Gardening

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  • The Peterborough Community Garden Network’s Urban Grain Seed Project

    You Grow Girl
    Gayla Trail
    30 Aug 2015 | 4:37 pm
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  • Money Saving Garden Ideas with a Living Wall

    Shawna Coronado
    Shawna Coronado
    31 Aug 2015 | 4:20 am
    Living wall systems can be quite money-saving. You can use the systems year after year and can be planted with seeds or a combination of seeds and pre-grown plants in order to reduce expenses. While the garden featured here is a flower garden with orange and cream “dreamsicle” color combinations, now is the perfect time to consider planted fall and winter vegetables and other fall blooming annuals – a living wall is the perfect place to plant all season long.  Whether you are doing a fall garden or planning next springs planting, below is an excerpt from my latest book…
  • Keeping An Eye On Hemp Dogbane: Wildflower Wednesday

    Cold Climate Gardening
    Kathy Purdy
    30 Aug 2015 | 4:13 pm
    The email from my neighbor to the south was ominous. “There’s a plant I’ve never seen before on the north side of your property along the road. It’s already grown into a big patch and I’m afraid it might be swallowwort.” I had read that swallowwort was highly invasive, but I had never seen any […]
  • september garden chores

    A Way To Garden
    margaret
    1 Sep 2015 | 2:23 pm
    OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS to divide or add perennials; to plant shrubs and trees; to repair or renovate lawns; to fight next [read more…] The post september garden chores appeared first on A Way To Garden.
  • Guernsey Garden

    The Occasional Gardener
    14 Aug 2015 | 8:47 am
    I've been remiss in not writing about the first garden that I helped design for someone other than myself and that's my aunt's garden in Guernsey. She had an offer from a neighbour to take a little off the side of her garden in return for more space at the back. In the photo the side is the wall straight ahead, and to the left the arch of roses leads to the additional rear space.I had been to her quaint stone cottage, a step back in time on an ancient village lane, a couple of times before but the job of redesigning the space was done remotely while I was home in London. It was actually a…
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    You Grow Girl

  • The Peterborough Community Garden Network’s Urban Grain Seed Project

    Gayla Trail
    30 Aug 2015 | 4:37 pm
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  • My Garden Photography & a Garden Tour

    Gayla Trail
    17 Aug 2015 | 2:11 pm
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  • Big Impact with the ‘Tiny Padhye’ Lily

    Gayla Trail
    6 Aug 2015 | 1:03 pm
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  • Waste Not: Use Up Tough Garlic Scape Ends

    Gayla Trail
    8 Jul 2015 | 2:04 pm
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  • Gardening Mad

    Gayla Trail
    9 Jun 2015 | 9:36 am
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    Shawna Coronado

  • Money Saving Garden Ideas with a Living Wall

    Shawna Coronado
    31 Aug 2015 | 4:20 am
    Living wall systems can be quite money-saving. You can use the systems year after year and can be planted with seeds or a combination of seeds and pre-grown plants in order to reduce expenses. While the garden featured here is a flower garden with orange and cream “dreamsicle” color combinations, now is the perfect time to consider planted fall and winter vegetables and other fall blooming annuals – a living wall is the perfect place to plant all season long.  Whether you are doing a fall garden or planning next springs planting, below is an excerpt from my latest book…
  • Gardening for Arthritis Tools – Product Review and Contest

    Shawna Coronado
    24 Aug 2015 | 7:58 am
    When Troy-Bilt sent me several tools at the beginning of the summer to review, I had no idea I would be getting a diagnosis of severe degenerative arthritis and how a tool might truly make a difference in my garden for my health. I am very tough on tools – I chew them up and spit them out – and below are four tools I reviewed from Troy-Bilt that I’ve used a grading scale of A, B, or C with a mention if I feel they are good for gardening if you have arthritis or another condition. If I find a tool that’s an F, I’m not even going to share that horror with you, so…
  • #NeverGiveUp – Surviving Degenerative Spinal Arthritis

    Shawna Coronado
    19 Aug 2015 | 5:00 am
    A month ago I was diagnosed with degenerative Spinal Osteoarthritis, also known as Degenerative Disc Disease. Initially I was devastated because there is no cure. I have had daily pain for about four years and have noticed some challenges this year in taking care of my garden. For example, I have not been able to maintain the behind-the-fence garden as well due to the pain in my upper back and shoulders. An orthopedic discovered with x-rays that there is very little padding left between the vertebrae in my back, my spine is already starting to become malformed, and I am an inch shorter than I…
  • Beet Greens in a Yummy Vegan Salad Recipe

    Shawna Coronado
    17 Aug 2015 | 4:28 am
    Beet Greens. I know. It sounds so very weird and yet is one of the most delicious salads I have ever tried. Growing your own beets from seed is super easy – J.W. Jung Seed Co provided the seeds for these amazing red beets – and beyond providing beautiful color in the garden, they also provide lots of vitamins for your plate. If you are bored with the same old-same old garden salads, definitely experiment with a vegan salad made of beet greens – you will love it. HOW TO MAKE a VEGAN BEET GREEN SALAD RECIPE Here’s the secret to this recipe – use any quantity of…
  • An Easy Living Wall Entry Garden

    Shawna Coronado
    10 Aug 2015 | 4:30 am
    One of my favorite gardens at my home has been the freestanding living wall entry garden I built to reside next to my front door in an awkward little spot between the garage and stoop. I wrote about how to do it in Grow a Living Wall; Create Vertical Gardens with Purpose, my latest book. I love it as an oxygen providing “umph” when you exit or return to the house, and it gives any house a spot of curb appeal that is appealing and attractive. Below are some excerpts from the book that show you how easy it is to assemble and maintain. Beyond curb appeal, this is also a magnificent…
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    Cold Climate Gardening

  • Keeping An Eye On Hemp Dogbane: Wildflower Wednesday

    Kathy Purdy
    30 Aug 2015 | 4:13 pm
    The email from my neighbor to the south was ominous. “There’s a plant I’ve never seen before on the north side of your property along the road. It’s already grown into a big patch and I’m afraid it might be swallowwort.” I had read that swallowwort was highly invasive, but I had never seen any […]
  • The Pleasures of Gardening: Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day August 2015

    Kathy Purdy
    16 Aug 2015 | 3:22 pm
    I have been spending every free minute gardening this season and enjoying myself thoroughly. I focused first on getting all plants into the ground as soon as I acquired them, and then switched to weeding. Only another gardener could understand the pleasure to be had from setting a bed to rights, especially if the soil […]
  • Editing and Tweaking: Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day July 2015

    Kathy Purdy
    16 Jul 2015 | 8:07 pm
    This is my fourth spring in this garden. For three years I have been creating garden beds, but this year I have been editing them: rearranging the furniture, so to speak. I have been having a lot of fun. It is my art; it engages my creative juices, as I seek the most aesthetically pleasing […]
  • Hobblebush, A Native Shrub That’s Easy To Love: Wildflower Wednesday

    Kathy Purdy
    27 Jun 2015 | 7:03 pm
    At first glance, I thought it was a hydrangea. But I don’t know of any hydrangea that blooms with the trilliums. And the large, exquisitely puckered leaves were unlike any hydrangea leaf I’d ever seen. Turns out it was a viburnum–Viburnum lantanoides–to be precise. This native shrub likes it cool and moist–perfect for northern climates. […]
  • Summer Is Here: Garden Bloggers Bloom Day June 2015

    Kathy Purdy
    15 Jun 2015 | 11:08 am
    We know it’s summer when the frost-tender mosaic bird bath (pictured above) takes its rightful place in the front garden. That move from winter storage was delayed because I was attending the Garden Bloggers’ Fling in Toronto. (There’s a good story about the bird bath here.) All the usual suspects are blooming, so I’ll just […]
 
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    A Way To Garden

  • september garden chores

    margaret
    1 Sep 2015 | 2:23 pm
    OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS to divide or add perennials; to plant shrubs and trees; to repair or renovate lawns; to fight next [read more…] The post september garden chores appeared first on A Way To Garden.
  • ‘understanding roots,’ with robert kourik

    margaret
    29 Aug 2015 | 9:06 am
    ROOTS. They’re the engine of the plant, but remain mostly unseen—unless something’s being added to the garden or dug up, [read more…] The post ‘understanding roots,’ with robert kourik appeared first on A Way To Garden.
  • herbed roasted tomatoes to freeze, with alana chernila

    margaret
    25 Aug 2015 | 6:38 am
    HOW DO YOU STASH TOMATOES for offseason use? Roast them with herbs, then freeze the resulting goodness, says cookbook author [read more…] The post herbed roasted tomatoes to freeze, with alana chernila appeared first on A Way To Garden.
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    The Occasional Gardener

  • Guernsey Garden

    14 Aug 2015 | 8:47 am
    I've been remiss in not writing about the first garden that I helped design for someone other than myself and that's my aunt's garden in Guernsey. She had an offer from a neighbour to take a little off the side of her garden in return for more space at the back. In the photo the side is the wall straight ahead, and to the left the arch of roses leads to the additional rear space.I had been to her quaint stone cottage, a step back in time on an ancient village lane, a couple of times before but the job of redesigning the space was done remotely while I was home in London. It was actually a…
  • Shady Meadow

    8 Aug 2015 | 8:38 am
    The only kind of gardening that goes on in the orchard is a mowing about once a month, sometimes stretching to six weeks if the weather is dry and slows the growth down. I've experimented with leaving parts of it wild but I get concerned that my dogs who do like to go down there on occasion, might end up with ticks which they are miraculously free from now without any chemical help.  Touchwood. So it is allowed to get a little bit wild but not too much and thats what it was like today when I went down there to take some photos.I was surprised to see last week when I went down there,…
  • Blooming Stress

    8 Jun 2015 | 8:38 am
    "Your cactus is flowering, it must be under stress" a friend said. I looked up at the tall blue green column and holy moly there were about 20 buds on it. There were a couple of buds on the other column last week but I was dissapointed not to have seen it become a flower. Maybe it blooms at night, it suddenly registered, and there it was a huge white bloom when I rushed outside to check.Do cacti flower under stress? Its certainly a stressful situation, hot dry sunny slope and the plant has become huge and quite crowded, I recently cut out a few of the less attractive parts. The other plant…
  • Room to Grow

    27 Apr 2015 | 8:02 am
    The arbor in the tropical potager is now fully covered with the Passiflora Coccinea. What a great job its doing of that. Very nice even cover over the bamboo trellis  trailing over the edge with a string of red flowers. I was recently offered a rattan coffee table that made me rethink things and bring the table over from the verandah, which I don't know why I didn't do earlier, its slatted and matches the slatted bench I already have here. Then I found a bamboo gate that concertinas, allowing me to gate off entry into this area, see left pic, from my dogs who love to dig in the beds…
  • Green Flowers

    28 Feb 2015 | 9:37 am
    I don't often see green flowered orchids at the farmers market but I did today and two spectacular ones at that. Dendrobium Callophyllum on the right is a native of Java, Lesser Sunda Islands and the Moluccas. Hallelujah it likes  sun and I have just the spot for it. I will be moving it out of its pot (growing on charcoal) to attach to a branch to hang on the Dark Verandah. Most of the epiphytes I have, similarly set up are clustered around the shady bits so its great to have this filling one of the sunnier gaps. And fill nicely it will as it has 5 or 6 fairly lanky arched leaf…
 
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    cell phone plans 2015

  • Family Mobile Plans Presenting an Economical Solution

    Rafik
    31 Aug 2015 | 3:46 am
    The family mobile plans are great options for parents having kids spending minutes, messages and data plan. But it’s also very important to know everything about it, which carrier to choose and review every different offer in order to choose the best to be able to save some money. Always got to choose what’s best recognized in your area with the best reputation and review all of
  • Discover The Best Cell Phones for Seniors

    Rafik
    24 Aug 2015 | 2:48 am
    The main objective of designed phone for senior to improve their quality of life, from the ease and simplicity of use. These mobile devices must use technological advances to provide services to older people to enable them to communicate with your partner, family and emergency services. But this is not always so. In usphoneplans.com we will highlight some of the features that
  • Best Cell Phone Plans for Seniors Worth a Look

    Rafik
    17 Aug 2015 | 4:08 am
    Cell phones are important, especially for seniors who can live, driving and spend a lot of time alone. The benefits of owning a cell phone safety are obvious; call for help can be a necessity. Many wireless companies have changed their marketing efforts to push wireless packages for seniors that offer many of the same standard features as other wireless plans and similar and monthly
  • Best Cell Phone Plans Updated in 2015

    Rafik
    12 Aug 2015 | 12:47 am
    As a wide variety of mobile phone plans and deals are coping up these days, sometimes the mobile phone buyers feel helpless and confused rather than finding the comfort of shopping. This happens just because right after entering into a shop for buying a handset you get loaded with a bunch of offers and deals knowing about all of those in detail and then deciding to go for one on the
  • Best Prepaid Cell Phone Plans in 2015

    Rafik
    3 Aug 2015 | 6:16 am
    Nowadays having a Smartphone is simply another one of life basic needs. Understanding all too well about reliance on those devices, mobile phone service providers are capable to charge high costs for monthly data plans and all of the other extras. For people who just need a simple wireless plan or don't like the idea of joining a 2 or 3 years agreement, a prepaid cell phone is a good
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    Plant Whatever Brings You Joy

  • The Face of a Rose

    Kathryn
    24 Aug 2015 | 10:39 am
    Not one for keeping records of my garden, but rather a woman who relishes the treasures and surprises each day and season offers, I’d be hard-pressed to say if this particular garden ever once displayed the abundance of roses it currently does, but I’d say, “No. Nearly September? Hardly.” And yet here it is. And so I share the wealth with all of you. This loveliness comes from a batch of Meidiland roses I found orphaned at one of my rare ventures into a big box store. Gradually I’ve transplanted them into bigger and bigger pots and they have not disappointed! I…
  • The Garden as Trickster

    Kathryn
    23 Jul 2015 | 10:04 am
    Haha! The garden continues to teach me, this time about my powers of observation, and how not all is at it might first appear! Bet you’ve had that experience, too, right? In my last post I wrote about the concept of the seed bank, and, particularly, about the “discovery” that I unexpectedly had lambs ear growing in my garden! Well, guess what? It’s Giant Mullein (Verbascum thapsus). It’s quite a joke on me, as I’d written–extensively–about mullein three years ago. Yet, there were enough differences this time that I convinced myself I was looking…
  • The Seed Bank

    Kathryn
    15 May 2015 | 11:54 am
    Readers of Plant Whatever Brings You Joy will be familiar with this one of the 52 lessons: “Never pull up and discard what you cannot identify,” a metaphorical invitation to not pre-judge that which enters your life that seems unfamiliar. “The Lord works in mysterious ways,” as we know. The blessings in our lives can show up in many different unexpected packages. So when I planted morning glory seeds in March on a rosy obelisk, well away from the rest of the garden, so it could not overcome whatever was growing nearby, I thought I was so clever both to get a head…
  • The Rustic Quiche

    Kathryn
    17 Apr 2015 | 7:53 am
    rustic quiche with roasted red peppers and kalamata olives Back when Antonia was a little girl a lovely Asian woman in San Francisco gave me a recipe for quiche which I vaguely recall making successfully a couple of times, and then, inexplicably, the recipe failed. I have no idea why. But I concluded that I “didn’t know how to make quiche.” (How many times do we do this one way or another?) I moved on to other endeavors in the kitchen. Making yogurt. Crafting tortillas. Baking bread. Astoundingly it’s taken me decades to get back to making quiches. And even that began…
  • Fire Pits: Part Two

    Kathryn
    19 Mar 2015 | 6:44 pm
    As some of you will recall my last blog post was afire with enthusiasm for fire pits, inspired by gardening author Helen Yoest, who wrote a guest post about her own fire pit in her garden. Kindled in my new found passion was the realization my 72nd birthday was upon me, nearly, and that if I applied myself aptly I might actually combine the two, making a new fire pit the center of my birthday festivities. I began researching fire pits and made the decision to purchase one made by Landman and to purchase it locally. All that was left was to decide which design. I chose the vine pattern since I…
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    May Dreams Gardens

  • Dear Jo Ellen, Do you remember?

    Carol
    31 Aug 2015 | 6:29 pm
    Dear Jo Ellen, I was thinking back this evening to when I attended my first Garden Writers Association symposium back in "the aughts", as in '09, and remembered that is the year I met you in person. Two years before my first GWA meeting, I met Mary Ann from Boise, Idaho at the first Garden Bloggers' Fling in Austin, Texas. She suggested I join GWA and go to one of the symposiums.  Wait, I
  • Enjoy each flower as it blooms

    Carol
    30 Aug 2015 | 6:44 pm
    Crocus speciosus I like to think if you blinded folded me and lead me gently to the center of my garden on any given day of the year, and then took off the blindfold, I could look around and tell you about what time of year it was, give or take a week or two. Today, I'd be off by a few weeks because this autumn crocus is blooming and I think it's early. I usually look for the autumn crocus,
  • A Garden Revival: A One Act Play

    Carol
    27 Aug 2015 | 6:29 pm
    A Garden Revival A One Act Play By Carol M. Gardenangelist Cast of Characters Gardenangelist…………………………......An evangelist of gardening Garden Fairies………………………………Assorted Garden Fairies Granny Gus McGarden..................................The garden fairy who tends the compost bins TIME: Late Summer SETTING: A garden ACT ONE SCENE 1 (We see some garden fairies looking at a sign in
  • Gardenangelist Defined

    Carol
    25 Aug 2015 | 7:13 pm
    gardenangelist (gär dn ān′jəl ist) n 1. A person who loves gardening and tries to convince others to love it, too.  2. A spokesperson for the love of gardening.  3. Someone who donates lavishly to a garden, a benefactor.  4. An evangelist for gardening. v gardenangelize 1. To speak about one's love of gardening. 2. To attempt to convince others to garden. -zed, -zing n gardenangelism 1. The
  • Dear Cindy, How hot is it today?

    Carol
    24 Aug 2015 | 6:48 pm
    Dear Cindy, Greetings from the Hoosier State where we've been enjoying some rather mild weather these last few weeks.  And by mild I mean I don't think we got to 80F today. Even for us, that's unusual in August.  How hot is it where you are, on your Corner of Katy down in Texas?  You mentioned in your last bloom day post you were desperate for rain and then I saw you posted after that about
 
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    Backyard Gardening Blog

  • Troy-Bilt Hand Tools Review

    Administrator
    2 Sep 2015 | 6:24 am
    If I say “Troy Bilt” what do you think of? Power tools right? I know I immediately think of chipper shredders, but that is not all they make. They have recently expanded into hand tools for gardening, and lucky me they sent me some free ones to review. I definitely like the trowel. I can’t […]
  • Last Trip to the Tree Store

    Administrator
    26 Jun 2015 | 1:36 pm
    For Father’s Day I took the family to the tree store here, probably for the last time, since we’re moving next month. In Chattanooga, where we are moving, I’m sure there are nurseries with a large variety of stock, but I haven’t found them yet, and I didn’t want to risk moving there and not […]
  • How to Divide Ornamental Grass

    Administrator
    6 Jun 2015 | 8:35 am
    Step 43 of my preparation to move to another state was digging and dividing my ornamental grass today. But even if I weren’t moving it was past time to do this. Miscanthus, the sort of grass I have (miscanthus sinesis ‘Morning Light’) also called maiden grass, grows from a rhizome and as it gets older […]
  • Use Impatiens to Brighten up Shady Spots

    Administrator
    31 May 2015 | 4:53 pm
    I just did a search on my blog for impatiens, I found 0 results, I can’t believe I’ve never mentioned this plant in a post before. It is my firm belief that every ornamental gardener (and even vegetable gardeners – to attract pollinators) should plant both perennials and annuals. I love perennials because you plant […]
  • How to Divide Daylilies and Other Perennials

    Administrator
    21 May 2015 | 2:57 pm
    My move gets ever closer, less than 2 months now and I say goodbye to the garden I’ve built over the last 12 years and… well… its traumatic. But one thing is for sure, I don’t want to have to buy a lot of these plants again. So I’ve been busy taking divisions and otherwise […]
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    Gardening in the Santa Cruz Mountains

  • 30 Aug 2015 | 7:36 am

    Christine
    30 Aug 2015 | 7:36 am
    Santa Cruz Mountain lifestyle..I am Christine Wood..this is my blog about gardening, food, wildlife in the area and much more. Beautiful Santa Cruz is on the Monterey Bay, on the coast of California U.S.A. South of San Francisco. Comment to scchristy@yahoo.comLogitech webcam on a tripodhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6WDbMGEC01Y&feature=youtubeCut into the 'cucumber' anddiscovered it was a Zuchinni!!Totally forgot what I actuallyplanted in that area!He's back!August......Hard work in the garden is therapy! Pumpkins are not thriving...was it the seed? the soil, location? Do have…
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    Digging

  • Plant This: Inland sea oats

    Pam/Digging
    1 Sep 2015 | 10:08 am
    Are you hunting for a shade plant that looks good from April to January but especially shines during the challenging late summer? Try inland sea oats, also known as northern sea oats (Chasmanthium latifolium), a grass that’s native to eastern and central North America, including central Texas. A riparian species — you’ll see it growing wild along creeks in Austin’s greenbelts — it’s marketed as a good choice for rain gardens. But with plenty of shade it grows just as well in the dry soil under live oaks. This is the time of year I love inland sea oats the…
  • Good morning, sleepyhead!

