watering Water is a precious resource which needs to be used wisely to be effective and efficient. Some tips for using irrigation water more efficiently are: 1) Install rain sensors on your sprinkler systems. There is no need for your irrigation system to run when it is raining or going to rain. 2) Adjust irrigation timers according to seasonal needs. Irrigation should not be running mid afternoon or during the night. Timers can be set based on seasonal time. 3) Detect and repair all leaks in the irrigation systems. 4) Water trees and shrubs, […] The post Efficient Watering…
  • ATTRACTING BUTTERFLIES

    HGadmin
    7 Jul 2015 | 10:06 am
    ATTRACTING BUTTERFLIES To attract the greatest number of butterflies and have them as residents in your yard you will need to have plants that serve the needs of all life stages of the butterfly. They need a place to lay eggs, food plants for the larva (caterpillar), a place to form a chrysalis and nectar sources for the adults. Most adult butterflies live 10 to 20 days but some live no longer than 3 to 4 days. The overwintering monarchs may live 6 months. Over 700 species of butterflies are found in North America. Butterfly […] The post ATTRACTING BUTTERFLIES appeared first on Harmony…
  • WHY GROW NATIVE PLANTS?

    HGadmin
    2 Jul 2015 | 10:05 am
    WHY GROW NATIVE PLANTS? A native plant is one that naturally occurs on a site and has not been introduced from another distant place. Native plants provide the best diversity of habitat elements for wildlife. Wildlife in your area have evolved to use native plants as food, cover, places to raise their young and sometimes even for water. Native plants will thrive in their natural site because they are best suited to the conditions of that site. Plants native to the soils and climate of your specific area provide the best overall food sources for […] The post WHY GROW NATIVE PLANTS?
  • The Organic Way to Fertilize your Garden

    HGadmin
    30 Jun 2015 | 8:22 am
    Is there any Organic Way to Fertilize your Garden? Building a healthy soil is the basis of healthy plants whether they are flowers, vegetables or herbs. All plants need nutrients and they get their nutrients from the soil they are planted in. Nutrients in the soil thus need to be replenished. This replenishment is called fertilizing. Organic fertilizers for your garden Manures: provides nitrogen content, trace elements and organic matter to build a healthy soil ecosystem. Fresh animal manure can burn plants and so should always be composted. Composted manures are weed seed free also.
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    goldfordgardens

  • 20 Gross Facts about Cockroaches That Will Give You the Heebie Jeebies

    ameliagoldford
    20 Jul 2015 | 6:25 am
    Besides your urge to puke and the desire to exterminate them all in the moment you see them, cockroaches have something really strange about them. These creatures have abilities that will make the xenomorphs from the Alien franchise look like a giant and yet quite nerfed version of the insects that terrorise you in your home. Cockroaches have one bad habit above all else – to appear when you don’t want them. For example, if you see them in your garden while you’re doing the driveway cleaning, then you will already know they have located your home. The latter means you have to…
  • Easy Gardening: 8 Types of Ingenious Mulching

    ameliagoldford
    3 Jun 2015 | 5:53 am
    Even gardeners with decades of practice don’t pay enough attention to mulching. Vegetable gardens, flower gardens, standard lawns – they all need hay bales and other piles of organic matter for safe growing. You don’t have to make this aspect of your gardening repetitive! The following examples will give you lots of options for your proper garden care. These are the eight most frequently used types of mulch, along with some important aspects of applying them: Salt marsh hay: as its name implies, this type of mulch comes from grass which is typical for salt marshes. The seeds…
  • 6 Tips on How to Clean Cast Iron Radiators

    ameliagoldford
    22 May 2015 | 8:45 am
    One of the distinctive features in the old UK homes is the availability of a cast iron radiator. While this is not exactly a sign of opulence (at least it wasn’t the case when they appeared), nowadays this heating item brings some vintage charm in your home. Some of these radiators are actually well-decorated. Some old homes even have patterned heating devices with ornamental curves and other pleasant details. On the other hand, such radiators can have their looks ruined if nobody takes care of their hygiene. Make sure that none of this will happen and follow the techniques used by the…
  • 6 Tips on Cleaning Soot Stains from Your Carpet