    Pam/Digging
    31 Aug 2015 | 7:13 am
    Every morning lately I’ve checked out the datura (Datura wrightii) in the front garden to see how many of its night-blooming flowers are still open. Because it’s growing in bright shade, it’s never smothered in flowers, but even two or three of these hand-sized blossoms make a statement. I counted half a dozen today, their white trumpets glowing, as if lit from within, in the warm rays of sunrise. This creamy beauty is from a couple of days ago. I’m enjoying datura season! All material © 2006-2015 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.
  • The Gardener of Good and Evil makes my garden look good

    Pam/Digging
    28 Aug 2015 | 2:29 pm
    Water visually cools Pam’s back garden. Photo by Lori Daul. Although she claims both a halo and a pitchfork in her blog name, Lori Daul of The Gardener of Good and Evil is purely a force for good — or at least that’s what I believe after seeing how beautifully she photographed my garden. The repetition of plants and paving draw the eye to Pam’s stock tank pond. Photo by Lori Daul. Lori came over one recent morning to take promotional shots for the Inside Austin Gardens tour on October 17. She’s on the tour’s organizing committee, and, as I mentioned earlier this…
  • Come see my garden on the Inside Austin Gardens Tour

    Pam/Digging
    25 Aug 2015 | 7:26 am
    The Inside Austin Gardens Tour is coming up soon, in a little less than two months, and my garden will be on it. This will be my first time on a public tour, and I hope that you’ll come and say hi. I love the slogan for this tour — For Gardeners, By Gardeners — because it speaks to the accessibility of the 6 private gardens on tour. This is not a mansion-laden tour of gardens maintained by landscaping crews but a peek into gardeners’ gardens, with all the passions, quirks, and real-life trial-and-error they offer. Each garden has a theme, and mine is “Oh…
  • Mellow mallow on Monday

    Pam/Digging
    24 Aug 2015 | 7:33 am
    Mmmmm, I do love Indian mallow (Abutilon palmeri). Those velvety, lime-green leaves and stems! Those Creamsicle-orange cupped blossoms! Its soft-orange flowers pop against cobalt blue. Its pettable green leaves soften the blue stucco wall in the back garden, unfazed by blasting sun and heat. Mmmm, mellow mallow In the front garden, deer shun those fuzzy leaves and ignore the blossoms too. Both plants did get an infestation of small, blue caterpillars earlier this summer. They devoured the leaves, disfiguring the plants. I handpicked the caterpillars every few days for several weeks, and that…
 
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    Blithewold Blogs

  • Taking off

    Kris Green
    6 Aug 2015 | 12:04 pm
    I freely admit that when we moved the Pollinator Garden this spring to its new location at the top of the meadow west of the vegetable garden I didn’t have high hopes for it to be a thing of beauty this year. For a couple of reasons. One, the intended location was full of nutsedge that […]
  • Lily days

    Kris Green
    27 Jul 2015 | 9:29 am
    Lily has to be one of the most overused descriptors in horticulture. Go figure, given how aptly it defines so many flowers: the word itself has a trumpeting flare and and if I use my imagination, a sweet fragrance too… Spring is plenty-lily-ful with trout lily, lily of the valley, checkered lilies, and lily-flowering tulips doing their thing, but starting […]
  • North Garden inventory

    Kris Green
    17 Jul 2015 | 8:14 am
    I’m asked often enough to name my favorite plant and season that it’s a little strange that hardly anyone* ever asks which is my favorite garden. Not that I could possibly pick a favorite (the pollinator garden). But since I featured the Rose Garden (my other favorite) last week, I can’t let this week go by without giving Blithewold’s pièce de […]
  • Rose Garden inventory

    Kris Green
    10 Jul 2015 | 7:40 am
    Thank goodness for rainy days. Without them, we stay outside and never get around to tidying the potting shed, defrosting the fridge, or keeping up with the paperwork. (Not to mention how happy the gardens are after a good downpour.) I’m grateful too that Betsy worked on the blog last week because aside from the pleasure of seeing Blithewold’s gardens […]
  • Prune it up

    Betsy Ekholm
    1 Jul 2015 | 11:11 am
    I am really excited to introduce my fellow horticulturist, Betsy Ekholm to the blogosphere. Betsy started working with Gail and me in 2013 as our gardens intern and we couldn’t let her go. Had to make her an official member of the garden crew — though you wouldn’t be wrong to think after reading this post […]
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    Flatbush Gardener

  • Bombus fervidus, golden northern bumblebee, yellow bumblebee

    Flatbush Gardener
    1 Sep 2015 | 8:19 pm
    Sunday, while cutting up edited plants into my compost tumbler, I caught sight of something unusual out of the corner of my eye. It turned out to be Bombus fervidus, golden northern bumblebee, or simply, the yellow bumblebee. This is at least the... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Garden Insect Species Records 2015

    Flatbush Gardener
    7 Jul 2015 | 5:18 am
    2015-07-12: Added two I'd forgotten about: Orius insidiosus, and Anthrenus verbasci. Since I wrote this post, I discovered a new species of bee. That brings the number of species to 18. These are the insect species I've discovered or identified in... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Pyrrhalta viburni, viburnum leaf beetle (VLB)

    Flatbush Gardener
    1 Jul 2015 | 5:24 am
    Pyrrhalta viburni, the viburnum leaf beetle, or VLB for short, is native to Europe. It was first discovered in North America barely two decades ago, in Maine in 1994. Both larvae and adults eat leaves. Our native Viburnum species are extremely... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • What I'm About

    Flatbush Gardener
    22 Jun 2015 | 6:40 pm
    Notice anything different about me? Until a few minutes ago, the by-line at the header of this blog read: Adventures in Neo-Victorian, Wild, Shade, Organic and Native Plant Gardening, Garden Design, and Garden Restoration.It now reads: Urban... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Native Plant Acquisitions: LINPI 2015 Plant Sale

    Flatbush Gardener
    14 Jun 2015 | 3:30 pm
    Saturday, June 13 was the last open day in 2015 for the Long Island Native Plant Initiative (LINPI) Plant Sale. I picked up another 13 species to add to my list, which has already grown this Spring to over 200 species of plants native to eastern... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
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    Ledge and Gardens

  • Tantalizing Tomatoes

    Layanee DeMerchant
    26 Aug 2015 | 3:01 am
    Hawaiian Pineapple Has a gardening season ever flown by as fast as this one? No, that's not a pumpkin, yet. It is a tomato and the tomatoes tell the tale. They ripen during the hot days of August here in my garden and August is the beginning of the end.  The tomato vines look a bit dismal with the yellowing and spotting of leaves (no, I am not going to show you)  but they are laden with fruit and the fruit is perfect. For some reason I planted these 30 vines much too close together this year. I don't know what happened and can only offer the explanation that the snow did…
  • Walk This Way

    Layanee DeMerchant
    20 Aug 2015 | 3:15 am
    August has brought with it high heat and lethargy. I have a new appreciation for those who garden in warm and down right hot areas of this country and the world. There is nothing that saps the strength like heat and humidity. It is time for porch swings, adirondack chairs and tall, sweaty glasses of cool drinks. Or, one could do piece work. The walkway to the front door runs right through a patch of ledge. A jackhammer was required to level the area for the brick walk. On either side of this area there is the still existing ledge and pockets which are too shallow for planting resulting in a…
  • High Summer

    Layanee DeMerchant
    5 Aug 2015 | 6:50 am
    Somehow gardening tasks took me away from the blog in June and July. Well, gardening tasks and other pursuits. The gardening tasks have paid off with dividends in the form of sweet corn, squash, kale, lettuce and ripening tomatoes. These all feed the body but the smell of garden phlox sure feeds the soul. I have found that the newer cultivars of phlox have much less scent than those garden 'volunteers'.  These rogue phlox are always a bland, to my eyes, pinkish purple but there is nothing bland about their scent.  The heavy air of an August night carries this fragrance on…
 
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    A Leafy Indulgence

  • Water Lily & Lotus

    Swimray
    30 Aug 2015 | 7:05 pm
    In early August I visited the Kenilworth Park & Aquatic Gardens along the Anacostia river here in Washington DC. This is one of those hometown attractions that I have never seen. You know the type of place -- the one attraction in your home town that you have never visited but everyone else in the country has. (Now if I can only get to the Washington Monument some day, my life here will be complete.)I heard it was the lotus blossom time, and after reading the post by John at DC Tropics, I decided to stop by. It was an extremely hot humid Sunday. As I arrived upon opening time, a large bus of…
  • The Dwarfs Have No Name?

    Swimray
    22 Aug 2015 | 6:33 am
    The dwarf sunflowers tested this year were picked up in a big box store. Ferry-Morse labeled the packet as Sunflower Dwarf Sunspot. I have grown a Sunspot variety [posted 08.07.2007] in the past that was a dwarf, so this extra title Dwarf made me curious. Did the company have a giant named sunspot, too?It seems, from looking at my description and photos from 2007, that this Sunspot is the same as the first dwarf sunflower tried back in 2008. The current plants happened to be planted in the same location as in 2007, and just as in 2007, are facing away from my yard towards the neighbor to the…
  • August Bloom Day

    Swimray
    15 Aug 2015 | 8:03 pm
    The good news is that I have made three garden bloggers bloom days in a row. The bad news is that there is little else to show between the posts. However, I have three posts waiting in the wings, including my annual review of a dwarf sunflower variety. I will begin posting them next week.Let sleeping bumblebees lie. The first dwarf sunflower variety is finisehd blooming, but the second one is now going full strong: Elf by Burpee.This is Tiger Eyes marigold from Park Seed. There is something going on with this marigold that I have yet to figure out. It starts out looking bicolor like it…
  • High Line Impressions

    Swimray
    21 Jul 2015 | 3:19 pm
    While on a trip to New York City, a visit to the High Line was high on my list. This is the old elevated railroad that was preserved and turned into a park. Overgrown with weeds and plants, it was 'rehabilitated' into a walking landscape; transformed from a rusting eyesore to an urban park and walkway with views. Watering systems, soil, stairs, elevators, and of course vegetation were installed on the old structure. I imagine the steel structure had to be beefed up in some spots, too.It is a phenomenal success story. I have a link to the High Line blog (on the right sidebar.) I read that it…
  • July Bloom Day

    Swimray
    15 Jul 2015 | 8:38 pm
    It has been a month since the last post. No excuses are offered but another rush out the door after work today to snap a few photos hopefully makes up.Echinacea is very thick and the goldfinches are probably drooling waiting for the seeds to be ready.One flower finally opened on this particular zinnia, 'Oriole'. I was expecting more of an orange hue.Pollinator-magnet liatris is nearing the end of its bloom. Funny, as it blooms from top down each stem.Rudbeckia 'Irish Eyes' reseeded after blooming early this year. This result grew up and bloomed already - without green eyes.This Rudbeckia…
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    A Leafy Indulgence

  • Water Lily & Lotus

    Swimray
    30 Aug 2015 | 7:05 pm
    In early August I visited the Kenilworth Park & Aquatic Gardens along the Anacostia river here in Washington DC. This is one of those hometown attractions that I have never seen. You know the type of place -- the one attraction in your home town that you have never visited but everyone else in the country has. (Now if I can only get to the Washington Monument some day, my life here will be complete.)I heard it was the lotus blossom time, and after reading the post by John at DC Tropics, I decided to stop by. It was an extremely hot humid Sunday. As I arrived upon opening time, a large bus of…
  • The Dwarfs Have No Name?

    Swimray
    22 Aug 2015 | 6:33 am
    The dwarf sunflowers tested this year were picked up in a big box store. Ferry-Morse labeled the packet as Sunflower Dwarf Sunspot. I have grown a Sunspot variety [posted 08.07.2007] in the past that was a dwarf, so this extra title Dwarf made me curious. Did the company have a giant named sunspot, too?It seems, from looking at my description and photos from 2007, that this Sunspot is the same as the first dwarf sunflower tried back in 2008. The current plants happened to be planted in the same location as in 2007, and just as in 2007, are facing away from my yard towards the neighbor to the…
  • August Bloom Day

    Swimray
    15 Aug 2015 | 8:03 pm
    The good news is that I have made three garden bloggers bloom days in a row. The bad news is that there is little else to show between the posts. However, I have three posts waiting in the wings, including my annual review of a dwarf sunflower variety. I will begin posting them next week.Let sleeping bumblebees lie. The first dwarf sunflower variety is finisehd blooming, but the second one is now going full strong: Elf by Burpee.This is Tiger Eyes marigold from Park Seed. There is something going on with this marigold that I have yet to figure out. It starts out looking bicolor like it…
  • High Line Impressions

    Swimray
    21 Jul 2015 | 3:19 pm
    While on a trip to New York City, a visit to the High Line was high on my list. This is the old elevated railroad that was preserved and turned into a park. Overgrown with weeds and plants, it was 'rehabilitated' into a walking landscape; transformed from a rusting eyesore to an urban park and walkway with views. Watering systems, soil, stairs, elevators, and of course vegetation were installed on the old structure. I imagine the steel structure had to be beefed up in some spots, too.It is a phenomenal success story. I have a link to the High Line blog (on the right sidebar.) I read that it…
  • July Bloom Day

    Swimray
    15 Jul 2015 | 8:38 pm
    It has been a month since the last post. No excuses are offered but another rush out the door after work today to snap a few photos hopefully makes up.Echinacea is very thick and the goldfinches are probably drooling waiting for the seeds to be ready.One flower finally opened on this particular zinnia, 'Oriole'. I was expecting more of an orange hue.Pollinator-magnet liatris is nearing the end of its bloom. Funny, as it blooms from top down each stem.Rudbeckia 'Irish Eyes' reseeded after blooming early this year. This result grew up and bloomed already - without green eyes.This Rudbeckia…
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    Garden Rant

  • Solace from the Garden at Night by Evelyn Hadden

    Evelyn Hadden
    1 Sep 2015 | 10:48 pm
    This week I have been mourning the passing of a friend who lost her battle with cancer. On learning the news yesterday evening, I went out into my garden and sat in the dark for several hours, watching the stars. It was an instinct to go to that haven for comfort and reassurance — reassurance that the world is still vast and beautiful and alive, that we are but one small part of it, that it will go on even when we individual humans cease to exist. There is something curiously peaceful about the night sky, the moon and stars, the rhythmic chirping of insects, the anonymity of sitting in the…
  • So, an artist, a curator, and a designer walk into a garden (part II) by Elizabeth Licata

    Elizabeth Licata
    1 Sep 2015 | 5:07 am
    Then Here’s an update on an interesting front garden concept I introduced last year.  (I promised to follow up!) This project by a local curator, artist, and designer is called Territory of Collaboration. Organic shapes and plants suggested by the artist were combined with the ideas of the designer; another overriding intent was to echo in some ways the circular turret and painted arch found on the Victorian structure.   Now Curator Claire Schneider is a friend of mine who’s mainly interested in food gardening at her own house. But for this property, which she also owns, she wanted…
  • Inside the White House Rose Garden “Memory Book” by Susan Harris

    Susan Harris
    28 Aug 2015 | 4:37 am
    For the first time ever, the public is able to see a private scrapbook about the Kennedy Rose Garden created by Jackie Kennedy herself in 1966 as a gift to her old friend Bunny Mellon, who helped design the garden. The scrapbook has been scanned, and the 150 or so pages are the highlight of the White House Historical Association’s Kennedy Rose Garden Exhibit Far more interesting than I expected (frankly), the scrapbook tells the story of the garden with photos, sketches,  plant order invoices (tulips from Viette), and very personal and moving handwritten notes, such as one about her…
  • My Hot and Spicy Adventures, or She’s On Fire! by Ivette Soler

    Ivette Soler
    25 Aug 2015 | 8:34 pm
    Jalapeños, Serranos, Trinidad Scorpion peppers, Chocolate Habañeros, Pequìn, Chiltepin, Negros Chiles De Arbol, and an unknown tree variety are one day’s harvest in my Garden Of Spicy Delights I HAVE A HEAT TOOTH!!! Not a sweet tooth, a HEAT TOOTH! I love hot peppers. I have been honing my tolerance for heat for a few years now, and at this point I can take a bite out of a habañero and not pass out or vomit. It hurts, and I have to breathe deeply as my eyes water and my mouth and lips burn, but I can do it, and I have to admit – I love the burn as much as I love the flavor! I…
  • The wild side by Elizabeth Licata

    Elizabeth Licata
    25 Aug 2015 | 5:11 am
    Buffalo’s Delaware park At this time of year, I often prefer hiking to gardening. Late summer is my favorite time for the plants that grow wild in the parks and the preserves of Western New York, and the more common they are, the better I like them.  They don’t even have to be native. I enjoy the fact that they’re just there, ready for me to enjoy. I don’t always know what they all are, which adds to the delight. On recent walks, I’ve enjoyed eutrochium/eupatorium (all types), veronicastrum, bull thistle (cirsium), oenothera, linaria, wild impatiens (jewelweed), every type of…
 
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    Life In Sugar Hollow

  • Full Hearts, Fresh Starts

    Tracey
    21 Aug 2015 | 12:13 pm
    School may have started, but I am not going to let it dictate how we spend the end of August. Where I come from, the school years always started after Labor Day (and after the annual North Forest Avenue block party). Truth! And that's the way it should be, really. We snuck in one last trip to big water last weekend - to the York River - an estuary two and a half hours away from our home in the mountains. (Top two photos.) We had a small, private beach to ourselves. We kayaked, watched dolphins, herons and bald eagles and listened to the water lapping against the dock from our shaded deck that…
  • Keeping Up With Summer

    Tracey
    7 Jul 2015 | 8:54 am
    How is it early July already? I am not liking how quickly time can pass, especially with the chitlins growing so quickly.But first grade is finished (again, already?!) and we got away to the Finger Lakes last month (see the bottom four pictures). The water at the lake was high and things were mossy and damp and in the 70s the whole week. We got out on the boats twice a day, Willa learned how to fish and we enjoyed the pace of life on the water. There is so much I miss about New York and I loved our time in our rustic cabin. Last week, we also got to Lynchburg for playtime at Amazement Square…
  • In Full Swing/Spring

    Tracey
    26 May 2015 | 6:43 am
      Getting ALL of the gardening things done. Found a fragrant mock orange (second photo up from bottom). Bought some cleome and tomatoes and they are all planted. Phew. My brother has some peonies he wants me to transplant and then, I should really be finished for the season. I finally treated myself to a big, yellow TubTrug and for some reason, it makes weeding that much easier/nicer. (Also, I was able to wash the dogs in it.)This spring, I have had to become a master rose slug spotter. For years, I thought it was leaf miners decimating my roses. But a pair of reading glasses…
  • Well, Well, Well

    Tracey
    11 May 2015 | 12:09 pm
    Celebrating the sun, the rain, new plants and seeds that have been scattered. So many plant sales! I am trying out many new things this year - as a result of the generosity of other gardeners and their divisions. Forget-me-nots, blackberry lilies, asters, lamb's ears, 'Man in the Moon' marigolds, hollyhocks, lenten roses, obedient plants and foxgloves. I have also added a few more boxwoods and sowed seeds for four different zinnia varieties ('Blue Point,' 'Granny's Bouquet,' 'Cut and Come Again' and a diminutive variety - 'Pinwheel').There was also the transplanting of a very old…
  • When The Going Gets Great

    Tracey
    20 Apr 2015 | 6:38 am
    Hot damn, spring is here! And as a former girl from the North, I would say we earned it this go around. But all of that precipitation and those frigid temperatures were, actually, fantastic for the garden. My winter daphne is blooming and all of the bulbs appreciated their winter-time. That photo at the bottom is actually a tulip. 'Angelique.' They look like peonies. Amazing-amazing. And the bluebells are spreading more and more each year (top photo). Inside for a rainstorm yesterday, Willa and I worked on botanical letters (via The Postman's Knock's tutorial - second photo from top), after…
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    Transatlantic Gardener

  • New research: Non-native plants just as good as natives for pollinators

    Graham Rice
    17 Aug 2015 | 1:00 am
    There’s been a great deal of controversy about whether native plants are best for pollinating insects or whether non-native garden plants are just as valuable. On the whole, the debate has been informed by more opinion than science but, after a four year research project at their Wisley garden near London, the Royal Horticultural Society has the answer. This is the first ever designed field experiment to test whether the geographical origin (‘nativeness’) of garden plants affects the abundance and diversity of invertebrates (wildlife) they support. “Until now the role native and…
  • New heuchera that's quietly different

    Graham Rice
    10 Aug 2015 | 5:11 am
    In the first waves of enthusiasm for heucheras, back in the 1930s and then the 1950s, it was the flowers that were key and in fact many varieties were developed specifically as commercial cut flowers. More recently, of course, foliage has been the thing and an astonishing range of foliage colors and patterns has been developed although many have poor flowers which are best snipped away. So, obviously, the next thing was to bring the two features together. ‘Rave On’ is pretty good in combining good foliage with good flowers, but flowering tails off as spring passes. But, so far, ‘Berry…
  • Plant names with a groan

    Graham Rice
    3 Aug 2015 | 6:26 am
    Nurseries and plant breeders plunder a huge range of sources when dreaming up names for their new plants. Gone are the days of ‘Purple Prince’ and ‘Snow Queen’, most of the names in that traditional style have already been used – and you can’t use the same name twice for the same kind of plant. So new names are in constant demand. One of the most popular tricks is to adapt a familiar phrase, often by creating a groaning pun – which may, or may not, have some relation to the plant itself. Here are a few examples from books, music and films. Pulmonaria ‘Dark Vader’ We all know…
  • Slug resistant hostas?

    Graham Rice
    2 Jul 2015 | 4:00 am
    Slug resistant hostas? Yes, well, maybe… Anyone who writes anything about hostas usually ends up saying that some varieties are slug resistant. But let’s stop right there: what do we mean by “resistant”? Well, we don’t mean immune, that’s for sure. What we mean is that they’re far less likely to be eaten than other hostas, that’s all. These are varieties that have unusually thick and heavily textured leaves that the slugs struggle to munch through. They’re often related to the old favorite H. sieboldiana ‘Elegans’ and many of them have blue foliage. Now, I was looking…
  • The Welsh poppy gets a change of name

    Graham Rice
    14 Jun 2015 | 1:00 am
    As I mentioned here recently, there’s a plan to change the classic botanical name of the Welsh poppy, Meconopsis cambrica. Chris Grey-Wilson, the world’s leading expert on Meconopsis, first proposed the idea of restricting the name Meconopsis to the Himalayan poppies in the botanical journal Taxon in 2012. He repeats the suggestion in his stunning new monograph on Meconopsis, which was published recently, and proposes a new botanical name for the Welsh poppy. Actually, what he says, basically, is this: if you apply all the legitimate and agreed botanical rules, the Welsh poppy is in fact…
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    WashingtonGardener

  • Video Wednesday: My Garden Gnome Collection

    WashingtonGardener
    2 Sep 2015 | 1:20 pm
    Here is the collection of Garden Gnomes at the Washington Gardener Magazine headquarters garden in downtown Silver Spring, MD. Count along! How many do you have? Which is your favorite?Some are gifts, some I bought, and some just found their way to me. On of our summer interns, Daven Desai, shot the video. Enjoy! PS Last week, I shared my Flamingo collection, see that here.
  • DIY: Compost Bin

    WashingtonGardener
    1 Sep 2015 | 2:24 pm
    Guest blog by Gaby GalvinEver thought about composting and then changed your mind because you don’t want to see a big smelly pile in your backyard? Let those fears wash away, because this easy DIY compost bin will take only about 10 minutes to put together, though you’ll be seeing the benefits for a long time after. Compost is full of nutrients and will help your garden look its best, not to mention it’s eco-friendly.Supplies:Storage bin (you can use an old one with cracks)DrillInstructions:1. Drill random holes all over the storage bin, including the bottom and lid. They should each be…
  • Tomato Taste 2015 Results: A Stunning Upset!

    WashingtonGardener
    30 Aug 2015 | 2:44 pm
    We had almost 300 people come to yesterday's Washington Gardener Magazine 8th Annual Tomato Taste at the FreshFarm Silver Spring Market yesterday. Here are the results of the more than 200 ballots submitted.Black Cherry from The Farm at Our HouseSun Gold from Chicano SolSun Sugar from Spiral Path Farm tied with and  Red Currant from our own Washington Gardener Magazine garden plot  Pineapple from Three Springs Fruit Farm Garden Peach from The Farm at Our House  Juan Flamme from Three Springs Fruit FarmValencia from Country Pleasures Orange Banana Paste from The Farm at Our…
  • Fenton Friday: Dry as a Bone

    WashingtonGardener
    28 Aug 2015 | 5:22 pm
    was my wildflower patch I know I should not complain about our lack of rain in comparison to my gardening friends out west, but really it has been a brutal month here as well. Just getting missed by nearly every storm has been excruciating. Nothing worse than watching the radar, anticipating a good soaking -- only to see the front break up and disappear or veer north or south around the DC beltway. Ugh!So now I am at the point of choosing what to let go and no longer water and what I have to haul buckets of water to just keep barely alive. In my communty garden plot, I'm writing off the…
  • ADVERTISER OF THE WEEK: Sunshine Farm and Gardens

    WashingtonGardener
    27 Aug 2015 | 12:07 pm
     Rare and Exceptional Plants for the Discriminating Gardener and CollectorBarry GlickSunshine Farm and Gardens696 Glicks RoadRenick, WV 24966, USAEmail: barry@sunfarm.com www.sunfarm.comADVERTISER OF THE WEEK Details:Every Thursday on the Washington Gardener Magazine Facebook page, Blog, and Yahoo list we feature a current advertiser from our monthly digital magazine. To advertise with us, contact wgardenermag@aol.com today.
 
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    A Tidewater Gardener

  • Tubing and Tattoos

    Les
    23 Aug 2015 | 5:33 pm
         Earlier this month, some friends and I left the flatlands, and headed west to Scottsville for a day of tubing on the James River. This is one of my favorite things to do on a late summer day when the water is warm and clear. I wish I could share with you the beauty of the James, but on a total immersion trip like this, carrying anything subject to water damage, such as a camera, is not good
  • Bloom Day - Thankful Yet Again

    Les
    15 Aug 2015 | 5:56 pm
         Someone asked me tonight how I was liked working in the weather this week, which was more than just small talk considering we have been enjoying a remarkable-for-August spate of weather with crystal clear skies, lower (but not absent) humidity, and temps in the low to mid-80's. I answered that I was indeed thankful for the weather, but can take anything as long as it is not cold. It is
  • Land, Sea, and Sky

    Les
    23 Jul 2015 | 7:41 am
         What follows is an assortment of photos taken this past weekend on the Eastern Shore of Virginia. The first few were taken during a morning walk along the edge of Metompkin Bay near my parents' house. The remaining photos were taken later in the day when we took the boat to Cedar Island, where the black skimmers were busy tending to their chicks. This part of the world is very special to me,
  • Eighth Annual Citywide Bloom Day

    Les
    15 Jul 2015 | 2:00 am
         If you have ever visited here for July's Garden Bloggers Bloom Day, then you may remember that I use the occasion to celebrate the crapemyrtle (Lagerstroemia species and hybrids). You can get the backstory on the relationship between the city of Norfolk and this particular tree from my first July GBBD. Recently I came across a breakdown of street trees in the city by species, and crapemytles
  • Open Garden in Carrollton

    Les
    11 Jul 2015 | 8:23 am
         Back in June I was invited to an Open Garden event at the home of Bill and Linda Pinkham. This was not my first time here (nor this blog's), and I always enjoy visiting. The Pinkhams are consummate plant people, and over the years have designed some of the best residential landscapes in southeastern Virginia, introduced new plants to area gardeners, mentored many in horticulture (including
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    clay and limestone

  • Wildflower Wednesday: A Cool, Cool Season Native Grass Lesson

    Gail
    26 Aug 2015 | 2:00 am
    Poverty Oat Grass early summer 2013 I love my cool season grasses. They're the first grasses to green up and by the time the warm season grasses are knee high they've begun to set seed! It's a puzzle to me why they're still overlooked, underestimated, unappreciated and in some cases still unknown. On the whole they're easy peasy plants that would grow well in many of our garden settings.Poverty Oat Grass behind the chair frames late spring 2015Most cool season grasses don't make as big a show as our handsome warm season native grasses, but, they play an important ecological role in plant…
  • Is it a hummingbird? Is it a bee? No, it's a moth!

    Gail
    24 Aug 2015 | 6:00 am
    The first time I saw a Snowberry Clearwing Moth in the garden I wasn't entirely sure what it was. It had several hummingbird characteristics, it was fast moving (they can reach speeds of 35 mph), it had fast beating wings that hummed, and, it hovered over blossoms while it sipped nectar, but, its coloring, antennae, six legs and long, butterfly-like proboscis clearly said "this is an insect in the butterfly/moth family"! It didn't take long to identify it as Hemaris diffinis, a day-flying moth in the sphinx family.These moths hover and stabilize their flight by resting their front legs on the…
  • A beautiful flash of orange in the garden

    Gail
    10 Aug 2015 | 10:24 am
     Had me running for the camera...I was sure it would be gone when I got back outside, but, there it was,  a gorgeous Great Spangled Fritillary butterfly whose orange wings are decorated with a checkerboard of black spots, lines and chevrons. The spangles in its name are in reference to the silvery spots on the underside of the hind wing.It's a skittish butterfly and I carefully crept closer and managed to capture a photo that show its black lines, dots, crescents and squiggles before it flitted away! Even the caterpillars are skittish! Violets may be plentiful, but, the cats are…
  • The trouble with Salvias!

    Gail
    3 Aug 2015 | 6:00 am
    I absolutely love annual salvias for  the rich color contrast they bring to my golden summer garden. They're also a nectar rich food for pollinators.But, when I say food for pollinators, I meant the marvelous bees, hummingbirds and butterflies that visit the plant for nectar. I certainly didn't mean that I wanted my salvia flower buds to be eaten to nothing by the tiny Southern Pink Moth caterpillars! That's exactly what has been happening to my annual salvias. The flower buds disappeared overnight, eaten by tiny caterpillars that I was sure had been eradicated from the garden years ago…
  • Wildflower Wednesday: Summer Phlox

    Gail
    21 Jul 2015 | 11:00 pm
    I count on the different species of Phlox for several seasons of delightful color starting in early spring. Right now Summer Phlox is blooming in various shades of pink and magenta. There are even a few of the white flowered 'David',a lovely striped 'Peppermint Twist' that wants to revert to a favorite parent color, anda newer cultivar, 'Jeana' that is an absolute delight. I am not alone in thinking she's a marvelous addition to the garden, every Swallowtail in the neighborhood has stopped by for nectar. The first Phloxes in this garden were here when I arrived. They were the offspring of…
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    Dirt Therapy

  • Cool and rainy weekend

    Phillip Oliver
    17 Aug 2015 | 12:29 pm
    I love this weather (very Portland-like!). I wish it would stay like this all the time. I would be out in the garden more than I am now, that is for sure!  Text and photos by Phillip Oliver, Dirt Therapy
  • Lilies in pots - "Muskadet"

    Phillip Oliver
    9 Jul 2015 | 7:52 am
    Lily "Muskadet" growing in a pot on the patio. I have found that lilies do quite well in pots and they even bloom in shady locations. It is wise to select varieties that do not get too tall - "Muskadet" is only about 2 feet tall. I have had this one for years. I just put it in our unheated basement during the winter where it goes dormant.  Text and photos by Phillip Oliver, Dirt Therapy
  • Early morning wet garden

    Phillip Oliver
    7 Jul 2015 | 11:44 am
    I took these photos on Sunday morning following the fourth of July. We got tons of rain on Friday and spotty showers on Saturday. The garden really greened up as a result. Hopefully you can't see the weeds in the photos. I was hoping to get some work done in the garden on Friday and woke up to the rain. It is hard for me to keep it up this time of year - I hate the heat and the humidity and the mosquitoes (although they really don't bite me) are awful this year.  Text and photos by Phillip Oliver, Dirt Therapy
  • Frozen Lemonade Pie

    Phillip Oliver
    4 Jul 2015 | 5:39 pm
    As much as we needed the rain, I was bummed out that it came on Friday and today. I had tons of work to do in the garden and got very little accomplished. Couldn't the rain have waited until tomorrow?I made Michael one of his all-time favorite desserts - Frozen Lemonade Pie. It is one of the easiest things in the world to make. We embellished it a few years ago and added more graham cracker crumbs.Frozen Lemonade Pie(Makes 2 pies)3 Graham Cracker Crusts14 oz. sweetened condensed milk (chilled)8 oz. Cool Whip (thawed)12 oz. frozen lemonade (unthawed)Fold the condensed milk and Cool Whip…
  • Lily 'Caravan" and "Silk Road"

    Phillip Oliver
    2 Jul 2015 | 7:46 am
    The lilies are beginning to bloom. I think they are spectacular plants. They struggle to reach for the sun in our garden and the stalks aways flop over and have to be staked, otherwise the beautiful flowers end up nodding towards the ground. This is one of my favorites - "Caravan" - which I purchased many years ago from The Lily Garden in Vancouver, Washington.Another good one is "Silk Road" (pictured below).Text and photos by Phillip Oliver, Dirt Therapy
 
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    Natural Gardening

  • A Basilica sunset

    Lisa Wagner
    2 Sep 2015 | 6:45 pm
    We're lucky to have a beautiful Basilica in downtown Asheville -- I don't remember all of the particulars at the moment, but it was built following a gifted architect's plans, and is a gem.Looping through downtown this evening, Woody and I saw the sunset beyond the Eastern white pines, with the basilica to the left.  My iPhone didn't get anything close to the image I saw, but imagine this in focus and in technicolor.A Basilica sunset
  • Wild plant foraging, phytonutrients, weeds, and other thoughts

    Lisa Wagner
    1 Sep 2015 | 6:09 pm
    I started my botanical career early on. I was fascinated about the plants that grew in the city: in sidewalk cracks, in vacant lots, and along roadsides. A summer spent outside NYC when I was 12 found me peering at these survivors.  How did they grow in these inhospitable places?I was equally fascinated by the wild, native plants that I saw in the national parks that my family visited (we were tent campers, visiting most of the western national parks, as I grew up).  And, I spent a summer on Mt. Hood as a high-school student interested in science, too, many years ago. Amazing.
  • A transitional vegetable garden

    Lisa
    31 Aug 2015 | 6:28 pm
    The darn green beans keep producing, but it's heartening to see seedlings of spinach, arugula, mustard- spinach, lettuce, and creasy-greens come along nicely. Transplanted leeks, lettuce, and rapini are looking good, too. And I'm hopeful for quite a few more tomatillos and ancho peppers in the next month or so, as well as the thick-walled pizza peppers coming along in pots. The poblano/ancho peppers are a great variety called "Magnifico" and they're truly tasty. I bought a transplant at the WNC Herb Festival this spring, but tracked down a source of seeds today - Territorial Seeds - and…
  • Lotus fruits and lovely gardens

    Lisa Wagner
    30 Aug 2015 | 5:28 pm
    One of the benefits of living in Asheville is being able to visit the Biltmore Estate. As a passholder, I happily can go anytime, for early morning walks along the French Broad River, or excursions with my gardening companion and Woody through the gardens and a loop around Bass Lake.I don't give a hoot about the house, but the landscape and gardens (and the preserved views of the mountains and pastoral andscapes) are truly a treasure.  The walk along the French Broad River is wonderful. And the wave of sunflowers that's continued all summer -- lovely! In recent years, the horticultural…
  • A glut of green beans

    Lisa Wagner
    28 Aug 2015 | 6:34 pm
    My message in vegetable gardening programs is to plant what you like to eat, just enough for what you want to eat and preserve (whether freezing, canning, etc.) and not anything more.Small vegetable gardening spaces have kept me honest in this regard; even when I had more space, various critters and soil pests combined to make things manageable.But this year, for some reason, my pole beans on trellises have been pest-free, and have kept producing for weeks and weeks... how many green beans can the two of us eat? I've frozen them plain, cooked them with garlic and onions, frozen those,…
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    Outside Clyde

  • Land Management

    Christopher C. NC
    2 Sep 2015 | 8:10 pm
    I look over the Tall Flower Meadow and it is good. As my eye moves beyond the meadow and further down the utility easement, three very distinct zones of vegetation become readily apparent. There is a zone of floral abundance - my meadow, a plain green tangled thicket of wildness and a half barren dead zone. The zone of floral abundance is a direct result of my
  • Enter September

    Christopher C. NC
    1 Sep 2015 | 7:08 pm
    I shouldn't be surprised. It's June, July, August. That is three. That is half the time of vegetation. May counts because of all the green fuzz that wasn't there in April. Goodness it's September already. It is my favorite month of the year in the Tall Flower Meadow. I wait all year for this. After working seven days a week for five months plus, it is nice to pretend that
  • Some Needed Rain

    Christopher C. NC
    31 Aug 2015 | 7:26 pm
    It was getting a bit dry out there. A few random asters had turned quite crispy. It may have been from lack of water or it may have been from bugs or varmints. In abundance losses are tolerated. I don't have to know exactly what happened. It rained gently and steadily for several hours last night. It was most welcome. I'm sure it was even more
  • Along The Scenic Byway

    Christopher C. NC
    31 Aug 2015 | 5:53 am
    If I remember my original intent correctly, it was to have more flowers and less grass. Time has given me more grass and less flowers. I had some notion that the Miscanthus 'Morning Light' was a bit more petite than it has proven to be. The last two years I have removed whole clumps and cut others in half. I still have more grass and less flowers. At
  • The Interactive Visible Art Piece

    Christopher C. NC
    29 Aug 2015 | 5:47 pm
    I don't always know exactly what is going to happen in the garden. The best way to find out many times is to just do it. If it's not set in concrete it won't be hard to undo. If it is in concrete, and a concrete notion has been running through my head for years, then it will just be a little harder to undo. I brought home a dingy grey, tiled table top, spray painted it gold
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    Sharing Nature's Garden

  • Summer gardening with nice weather and good soil...

    Diana
    22 Aug 2015 | 9:04 am
    Every year, we travel to Indiana to visit Jeff's family.  About an hour north of Indianapolis in farm country, it's like a breath of fresh air.The weather is cooler, the soil is blacker, the life is simpler.  I feel the stress of life back home drift away as we whiz by field after field of corn and soybeans.  Each visit includes some exploration into native plants and unfamiliar gardens filled with peonies, lilacs, conifers and other plants that would turn to toast in Central Texas.My mother-in-law's planters are always stunning.  The feathery grass between my toes…
  • Artful garden blends blooms and mixed media...

    Diana
    29 Jun 2015 | 8:22 pm
    In addition to the beautiful blooms and creative designs we enjoyed at the Toronto Garden Bloggers Fling earlier this month, we were also treated to some amazing mixed media art entwined into this landscape on the hilly shore of High Park’s Grenadier Pond.  Filled with the work of sculptor Wojtek Biczysko, the garden reflected upon itself through various metal sculptures that brought light and movement into the landscape. This piece evokes the image of a hammock in the trees (to me) -- a place I would love to spend time with a good book and the sounds of nature. Bordered by a vining…
  • Heavenly hillside gardens on Garden Bloggers Fling in Toronto

    Diana
    13 Jun 2015 | 8:04 pm
    Last week marked my participation in the 8th Garden Bloggers Fling.  Held this year in the lovely city of Toronto, I flew to Canada with Fling travel mate, Pam Penick, of Digging.The weather, at least 10 degrees or more cooler than back home in Austin, welcomed us as we prepared for 3 days of jam-packed garden tours.  On the bus at 8:30 a.m. each day, our itinerary was filled with eye-opening private gardens, public gardens and other interesting Toronto highlights.On our first day, we toured a series of hillside gardens located around High Park's Grenadier Pond.  Nothing says…
  • Delightful garden tour on a challenging slope ...

    Diana
    31 May 2015 | 8:20 pm
    It's a treat to get together once a month with other Austin garden bloggers to share stories, enjoy each others' gardens, eat, drink and pass along plants at our plant swap.On Saturday, we were treated to double the fun.  In addition to our monthly gathering at the stunning garden of David and Jenny of Rock Rose, we also ventured nearby to their neighbors and were given a guided tour of another beautiful garden.Located on approximately one and one third acre, this garden's hills and vales are interwoven with ribbons of rock and drainage solutions that blend into the landscape.  As…
  • El Nino is quenching the garden's thirst...

    Diana
    25 May 2015 | 7:26 pm
    Our devastating drought has altered the state of our gardens here in Central Texas and it's changed our mindset, too.We're not used to rain.  Not a little rain, not a lot of rain. We've had so much rain here this month that we don't know what to do with it.  There's so much green in my garden that I have to wear shades to walk through it.  My plants would now like a little sun to shine as well, but they've never been quite so lush.  A ribbon of catmint, Mexican feather grass and lamb's ears lines the front of this Southwest cottage-style bed. The lamb's ears make a…
 
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    Kiss my Aster!

  • A Pretty, Seedy,Edible I Can't Live Without (but I'll NEVER have to try because... did I mention SEEDY?)

    Kiss My Aster!
    10 Aug 2015 | 11:15 am
    I first learned to love Jewels of Opar (Talinum paniculatum) as an annual. I love the way it defies texture and color rules. It's neon chartreuse and barely pink. Or is it the other way around? It takes up space but doesn't, with it's airy stalks, minute long blooms and long lasting, alien-like seed balls. It's smoke-like and modern. It has presence but also movement. Ah, it's a rare thing, a plant that does many things and is good at all of them.Talinum paniculatum's airy wands make this photo look weird from a distancePlus, it seeds out all over the place. Last week I brought some in for a…
  • New Plant: Kaveri Lily

    Kiss My Aster!
    9 Jul 2015 | 12:22 pm
    The fine folks at Longfield Gardens sent me a few of these 'Kaveri' hybrid lily bulbs to try. I almost said "no" because I'm not that into lilies, honestly, but the color and height intrigued me. So they sent them, I stuck them in the ground and LOW AND BEHOLD... I did not expect to love them this much. I took these photos with my iPhone so you can imagine what they are like IRL!The color: Ok, I don't even know how to describe it other than.... It does not look like it IS those colors. It looks like someone has painted these Cheetos/Flaming Hot Cheetos colors onto white bisque…
  • Pants off! Plants off!

    Kiss My Aster!
    18 Jun 2015 | 6:01 pm
    I don't do a lot of landscaping installs, although I like to design them and micromanage them to the end. Sometimes I do an install, here and there, if it's something I think I can hack.Recently I thought I could hack an install for a customer I've worked for for years setting up new planters at a new residence. It was really, really raining the day I set for the install. I was already there with all these plants, a local garden center had delivered 75 bags of compost (way too much compost, but that's another story) and I was determined to get the work done. However, I didn't realize that all…
  • Raising the Pink Flag

    Kiss My Aster!
    5 Jun 2015 | 8:27 am
    A long time ago, when I lived in Chicago's Avondale 'hood, there was a woman that had a "famous" native front yard and absolutely no grass. Famous/notorious, take your pick. Half the neighborhood thought it was gorgeous and half thought it was a rat-inducing nightmare. I liked it, but was consistently annoyed by the white landscape flag marking each and every plant. Also, she wore a black bathing suit to work in her garden every day and she looked like Mrs Claus. Those things were not annoying, just totally worth mentioning, for some reason. So, fast forward 10 years and I've got every…
  • Plant of Last Week: Dame's Rocket

    Kiss My Aster!
    26 May 2015 | 10:14 am
    I just spent a week winding through the weird back roads of Wisconsin and this plant, Hesperis matronalis, ruled the roadsides. You can call her Dame's Rocket. She screams at you to notice her in ditches and roadsides in bitchin' shades of neon violet. Invasive? Maybe. Depends on where you live so none of your sass.TRUTHS:1. Smells great2. Butterflies and bees love it3. I can't get over the color/height for this time of yearSo, yes, it's a crazy reseeder. So be the boss, deadhead or pull the whole plant, or stand back with your hands up. I sprinkled 30000000 Hesperis seeds on the borders of…
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    Our Little Acre

  • Wordless Wednesday: Make Love, Not War

    Kylee Baumle
    26 Aug 2015 | 8:30 pm
    Morning Glory Ipomoea nil 'Tie Dye'~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Why do plants do this (have variegated blooms)? Here's one explanation:"The Japanese morning glory has an extensive history of genetic studies. Many mutants in the colors and shapes of its flowers and leaves have been isolated since the 17th century, and more than 200 genetic loci have been localized for the 10 linkage groups. They include over 20 mutable loci, several with variegated flower phenotypes. In a line of Japanese morning glory bearing variegated flowers called flecked, a transposable element of 6.4 kb, termed Tpn1, was…
  • Of Starfish and Monarchs

    Kylee Baumle
    24 Aug 2015 | 8:36 pm
    One day, an old man was walking along a beach that was littered with thousands of starfish that had been washed ashore by the high tide. As he walked, he came upon a young boy who was eagerly throwing the starfish back into the ocean, one by one.Puzzled, the man looked at the boy and asked what he was doing. Without looking up from his task, the boy simply replied, "I'm saving these starfish, sir".The old man chuckled aloud, "Son, there are thousands of starfish and only one of you. What difference can you make?"The boy picked up a starfish, gently tossed it into the water and turning to the…
  • Wordless Wednesday: Cheeky Peachy Still Life

    Kylee Baumle
    19 Aug 2015 | 5:36 am
    We enjoyed our first peaches ever (that we grew ourselves) this week!Elberta PeachesPrunus persica 'Elberta'Semi-dwarfZone 5
  • Just Another Monarch Monday

    Kylee Baumle
    10 Aug 2015 | 1:04 pm
    I found this fifth instar caterpillar yesterday and it's nowin my kitchen, nearly ready to pupate.Oooh oo-oooh. My day didn't really start out to be focused on monarchs, although just yesterday I'd brought in a fifth instar monarch caterpillar so that I can witness the miracle of metamorphosis up close. I had other plans for my day, but those got put on the back burner.It all started this morning when I walked out to my back garden, where all my milkweed grows, with the intention of finding more monarch caterpillars to bring in. These precious insects are vulnerable to prey and I know they…
  • A Living Room Divider: Define Your Space With Plants

    Kylee Baumle
    9 Jul 2015 | 10:12 am
    When Jenny Peterson and I were writing our book, Indoor Plant Decor: The Design Stylebook for Houseplants, one of the ideas we shared for using houseplants as a design element was as a room divider.From Indoor Plant Decor: The Design Stylebook for HouseplantsThe photo on page 83 of the Traditional Mix chapter shows how I used this concept in my own entry/living room. Our house was built in 1975 and when we bought it in 1977, we never gave the spindled half-wall a second thought. It's just how things were traditionally done back then.Over the years, I came to hate those spindles. First of all,…
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    Our Twenty Minute Kitchen Garden

  • The Little Heartbreaks of Harvest Time

    20 Minute Jim
    2 Sep 2015 | 4:04 am
    The heartbreaks of harvest time started in mid-August this year, with cool nights prompting the tomatoes to ripen in earnest. Barely ten days separated the pleasure of that first, vine-ripened Brandywine, still warm from the sun, from the brutal onslaught. Perhaps I overstate the “brutality” of such bounty, but this time of year there are […] The post The Little Heartbreaks of Harvest Time appeared first on Our Twenty Minute Kitchen Garden. Related posts: Food Gatherers welcomes harvest donations, including green tomatoes! As the gardening season comes to a close, you may...
  • Watermelon Pickles Recipe

    20 Minute Jan
    19 Aug 2015 | 7:30 am
    Last week, we made our first-ever watermelon pickles. I used a watermelon pickles recipe that my sister gave me some years ago, and I also consulted our Ball Blue Book, keeping in mind the principles of safe canning and our adventurous palates. As 20 Minute Jim previously noted, our inspiration in part was the several […] The post Watermelon Pickles Recipe appeared first on Our Twenty Minute Kitchen Garden. Related posts: Poetry, Old Lovers, and Watermelon Pickles Janice and I were married at an age so young... My Aunt’s Refrigerator Pickles – and a Spicier Variation My…
  • Poetry, Old Lovers, and Watermelon Pickles

    20 Minute Jim
    18 Aug 2015 | 4:10 am
    Janice and I were married at an age so young we should barely have been granted a driver’s license let alone a marriage license. But even at that obscenely young age, we found when we merged our belongings that we had duplicates. In addition to a couple embarrassingly naive records, we both owned a copy […] The post Poetry, Old Lovers, and Watermelon Pickles appeared first on Our Twenty Minute Kitchen Garden. Related posts: Watermelon Pickles Recipe Last week, we made our first-ever watermelon pickles. I used... My Aunt’s Refrigerator Pickles – and a Spicier Variation…
  • Before and After: What 20 Minutes Looks Like (8) – Weeding the Wedge

    20 Minute Jim
    13 Jun 2015 | 12:43 pm
    It rained this week. At least, inclement weather is my excuse for waiting until today to head outside. I was glad to see the plants were not waiting for the weekend. The tomatoes that Jan placed in the “Wedge” bed were nice and stocky, signs that the soil is approaching the temperature of a comfortable […] The post Before and After: What 20 Minutes Looks Like (8) – Weeding the Wedge appeared first on Our Twenty Minute Kitchen Garden. Related posts: 20 Minute Weeding ...20 minutes of weeding is about all I can take...... Before and After: What 20 Minutes Looks Like (2)…
  • Before and After: What 20 Minutes Looks Like (7) – The End Cap Bed

    Jardinier
    12 Jun 2015 | 7:50 am
    Our gardens are divided into beds distributed around the property. Our design was to have the kitchen gardens integrated into the yards, rather than having one big rectangular plot, so we have squares and circles and pathways between. This gives us lots of flexibility with planting, with plot rotation, and with indicating which bed we […] The post Before and After: What 20 Minutes Looks Like (7) – The End Cap Bed appeared first on Our Twenty Minute Kitchen Garden. Related posts: Before and After: What 20 Minutes Looks Like (8) – Weeding the Wedge It rained this week. At…
 
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    The Gardens of Petersonville

  • Tales of Woe and One of Graditude

    Sheila
    2 Sep 2015 | 1:04 pm
     This is what many plants look like when you plant them in the heat of the summer in a drought. I was deseperately trying to fill in bare spots with plants to prepare for a big party I was planning that would take place out in the SJC gardens. All the leaves died within the first month on this acanthus, but new ones have already started to grow. I know I wasn't the only one with sick looking dahlias, I heard many other gardeners complaining this year. Since they hate soggy soil you would think they would do better with limited water. This may be the result of a virus or disease, but…
  • When Plants Get Stressed

    Sheila
    1 Sep 2015 | 8:06 am
     Different plants respond differently to stress (much like people). Many plants, like this brilliant 'Santa Barbara' bougainvillea, think it's best to send out as many flowers as possible to help spread seeds before it may expire. Although it is considered a tropical plant, and I think of tropical plants as ones coming from lush, rain forest-y places, many are extremely drought tolerant. This is probably why the most beautiful and prolific bougainvilleas are usually found in the most desolate places like abandoned buildings or deserted parking lots and yet we can't get them to bloom in…
  • Getting Back To Business

    Sheila
    29 Aug 2015 | 8:49 am
     It's been a busy summer and I know I've been negligent in posting to my blog, but that doesn't mean I haven't been busy in the gardens. This summer we had a wedding in the family, a big birthday bash in the garden in SJC, started to design our new home in Laguna in addition to Grandparent's Week and lots of birthdays and visits from family and friends. I can hardly believe that summer is almost over although the signs are showing outside in spite of the 90 degree temperatures.  We have been asked to cut back our water consumption 26% to help alleviate stress from the drought.
  • Meet My New Friend

    Sheila
    11 Aug 2015 | 8:49 am
    I've been crazy busy these past few weeks, but I wanted to take a minute to share a post about my SJC garden on the lovely blog of Alex Anderson - Love, Peace and Gardening. Alex writes about gardens and gardening and was directed to me when she visited the Hortense Miller Garden open house (although I am a docent there I could not make the open house this year). I was happy to share my garden with her on a misty morning and we had a lovely time walking, talking and discovering we had a lot in common, and not just about gardening. She also is passionate about Integrative Health as am I!
  • Sprucing Up The Summer Garden

    Sheila
    2 Aug 2015 | 8:39 am
    Veronica and Cleome  In a definite case of do-as-I-say-not-as-I-do, I have been busy planting this week. If I had seen someone at the nursery with as many plants as I had on my carts, I would have labeled them a novice. Nobody plants in the middle of summer. But I have a good excuse, or a couple of them. I really want to attract more butterflies to the gardens and since there are so many of them fluttering around looking for their favorite flowers, I figured now is a good time to add some of them to the garden before I forget. Rose of Sharon I also have an upcoming event taking…
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    Am I Bugging You Yet?