    ameliagoldford
    13 May 2015 | 4:04 am
    If you have a fireplace in your living room, prepare for a risky situation – the forming of persisting dark stains on your carpet. Even more, every source of soot can create such stains – from candles to ovens. These are some of the nastiest stains – it looks like the more you scrub and wipe the sooty area, the more it spreads. The problem will be even more obvious if you have a bright-coloured carpet. Luckily, not everything is ruined – you can even use some DIY techniques for the clean-up of your carpet. You will be able to find most of the required ingredients in your pantry.
  • What to Cook With a Few Garden Tomatoes

    ameliagoldford
    7 May 2015 | 5:00 am
    Home gardening is more popular than ever and many vegetable gardeners in the UK know well the pleasure of growing delicious tomatoes. There are many uses for your harvest of garden tomatoes. You can enjoy them fresh, also as tomato sauce, salsa, pasta sauce and barbecue amendment. So how to use your garden tomatoes for a nutritious recipe? The following tips provided by professional gardeners will be of use. You can enjoy these quite easy and so yummy recipes with just a minimum quantity of tomatoes. Tomato Appetiser 1 loaf of long bread, baguette-like for the win; 7 to 9 tomatoes,…
 
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    Garden Wholesale

  • Flower Fountains

    Duqaa
    16 Jul 2015 | 11:03 am
    Duqaa Offers You Stunning Collection of Flower Fountain to Decor Premises Duqaa 3 Tier flower fountain baskets Ideal for the Patio, Balcony or Decked areas. Gives three levels of cascading color. Perfect for a combination of upright and trailing plants. It will create an eye-catching feature all summer by adding height to floral displays. Strong metal rod and strip construction and durable coating give a long life. Easily assembled all fittings and instructions included. The traditional Georgian design made from wrought iron  and other material will look fabulous wherever you wish to place…
  • Incense Burner & Sticks

    Duqaa
    16 Jul 2015 | 10:55 am
    Duqaa Proudly offers a Diverse Collection of Authentic Incense Burner and Sticks Duqaa offer a quality range of Religious Products that gives a pure, aesthetic and religious feel. Moreover, our range of products is manufactured from quality raw material that is procured from trustworthy vendors of the industries. Incense burners, incense holders, ash catchers come in various sizes and shapes. Some are used for one kind of incense, others are more multi-purpose. Incense burners take a variety of forms and are created from many different materials, depending on the region. Most are open…
  • Votive & Candle Holders

    Duqaa
    16 Jul 2015 | 10:41 am
    Duqaa Give An Elegant Look To Your Home With Home Decor Items Decorating home with Votive, lanterns and candle Holders are becoming the most popular trend. These can be used in various purposes, such as family function, party, get-together, festive occasions among others. These help to explore the beauty as well decoration of your function. As well as lanterns bring the perfect texture. If you are looking for the reliable source that can offer your quality as well as affordable lanterns post,cylinder vases then you can take the help of the internet. One of the most reputed and reliable online…
  • Garden Planters

    Duqaa
    16 Jul 2015 | 10:30 am
    Duqaa that specializes in offering a wide range of home and garden decorative products. The following press release is written to provide information about the trustworthy online store that offers beautiful, elegant and eye catching Home and Garden decor Planter at remarkable rates. Duqaa is resourced with an incredible team of experts who have minutely focused on product quality and come up with the best of the Indoor and outdoor large flower pots, planters. Many home and garden products, garden supplies and other elements of garden decor are now a part of the daily living and lifestyle. A…
  • Garden Supplies Wholesaler

    Duqaa
    16 Jul 2015 | 5:41 am
    DUQAA.COM GARDEN SUPPLIES WHOLESALER “Duqaa”: Leading Store To Shop Decorative Home and Garden Products. The written press release comprise information about the top e-store offering wonderful range of decorative items like Handicrafts, Votive & Candle Holders, Garden Lamps & Lanterns, Birdbath and Feeders, Patio Outdoor Furniture, Garden Fountains & Sculptures etc at very reasonable price. Duqaa.com is a leading manufactur, exporter & supplier of Handicrafts, Home & Garden Decor, Wedding Supplies, Home & Garden Accessories. On Duqaa.com you will find exclusive and…
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