  • Rank Amateur says "Nuts"

    vanessa cardui
    23 Aug 2015 | 9:57 am
    Nuts.  I failed, I am such an amateur.Sure, I noticed this beetle suspended in its small way from a pot rim on my porch.I came down to its level for a closer look and saw it was caught up in spider silk.And then saw the spider.Watched the spider approach its comparatively enormous prey from the ventral aspect andinject venom. Probably between abdominal segments.The beetle struggled, flexing and spinning for a few seconds then stilled.I snapped a few photos.But,I neglected to count the segments on the beetle's antennae(looks like 11 in the photos, 11 beadlike segments).It didn't occur to…
  • Leucophyllum in Crazy Bloom

    vanessa cardui
    17 Aug 2015 | 3:02 pm
    Next to the front porch our Texas Ranger, leucophyllum frutescens, is blooming large.This drought hardy plant needs little water, can survive our average summer without supplemental irrigation, but the surprisingly substantial rain we had a month ago seems to have ramped up the flower bud production way beyond normal.  Leucophyllum usually blooms late summer but this year is ridiculous in its bounty.In Texas, some refer to their state flower as the 'Barometer bush', due to its response to increased humidity and/or summer rain with eye-popping flower production.  Some say the…
  • Athanasia acerosa and friends

    vanessa cardui
    23 Apr 2015 | 7:05 pm
    So my mystery plant is no longer a mystery.Years ago I found a scraggly one gallon shrub with interesting leaves etc at Daylily Hill Nursery in Escondido (hidden . . . get it?).   The nursery worker really did not know what it was, nor did I, nor could I find anything like it on the internet and even my plant geek nephew couldn't place it.  But I planted it anyway, and imagined it to be akin to the beautiful and bountiful rabbitbrush seen in New Mexico on a summer trip.The thing has grown well in my parkway, land of little irrigation and not too much rain these past few years.
  • Monarch population comeback

    vanessa cardui
    26 Oct 2014 | 8:21 am
    Back in winter 2012 I posted about a monarch butterfly deformed upon emerging from its pupa.  I went on about how maybe the winter timing of its emergence had something to do with its deformity or difficulty eclosing.This was clearly incorrect as the butterflies, and all of the caterpillars mentioned in that post as well, was infected with the OE parasite (Ophryocystis elektroscirrha).  The caterpillars ingest the spores of the parasite as they feed, which have been deposited there by their infected mother as she laid the eggs. In an earlier post I was observing massive…
  • Cotinis mutabilis

    vanessa cardui
    5 Oct 2014 | 3:08 pm
    These big shiny green beetles are well known as fruit eaters.  When we had the fig tree in the nursery, they lived up to their common name 'Fig eater beetles' by attacking and eating the ripe figs enmasse.  Actually, that's one reason we got rid of that fig tree.  The other being, don't particularly like figs or stepping in the fallen ones while doing chores.But I've also seen these beetles spending a lot of time on flowers, like this one on the bulbine frutescens.  Since Cotinis mutabilis is attracted to sweets (fruit, fruit juice) they could be eating nectar and maybe,…
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    Skippy's Vegetable Garden

  • what a glorius summer day!

    kathy
    7 Aug 2015 | 9:28 am
  • fall seedlings

    kathy
    7 Aug 2015 | 9:15 am
    I've been starting up a bunch of fall seedlings this past week. I used tape for tags instead of pretty wood labels.Looks like I'll be eating a lot of Bok Choi! The BoPak is a new experimental variety that I'm trialling, Mei Qing and Win Win are my old favorites. And then I found a package of Pechag that I couldn't resist buying. I love stir fried bok choi.I'm hoping I can get a big crop of fall cucumbers for pickling. All my summer vines have died from wilt. I'm hoping that the beetles that carry the wilt (a bacterial disease) will have moved on by September. (I didn't want to use a beetle…
  • today's harvest

    kathy
    1 Aug 2015 | 5:47 pm
    Carrots: I'm just thinning them so for, but the little ones are tasty. The varieties from left are: Bolero, Mokum, Oxheart.Beets: This is my first beet harvest. Four varieties from left: ???, Chiogga, Blankoma, Merlin.And it's my first TOMATO of the season. Yippee, but WOW, really late. (A previous harvest photo had a couple tomatoes that another gardener gave me.) The tomato variety is Tiren. The seedling was grown by Jane, a friend of my mom's. It's a Roma type. A super looking plant with fruit hanging heavy.Cukes: These are both Corinto cucumbers. My Corinto vine is producing best in spite…
  • todays harvest

    kathy
    28 Jul 2015 | 11:42 pm
    fast and furious with the zucs!
  • seems like not a good year for cucumbers

    kathy
    25 Jul 2015 | 6:38 pm
    Today I harvested a very nice cucumber. a pretty Corinto cuke. But Sadly, i don't think it'll be a great year (or even a good year) for cukes. Not sure what's going on but the leaves on most of my vines are shriveling and vines are dying. I have about 20 plants, 6 or 8 varieties, and they're in the back of three different beds, growing up the fence. A virus maybe? Some leaves have a lot of beetle-like damage, but I'm not seeing any beetles. I did see some grubs and wimpy roots when I pulled up one plant. I don't know. Last year, cucumbers were my over-and-above crop. I will look up when the…
 
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    Home Garden Companion

  • Discussion on what Versailles may teach a Modern Homeowner

    Ilona Erwin
    30 Aug 2015 | 1:19 pm
    I found the following video fascinating. It covers many topics of interest to modern homeowners and gardeners, foodies and historians. I want to take some of the quotes- there were so many! The simplest, most zenlike is that there is no garden without the gardener. Watch the video… which topic struck you as one to think about? The post Discussion on what Versailles may teach a Modern Homeowner appeared first on Home Garden Companion.
  • Late August Good For Choosing And Planting Shrubs

    Ilona Erwin
    6 Aug 2015 | 8:41 am
    People in my neck of the woods generally plant trees and shrubs in the spring, but early fall is just as good, if not better. Late August and early September in Ohio are often dry (perhaps not this year!), so some attention should be paid to making sure a newly planted bush is kept moist. Once the cooler weather and rain of fall begins, the roots will take hold and should have a good start before hard frosts. Nurseries usually carry fresh stock at this time of year, so consider adding to the shrubbery of your landscape. Why Plant Shrubs? A little refresher if you aren’t already…
  • Nature Will Have Her Way

    Ilona Erwin
    22 Jul 2015 | 7:11 am
    Nature takes no halfway measures. When in balance, with the sure and languorous change of seasons, we are lulled into the belief that our regimes and schemes hold sway, that humanity is all powerful in its display of dominance and power. Our technologies collude in the illusion of control and eminent domain over earths terrain, climate and creatures. But in its circuit through time, Nature will reassert the truth that our human powers are indeed very small in this domain of climate, weather patterns, and impending descent of ancient phases of drought or cold, or flood. And the temporary cloud…
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    Bananas.org

  • Brazilian species ID

    Yuri Barros
    2 Sep 2015 | 4:06 pm
    Today I was wtching his video............and this species is totally new to me............ I´m a newbie............but as this species have seeds...............I suppose that this is a wild one............. This came from State of Pará............North Region of Brazil............in the Amazonian realm........... The bunch is very beautiful...............I don´t know what is it............ Check this out........ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1yTxSpDVWL0
  • Siam Ruby health!

    blownz281
    2 Sep 2015 | 4:02 pm
    This is the second plant I got from the same nursery. First plant I posted on here had the same problems and after two years died. Have had this one since July. It was in full sun for several hrs a day. Mix of compost and potting soil. Still did the same with the larger plants drooping and new leaves wilting and dieing. Pups like made but they never get taller then 4ft. Then pups start to wilt and die off. So let it dry out before watering again. Several weeks and no change. It's been a week and I potted it up on my porch out of direct sunlight. Backed of the watering. Still acting the same…
  • Black Spots

    chris_zx2
    2 Sep 2015 | 2:28 pm
    I'll post some pics when I get home and I've probably already figured it out but just in case I thought I'd ask the experts!!! I woke up this morning to black spots on my Mango, very tips of new leaves of my Meyer lemon and on a few edges of my DC. It looks like tar but can't be wiped off and it's not brittle or dry. I upgraded the pot about a month ago and added Miracle-Gro 12-4-8 slow release into the soil which is a mix of 5 parts pine bark to 1 soil. I have always had great results with this mixture in all my citrus and with this banana. It was growing approximately a leaf every 2-3 days…
  • Tigua vs other Iholena (red)

    Tytaylor77
    1 Sep 2015 | 6:40 pm
    Was hoping someone would have experience or know. I know the Tigua is a great short cycle banana. My question is all Iholena short cycle. Especially the Red Iholena? Thanks
  • Manini (AeAe) corms doing great!!

    xeriscape8321
    1 Sep 2015 | 4:15 pm
    I'm always hesitant about posting pics before I'm sure a plant, or in this case Corms, will establish themselves...i finally feel confident these Manini (Hawaiian AeAe's) will do well...this is less than a full month after i planted the bare corms...i think they will like it here in Fort Lauderdale:goteam: Thanks Keith...these are great specimens!
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    Defining Your Home, Garden and Travel

  • Goodbye, Home and Gardens

    26 Aug 2015 | 7:43 am
    Dear readers,My home and gardens, featured in this blog, are now in the hands of a wonderful family with children and dogs.The years spent here with my husband were incredible. We loved our neighborhood, our home and the gardens. After "The Musician" passed away from brain cancer, it was time for me to move on. I spent a year here without him and it was bittersweet.I'm currently renovating a much smaller house, built in 1939.  It's a project! There are still months to go to completion and I'll have new garden opportunities on the established half acre lot.Thank you for reading my blog.
  • Chocolate Chili Cookies

    24 Dec 2014 | 2:07 pm
    This recipe never disappoints. If you like gingerbread and you like chocolate, bake these for a sweet and spicy chocolate fix.The recipe that I used came from the blog, Savour Fare. I altered the recipe by using powdered ancho chile instead of chipotle. My photos were taken with an iPhone and therefore don't really show the darker color of the chocolate cookies as the photos on the recipe blog.The cookies while cooling...before they disappeared!I used Madagascar vanilla bean paste and Ghirardelli unsweetened cocoa. Using quality ingredients will give you the best results. The…
  • One Last Time: Free Yourself and Your Oven and Grill the Turkey

    22 Nov 2014 | 2:34 pm
    Friends: This annual posting of my favorite Thanksgiving story was inspired by my wonderful husband who passed away in May 2014 from brain cancer (glioblastoma multiforme)... the reason I've been off the blogs for the last year. It all started with Thanksgiving 2006. Expecting a crowd for the big meal, I couldn't work out a way to get everything in the oven since the turkey was so large.We had to figure out how to get everything cooked on time. The microwave wouldn't do it. Ah ha! What about using the grill? Would that work? My husband placed the turkey (in the pan) on the grill to see…
  • Yes, The Deer Ate the Yucca

    8 Feb 2014 | 4:26 pm
    Deer damage. February 2014Well, not the entire yucca. Not yet—and there's no sign of spring around here.It's been a cold winter and food is scarce, so hungry deer seek out plants that aren't on the regular menu. The deer ignore the yucca from spring through fall. This is not the first winter when the yucca was ripped up, so I wasn't surprised. I should have put a cage around it, but I didn't. While the yucca is ragged, it will recover and bloom again this summer.The victim here is yucca filamentosa 'Color Guard' but the deer will nibble the tips on any variety of yucca. For photos of this…
  • Baked Gifts: Chocolate Biscotti Recipe

    7 Dec 2013 | 1:11 pm
    For the holiday season, I'm repeating this post from 2012. This Chocolate Biscotti Recipe from David Lebovitz is easy to make. Bake a delicious gift!Start out with good ingredients such as Valrhona Cocoa,demerara sugar, slivered almonds and chocolate chips.As a fan of food and bigger fan of Paris, I follow the blog of expat American +David Lebovitz, pastry chef, author of cookbooks and one of my favorite iPhone apps, Paris Pastry®. I made his Chocolate Biscotti Recipe for holiday gifts. Is it possible for an amateur like me to turn out great biscotti?I took…
 
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    North Coast Gardening

  • Summer Recipe: Roasted Corn with Cilantro Chili Salt

    Debbie
    7 Aug 2015 | 7:45 am
    What’s the best part of a summer cookout? Anything cooked on the grill of course! Who says that only proteins get prime real estate on the grates? Grilling vegetables infuses a wonderful smoky, charred taste that’s hard to replicate on the stove. One of the best veggies to grill is corn. Grilling corn in its husk keeps the ears from burning. The result is a tender and sweet taste like none other. However, before we get to the grilling part, we must make the delicious flavored salt that will enhance the grilled corn: Cilantro Chili Salt. Flavored salts are a perfect way to preserve extra…
  • Attracting Birds to the Pacific Northwest Garden

    Linda
    30 Jun 2015 | 12:02 am
    Watching birds swoop and listening to them sing are some of the many joys of gardening.  But hanging up a few feeders isn’t enough to create a true backyard habitat for birds; inviting them to come and “stay a spell” takes careful consideration of their needs. So what exactly do you need to do to keep birds hanging around your yard and garden? What birds need in a habitat garden Birds basically need three things to survive: water, food and shelter. So how can we, as gardeners, provide these necessities for the birds who visit us? Water sources: Birds need water for two main…
  • The Many Faces of Coreopsis: New Varieties to Love

    Linda
    23 Jun 2015 | 12:01 am
    Coreopsis is a staple of the traditional flower garden because it’s long-blooming, easy to grow, and the profuse little daisy-like flowers can cheer up anyone if they’re having a bad day. Yet most people haven’t looked beyond the old-school varieties to learn about the wide array of colors available in this favorite, adaptable plant. These aren’t your grandmother’s Coreopsis In Grandma’s day this plant was basically just yellow, but because gardeners are always on the lookout for something new, there are now many faces to Coreopsis, from cherry to melon colors, ones with golden…
  • How to Make Liquid Fertilizer from a Granular Organic

    Genevieve
    16 Jun 2015 | 12:12 am
    After sharing recipes for making your own granular organic fertilizer from inexpensive bulk ingredients, I’ve gotten a number of questions from readers asking how to convert a dry organic fertilizer into a liquid. Why would you want to? Liquid fertilizer is fast-acting. A liquid fertilizer can be faster acting than a dry or granular fertilizer, because the fertilizer has already dissolved into the liquid and thus plants will take it up quickly in larger quantities. This isn’t appropriate for all landscape settings, such as when you are fertilizing shrubs, but when you are fertilizing…
  • Fabulously Fastigiate: Narrow Plants for Skinny Spaces

    Linda
    9 Jun 2015 | 2:00 pm
    Most gardeners have one of “those” spaces: an awkward, skinny location where you need that most unusual of plants, one that grows much taller than it does wide. We call these plants “fastigiate”, which means tall and narrow, or tower-like. Usually these spots in the garden are created by fences or walls, but you can also end up with little un-planted areas in the back of your border when you remove unsuccessful plants or otherwise adjust a mature planting plan. In addition, sometimes you want a tall, narrow focal point to flank an entry or act as a visual exclamation point in the…
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    High Altitude Gardening

  • This, That, and The Other Little Thing

    30 Aug 2015 | 12:53 pm
    Big Love: Sable is so tall, I need to stand on that truck tire to get into the saddle. But, I don't care. I love her.Enjoyed some muchneeded horse time, yesterday, with my best friend. Here she is, standing politely at the barn door, waiting for her oats. I would imagine that most folks visiting this blog are garden gals, not horse people.. so plz allow me to point out an interesting tidbit about this photo.Look close -- she isn't wearing a bridle or a halter. Because she's not tied up; she never is.The gates to this boarding facility are wide open, and she could run away, but she won't.
  • Grateful for Gardens

    23 Aug 2015 | 3:47 pm
    It has been a long, hot and very tiresome summer. Was thinking about that, yesterday, when I was down in the Salt Lake City Valley, running a full day of errands.I love my little hometown ~ the mountain town of Park City. But, I hold zero affection for the sprawling metropolis down below. I only visit when I need stuff. And, I needed all kinds of stuff. Grateful for a big car that I filled to the brim with groceries, flowers, horse supplies and even some new clothes.The hard labor of horses + getting my new gardens all spiffy caused me to drop from a size 14 to a size 12 jeans. I probably…
  • Coleus

    22 Aug 2015 | 3:59 pm
    I absolutely love their stunning foliage. :))
  • Daylilies

    21 Aug 2015 | 4:09 pm
  • Foxglove

    18 Aug 2015 | 4:09 pm
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    Ewa in the Garden

  • The Vegetable Free Breeding Award

    20 Aug 2015 | 7:37 am
    The Vegetable Free Breeding Award 2015 was initiated by the Humane Earth Foundation to identify, reward and inform about the work of home gardeners or professional vegetable growers in original vegetable creation. It is the vocation of the Humane Earth Foundation, a private Swiss Foundation to support the work of associations defending the environment, at European level, by
  • Write a blog. Discover garden. Get mentioned in garden magazine as discoverer.

    16 Aug 2015 | 12:49 pm
    I have two questions to you. The first one, do you still believe in coincidence? And the second one, do you remember my blog post about most stunning cactus garden I have ever seen?  Would you call it a coincidence that I met the owner of the most stunning cactus garden in Europe? I wouldn’t. Although he appeared in front of me in most unexpected way – I will tell you more about it  one day -
  • Oriental Patio Garden Before and After

    15 Aug 2015 | 3:50 am
    <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 21 false false false PL X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]>
  • Algarve - vegetable garden - Day 29

    2 Aug 2015 | 2:28 am
    And on the hot and dusty day 29, my vegetable garden looked like this. I was harvesting lettuce every, just for one person. Just waiting 4 weeks and you may have your own chlorophyll and other precious nutrients to heal your body. Tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers and courgettes were flowering promising good produce. But then my doctor said no tomatoes and no peppers, as they are inflammatory
  • Hackers can overtake your car while you drive it

    24 Jul 2015 | 9:02 pm
    This is really scary. Just see it. I think I will stick to the old car :) What about you?
 
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    Your Small Kitchen Garden

  • Small Kitchen Garden Goes Community

    Daniel Gasteiger
    25 Aug 2015 | 12:33 am
    This spring I rented a plot at a community garden. It changes everything. -post #1 In early April, snow had just melted from the community garden; no one had even tried to plant peas on St Patrick’s Day. In March I researched local community gardens for a newspaper article and found only four such gardens within the newspaper’s coverage area. One evening I was describing my exploration to my wife and I mused, “Maybe I should rent a plot.” Without hesitation, my wife somewhat threateningly replied, “You better not.” That sealed the deal. I chose the largest of the area…
  • Sunflowers and Naked Ladies

    Daniel Gasteiger
    21 Aug 2015 | 9:56 pm
    Sunflowers have surrounded a decorative shrub in a farmer’s field… or perhaps the shrub has infiltrated sunflower territory. Either way, it looks kinda cool. Every summer I keep watch for fields of sunflowers in full bloom. A few local farmers grow sunflowers, swapping crops from field-to-field—sunflowers one year, corn another, and soy beans in another. This year, there had been no sunflowers in the usual places, but yesterday I drove a few hundred yards past those places and discovered a thousand yellow flower heads. These sunflowers were different from those of past seasons: Rather…
  • Wordless Wednesday: Monarch on Dianthus

    Daniel Gasteiger
    19 Aug 2015 | 8:58 pm
      Small Kitchen Garden – Wordless Wednesday: Monarch on Dianthus Technorati Tags: blossoms, butterfly, dainthus, flowers, monarch, monarch butterfly
  • Garden Bloggers Bloom Day at Longwood Gardens

    Daniel Gasteiger
    15 Aug 2015 | 9:58 pm
    Zinnias grew in several places at Longwood Gardens. This variety was common. I captured the photo in a trial garden among many where visitors vote for their favorite plant combinations. In the right light, you can see a purple tinge on the inside ends of the petals. If I grew zinnias, I’d track down this variety; it’s eye-catching. I’m cheating a lot this month for Garden Bloggers Bloom Day. I’m posting flowers, but I’m not posting my flowers. My wife and I recently spent the day at Longwood Gardens in Kennett Square, Pennsylvania. We toured just about every venue there, and…
  • Longwood Gardens: Meadow & Green Roofs

    Daniel Gasteiger
    13 Aug 2015 | 9:55 am
    Many paths wind in and around Longwood’s Meadow Garden. One crosses a curved, two-level bridge that encourages you to tarry. My wife suggested we vacation at Longwood Gardens. It was a short trip: Thursday to travel there and enjoy the garden, and Friday to explore the Kennett Square area and travel home. We killed it. The garden opened at 9AM and, with a “Nightscape” ticket, we could stay until 11PM. Between the two of us we had seen virtually nothing of Longwood. We decided to arrive as the doors opened. The gatekeeper told us it was the earliest anyone had arrived at the garden on a…
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    Veggie Gardener: Organic Vegetable Gardening Tips

  • Strategies to Increase Yield in the Veggie Garden

    Chris Eger
    30 Aug 2015 | 3:42 pm
    Have you ever heard a story of garden production that seemed difficult to believe? Perhaps someone shared with you the yield from their garden and it left you scratching your head in doubt because in comparison to your garden’s yield, the numbers simply didn’t seem attainable. Although it is easy to feel overwhelmed by the numbers someone else might give you, it actually is possible to reach high yields such as those on your own. Here are some suggestions to help you achieve such numbers for yourself. For starters, all good gardens begin with soil. The health of your soil is vital to the…
  • Growing Tomatoes from Up Above

    Chris Eger
    23 Aug 2015 | 8:42 pm
    For many of us, garden space is at a premium. This sometimes makes it so that we must choose between what we really want to plant and what we have room to plant. Although such decisions may riddle some of us with despair, this is when we should stop looking sadly into the dirt and instead look hopefully towards the sky to locate a spot from which we can grow tomatoes upside down. Sure, it may sound silly to grow tomatoes upside down but this method has actually proven to be quite successful. By taking advantage of aerial space via this form of container gardening, you can increase tomato…
  • Growing Green Beans in the Veggie Garden

    Chris Eger
    16 Aug 2015 | 12:41 pm
    A good color to have in your veggie garden is green, especially when that green belongs to green beans also known as string beans or French beans. There are many reasons to grow and eat green beans aside from great taste alone. Health benefits aplenty can be had thanks to the consumption of green beans which is all the more reason to add them to your garden. For starters, green beans have been linked to decreased risk of conditions such as heart disease, diabetes, and obesity. They are also high in chlorophyll which has carcinogen blocking abilities. Possible as well through eating green…
  • Give Your Garden a Boost with Molasses

    Chris Eger
    7 Aug 2015 | 2:51 pm
    We all get a little sweet tooth now and then. Sometimes you just need that little bit of sweet to satiate your palate and nothing else will quite do. You may reach for a cupcake or a brownie in order to placate yourself, but the fact of the matter is you’re not the only one who likes a sweet little pick me up. The plants in your garden enjoy it as well. If you ever attend a farmer’s market in south Mississippi, you will see a line for cookies. Devotedly patrons wait for their piece of the prize, that being a cookie made with molasses. You may have never tasted such a thing in the past,…
  • Repel Slugs with a Penny Ball

    Chris Eger
    1 Aug 2015 | 7:54 pm
    A common problem with which gardeners are faced is the presence of slugs. These creatures are a type of mollusk that can be described as snails without shells. They can vary in length but usually top out at close to two inches in length. Though you may not always get a visual on them, a telltale sign is the slime trail left behind as they move about. Slugs are a problem because they can do a lot of damage to gardens. In addition to chewing leaves, they are known to feast on fruits and vegetables. Through the use of mouth parts that create a file type of effect, irregular holes are caused and…
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    Garden Therapy

  • Make This Hand-Painted Market Bag!

    Stephanie
    2 Sep 2015 | 7:24 am
    This hand-painted market bag is great for groceries, better than gift wrap, and a handy hostess gift. Whether you are looking for something stylish for back to school, carting around kids stuff, or filling up with produce, these market bags have just the personal touch to let you go green with style. I love that plastic bags are no longer being ... The post Make This Hand-Painted Market Bag! appeared first on Garden Therapy.
  • Sugar Scrub Recipes from Head to Toe

    Stephanie
    1 Sep 2015 | 12:40 pm
    Sugar scrubs are moisturizing and exfoliating for skin and are easy to make. There are some ingredients, however, that should changed, added, or removed for sugar scrub recipes to be perfectly suiting to the differing skin on the various parts of your body. Basic Sugar Scrub Recipe Oil + Sugar + Essential Oils Sugar: Regular granulated sugar is just fine ... The post Sugar Scrub Recipes from Head to Toe appeared first on Garden Therapy.
  • Hammered Flower Print Cards

    Stephanie
    29 Aug 2015 | 10:26 am
    I love to send a little bit of my garden when sending a thank you note. It’s not always practical for flowers or preserves to be sent across the country or even to a different country, but a flower print will do! Printing cards using garden leaves and flowers is a simple and personal way to send a sentiment to ... The post Hammered Flower Print Cards appeared first on Garden Therapy.
  • Beyond Tulips: Extraordinary Fall Bulbs You Need to Grow!

    Stephanie
    28 Aug 2015 | 3:48 pm
    Tulips are wonderful plants. Frilly parrot tulips, deep-dark-almost-black purple tulips, cheery giant tulips and more can be found in my garden beds. But tulips aren’t the only fall bulbs I plant. I get just as much enjoyment out of some of these outstanding spring bloomers, and now is the time to get them in the ground! I wrote my list of ... The post Beyond Tulips: Extraordinary Fall Bulbs You Need to Grow! appeared first on Garden Therapy.
  • Top 10 Drought-Tolerant Perennials

    Stephanie
    28 Aug 2015 | 7:19 am
    Replacing your garden plants with drought-tolerant perennials is the smart choice for a low-maintenance garden that conserves water. The climate is changing and what we used to count on for garden micro-climates is now all over the map. By now you may know that I live in Vancouver, BC. Vancouver is a rainforest, a temperate rainforest, considered part of the ... The post Top 10 Drought-Tolerant Perennials appeared first on Garden Therapy.
 
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    Urban Organic Gardener

  • Urban garden grows at Brookline’s Ivy Street School

    UOG
    2 Sep 2015 | 4:12 am
    This post is originally from brookline.wickedlocal.com It contains myriad herbs, including basil, parsley, chamomile and others, as well as vegetables, such as beets, tomatoes, cucumbers, green beans and more. Students at the Ivy Street School, which serves teens and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder, brain injury and other mental health diagnoses, are enjoying a unique feature of the school: an urban garden. This program has become an annual tradition at the school, and it allows students to not only learn about growing plants, but it provides therapeutic and nutritional benefits as…
  • This Kid Kinda Has a Point …

    UOG
    24 Aug 2015 | 11:27 am
  • Red Wine Lover. Easy Going Photographer & Gardener. Meet Paula!

    Sariann Irvin
    20 Aug 2015 | 8:51 am
    How would you quickly describe yourself to others? I’m easy-going and like to spend time at home tending to my garden and watching my chickens while enjoying a glass of red wine. How did you get started with your blog/instagram page/etc?  I’ve had a blog ever since I can remember and it started out as being more of an online journal but morphed into a food blog and now have integrated gardening. Photography has always been a part of my blog no matter what the topic. I started on instagram mainly posting photos of food from restaurants and my home-cooked meals but started posting…
  • How to Control Powdery Mildew, the Easy Way

    UOG
    15 Aug 2015 | 3:18 pm
    This post and its content/images are from SeedsNow.com, click here to view the full post. Powdery mildew. You’ve probably had it plague one of your plants at some point or another during your years of gardening. Powdery mildew is one of the most widespread and easily identifiable plant fungal diseases. From vegetable gardens to rose gardens, ornamental trees and shrubs, almost no type of plant is immune. You’ve probably seen it many times. White or gray powdery spots appear, most of the time covering the entire leaf surface. It’s also found on plant stems, flowers and even fruit.
  • On Monday, astronauts aboard the International Space Station harvested and ate the first lettuce to have been grown in space

    UOG
    10 Aug 2015 | 3:11 pm
    On Monday, astronauts aboard the International Space Station harvested and ate the first lettuce to have been grown in space.
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    Gardener's Journal

  • Make Berry Syrup with Summer-Fresh Fruit

    gscadmin
    17 Aug 2015 | 11:37 am
    A soda made with raspberry-mint syrup An abundance of raspberries and blueberries gave me an excuse to make some fresh fruit syrups this summer. With just three ingredients, these syrups are simple to make and easy to freeze or can — if you can stop yourself from using them immediately! I mix them with seltzer for homemade soda, stir into yogurt or pour over ice cream. They would be a sweet addition to mixed drinks or a pancake breakfast, too. Add fresh herbs and combine fruits to make your own unique flavors. Here’s how to make the basic syrup: Berry Syrup 1 quart or more fresh or frozen…
  • Company Farm Update: Growing Strong, Despite the Rain

    gscadmin
    17 Aug 2015 | 9:57 am
    Onions, an experimental crop in 2015 Relentless rain in Vermont this spring and early summer almost nixed the planting of our newly expanded Company Farm, our volunteer effort to feed the hungry here in Vermont. We were able to plant about a month later than normal, and the plants are growing at last. With luck, we hope to pull off a harvest. For the last two summers, employee-volunteers have planted, maintained and harvested thirty 4′ x 6′ raised beds at our Burlington, VT, campus, growing potatoes to be donated to the local food shelf. This spring, we expanded Company Farm to…
  • When Blight Strikes, it’s Time for Tough Love

    gscadmin
    27 Jul 2015 | 7:08 am
    An empty pot, brought about by Early Girl’s early demise. How do you become a better gardener? Practice. That’s the secret. In my practice this season, I planted two tomatoes in our front-yard vegetable garden, showcasing them in shiny red pots (from our Viva line) that flank the front entrance. They looked so nice. Front yard vegetable gardens can be beautiful. But then it rained. And it rained. I sprayed proactively with Serenade because I knew — based on lots of practice — that tomatoes get blight easily. Especially when rainfall is abundant. Despite my best efforts, one…
  • Peony Lovers: Who Was Sarah Bernhardt?

    gscadmin
    17 Jun 2015 | 7:57 am
    A rain-soaked Sarah Bernhardt blossom gets a new place to shine as a floater in a lily pool. Ever wonder how some plants get their names? The romantically fragrant, pink peony Sarah Bernhardt was named more than 100 years ago and remains a garden favorite. The beloved French actress, known as Madame Sarah (born in Paris 1844-1923), is still considered the most famous actress of the 19th century. The peony that bears her name was introduced in 1906. Among the first actors of her time to take movie acting seriously, Sarah Bernhardt played the role of Queen Elizabeth in her most famous film…
  • Dish it Out. Succulents Can Take the Heat

    gscadmin
    9 Jun 2015 | 11:41 am
    If you’re looking for a simple, easy-care planter that can endure heat and dry spells, consider filling a pot with succulents. I start with an old concrete urn that makes most any plant look good. To ensure good drainage, I add some sand to the potting soil, mounding the soil slightly to show off a mix of low-growing, cold-hardy succulents. In a couple seasons, the plants will fill the allotted space, giving the urn a bejeweled effect. A local nursery offers “variety packs” of succulents — sempervivums and sedums — making it easy to create create varied texture and…
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    Annie's Gardening Corner

  • Coastal Landscape Design Meets Drone

    13 Aug 2015 | 4:36 am
    A drone captures the impressive angles of Bilowz Associates Inc.'s recent landscape designs. Coastal properties in particular are best captured by an aerial view. Fast forward to another one of Bilowz Associates Inc.'s stunning coastal landscape design projects. Do you feel like you're on a plane, coming in for a landing? There's nothing quite like capturing this view. The best way to envision the master plan we developed with all of its many intricacies and details can be done with many technologies and tools. And now with the accessibility of drones, it's our go-to. The number one…
  • What Remains

    5 Aug 2015 | 5:10 am
    After yesterday's storms, most of our edible garden is completely gone. Without too much notice, the hail, rain and strong winds shredded, bruised and damaged just about everything we grow. Our garden is a hobby. It's not for commercial production. It's part of our lifestyle to create more than just beautiful landscape designs but understand and appreciate everything that relates to sustainability including agriculture and our food source. This leads me to our local farm friends. Some fared the weather, they dodged the storm. But for those within our own town, it was simply devastating. As…
  • Maximizing Coastal Beauty

    24 Jul 2015 | 2:27 am
    A recent Bilowz Associates Inc. Landscape Design Project. One of our specialties - coastal properties. Exterior spaces tell a powerful story.  At first glance, what might immediately catch your eye is this breathtaking setting. There's no denying this exquisite point surrounded by open water with its own boat dock would be a perfect dream spot for most. But can you guess what that raised grass area is on the right? Follow our design story in the coming weeks to find out this and more. A close up image with details of this area will be revealed to give you a sense of how unique this truly…
  • Flower Break Message

    22 Jul 2015 | 8:22 am
     When the Daylily blossoms begin to fade...Replace them with Dahlias. Adore Dahlias in the garden or cut them for your summer flower vases. © All Images – Property of Bilowz Associates Inc.    If you like this blog, check in for your daily share's worth of garden inspiration, landscape architecture and design tips; always original, not cookie cutter and copied. Just like our design work, we strive for unique! We invite you to contact Bilowz Associates, Inc., or to browse our portfolios. Like ourFacebook follow on Twitter or subscribe to the blog to receive posts daily via…
  • Hot Monday Tropics

    20 Jul 2015 | 7:21 am
    With the weather feeling quite tropical, the title is just a play on words. But there is a hot Monday topic to discuss and it's worth a repeat summer performance. Before the segue into microclimates and why it's important to understand them as they relate to garden and design, there's another quick message - pay attention to the nature of things. What's the best way to do that? Expose yourself to nature everyday if you can and pay attention to the process occurring as you take it all in. Where did your paths lead you this weekend?  Somewhere in nature? To beautiful and contemplative…
 
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    Serenity in the Garden

  • Repurposing and Recycling in Garden Design

    Jan Johnsen
    31 Aug 2015 | 8:47 am
    Recycled Concrete wall from Bourget BrosThis is a perennially popular post and so I am sharing it again!Recycling can be many things to many people...or, in other words,  One man's trash is another's man treasure"from Stone Art BlogThis piano was placed in a garden. Here is what Sunny Wieler of Stone Art Blog wrote about this:"Besides being a passionate gardener, my dad is also a passionate piano player, so a few years back we got him a new piano for his birthday. So the old piano spent a while in the shed before he had the great idea to put it out in the garden..."Little did…
  • Cottage Garden Primer

    Jan Johnsen
    19 Aug 2015 | 7:44 am
    Cottage Garden - Jan Johnsen    I once worked with a lovely client ( now a dear friend!) who wanted a cottage-style flower garden.Now there are cottage gardens and then there are cottage gardens...know what I mean?In Great Britain, it seems everyone has the most magnificent flower garden, each more spectacular than the next...their lushness sets a standard of perfection for cottage gardens that makes me want to say to someone here in the Northeast U.S., 'Would you like to consider an ornamental grass garden instead?"Designed and installed by Johnsen Landscapes &…
  • Trees of Peace

    Jan Johnsen
    17 Aug 2015 | 11:15 am
    Years ago I heard somebody say that all our political and diplomatic conferences ought to be moved out of smoke-filled rooms and held underneath trees..."-  Clyde S. Kilby,   page 159 of “The Lost Myth”, Arts in Society, Vol. 6, 1969.from justfocus in New ZealandImagine if the United Nations met under trees? I imagine their discussions might be a little more fruitful...Trees are a wonderful mediating influence in our lives.If a child misbehaves, instead of sending them into a corner have them go outside and sit at the base of a tree...or better yet - in…
  • Unhappy Hipsters in the Garden

    Jan Johnsen
    9 Aug 2015 | 12:04 pm
    These photos and captions are from Unhappy Hipsters....a very funny website, please check it out..I have my comments in bold below.Sure she was watering a street tree during a statewide drought. But the gate was made of recycled street signs. Carbon footprint: neutral.(Photo: Randi Berez; Dwell Magazinre, Dec/Jan 2006)My comments - you gotta love that street sign fence!The porthole windows seemed like a good idea. But now the house appeared to be leering at them, distinctly ominous.(Photo: Philip Newton; Dwell Magazine, March 2004)My comments - such emphasis on the house design..such…
  • Annual Flowers - Colorful, Joyful and So Rewarding

    Jan Johnsen
    6 Aug 2015 | 5:15 am
    (Jan Johnsen - angelonia, vinca and dusty miller)    Annual flowers - those that bloom all summer into late fall then give it up for good - are the secret to a joyful and colorful garden. I know people think planting annual flowers take too much work in spring but I say, "go ahead, try it! The rewards in your garden continue into the late fall."(Jan Johnsen - profusion zinnias, marigolds,salvia, plectranthus)Colorful annual flowers make us happy, enrich our lives and then sometimes take our breath away, to boot.(Jan Johnsen - coleus, plectranthus,angelonia, and more)I know all…
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    MySecretGarden

  • End of Month View - August 2015

    1 Sep 2015 | 7:00 am
    After removing some dry brown flowerheads and getting good rains, my garden looks totally summer-like.  Since everything bloomed earlier than usual this year, I was afraid that August would stay flowerless, lol. But salvia, phlox, roses, verbena and some others came to the rescue. Salvia 'Black and Blue' is one of my favorites. Its rich long lasting blue flowers are irresistible! I
  • Sherri's Garden

    26 Aug 2015 | 6:04 am
    The NPA Garden Tour on Bainbridge Island happened to fall on a very hot and bright day. But, the gardens that we visited had shade corners for coolness and literally were just cool. Here are some pictures of Sherri Wilson's 2-acre garden. Frog Princess is a sure sign that there will be some surprises ahead! This is what Sherri said about her garden in the NPA brochure: "Inspired by
  • In The Garden. Wordless Wednesday

    12 Aug 2015 | 6:33 am
    . ***Copyright 2015 TatyanaS
  • My July Garden

    5 Aug 2015 | 7:58 am
    Looking back at July, two words come to my mind first: hot and dry. It was the hottest and driest summer ever recorded in the Seattle area. Somehow, a recent rain that gave a relief to the surrounding area avoided our neighborhood. During June and July, we had just a couple of occasions when several drops touched the ground.  Our sandy soil dried fast after every watering by our sprinkler
  • Sequim Lavender Festival 2015

    29 Jul 2015 | 8:04 am
    They call it Lavender Capital of North America! These are some of my pictures from the Lavender Farm Tour which was a part of  the 19th  Sequim Lavender Festival. Location: Washington state, Olympic Peninsula, Sequim-Dungeness Valley. We visited Blackberry Forest Farm, Purple Haze Lavender Farm, Graysmarsh Farm, Creek Side Lavender Farm, Jardin du Soleil Farm, Olympic Lavender Heritage
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    Veg Plotting

  • GBMD: Living Wall

    VP
    1 Sep 2015 | 12:30 am
    Patrick Blanc's living wall at the Athenaeum Hotel, Piccadilly. Well worth making a detour to gawp at (that's a technical term).If you're not reading this on vegplotting.blogspot.com, Blotanical or your own web reader such as Bloglovin' or Feedly, then the website you're using is a blogpost feed scraper. Why not go straight to the source instead? That's vegplotting.blogspot.com
  • Back to School

    VP
    31 Aug 2015 | 12:30 am
    It was most timely when My Garden School contacted me recently with an offer to review one of their 4-week long courses. I'm disappointed with the range of evening classes at my local college this year and decided not to take one this autumn.In contrast, My Garden School's list of options is quite extensive, and I swithered for quite a while between Toby Musgrave's Garden History, Michael King's Perennial Planting with Nature, and Noel Kingsbury's Planting Design With Perennials. However, the clincher for me was finding Clive Nichols' Flower Photography Masterclass. I missed out on a day…
  • Tomato Trials

    VP
    28 Aug 2015 | 12:30 am
    Forget your 5 a day, how about eating dozens of tomatoes in a few hours? This sight greeted me at Thompson & Morgan's (T&M) trials ground on Tuesday, ready for 15 or so of us to sample these tomatoes. At the front you can see 8 'traditional' varieties ready for our assessment, with bowls of 9 each of 'coloured' and 'cherry' tomatoes lined up for later.As with wine tasting, the bottles of water and crackers you can see were much needed accessories to stop our palates becoming jaded, though thankfully we were allowed to swallow our efforts rather than using a spittoon.Much chewing and…
  • The Art of Swimming *

    VP
    26 Aug 2015 | 12:30 am
    Take a wander around the rapidly changing King's Cross area and you can't help but notice this intriguing sign in several places.Further on, a fence and a planted mound obscure the view towards the newly minted apartment and office blocks.A doorway invites you in, so you climb the stairs...... and the mound's purpose is revealed.My place was booked, so after checking-in I was pointed in the direction of the red and white cabins to make my preparations...... and ponder the view.Then I noted the temperature and...... ignored the Frenchman still shivering on the side, and plunged straight in.For…
  • Seasonal Recipe: Apricot Tart

    VP
    24 Aug 2015 | 12:30 am
    It's Great British Bake-Off time on the telly, where the contestants vie for the top prize with increasingly ambitious bakes and not a soggy bottom in sight. I was gifted a tray of tomcot apricots when I went on a blogger day at the Thompson & Morgan garden recently, so my thoughts also turned to baking and the art of producing a simple-to-goodness tart.If memory serves, dessert tarts require a sweet pastry, a baked custard made with cream, and a sugar-glazed coating. I wanted to produce something lighter and less sugary which allowed the flavour of the fresh apricots to shine…
 
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    The Enduring Gardener

  • Gulf Stream Glories

    The Enduring Gardener
    30 Aug 2015 | 11:27 pm
    I’m sure that Logan is still lovely on an overcast day (of which Scotland has a few) but it was at its very best on a hot sunny day when the eucalyptus and many sub tropical plants look perfectly at home against a bright blue sky.  The star of the show was a magnificent Metrosideros umbellata – a tender New Zealand tree I had never heard of before – not only was it a fabulous sight, it was alive with bees who clearly loved it as much as I did.  Other plants that particularly caught my eye included a Polylepis australis with its extremely shaggy bark (and an opportunistic fern that had…
  • Rhubodach to Colintraive

    The Enduring Gardener
    29 Aug 2015 | 4:07 am
    There’s a lovely little ferry that takes just 5 minutes to cross from the northern tip of Bute to Colintraive on the mainland.  Last time I visited Bute I left this way to continue driving up the west coast, this time, we drove to the ferry, went across as foot passengers to eat at the Colintraive Hotel and then caught the ferry back to Bute. It was a lovely thing to do on a beautiful evening – just check the time of the last ferry as it is a very, very long way round if you miss it.
  • Ascog Hall Victorian Fernery & Garden

    The Enduring Gardener
    26 Aug 2015 | 3:59 am
    The sunken fernery has had a chequered history since its heyday in the 19th century when it was an object of considerable wonder. Carved out of solid rock and topped with a glazed roof, it housed a magnificent collection of ferns from around the world. Along with the surrounding garden and the house it fell into disrepair and dereliction after the 2nd World War but was rediscovered, restored and replanted in the 1990s.  Recently, new owners have taken over and are working hard to revitalise the surrounding garden and ensure that the Fernery remains the remarkable place it is.  
  • Mount Stuart

    The Enduring Gardener
    24 Aug 2015 | 5:00 am
    The last time I visited Mount Stuart was shortly after the estimable James Alexander Sinclair had designed and planted the garden leading to the new visitor centre – it looked wonderful then and it was good to see that it is looking just as good now, several years on. After a bit of a lull when things were kept ticking over, the gardens and parkland are the focus of restoration and reinvigoration with the brand new Head of Horticulture, Don Murray, bringing his experience in the same role at the Eden Project to move things forward with the Curator, Graham Alcorn. There are many stories to…
  • Isle of Bute

    The Enduring Gardener
    21 Aug 2015 | 11:45 pm
    It’s a few years since I last visited Bute and despite the 35-minute ferry crossing being eye-wincingly expensive (if you take your car), it was lovely to return to the island. Rothesay, the island’s town, was once a fashionable resort  but is tired and down at heel these days, but Munro’s B&B perched above the town with panoramic views over the Firth of Clyde is a great place to stay – contemporary, comfortable and friendly with delicious breakfasts. We were on Bute to visit two places – Mount Stuart and Ascog Victorian Fernery.  
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    Urban Gardens

  • Reclaiming Urban Spaces: Modular Micro-City On Parisian Bridge

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    2 Sep 2015 | 1:42 pm
    Parisian Architect Stéphane Malka addresses the economic inequities inherent in urbanization in a concept that reimagines how people might live in today’s mobile world–in this case, hanging off the side of the Pont Neuf bridge in Paris. Malka thinks people … Read More... The post Reclaiming Urban Spaces: Modular Micro-City On Parisian Bridge appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Fiskars Project Orange Thumb Grant Recipient: Washington Shores Community Garden

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    29 Aug 2015 | 3:09 pm
    Since we posted earlier about the Fiskars Project Orange Thumb community gardens grant program, thirty grant recipients in the U.S. and Canada have begun using their awards to bring their garden plans to fruition. One of those grant recipients was … Read More... The post Fiskars Project Orange Thumb Grant Recipient: Washington Shores Community Garden appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Bioclimatic Garden Building Promotes Biodiversity

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    22 Aug 2015 | 5:33 pm
    Photo: © Javier García Part of a plan to promote biodiversity and protect the surrounding environment in the South American city of Cali. Colombia, the multi-use Host and Nectar Garden Building also seeks to establish a network of gardeners … Read More... The post Bioclimatic Garden Building Promotes Biodiversity appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Life, Shelter, and Nature: Contemporary Interpretations of the Sukkah

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    20 Aug 2015 | 10:01 am
    Italian Gianluca Pelizza’s Desert Veil, a wood-framed cube roofed with olive branches. The Kehilla Residential Programme’s annual Sukkahville Design Competition invites architects, students, artists, builders and design professionals to submit design proposals for the design and construction of a contemporary … Read More... The post Life, Shelter, and Nature: Contemporary Interpretations of the Sukkah appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Self-Watering Modular and Magnetic “Connect a Pot” Planters

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    19 Aug 2015 | 10:00 am
    For those of us who have downsized to smaller digs where space is at a premium, there’s a new self-watering modular pot system for growing plants, herbs and flowers indoors in compact areas. Connect a Pot fits well into the … Read More... The post Self-Watering Modular and Magnetic “Connect a Pot” Planters appeared first on Urban Gardens.
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    Busch Gardens in Virginia Blog

  • Busch Gardens Howl-O-Scream Horrors Unearthed

    Emily Bea
    12 Aug 2015 | 1:47 pm
    For this year’s Howl-O-Scream, Busch Gardens Williamsburg joins forces with the legendary producer of the 1999 horror film The Blair Witch Project, Robin Cowie. The award-winning filmmaker reveals the darkest corners of his mind to Busch Gardens as the producer and director of Unearthed – Scarlett’s Revenge, one of three new haunted houses debuting at Howl-O-Scream this year. Howl-O-Scream opens Sept. 25 and runs every Friday, Saturday and Sunday through Nov. 1. Busch Gardens opens at 10 a.m., but becomes a seriously scary place at 6 p.m. when the Howl-O-Scream haunts come…
  • Happy Birthday, Lakota

    Emily Bea
    8 Apr 2015 | 11:33 am
    In their Natural Habitat, a gray wolf lives about 5-7 years. In a zoological setting, their life-span can more than double1 to 12-16 years2. If you have been visiting Busch Gardens and Wolf Haven for the past decade, you may have had the privilege to see one of our resident wolves, Lakota.  He will be turning 15 on April 10!     I’m sure as someone who cares for many animals, there is some unwritten rule that I shouldn’t have favorites, but Lokata is without a doubt my personal favorite. Even at 15 he still loves to interact with his trainers on stage and…
  • Spot the Daffodils at Busch Gardens Williamsburg

    Emily Bea
    6 Apr 2015 | 8:32 am
    Can you find all of these varieties around the park?   1. "Ice Follies"     2. "Pippit"   3. "Tete a Tete"   4. "Fortissimo"   5. "Dutch Master"   6. More "Ice Follies"   7. More "Fortissimo"   Jason, a supervisor in charge of landscape beds at Busch Gardens, estimates that over 1/3 of the 15,000 bulbs planted this season are daffodils, and some of the ones you enjoy throughout the park were planted years ago.  Thanks to Jason for the variety names, and the nice combinations with pansies and violas. Happy Hunting,
  • Lettuce Wraps Recipe from our Food & Wine Festival

    Kevin Crossett
    7 Mar 2015 | 8:20 am
    Whether you prefer chicken, pork, beef or tofu, these lettuce wraps are for you. Make them for yourself, or come and try them at the 2015 Food & Wine Festival.
  • Happy New Year - Celebrating the Year of the Sheep at Busch Gardens

    Emily Bea
    23 Feb 2015 | 8:54 am
    Happy New Year to All! You may wonder why I am wishing you all a Happy New Year, well last Thursday marked the beginning of the Chinese New Year.  As we say good bye to the year of the horse, we usher in the year of the Sheep (goat or ram).  This spring festival dates back more than 2000 years.  It is said that all of the animals were asked to meet on New Year’s Day to celebrate and only 12 animals arrived for the celebration.  To reward all of the animals that did show up, a year was named after each animal.     Grazing is a favorite activity for the…
 
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    My Tool Blog

  • Senco Value Bundle is 5 star!

    Jade
    1 Sep 2015 | 7:01 am
    Our ‘Value Added Bundles‘ kicked off last Month with the Senco screwdriver twin pack and two extra packs of screws. It’s a sensational offer as the single cordless unit alone is worth £421.13, so your money goes a lot further. Don’t just take our word for it, our latest Feefo reviewer gave this a 5 Star Rating, stating the new gun is “A lot easier and smoother then the old senco gun. Would advise any1 to buy 1!“ Here’s what’s in the box.
  • The DeWalt 5.0Ah range at My Tool Shed – higher capacity batteries for longer lasting tools

    Beth
    25 Aug 2014 | 2:48 am
    Introducing the NEW XR 5.0Ah Li-Ion battery pack from Dewalt. DeWalt’s NEW higher capacity 5.0Ah Li-Ion batteries provide up to 33% more runtime than the equivalent model with 4.0Ah batteries. Only £107.99 inc VAT, The NEW lightweight DeWalt DCB184 18v XR 5.0Ah Li-Ion Battery Pack offers extended runtime and optimised power, providing the user with upgraded 5.0Ah power with no weight increase in comparison to the 4.0Ah battery packs. With no memory effect and virtually no self-discharge, it offers maximum productivity and helps to decrease downtime. Compatible with all DeWalt XR Li-Ion…
  • DeWalt DCV582 XR Wet & Dry 240v Corded/Cordless 14.4-18v Vacuum

    Beth
    31 Jul 2014 | 8:32 am
    The DeWalt DCV582 XR Wet & Dry vacuum is suitable for both on site and workshop use, as it can be used with DeWalt 14.4v – 18v XR Li-ion batteries but can also be plugged into the mains. Ideal for both wet and dry applications without the need to continuously change the filter, this lightweight, powerful vacuum from DeWalt is completely versatile and can be used for many applications both indoors and out. A highly efficiency HEPA filter ensures dust as fine as 0.3 microns is collected, minimising cleaning time.                 Specification…
  • Dewalt DCK250P2 Combi and Impact Driver 18v 5Ah Brushless Kit

    Beth
    22 Jul 2014 | 8:12 am
    Introducing the new DeWalt DCK250P2 18v XR Brushless 5.0Ah Twin Pack which includes the DCD795 Compact Hammer Drill and DCF886 Impact Driver. Ideal for use in confined spaces, the DeWalt DCD795 is an ultra lightweight and compact brushless hammer drill driver which features an LED work light for greater visibility and a 2-speed, all-metal transmission. Designed with aluminium front housing and an ergonomic handle,the DeWalt DCF886 is a compact impact driver with brushless motor technology and features 3 LEDs for perfect work piece illumination. Specifications DCD795 Brushless Compact Hammer…
  • DeWalt DCN692P2 18v XR 5.0Ah Li-ion Brushless Framing Nailer

    Beth
    21 Jul 2014 | 4:56 am
    This Bare Unit DeWalt DCN692 18v XR 2 Speed Framing Nailer features BRUSHLESS motor technology to provide the power to fire 90mm ring shank nails into soft wood and 63mm into hard woods. This Nailer comes with 2 modes including a sequential operating mode which allows for precision placement and a bump operating mode that provides the user with production speed. Both of these modes optimise the nailer for firing all lengths of nails. Ideal for numerous applications, including; Stud Wall Installations, Roof Battening, Fencing, Cladding Installations, Roofing, Decking, Floor Board Installations…
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    Pacific Outdoor Living | Landscape Design - Landscape Contractor La

  • Inspiring Pergola Design Ideas for Your Landscape

    admin
    20 Aug 2015 | 5:29 pm
    Functional and elegant, pergolas work great for adding an inviting feel to your outdoor living space. Characterized by its classic arches, these structures provide shade and let you relax in your landscape even under the summer heat. If you’re looking for inspiration for your pergola, we’re here to help. Let’s check out several ways a […]
  • 5 Essentials to Building Your Backyard Fire Pit

    admin
    12 Aug 2015 | 3:18 pm
    Who doesn’t love gathering around a bonfire? The good thing is, we can now indulge in this tradition anytime we want to with the help of backyard fire pits. Fire pits make your outdoor living space all the more inviting. Long conversations, backyard parties, barbeques, story time with kids – you can entertain guests or […]
  • More Green, Less Blue: 5 Water-Saving Tips for Your Landscape

    admin
    4 Aug 2015 | 5:19 pm
    Is it possible to reduce water usage without giving up your gorgeous landscape? The answer is yes. You can maximize the beauty of your outdoor living space while minimizing water consumption. Here are few tips. Water wisely. Practice irrigating in the morning when temperature is cooler and water absorption is high. Watering in the afternoon […]
  • PACIFIC OUTDOOR LIVING TEAMS UP WITH LAPD

    admin
    16 Sep 2014 | 5:22 pm
    < Pacific Outdoor Living is proud to announce that each and every dollar raised from the price of admission to the Designer Showcase & Outdoor Living Expo on October 25th will go directly to the LAPD Cadet program.  You can find the LAPD Cadet program active at each police station in the City of Los Angeles.  […]
  • Hardscaping vs Softscaping

    admin
    16 Jul 2014 | 4:03 pm
    If you’ve been looking into landscape design or exterior home improvement, you’ve most likely heard the terms hardscaping and softscaping. Well, that’s because every landscaping project can be broken down into these two aspects: hardscaping and softscaping. So, what is the difference and how can you use it to plan your own design? Let’s take […]
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    Lead up the Garden Path

  • Welcome to the club, Candle Light.

    Pauline
    25 Aug 2015 | 11:49 pm
    I know I’m probably tempting fate, but as the hydrangeas have been so good this year, with all the rain we have had, I’ve been and bought another one, this time Hydrangea paniculata Candle Light. Hydrangea paniculata Candle Light. H. Candle Light. The flower heads on  H. paniculata varieties are cone shaped and rather large in some cases, here they are about 12 inches from top to bottom. H. Candle Light. The real flowers are tiny, you can just see some pink buds in between the large creamy white sepals. H. Candle Light At the tips of each cone, there are far less sepals and lots…
  • GBFD. August.

    Pauline
    21 Aug 2015 | 11:28 pm
    This is the time of the month when our thoughts turn to the foliage in the garden. Sometimes it doesn’t just form a green backdrop to all the flowers of summer, quite often they are the points of interest themselves. Heuchera and hosta. Heucheras and hostas make a lovely contrast, the hosta is Canadian Blue and the Heuchera  h.Marmalade showing the change of colours as autumn approaches. Brunnera Jack Frost. Brunnera Jack Frost looks good from the moment it appears in the spring. This is now seeding around so I have quite a few plants to pot up and plant  around the garden. Here the…
  • GBBD August. Welcome rain.

    Pauline
    14 Aug 2015 | 11:22 pm
    I can’t believe that August is half way through. We have had quite a bit of rain followed by sunshine, on and off all month, which has meant that flowers are blooming everywhere. Quite often August is a dry month and the garden suffers, plants stop flowering, going over much faster than usual, but this year all the rain has been such a benefit, especially for the Hydrangers which have been providing colour for about 2 months now. I watched the weather forecast and quickly took my photos a couple of days ago, I’m really glad I did as  we had non stop rain through the night and…
  • Jade plums and butterfly leaves.

    Pauline
    9 Aug 2015 | 11:15 pm
    Yesterday I was summer pruning the fruit trees up at the top of the garden, hopefully forming fruiting spurs ready for next year. All the little trees are of the Minarette variety, a long slender trunk which is then has its side shoots clipped tightly to the fence behind, this way we have a little orchard which takes up very little room. Victoria plums. The first fruit I noticed after cutting away loads of foliage, were the Victoria plums, hanging there like a huge bunch of grapes made out of jade. Victoria plum. They should ripen now that so much foliage has been cut away, I just hope that…
  • Singing the Blues.

    Pauline
    4 Aug 2015 | 10:16 am
    There are three areas in the garden where interest is being held by all the blue flowers that there are. It doesn’t seem to matter what the neighbouring colours are, yellow, orange, pink or white, blue goes with them all. Mopheaded Hydrangea. Mophead Hydrangea. This hydrangea in the corner of the back garden is such a beautiful blue, the colour really sings out of the shade. Corner of the back garden. From a distance it can easily been seen. Corner of the back garden. View from the house. Even from the house, it shines in the corner. The back lawn is covered in brown Horse Chestnut…
 
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    leavesnbloom

  • Going Back to School with My-Garden-School.com

    Rosie Nixon
    2 Sep 2015 | 10:36 am
    Crocosmia at sunset If you're like me ...you'll never be able to resist a plant clearance section.  The problem is that I've been at too many plant sales ...can't be helped when it's usually me putting on the reduced stickers! and over the years I've bought too many bargains.  What design there was in the back garden in relation to texture, shape and colour has become blurred. I got caught in the trap of thinking of flower colour rather than thinking about how each plant could contrast and give interest in the border even when it wasn't in flower. It didn't really bother me…
  • ParkHead Gardens Perth

    Rosie Nixon
    19 Aug 2015 | 2:27 am
    For years I'd been telling Maddy that I'd visit her garden - Parkhead Gardens in Perth; every year it would go on my 'to do list' ...but it never happened.  It's not as if it was on the other side of the country as it's practically on my own doorstep.   Gasp ...I can't believe it took me so long but I finally made the arrangements.  Checked the weather forecast as it's been a very dull and wet summer here; the date and time were set; there was no turning back now!   I already knew from chatting to Maddy and visiting her website that she has a beautiful…
  • Light up your garden with Candelabras

    Rosie Nixon
    3 Jul 2015 | 2:33 pm
    photo taken at a friends garden Primulas were once just flowers that I associated with late winter / early spring.  When I was growing up primroses and polyanthus grew prolifically in my grandad's garden.  They were one of the first flowers I grew myself as a child; the first plants that I learned how to divide and transplant ...with great results; with very forgiving leaves and roots around a gardener with little fingers.   Little did I realise back then how diverse the Primula family really was! Years later I grew them from seed after giving the seeds 'a taste of winter'…
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    Garden Walk Garden Talk

  • Philly Tale to Tell

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    2 Sep 2015 | 4:00 pm
    See William Penn on top of City Hall? A little Philly tale to tell…A while back, it was decreed that no building could be taller than Billy Penn atop City Hall. The colonial gent faces Penn’s Landing and presides over … Continue reading →
  • A Life More Ordinary – Part Two

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    30 Aug 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Going “home” really brings out the nostalgia in me, a way to connect with our roots and look to what the future holds. Growing up in the country, kids playing outdoors among the trees was not an endangered activity like … Continue reading →
  • A Life More Ordinary – Part One

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    27 Aug 2015 | 4:00 am
    A trip “home” had me thinking about the importance of a life more ordinary. One of less complications. I recalled the days in college where we all were hellbent on changing the world, being the one to make the difference. … Continue reading →
  • Longwood Idea Garden – Use Annuals Like Perennials in Design for Impact

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    24 Aug 2015 | 4:00 am
    I never thought I would see a good example of using exclusively annuals like one would use perennials in border design. When I first looked at the trial garden beds, the view “read” perennial. Upon closer inspection, the beds were … Continue reading →
  • Traveling in Comfort

    Garden Walk Garden Talk
    21 Aug 2015 | 4:00 am
    … If you are willing to pay the big bucks for first-class leg room, fully reclining seats, decent meals, premium entertainment and room to move. Today, I am on a weary nine-hour bus ride from Pennsylvania after garden-hopping all week. … Continue reading →
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    Vegetable Gardener - All featured posts

  • Castor Bean (Ricinus communis)

    2 Sep 2015 | 4:36 pm
    Posted by cookinwithherbs Although castor bean is a gorgeous, showy plant in the garden, the seeds are poisonous. So why would one want to grow it? Read on to find out...
  • Container Tomato Yields Big Results

    1 Sep 2015 | 10:00 am
    Posted by WesternGardener In a surprise victory for small-space vegetable gardeners, a container-grown tomato won the largest tomato contest at a local garden center and a $100 gift card payday.
  • 5 Ways to Garden Together as a Family

    31 Aug 2015 | 5:48 pm
    Posted by ChrisMcLaughlin Gardening as a family let's you create lasting memories and offers more opportunities to connect with one another.
  • 10 Garden Basil Varieties

    31 Aug 2015 | 3:42 pm
    Posted by ChrisMcLaughlin There's enough basil varieties to plant a garden dedicated to them.
  • Green Chile Season

    28 Aug 2015 | 1:19 pm
    Posted by cookinwithherbs It's that time of year again--the green chiles are here! The Hatch chile tractor trailers has been pulling into towns across the nation to deliver these glorious New Mexico capsicums. I also have them in my garden, however I get a case to freeze so I can have my capsaicin fix all winter long. Here are a few favorite ways to use them.
 
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    The Gardening Blog

  • What’s Hot and What’s Not

    Barbara
    14 Aug 2015 | 8:20 am
    At every turn, you can find a gem of a flower or you can hit a gremlin!! Today was my day! I stuck my head out on this cold day and to my surprise found lots to photograph! So my post today was suitably named “What’s Hot and What’s Not!” Let me show you what I found ….. WHAT’S HOT: Lemon season!! Love them for salad dressing and for Lemon Cordial! WHAT’S [...]
  • Flourishing in my winter garden

    Barbara
    27 Jul 2015 | 2:20 pm
    I am so pleased to say that there is so much happening in my winter garden. Lots to harvest and even more thriving! Let me show you whats going on……. Lots flowering….  Lots to eat …  What is on its way… What herbs do we have… Composting pals… I hope you are having as much fun in your garden as I am!! Happy gardening xxxx
  • Gutter Garden

    Barbara
    22 Jun 2015 | 12:18 pm
    I have heard the saying, “Weeds are flowers that don’t know that they have to grow in a row”. Well, I have found a new respect for this common plant – my new name for a weed. The Dictionary defines a weed: weed |wiːd|noun: “a wild plant growing where it is not wanted and in competition with cultivated plants.” Well, that is not always true. I have a place for “weeds” in my garden and they are very [...]
  • Essence of my Winter Garden

    Barbara
    11 Jun 2015 | 2:45 pm
    I love the softness and the coolness of a winter garden. After a harsh summer, it is a pleasure to see so much green. The mist envelopes the mornings and everything looks magical – the spiders webs look like jewellery. I hope you enjoy the walk through my June garden…….. Lets see whats happening in the front garden My beautiful Leopard Tree! Lets see whats growing in the winter veggie garden Another [...]
  • My Greywater System

    Barbara
    31 May 2015 | 10:34 am
    We have been planning this simple Grey Water System for quite sometime. It needed to be simple and cheap to do! So today was the day!! I will take you through the process with the photo DIY. We decided to use a collection box to trap the grey water and direct it to the veggie patch through a system of pipes. These pipes are the average plumbing pipes you get at any hardware [...]
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    Native Plants and Wildlife Gardens

  • Plant Strategies for Dry Times

    Mark Turner
    1 Sep 2015 | 5:00 am
    A couple of months ago I wrote about the effect of the dry spring and early summer on our native plant garden and woodland. Since then you’ve probably seen photos and heard about the severe wildflowers that have burned hundreds of square miles of eastern Washington. Fire has even burned a large swath of forest […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • Urban Rooftops and Native Plant Preservation

    Kevin Songer
    28 Aug 2015 | 3:58 am
    Recently I shared my thoughts about how green roofs in the city can provide important habitat to endangered native plants with The Nature of Cities. While there are many other contributors on the TNOC website with wonderful articles, my thoughts are posted below (as well as within the TNOC site).  And while some may brush […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • A Dozen Diurnal Moths

    Loret T. Setters
    13 Aug 2015 | 10:20 am
    Diurnal moths fly during the day rather than at night like the majority of moths.  Some are quite pretty and are often mistaken for butterflies.  One way to differentiate between the butterflies and moths is to look at the antenna.  Moths have feathered antenna and butterflies have clubbed ends. So, here is a dozen diurnal […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • A Bestiary: Part Forty-Three ~ Songbirds: House Wren

    Carol Duke
    11 Aug 2015 | 5:15 pm
    Just writing the name House Wren Troglodytes aedon, stirs up angst within me. Dogged little creatures, these birds, like all native songbirds, are protected and it is illegal, according to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918, to remove their completed nests of twigs, snake skins, spider casings, and feathers even when placed on top of murdered bluebird […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
  • A Fond Farewell Bonanza

    Benjamin Vogt
    9 Aug 2015 | 4:30 am
    The folks at Comedy Central contacted me earlier this year, and I’m pleased to say I’ll be a correspondent for The Daily Show this fall as their native plant expert. As such, I find it necessary to end my time here at the most wonderful of places on the internet, where so many of us […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us know what you think by leaving a comment at this post
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    The Pond Blog

  • How to Deal with Tea Colored or Brown Water

    Bill Dubert
    11 Aug 2015 | 3:31 pm
    Tea-colored water is something that happens, sooner or later, to most outdoor koi ponds. This is when your pond is clear (not cloudy), but the water has a distinct dark tinge to it, usually a brown or orange color. Like many pond problems, you have to understand and address the cause of the problem to get to the solution. The Cause of Tea Colored Water Tea colored water is caused by the buildup of tannins in the water. Tannins are a class of polyphenolic molecules that…. you know what? You don’t need to know that. Tannins come from plants, usually plants breaking down in some…
  • Fire and Water: The New Fire Fountain from Aquascape

    Bill Dubert
    11 Jun 2015 | 1:51 pm
      Fire and water. There are few things in the world quite like combining two traditional opposites for making a stunning statement. For my part, our new Fire Fountain is one of the most exciting new products to come through in a long time. This product would be really cool if it were just a bowl of stones and water with a fire pot in the middle, but it’s so much more than that. It features a pump system that moves water steadily from the outside of the bowl surface, falling over the edge of the inner ring like an infinity pool, an endless cycle of water moving toward fire. Place…
  • Dealing with Duckweed in Your Pond

    Bill Dubert
    21 May 2015 | 7:28 pm
    I have a confession to make. I really like duckweed. I think that it’s pretty, and can be really interesting to look at. The way that it propagates so rapidly is really impressive, and the free-floating roots are neat. Watermeal, a type of duckweed, doesn’t even have roots, it just absorbs nutrients and water directly through the bottom of it’s frond. Watermeal is also worth noting for being the smallest known flowering plant. Duckweed, though, can be a huge problem in a pond. In good conditions, a duckweed plant can bud and divide once per day, meaning a daily doubling of…
  • Save up to $100 off of Aquascape products today at Loch Ness Water Gardens!

    Bill Dubert
    26 Mar 2015 | 2:56 pm
    Need a new pump? A new pond vacuum? Stocking up on water treatment supplies? Now’s the time with one of the best deals you’ll see all year. From now until May 31, 2015, Aquascape is offering a fantastic mail-in rebate worth up to $50 off of their products. Now, that’s a great deal, but it gets better: Combine it with our Spring Savings coupon deal, also worth up to $50 off exclusively at Loch Ness Water Gardens, and you can save up to $100 off of a purchase of any combination of Aquascape products! Here are the details: From March 15th – May 31, 2015, Aquascape is…
  • Tips for your Spring Pond To-Do List

    Bill Dubert
    20 Mar 2015 | 1:41 pm
    Well, Spring is officially here after what has been, for much of the US, a particularly nasty winter. That means that it’s time to pull off the cover net, clean up around the pond, squirt various liquids into your water, etc. You know the drill. Here are a few quick tips to make things go more smoothly this year. Make an actual to-do list This is one of those tips that took me a long time to figure out, but has since been absolutely invaluable. Sitting down with a pen and pad to make out a physical list that you can check off is incredibly useful for a few reasons. First of all,…
 
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    Nigel Gnome grows a vegetable

  • Definately Springy!

    Nigel Gnome
    8 Aug 2015 | 11:15 pm
    Little signs everywhere of spring on the prowl, the snowball tree is hinting at buds, the plum tree very much so, and the prunus has popped pink (albeit a week later than last year).Prunus blossomApplied copper spray to the roses and plum and nectarine tree. Planted out 37 home grown leek seedlings and a set of red sails letuce seedlings. Still picking a good bag of tender stems broccoli every second day, so nice and so easy.The sun is starting to sweep onto more and more of the vege patch, so it's becoming much more planteable. All getting very exciting. :)
  • Crispy frosty

    Nigel Gnome
    13 Jul 2015 | 1:55 am
    We are in the middle of a fosty patch, the last few mornings the car has been white and patches of lawn have been dusted.The lovely tender stem broccoli have been loving itquick pick of broccoli bitsFrosty broccoliLettuce and parlsey under wire to keep the blackbirds off the compost
  • Shortest day!

    Nigel Gnome
    20 Jun 2015 | 10:41 pm
    Nine hours of daylight, not a lot of time but enough to do a few tasks in the garden.I planted some heritage purple broccoli we bought from a great organics store in Napier last weekend. They bring our broccoli plantings to 25, should keep us happy I'd say.Lemons looking goodThe parsnips, carrots and beetroot are all doing well, though the shadow line needs to retreat now and give the iceberg lettuces some sun. That should happen quite quickly now we have reached winter solstice.A cute fantail with only one tail feather was flitting about this afternoon
  • Carrots are up!

    Nigel Gnome
    27 Apr 2015 | 11:06 pm
    My lovely prepared soil must work, the carrot seedlings are just peeping out, the recent rain hasn't harmed them at all even though it has been quite heavy at times.A lovely gift from friend, a handsome grey pupkin, the best. :)Lovely grey pumpkin detailThe forest pansy tree has been dropping it's leaves very quickly in the last few days, they look lovely on the lawnAutumn is definetely here.Forest pansy whirlI have been sent a link to an interesting website to encourage people to let their gardens go wild, well sort of. :)It's an American site but the ideas would aply anywhere.Garden Gone…
  • Beanless but there is hope of carrot

    Nigel Gnome
    20 Apr 2015 | 12:57 am
    Poor old beans met their fate this weekend, they were looking like they were suffering. It was surprising to find how many pods they were still hiding deep under the leaves. These palnts have produced so many beans, many bags full. At times the yellow ones would be flourishing, then the greens ones seem to respond and grow a whole new crop, then the yellows would do it back. They were planed 6th January I cut the stems leaving the roots in the ground enabling them to add nitrogen to the soil over winter.last beans and more chilliesI wanted to plant some more carrots and have another go at the…
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    Flowerona

  • Wedding Wednesday : On Trend – Natural Buttonholes

    Rona
    1 Sep 2015 | 4:01 pm
    There’s a growing trend in the world of wedding flowers for natural buttonholes, or boutonnières as they’re also known. So, in today’s Wedding Wednesday blog post, I thought I’d share with you some beautiful examples, which I’ve come across recently. Traditionally, stems are wired and then covered with tape as shown here. But with natural buttonholes, there’s no wiring and the stems are left exposed. Mirroring the ‘just picked from the garden’ look, it’s a much more informal style. The flowers and foliage are usually tied with…
  • Houseplant of the Month – Carnivorous Plants

    Rona
    31 Aug 2015 | 4:01 pm
    Mention carnivorous plants, which are the subject of this month’s Houseplant of the Month blog post, and I immediately think of the Venus Fly Trap, a plant that I was fascinated by as a child. Indigenous to bogs, carnivorous plants trap and extract food from creatures, particularly insects, to supplement the lack of nutrients in their habitat. Three well-known carnivorous plant groups are: Fly Traps with shiny-edged leaves which are hinged in the middle. Sticky-Leaved Plants with hairs which secrete insect-catching fluid. Pitcher Plants with leaves which are water-filled funnels. Fly…
  • Flowerona Loves – August 2015

    Rona
    30 Aug 2015 | 4:01 pm
    If you’re in the UK, I hope you’re having a lovely Bank Holiday weekend. Today, I’m delighted to introduce a brand new monthly blog post series, called Flowerona Loves! It’s an idea that I’ve been mulling over for quite a while as I’ve wanted to add a more personal element to Flowerona. But it’s taken me until now, with a tiny bit of a lull over the summer, to make it happen. So, at the end of each month, I’ll be sharing with you my favourite things that I’ve loved and sometimes, but not always, they’ll have a floral theme. 1.
  • Flowerona Links : With dahlias, houseplants & a studio tour…

    Rona
    29 Aug 2015 | 4:01 pm
    Flowerona Links is back…with lots of stunning floral inspiration from around the globe! General Florist Jo Flowers – Day in the Life Drama queen: How the dahlia became fashion’s favourite flower How to choose the right houseplant for you Studio Tour – Florist – Botanique 8 Great Fall Sown Flowers for Spring Blooms Weddings Mountain bridal inspiration with florals by Soil & Stem Desert rose wedding inspiration in Marfa Glam Industrial meeting Botanical with flowers by Joanne Truby Fashion to table with Flutter Magazine Lakeside wedding inspiration with flowers…
  • Flowerona Reflects Video : 29/08/15

    Rona
    28 Aug 2015 | 10:57 pm
    This week’s Flowerona Reflects video features features an Etsy Wedding Breakfast with a floristry workshop led by Harriet Parry. Plus this a-m-a-z-i-n-g Cafe au Lait dahlia! I hope you enjoy watching the video and don’t forget, if you’d like to subscribe to my YouTube channel, please click here and then click on Subscribe.
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    Your Easy Garden

  • How to Create an Organic Container using Herbs, Flowers and Roses

    Your Easy Garden Team
    2 Sep 2015 | 1:26 pm
    Dave Epstein of Growing Wisdom shows us that creating an organic container using herbs, flowers and roses is easier than you think! Container gardens are a great for patios, porches, and other small urban garden settings.  If you have any questions about starting your own organic container leave a comment below and the Your Easy Garden Team from Tesselaar Plants will be happy to help!
  • Easy-to-Make Root View Box

    Kristen Blaker
    17 Aug 2015 | 8:06 am
    Teaching young children the magic of growing and sharing with them the experience of eating food they have grown straight from the garden is one of my passions. For the youngest gardeners, what’s actually going on under the ground is quite a mystery. To uncover the mystery and make the process super simple to understand, we made root view boxes. The children found it amazing to see what really happens underneath the ground as plants grow. Although this is ideally a  great project to do during summer vacation, you can do it any time of the year – indoors or out – with a few seeds.
  • Daylilies – One of the Easiest Perennials to Grow

    Judie Brower
    16 Aug 2015 | 3:10 pm
    7 varieties of daylilies along with Flower Carpet roses and Volcano phlox add a riot of color to this Vermont cottage garden. Daylilies are one of the most versatile, forgiving, and easy-to-grow perennials available. They thrive in USDA Zones 4-9 and tolerate droughts, floods, neglect, construction projects and more . . . and still come back year after year! That’s not to say they don’t need some care, but with a little effort you can fill your flower beds or landscape with a long-blooming perennial that pairs nicely with lower-growing roses like Flower Carpet and contrasts beautifully…
  • Easy Fairy Garden Terrariums for Kids

    Kristen Blaker
    8 Aug 2015 | 6:42 am
    Miniature Fairy Garden are easy to make using recycled soda bottles At Hiland Hall Gardens, we love to foster children’s natural curiosity about the natural world. A fun project that encapsulates this feeling is creating small garden rooms in terrariums made out of recycled containers. What you need for each garden: • a clear 2 liter bottle cut in half • 2 cups of small pebbles or rocks • sphagnum moss • large bowl or bucket of potting soil • seeds (we used watercress but lettuce or other small seeds will work) • plant cuttings (we used rosemary for extra scent but lavender or…
  • How to extend the bloom season for your phlox

    admin
    4 Aug 2015 | 1:11 pm
    Volcano phlox are real blooming machines, but if you “deadhead” them, they’ll bloom even longer!
 
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    The Mini Garden Guru - Your Miniature Garden Source

  • Miniature Garden Ideas

    Janit Calvo
    29 Aug 2015 | 2:20 pm
    Miniature Garden Ideas & Fairy Garden Ideas, New Videos! A couple of new videos with a few miniature garden ideas and fairy garden ideas from your fellow miniature gardeners at TwoGreenThumbs.com, America’s Favorite Miniature Garden Center. Miniature Garden Ideas: Fairy Garden Ideas Like this? Are you serious about miniature gardening? Join us here: http://www.TwoGreenThumbs.com for […]
  • Photography Tips for Miniature Gardens and Fairy Gardens

    Janit Calvo
    20 Aug 2015 | 2:49 pm
    Photography Tips for Miniature Gardens and Fairy Gardens Welcome to the dog daze of summah! This time of year often brings fleeting moments of reflection as we see the subtle signs of the changes of the season coming soon. The odd breeze that feels a little cooler, the late summer sunflowers doing their thing or […]
  • It’s a Miniature Garden and Fairy Garden Round-Up!

    Janit Calvo
    7 Aug 2015 | 10:54 am
    It’s a Miniature Garden and Fairy Garden Round-Up! Ah, summah! It is my favorite time of year. Things slow down a bit, there is still lots of daylight left to enjoy the evenings and the warm weather makes easier living, no worries about being cold and wet. How is that for optimism as we are in […]
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    Lunar Home and Garden

  • Tip for Moon in Sagittarius ~ Altars and Shrines

    CJ Wright
    24 Aug 2015 | 8:00 am
    Jupiter is associated with all things of a religious nature ~ the clergy, religious texts, priests and priestesses, altars and shrines. Moon in Sagittarius days are especially well-suited to working on personal altars or shrines you may have in your home. There are many types of altars ~ altars honoring ancestors, those for daily devotionals, […]
  • Home and Self-Care Tips for Virgo ~ Color | Redux

    CJ Wright
    23 Aug 2015 | 8:15 am
    The post was originally written in April of 2012 and is always one of LH&G’s most popular posts. Since we’re entering Virgo today I thought I’d repost it. The effects of color on our psyche and mood is well documented. Perhaps there’s a clue or two about how using these colors in your home or […]
  • The Power of the Pluto Trine in Home Repair

    CJ Wright
    20 Aug 2015 | 2:49 pm
    Here’s a little anecdote about the power of the trine, a 90° angle between planets’ zodiacal positions which almost always points toward ease. Anytime Pluto aspects your Moon, expect some kind of repairs to the home. And anytime Pluto is involved, believe me, you want trines! You want it as easy as it comes. Pluto […]
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    Organic Gardening Tips - Smiling Gardener

  • Intensive Planting - Get More Plants In The Same Area

    29 Aug 2015 | 5:00 am
    Intensive planting vs. other methods Biointensive gardening advocates for intensive planting. When you position your plants close together, you can grow more food in a smaller area. Plus, the plants will blanket the soil, decreasing weed growth, erosion, and soil evaporation.
  • How Much Of Your Garden Should Be Food Plants?

    14 Aug 2015 | 9:00 pm
    Link to my medicinal plants list If you’re trying to grow most of your own calories, it makes sense to grow calorie-dense food, which especially points to root crops such as potatoes and parsnips. When growing biointensively, 30% of the land is often allocated for this. With 60% of land going to ‘carbon’ and 30% going to ‘calorie’ crops, that leaves just 10% for vegetables.
  • Biointensive Cover Cropping To Be Self Sustainable

    31 Jul 2015 | 9:00 pm
    Link to my other cover cropping video Many of us get our compost materials from elsewhere, perhaps the garden center or a local farmer. And that's okay. Most of us are gardening on the side, doing other work that enables us to purchase these inputs, thus helping out the person we’re buying them from. If a garden store or farmer is selling or giving away straw or manure, you’re helping them out my buying or taking it, so I have no problem with this. But if we want to be truly self sustainable, we should be growing our own compost materials.
  • Biointensive Composting To Improve Soil Fertility

    17 Jul 2015 | 9:00 pm
    Link to my other composting video The main biointensive method for improving soil fertility is to use compost. The purpose of compost is to bring beneficial organisms and nutrients into the soil, as well as improving water-holding capacity, drainage and aeration, among other things.
  • Double Digging Garden Beds To Improve Soil Health

    3 Jul 2015 | 9:00 pm
    Link to my other double digging video When following biointensive gardening principles, the way to relieve compaction, improve drainage and promote deeper root growth is by double digging garden beds. If you’re on especially sandy soil, you might be able to skip it. I’m on clay, which is why I double dig a couple of beds each spring for my potatoes. By moving my potatoes every year, it ensures each part of my garden will get double dug at some point. It's hard work, but it makes a nice bed. Here's how to do it (Academy members, we cover this in month 1 along with many other aspects of…
 
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    Sow and So

  • Sow and So Sunflower Competition 2015

    Laila Noort
    31 Aug 2015 | 10:44 am
    The first signs that summer will soon be over are here. Some of the veggies in the garden are past their prime and so are some of the flowers. The sunflowers have reached their maximum height so it is time to announce this year’s winner of the Sow and So Sunflower Competition 2015. Contestants As you may or may not know, for the last two years our friend Michael Dahl has been the winner of our sunflower competition. Will he win again? Will he win three years in a row? Let’s find out! We have had some wonderful responses from our readers, some placed photos on our Sow and so…
  • R is for Remontant – Word Up!

    Bridget Elahcene
    30 Aug 2015 | 5:02 am
    Remontant \rɪˈmɒnt(ə)nt\ Some plants have a second flush of flowers and are termed ‘remontant’. The second display is usually slightly inferior to the first. Lupin is a good example. The post R is for Remontant – Word Up! appeared first on Sow and So.
  • Dill Flowers – Wordless Wednesday

    Laila Noort
    25 Aug 2015 | 9:44 pm
    The post Dill Flowers – Wordless Wednesday appeared first on Sow and So.
  • Q is for Quilled – Word Up!

    Bridget Elahcene
    20 Aug 2015 | 10:44 pm
    Quilled \kwɪl\ A term used to describe leaves or petals which are tubular (rolled) for much of their length. Cactus dahlias (see picture) are a good example. The post Q is for Quilled – Word Up! appeared first on Sow and So.
  • Cox’s Orange Pippin – Wordless Wednesday

    Laila Noort
    19 Aug 2015 | 11:05 am
    The post Cox’s Orange Pippin – Wordless Wednesday appeared first on Sow and So.
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    The Hortiholic

  • Inteview with a Veggie Veteran

    Tony Fulmer
    28 Aug 2015 | 7:08 am
    Scott T., Veggie GuruAs August winds down it may be tempting to think the only thing left to do in the veggie garden is harvest. Don't overlook planting "cool season" crops, says my favorite vegetable collaborator, Scott Thalmann.Scott is a retired policeman, working at Chalet, 2 suburbs north of Chicago. Scott's recommendations are based on 43 years of experience. His main garden is 28 x 28', with a 6 x 8' plot just outside his back door for easy harvest of salad greens. His vegetable garden was featured in Chicagoland Gardening magazine in 2006. He's been helping aspiring veggie…
  • The "Key" to Seeding a Better Lawn

    Tony Fulmer
    7 Aug 2015 | 11:46 am
    Spring has sprung, but fall hasn't fallen as far as lawn renovation goes. People are often surprised to learn that mid-August through mid-September is the very best time of year in northern Illinois to seed for a better lawn.Why is it the best time? Because our dominant lawn grasses, Kentucky Blue (for sun) and fescues (for partial shade) are cool season grasses. They flourish in the cooler conditions of spring and fall. They slow growth or go dormant in extreme heat and/or summer drought unless we irrigate. Fall also means dramatically less weed competition for newly seeded lawns than…
  • Plant Buzz Words

    Tony Fulmer
    29 Jul 2015 | 4:37 am
    I recently attended a great horticultural conference in Columbus, Ohio. I was fascinated with some dry erase boards that had been put up for passers-by to graffiti their response to several questions. To be sure, the attendees were all plant geeks enthusiasts. Anyway, the responses were totally positive and some almost spiritual. "Plants make me feel: complete/at peace/connected to God" and "Plants are important because: they transform me." Pretty moving stuff, wouldn't you agree?I started thinking about how some people new to gardening might fill in those blanks. I know people that…
  • Plant Life-Saving 101

    Tony Fulmer
    25 Jun 2015 | 8:52 pm
    Soggy soil and rotting rootsIt's an understatement to say that spring rainfall has been more than adequate. This year even the River birches and willows are looking longingly toward higher, drier soil. While you can't stop Mother Nature there are actions to take to save plants after the recent downpours:1) It seems obvious, but do override the in-ground sprinkler system. When air spaces in soil are full of water rather than oxygen, roots become stressed, roots may die. Even lawns, with their comparatively shallow root systems, have had enough for the time being. Save the water, save the…
  • Dahlia Do's and Don'ts

    Tony Fulmer
    2 May 2015 | 6:56 pm
    Flowers, like celebrities, can have cyclical popularity. Based on the volume of customer questions, dahlias are the smokin' hot plant right now. Never grown them? Check them out at your local garden center and prepare to be dazzled.   A wealth of choicesHybridizers have expanded the range of flower and plant sizes, colors and flower forms so there's a dahlia for every taste. It's pretty darned cool to watch a quarter-sized bud open into an 8" (or larger) flower later in the summer! Yep, I'm in awe of big ole' dinnerplate dahlias.Here are a few tips for success from my experience growing…
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    guzmansgreenhouse.com

  • How to make Crape Myrtles bloom all summer long

    Paul Guzman
    18 Aug 2015 | 6:25 am
    I love Crape Myrtles so many bright long lasting blooms for color throughout the Southwest. Did you know you can extend the blooming time of Crape Myrtles.  Most gardening folks think they will bloom one time and that’s it.  But you can make them bloom 2-3 times throughout the summer months. How do you prune … Continue reading How to make Crape Myrtles bloom all summer long The post How to make Crape Myrtles bloom all summer long appeared first on .
  • Plants that Bloom in Mid Summer

    Paul Guzman
    7 Jul 2015 | 6:46 am
    The Tuscorora Crape Myrtle. Is this gorgeous or what?  Bright, dark pink blooms that will last about 4-6 weeks.  Dead head the expired blooms during the summer season for an extra shot of blooms again.  Plants that Bloom in Mid Summer   Red Verbena – Bright red blooms that will last all summer long.  They … Continue reading Plants that Bloom in Mid Summer The post Plants that Bloom in Mid Summer appeared first on .
  • The Difference Between Bird of Paradise Plants

    Paul Guzman
    22 May 2015 | 5:22 am
    Recently many folks have been asking our staff and myself what the difference between the following Bird of Paradise Plants. Red Bird of Paradise Yellow Bird of Paradise Mexican Bird of Paradise Bird of Paradise So…without further ado here are those differences Red Bird of Paradise Botanical name – Caesalpinia pulcherrima: The Red bird of … Continue reading The Difference Between Bird of Paradise Plants The post The Difference Between Bird of Paradise Plants appeared first on .
  • Plants to help clean and filter indoor pollution

    Paul Guzman
    27 Apr 2015 | 9:38 am
    Is your home or office environment void of indoor plants?  Did you know there are hundreds of plants that help clean and filter out indoor pollution.  The EPA blog says plants can help reduce chemical toxins indoors. Materials such as treated wood, glues, paints, varnishes and a multitude of other household materials give out a … Continue reading Plants to help clean and filter indoor pollution The post Plants to help clean and filter indoor pollution appeared first on .
  • Unusual Indoor Houseplants

    Paul Guzman
    8 Feb 2015 | 1:39 pm
    Fabian Aralia – Polyscias scutellaria This is a great plant for small sized pots.  The root system is small thus only needs occasional watering.  It resembles a stump with round foliage. Use a bonsai pot for a great looking Bonsai indoor plant. I would suggest water once maybe twice per month.  Make sure to keep … Continue reading Unusual Indoor Houseplants The post Unusual Indoor Houseplants appeared first on .
 
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    Primrose Blog

  • Top 10 Blogs for Gardening Tips

    Primrose
    2 Sep 2015 | 2:53 am
    My Tiny Plot Gillian Carson talks through some great ideas for how to make the most of every corner of your garden or allotment, from home growing (and eating!) to creating gorgeous photo spots. She has some great recipes to try out such as banana cake and simple red currant jam, which offer some great inspiration when deciding on things to grow yourself. Emma the Gardener Emma Cooper shares a variety of fantastic garden related content from photos, videos, reviews to even her very own books. She has a great enthusiasm for sustainable living and gives advice on how to achieve this, with a…
  • The Strangest Things People Bury In Their Garden

    Primrose
    2 Sep 2015 | 1:19 am
    Have you ever buried something in your back garden? Ever stashed away anything secret as a child, laid a loved one to rest, or wanted to cover up something best forgotten..? 51% of people have, according to a survey we conducted. We’re a nation of animal lovers, so it doesn’t come as too much of a surprise that out of everything that was buried something, 77% were pets: 26% cats 18% dogs 9% birds 8% rabbits 7% fish 5% guinea pigs 27% undisclosed And even a deer that was found by the roadside. Perhaps cats are easier to lay into the ground than dogs. Or most people take the…
  • Stop the Spider Invasion!

    Primrose
    28 Aug 2015 | 7:44 am
    Experts say that “the number of giant house spiders creeping into UK homes is set to rise after the hot wet summer weather”. (BBC News, 22.08.15 – we’d link you to the article, but it’s full of graphic spider pictures!) Our PestBye™ Advanced Spider Repellent clears your whole house through ultrasonic sounds and electromagnetic waves and carries a 45 day no quibble money back guarantee. – Cat works in the marketing team and is responsible for online marketing, social media and the newsletter. She spends most of her time reading about a variety of…
  • The Definitive Guide For Colourful Gardens All Year Round

    Primrose
    20 Aug 2015 | 4:31 am
    You can have a colourful garden with flowers blooming all year round – just use our simple guide! Knowing what to plant, when to plant it and where it grows best can be a tricky business. But if you want a colourful garden for every season, all you really need to get dug in are the flowering times. So we’ve created this infographic as a handy visual guide for when flowers bloom. Simply pick the plants for each season that will suit the conditions best in your garden. Then you’ll be sure to have luscious planting whichever time of year! Embed this on your site primrose.co.uk…
  • How to Repot Your Plants: 3 Simple Steps

    Primrose
    18 Aug 2015 | 2:35 am
    There comes a time when most plants will outgrow their pots. You may notice the flowers beginning to wilt or roots poking through the bottom of the pot. This means it’s time for the plant to move. Here are three easy steps to repot your plant, along with a few pictures from our own attempts with the office plants at Primrose! 1. Prepare the new pot When you know your plant is ready for a bigger home, make sure it’s well watered – this will help to ease it out. Choose a new pot that’s bigger than the old one. Line the bottom of the pot with a layer of compost and dampen…
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    Urban Gardens

  • Reclaiming Urban Spaces: Modular Micro-City On Parisian Bridge

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    2 Sep 2015 | 1:42 pm
    Parisian Architect Stéphane Malka addresses the economic inequities inherent in urbanization in a concept that reimagines how people might live in today’s mobile world–in this case, hanging off the side of the Pont Neuf bridge in Paris. Malka thinks people … Read More... The post Reclaiming Urban Spaces: Modular Micro-City On Parisian Bridge appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Fiskars Project Orange Thumb Grant Recipient: Washington Shores Community Garden

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    29 Aug 2015 | 3:09 pm
    Since we posted earlier about the Fiskars Project Orange Thumb community gardens grant program, thirty grant recipients in the U.S. and Canada have begun using their awards to bring their garden plans to fruition. One of those grant recipients was … Read More... The post Fiskars Project Orange Thumb Grant Recipient: Washington Shores Community Garden appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Bioclimatic Garden Building Promotes Biodiversity

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    22 Aug 2015 | 5:33 pm
    Photo: © Javier García Part of a plan to promote biodiversity and protect the surrounding environment in the South American city of Cali. Colombia, the multi-use Host and Nectar Garden Building also seeks to establish a network of gardeners … Read More... The post Bioclimatic Garden Building Promotes Biodiversity appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Life, Shelter, and Nature: Contemporary Interpretations of the Sukkah

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    20 Aug 2015 | 10:01 am
    Italian Gianluca Pelizza’s Desert Veil, a wood-framed cube roofed with olive branches. The Kehilla Residential Programme’s annual Sukkahville Design Competition invites architects, students, artists, builders and design professionals to submit design proposals for the design and construction of a contemporary … Read More... The post Life, Shelter, and Nature: Contemporary Interpretations of the Sukkah appeared first on Urban Gardens.
  • Self-Watering Modular and Magnetic “Connect a Pot” Planters

    Robin Plaskoff Horton
    19 Aug 2015 | 10:00 am
    For those of us who have downsized to smaller digs where space is at a premium, there’s a new self-watering modular pot system for growing plants, herbs and flowers indoors in compact areas. Connect a Pot fits well into the … Read More... The post Self-Watering Modular and Magnetic “Connect a Pot” Planters appeared first on Urban Gardens.
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    Grow Our Way

  • How to Prune Tomato Plants

    Safer® Brand
    25 Aug 2015 | 4:27 am
    Are your tomato plants becoming large, unruly, and disease-ridden? It might be time to prune. Pruning is the delicate process of removing certain leaves or stems in order to grow larger, more flavorful tomatoes and reduce the plant’s chances of disease or insect damage. While pruning isn’t absolutely necessary, it does ensure all the nutrients go to the plant’s fruit and not to growing more branches and leaves. There are two main types of tomato plants: 1) Indeterminate Tomatoes, which will continue to grow and produce fruit until stopped by cold weather. These types of tomato plants…
  • Easiest Vegetables to Grow

    Safer® Brand
    6 Aug 2015 | 8:00 am
    “What should I plant in my garden?” Your garden might be blooming already with squash, peppers and peas but this question is always at the back of your mind. The hundreds of possibilities can be daunting, especially to beginner gardeners. Perhaps your busy life has left little time for gardening so you just want the easiest plants to take care of. If you’re looking for some garden inspiration, browse this list of the easiest vegetables, fruits, and herbs to grow. Below we’ve broken down the list even further for those who want the easiest plants to grow from seed, to keep in a pot…
  • How to Kill Weeds Naturally [Video]

    Safer® Brand
    2 Aug 2015 | 7:23 am
    Are weeds choking your garden or invading your lawn? Pulling weeds one by one is usually the task gardeners hate most. Many homeowners revert to using harmful chemicals to get rid of those pesky plants, but there are other all-natural weed killers that are better for the environment and your family. Many of them you can even find around your home! Watch the video below on how to kill weeds naturally and ways to keep weeds from growing in the future. All-Natural Weed Killer Prevention is key for a happy weed-less lawn and garden. Buy clean lawn seed and compost when first getting your yard…
  • 24 Amazing Benefits and Uses of Neem Oil for Plants

    Safer® Brand
    29 Jul 2015 | 4:15 am
    When searching for a safe and effective product to control insects and disease in your lawn and garden, look no further than neem oil. It’s a powerful organic solution to your most difficult-to-manage infestations. What is neem oil? Neem oil is a natural byproduct of the neem tree. The oil is harvested from the trees’ seeds and leaves. While it has been used as natural pesticide for hundreds of years, you’ll also find it in many products you use in your home, including: -Cosmetics -Toothpastes -Dog shampoo -Soaps People in India have been using the neem leaf for its medicinal properties…
  • 20 Common Tomato Plant Problems and How to Fix Them

    Safer® Brand
    14 Jul 2015 | 12:30 pm
    If you’re one of the three million people who planted a home garden this year, you’re most likely growing tomatoes. Nine out of 10 gardeners grow tomatoes, and that number would be 10 out of 10 if the holdouts would taste a fresh garden tomato and compare it to a grocery store purchase. Nothing beats the taste of a fresh home-grown tomato! Many gardeners who grow tomatoes, however, are frustrated with the progress of their plants. The plant may not set fruit. Or your tomatoes may ripen, but have ugly, spongy black spots at the bottom. Worse still, your plants may look great in the evening…
 
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    Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden

  • Painting with Petals

    Kristin Thoroman
    2 Sep 2015 | 1:13 pm
    One thing you can bet on during late summer is that we will have a riot of color in the Children’s Garden.  Another thing you can bet on is that we will have a gaggle of kids in WaterPlay trying to cool off! With cooler temperatures and lower humidity this summer it has been exciting to […] The post Painting with Petals appeared first on Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden.
  • Read Botanical Books with Us

    Janet Woody
    1 Sep 2015 | 4:05 am
    They say the Internet and e-readers will kill printed books — and libraries — but it turns out neither is true.   The Garden has a thriving book group centered in the library. Every two months, a group of book lovers get together in the reading room of the Lora Robins Library and discuss the latest title on […] The post Read Botanical Books with Us appeared first on Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden.
  • On Becoming A Butterfly

    Hilaire Ashworth
    28 Aug 2015 | 10:01 am
    Butterflies go through several stages of metamorphosis before becoming the adult butterfly that we all know and love. Since we currently have a special nursery for monarch (Danaus plexippus) butterflies located in the back of the exhibit, I thought it would be a good time to tell you about their development. There are four main […] The post On Becoming A Butterfly appeared first on Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden.
  • Pollinators: Bee Friendly

    Lynn Kirk
    27 Aug 2015 | 4:05 am
    The status of pollinators is sad, but true: America is losing pollinators at a remarkable rate. Pollinators are honeybees, wild bees, beetles, wasps, butterflies and moths, as well as birds and bats that transfer pollen in and between flowers of the same species. The efforts typically lead to fertilization for seed and fruit production, which directly […] The post Pollinators: Bee Friendly appeared first on Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden.
  • Meet Intern Will Eichenberger

    Nicki Apostolow
    25 Aug 2015 | 3:38 am
    On his first day of work as an intern, Will Eichenberger helped water a honeybee hive — something many high-schoolers would find daunting. But Will, though visually impaired, went about the task with aplomb. Will, a rising junior from Charlottesville, Va., joined the Garden as an intern in a partnership with the Virginia Rehabilitation Center […] The post Meet Intern Will Eichenberger appeared first on Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden.
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    The Horticult

  • High-Rises and Hydrangeas: The Landscape Designers of Harrison Green on Creating Elegant Urban Gardens

    Chantal Aida Gordon
    27 Aug 2015 | 3:00 am
    Thanks to places like the High Line and NYBG, thanks to community gardens and all those parks, New York is — in our opinion — one of the most exciting places to commune with plants.… ► The post High-Rises and Hydrangeas: The Landscape Designers of Harrison Green on Creating Elegant Urban Gardens appeared first on The Horticult.
  • Fuchsia Fanatics: The Fancy Plants of Late Summer

    Chantal Aida Gordon
    20 Aug 2015 | 3:00 am
    Not a whole lot’s blooming in our garden (now that our passion flowers are giving way to passionfruit!) — with one silky exception.… ► The post Fuchsia Fanatics: The Fancy Plants of Late Summer appeared first on The Horticult.
  • Going Super Vertical: How to Build a Copper Pipe Trellis (Without Soldering)

    Ryan Benoit
    14 Aug 2015 | 3:00 am
    This year we’ve been going up…up…and UP. For a few reasons: we’ve run out of horizontal space in our small 1,700-square-foot garden, and we needed a tall structure for one of our favorite young plants, Passiflora edulis, to climb and bask in the afternoon sun.… ► The post Going Super Vertical: How to Build a Copper Pipe Trellis (Without Soldering) appeared first on The Horticult.
  • Desert Meets Dada: Exploring the Outdoor Art of Noah Purifoy (in Joshua Tree and Beyond)

    Chantal Aida Gordon
    6 Aug 2015 | 10:30 am
    When artist Noah Purifoy — legendary for his assemblage sculpture — moved to Joshua Tree from Los Angeles in 1989, the yucca-, cholla- and sagebrush-dotted landscape became his gallery space.… ► The post Desert Meets Dada: Exploring the Outdoor Art of Noah Purifoy (in Joshua Tree and Beyond) appeared first on The Horticult.
  • Makes Scents: Visit Eric Buterbaugh’s Fragrant New L.A. Digs

    Chantal Aida Gordon
    30 Jul 2015 | 3:00 am
    Florist Eric Buterbaugh is the man who keeps Hollywood in stems. Opulent, modern and rosy, his designs are how fashion and entertainment’s top names (Valentino, Gwyneth, Vuitton) say things like thank you, congrats and let’s party.… ► The post Makes Scents: Visit Eric Buterbaugh’s Fragrant New L.A. Digs appeared first on The Horticult.
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    Grow Up Hydrogarden

  • Businesses Make Committed Efforts to Improving the Environment

    Amanda Kuhn
    11 Aug 2015 | 8:00 pm
    Mendi Falk, the director of Living Green in Tel Aviv, has put much effort into creating a fresher and greener environment.Their Green in the City project wants to utilize hydroponics as a way to incorporate agriculture into dense urban environments. Recently, restaurant patrons have been noticing a new and vast difference in taste when it comes to eating out. The product is fresh Some restaurantsRead More
  • What to Plant in August

    Erika Raia
    4 Aug 2015 | 7:31 am
    Summer is winding down but don’t put your garden away just yet! August is a great month to start your garden or refresh your hydrogarden. If you live up north, you will want to focus on fast growing crops like arugula, beets or cabbage. In the south, you can continue to grow herbs, lettuce, beets, beans, cucumbers and more. We recommend starter plants that youRead More
  • Hydroponics vs. Aquaponics? Does One Triumph the Other?

    Amanda Kuhn
    22 Jul 2015 | 4:52 am
    Sustainable farming is one in the same, but the question remains between which method is actually better. Hydroponics or Aquaponics? Hydroponics, which essentially means “water works”, is the process of growing plants in sand, gravel or liquid with added nutrients but without soil. Aquaponics essentially integrates the technology used in hydroponics but uses the method of growing crops and fish together in re-circulating systems. BothRead More
  • DIY Home Remedies Grown In Your Hydrogarden

    Amanda Kuhn
    30 Jun 2015 | 9:27 am
    Nowadays, women are all about the “do it yourself” movement. If you can do it why can’t we? This is a question that women in particular have been asking for years. Daily beauty remedies have reached a peak in pricing in todays society now more than ever. But thanks to outlets such as Pinterest, Women’s Day and Instagram, women have now been blessed with theRead More
  • Take a Trip With Your Hydrogarden

    Amanda Kuhn
    2 Jun 2015 | 10:40 am
    With summer right around the corner its easy to get distracted by all the fun activities going on around you. I find that I am much more prone to forgetting or thinking about what to plant in my hydrogarden. If you’re feeling adventurous, why not embrace a culture change and plant culturally specific produce that compliments particular ethnic cuisines? You can try an Italian gardenRead More
 
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    No Soil Solutions

  • Finding A Hydroponic Resevoir

    nosoilsolutions
    28 Aug 2015 | 7:25 pm
     Finding the right hydroponic reservoir is only as hard as you make it.  You don’t have to go out and spend a bunch of money and you may already have a few items around your house that you could make into a hydroponic reservoir, depending on your garden setup.  When selecting a hydroponic reservoir you The post Finding A Hydroponic Resevoir appeared first on No Soil Solutions.
  • Making A Hydroponic Reservoir Drain

    nosoilsolutions
    14 Jul 2015 | 9:39 pm
    There’s are a couple good reasons why it’s good idea to make a drain for your hydroponic reservoir. Since light produces algae growth, the hydroponic reservoir should be dark so no light will penetrate through. This creates the problem of not being able to able to see the water level of the nutrient solution. You will have The post Making A Hydroponic Reservoir Drain appeared first on No Soil Solutions.
  • 6 Ways To Keep Your Hydroponic Nutrient Solution Cool

    nosoilsolutions
    3 Apr 2015 | 7:53 pm
    The temperature of your hydroponic nutrient solution is not something that should be overlooked. Too cold and roots will not form, the plant will grow slow and maybe die. Hydroponic nutrient solution that is too hot does not hold oxygen your plants need and can cause stress to your garden. Hydroponic nutrient solution should be The post 6 Ways To Keep Your Hydroponic Nutrient Solution Cool appeared first on No Soil Solutions.
  • Choosing Quality Seeds for Your Garden

    nosoilsolutions
    8 Feb 2015 | 2:26 pm
    Often times the importance of using quality seeds are overlooked when gardening. Choosing quality seed for your garden may be one of the least expensive aspects of your hydroponic garden but is just as important as quality nutrients and grow environment. Many gardeners are gardening for the fun, for more healthy produce, and also quality. The post Choosing Quality Seeds for Your Garden appeared first on No Soil Solutions.
  • Using Rockwool For Seed Germination

    nosoilsolutions
    7 Dec 2014 | 10:44 pm
    Rockwool is a popular starter medium that has been used a long time with hydroponics. Smaller rockwool cubes are used for cuttings or seed germination and then transplanted into hydroponic systems. Larger cubes or slabs can be used to grow larger plants. It works well as a grow medium because it’s great at both maintaining The post Using Rockwool For Seed Germination appeared first on No Soil Solutions.
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    O'Connors Lawn Equipment

  • September Lawn And Garden Tips

    Verenice Torres
    1 Sep 2015 | 8:57 am
    Lawn Prevent henbit & poa annua with pre –emergence. Plant fescue and rye grasses late September & October. ( Do not apply pre – emergence where planting fescue or rye). Fertilize by September 15th. Water Bermuda grass 1” & fescue 2” week. Garden Spray pecan trees. Apply borer killer to trunks of infested trees. Fertilize azaleas, camellias, dogwoods. etc, with acid fertilizer to set more buds for spring blooms. Do not prune any spring flowering shrubs. Plant mums, pansies, and kale when cool. Treat webworms with BT or Malathion. Wrap young then barked trees with tree…
  • August Lawn And Garden Tips

    Verenice Torres
    1 Aug 2015 | 8:55 am
    Lawn Apply pre – emergence weed control for fall. Make early heavy grub applications & water deep. Fertilize bermuda grass with O’Connor’s. Mow Bermuda grass 2 – 2 ½ “ high. Garden Plant fall vegetables Divide iris, peonies, & day liles. Spray fall webworm with BT or Malathion. ( 2 & 3 year pine needles will drop) Check for caterpillars, aphids, and spidermites, thrips, scale, & boxelder bugs. Discontinue dead – heading roses by mid August. Flowering trees & shrubs must receive abundant water for the next 6 to 8 weeks to perform next spring. The post August…
  • July Lawn And Garden Tips

    Verenice Torres
    1 Jul 2015 | 8:32 am
    Lawn Fertilize Bermuda grass with O’Connor’s. Never remove more then 1/3 of grass or shrubs. Mow fescue at 3” (do not fertilize it!) Sharpen mower blade after 30 hrs. of use. Clean filter and check oil regularly. Use fresh gas, preferably no – ethanol. Continue to water grass and mow tall. Garden Keep old flowers trimmed off annuals, perennials, & roses. Prune to shape. Note: Aphids cause sticky honeydew, pine tip moth are laying eggs. Trim back mums by mid – July & fertilize. Prune & fertilize strawberries. Water most plants 1 ½ “ per week. Water newly planted trees…
  • June Lawn And Garden Tips

    Verenice Torres
    1 Jun 2015 | 8:27 am
    Lawn Fertilize Bermuda grass with O’Connor’s. Do not fertilize fescue or rye! Apply 2nd application of pre – emergence for late germinating crabgrass. Spray MSMA on grassy weeds. Water 1 ½ “, mow common Bermuda 1 ½ “ high. Mow fescue 3” high, Hydrid Bermuda ¾ “ high. Garden Prune shrubs as needed for lanky spring growth. Prune lower limbs of trees. Remove old flower spikes. Fertilize shade trees and shrubs. Add Iron / Sulphur. Watch for red spider on tomatoes & evergreens. Spray web worm larvae. The post June Lawn And Garden Tips appeared first on O'Connors Lawn…
  • May Lawn And Garden Tips

    Verenice Torres
    1 May 2015 | 8:18 am
    Lawn Plant Bermuda grass & warm season grass. ( you can sod or seed) Fertilize Bermuda grass with O’Connor’s. Water to 6” deep (early morning) Mow hybrid bermuda ½ – ¾ “ high. Mow common Bermuda 1 ½ – 2” high. Mow fescue 1 ½ – 3” high. Address emerging weeds. Garden Plant heat tolerant plants: bougainvilleas, hibiscus, cherille, lantanas, rose, moss, daises, celosia. Vegetables: sweet potatoes, okra melons. Spray evergreens for bag worms, lace bugs. Treat elms for elm – leaf beetle. Mulch 2 – 3” deep. The post May Lawn And Garden Tips appeared first…
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    Garden Buildings Direct Blog

  • 5 Do-It-Yourself Pet Beds Made from Recycled Materials

    Lennard Canilao
    28 Aug 2015 | 2:35 am
    You are a pet lover par excellence. Nothing gives you the taste of happiness and comfort quite like your cuddly Shih Tzu or your equally-adorable Himalayan cat. When you are in the office, besides stressing over the herculean tasks your superior always bombard you with, there are moments when you think about your pets, how they are doing, and how long you will have to wait before you can give them a big hug and provide them with what they need and then some. As if that’s not enough, you always go out of your way to check if they have already eaten or are far from any impending danger. Part…
  • Children at Play: 10 Playhouse Games for Your Kids

    Lennard Canilao
    19 Aug 2015 | 4:23 am
    You know what they say about raising kids? “Children are made readers on the laps of their parents.” Kids are probably the best gifts one can ever have. And admit it, you can’t even begin to describe the feeling you get when you come home from work and you are welcomed by your kids’ sweet hugs and kisses, and they do this without any tinge of mischief or naughtiness.   The Good: Children are always likened to angels so much so that they are seen as the metaphoric light at the end of the dark tunnel. When they smile—and most of the time they do this for no reason at all—it’s…
  • 15 Crazy Things That Happened In A Garden Shed

    Lennard Canilao
    29 Jul 2015 | 11:58 pm
    Most people use their garden sheds to store tools and equipment. But some people decide to use their sheds for unusual purposes as the following examples show: 1. Man Cave • Josh Carr fitted a bar, pool table, TV and dart board in his “man cave”. • It has uPVC doors and windows and features a decked patio area outside. 2. Nuclear Reactor • At 17, David Hahn built a homemade nuclear reactor in his parents’ garden shed. • The EPA had to clean up his home and car as it contained a lot of radioactive material. 3. Micro Shed on Wheels • Colin Edmondson built a “micro” shed…
  • 5 Tips For Protecting Your Wood Shed From Pests

    Maria Karla Salinas
    23 Apr 2015 | 5:53 am
    A wooden shed in a garden can give awesome storage room to putting away wood and different materials. Consequently, wood is the most favored material for building sheds since it improves the greenhouse environment. Nevertheless, a wooden shed can get to be home to a considerable measure of nuisances and termites which sustain themselves from the wood inside the shed winding up harming the wood. Along these lines, here are a few tips to help you shield your wood shed from vermin and other undesirable visitors. 1. Use Insecticides The most fundamental approach to shield your wood shed from…
  • Most Effective Methods to Check your Garden Shed for Leaks

    Maria Karla Salinas
    15 Apr 2015 | 12:58 am
    While puddles and wet supplies may tip you off to the way that your shed has a hole, it is regularly not that simple to recognize a break. On the off chance that you aren’t consistently utilizing the shed it can be barely noticeable a hole, so it’s a smart thought to check occasionally to check whether water is getting in any place. Over the long haul, water inside a shed will harm whatever is inside it and can likewise cause harm to the shed itself. Strategy 1: Checking for Leaks 1. Look out for staining. To check for holes, you’ll have to pay special mind to staining within…
 
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    A Garden for All

  • Tiger Eyes

    Kathy
    2 Sep 2015 | 6:00 am
    Tiger Eye Sumac’s lemony yellow foliage (photo by: Kathy Diemer) Rhus typhina ‘Bailtiger,’ otherwise known as Tiger Eye sumac, was a happy accident resulting from an unexpected mutation of its larger cousin, Rhus typhina ‘Laciniata’.  This sizzling specimen was first discovered by Bailey Nursery in 1985, and since then Tiger Eye has been making its way into gardens all across the U.S.   Rightfully so.  Once you’ve set eyes on the dazzling velvety-fern foliage burning like a flame in the landscape, you’ll be hooked-line and sinker.  Don’t wait…
  • Pruning Perennials

    Kathy
    26 Aug 2015 | 6:00 am
    Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’ along fence (photo: Kathy Diemer) Many of our taller, late blooming perennials are prone to flopping or collapsing under the assault of harsh summer wind and rain, and if you’re like me you don’t have the time (or the inclination) to go about staking everything. But there is an option that works quite well if done at the right time; pruning your perennials.  Candidates like ironweed, joe pie weed, tall varieties of rudbeckia, helianthus, phlox, and bee balm will bounce back from a pretty hard pruning and still produce gorgeous flowers…
  • Pye in the Sky

    Kathy
    19 Aug 2015 | 6:00 am
    Native Eupatorium and American cranberry (photo by: Kathy Diemer) I bet you thought I forgot the last in the sequence of “E-Series” plants; instead, I was waiting for the opportune moment to brag about this final one!  For those new to my blog, the first two “E-Series” plants (fabulous favorites that start with an E, using a pun from the auto industry for the E-Series Mercedes model) are Echinops (globe thistle) and Eryngium (sea holly), both wonderful perennials for the summer garden.  Yet, as the season wanes the aforementioned plants have sizzled out while the…
  • Phlox that Rock

    Kathy
    12 Aug 2015 | 6:00 am
    Dazzling Volcano phlox (photo by: Kathy Diemer) There are a variety of phlox out there to suit every need; from short creepers such as phlox subulata and phlox stolonifera, the slightly taller (18″) version, phlox divaricata, and the wild form that brightens our native grassy meadows, phlox drummondii.  All beautiful specimens of phlox-dom, but my favorite for adding height and scrumptious masses of fragrant flowers all summer long is the much adored “knock your socks off” perennial, phlox paniculata. Phlox paniculata ‘Shockwave’ (photo by: Kathy Diemer)…
  • Butterflies

    Kathy
    5 Aug 2015 | 6:00 am
    Eastern Tiger Swallowtail enjoying bottle-brush flowers (photo by: Kathy Diemer) Lately I feel like I’m living on a Lepidoptera landing strip, with butterflies dive-bombing me from all directions as they head in to land on a succulent blossom in my yard.  It’s heavenly to watch!  Some fly in pairs, others swoop in alone.  Clusters of yellow Eastern Tiger swallowtails congregate on a mound of bright purple phlox, casually fluttering over to some nearby rudbeckia flower heads.  A female black swallowtail is sipping nectar from the throat of a Casa Blanca lily, while a…
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    DIY Backyard Gardening

  • Building a Root Cellar

    Chellet
    2 Sep 2015 | 3:39 am
    Root cellars are quite beneficial in regions which have winter months. These used to be popular in the olden days, but they’re now making a comeback and just in time for gardeners and farmers who would like to store and preserve garden produce all winter. If are a gardener or farmer in North America, Europe, or […] The post Building a Root Cellar appeared first on DIY Backyard Gardening.
  • Garden Gadgets

    Chellet
    1 Sep 2015 | 9:15 pm
    If only all gardeners have green thumb, it will be easier to plant and grow garden plants all year round. But thanks to these garden gadgets, gardening can be easier and more enjoyable for the semi-green and brown-thumbed gardeners like me. =)     The post Garden Gadgets appeared first on DIY Backyard Gardening.
  • Building a DIY Greenhouse

    Chellet
    1 Sep 2015 | 7:21 pm
    Many homeowners dream about having their own greenhouse in their backyards. But it may take a carpenter and some blueprints in order to complete a good job. However, there are out-of-the-box options out there which makes this project more feasible and cost-effective. Here’s an infographic to help you decide in building your DIY greenhouse.     The post Building a DIY Greenhouse appeared first on DIY Backyard Gardening.
  • 2015 UPLB Garden Show Info

    Chellet
    3 Apr 2015 | 3:25 pm
    I have received quite plentiful inquiries via email and a new one on a comment section of the blog regarding any update on the 2015 UPLB Garden Show.   It used to be held around March and October, but as of today, we haven’t got any information as to when it will be held in […] The post 2015 UPLB Garden Show Info appeared first on DIY Backyard Gardening.
  • Jump-start Your Garden with End of Winter Gardening Prep

    Chellet
    22 Mar 2015 | 1:09 pm
    Here’s a very useful gardening infographic that can help you jump-start your garden next season… End of Winter Gardening Preparations and Tips     The post Jump-start Your Garden with End of Winter Gardening Prep appeared first on DIY Backyard Gardening.
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    Mill Race Garden Centre Blog

  • 11 Surprising Ways Gardening Makes You Healthier & Happier

    19 Aug 2015 | 7:07 am
    If you love to garden then you probably already know intuitively that it's a great way to forget your problems and enjoy yourself. But it goes much further than that, gardening brings many benefits and it may surprise you just how good for you it is. Here are 11 ways that keeping your own garden can make you happier and healthier. 1. Gardening battles depression Image Credit: Andra MIhali Gardener's World released a survey in 2013 that confirmed something I think we all suspected, but it's nice to have proof. Gardeners are generally more content and happy with their lives and they are less…
  • 17 Tips for Dealing with Veggie Garden Overproduction

    18 Aug 2015 | 7:54 am
    Did your veggie garden do exceptionally well this year? Have a surplus of homegrown veggies and running out of ideas? If your fruit and vegetables are filling your fridge, your cupboards, and even making their way onto your worktops, you may be tearing your hair out wondering just how you can make use of them before the inevitable rot sets in. But fret not – we’ve rounded up a whole host of fun ideas that will ensure every last piece is used up! 1. Make chutneys, jams and pickles Image Credit: Rebecca Siegel It’s a classic suggestion, but it’s also a method of preserving fruit and…
  • 19 Cheap & Easy Garden DIYs You Must Do This Summer

    5 Aug 2015 | 6:50 am
    How's your summer been so far? From barbecues, sunbathing, and eating your own body weight in ice cream, to a beautiful garden in bloom - what’s not to love about summer?! Although we hope you've made plenty of time for the aforementioned activities, we also think summer is great time for DIY - especially in the garden! With a limited number of warm summer weeks left this year, today we thought we'd round up some of our favourite garden projects to tackle this summer. Ranging from ideas to help wildlife, through to outdoor games and furniture hacks, we’ve got a fantastic variety of ideas…
  • 11 Activities for Under £10 That Will Make Your Kids Happy This Summer

    28 Jul 2015 | 8:56 am
    Already dreading the cries of “I’m bored!” from your children this summer? We know the feeling. The summer holidays are fantastic for getting to spend time with your little ones, but those trips to theme parks and zoos can soon add up. Fear not! We have some brilliant ideas for keeping kids occupied all summer long that won’t cost the Earth. In fact, many of these ideas involve typical household items that you probably already have at home. Bring on the summer! 1. Make a water blob Image Credit: Paging Fun Mums Though this tutorial was written by Louise at PagingFunMums over in the…
  • 21 Quick & Easy Summer BBQ Recipes That Will Impress Your Friends

    2 Jul 2015 | 3:07 am
    Are you itching to get the barbecue out of the shed? Us too! The arrival of the Great British Summer inevitably leads to gardens being filled with the delicious scent of grilled food, so even if you’re not planning a barbecue yet, you’re bound to get grilling once you’ve been tempted by the smell of sausages wafting into your garden! Our mouths are watering already… But before you rush off to the supermarket to stock up on frozen burgers, take a look at our round up of impressive, yet easy to make, homemade options. These summer bbq recipes are bound to wow your guests, but they’re…
 
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    Organic Lesson

  • 4 Reasons Why Gardening is Amazing for People with Diabetes

    gardenhero
    23 Aug 2015 | 10:27 am
    Continuing on in our series of gardening health benefits, we took a look at how gardening could be beneficial for those who are affected by diabetes. Much to the surprise of many people, gardening can improve the quality of life for people with diabetes in a number of ways. here are the four standout reasons why we believe it would be a great move for people with diabetes to become green thumb advocates. Vitamin D and Diabetes According to a study published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, there could be good reasons to believe that a lack of vitamin D could…
  • 14 Healthy Fruits & Vegetables for Disease Prevention

    gardenhero
    16 Aug 2015 | 1:54 pm
    Eat Your Greens. One Apple a Day Keeps the Doctor a Day. We have been hearing phrases like these since we were young but have you ever wondered what exactly makes these fruits and vegetables good for your health? In the following infographic, we wanted to highlight the health benefits of 17 common fruits and vegetables. From the juicy apple to the colorful Swiss chard, we examine what exactly these fruits and vegetables contain to make them good for your health. Here is a brief summary of each of the fruits and vegetables listed in the infographic. We recommend checking out this link (where…
  • 6 Wonderful Health Benefits of Gardening

    gardenhero
    21 Jun 2015 | 11:42 am
    It’s been over six months since I started my gardening journey and what a ride it has been. Because I live in a small apartment, my gardening endeavor started off really small with just two pots of herbs. Now, I have expanded that to eight! Along the way, I noticed how there has been so much that I have gained from gardening. Even with spending less than 30 minutes a day taking care of my gardening activities, I have noticed a difference to my overall well-being. For those who are reading this, I hope you are also interested in building or already maintaining or your own garden. To give…
  • Artificial Synthetic Grass: Benefits & Costs Infographic

    gardenhero
    7 Jun 2015 | 8:34 pm
    In recent years, the popularity of artificial grass has grown significantly for a number of reasons. Not only are homeowners looking for a permanent solution to having a beautiful backyard, a lot of homeowners, especially in California, are also facing a water crisis that prevents them from maintaining a natural grass lawn. Although the upfront cost of installing high-quality artificial grass is expensive, the cost of having a synthetic lawn makes sense over the long-term. In this infographic, we take a look at the main benefits of maintaining a synthetic lawn. Maintenance benefits The life…
  • Drought Tolerant Grass Alternatives for California Lawns

    gardenhero
    27 May 2015 | 8:49 pm
    It has been bad times for California homeowners as the drought continues its endless streak. With more and more restrictions being set on residential water usage, owning lush green lawns seem to have become a distant dream for homeowners. Well, that isn’t necessarily the case. There is still a bit of hope for lawn owners as there are many great drought tolerant grasses out there that would help maintain a nice textured lawn. In the infographic below, we present four drought tolerant alternatives that are known for requiring minimal water consumption. Please keep in mind that although…
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    Great Garden Supply: New Products

  • EarthBox Junior Garden Kit

    6 Aug 2015 | 7:45 am
    This compact-sized EarthBox Junior is just like the original EarthBox gardening system with the same smart technology, but approximately half the size and specifically designed for smaller spaces. Junior is the perfect size for growin..Price: $29.99
  • Gardman Greenhouse Mini 4 Tier with Heavy Duty Cover

    6 Aug 2015 | 6:38 am
    This 4 tier growhouse with a heavy duty cover by Growit is perfect for easy and convient growing almost anywhere.Price: $64.99
  • Mini Terra Cotta Garden Gnome

    6 Aug 2015 | 6:38 am
    This Mini Terra Cotta Garden Gnome is a beautiful clay piece made with the high level of quality you can expect from Burley Clay.Price: $3.99
  • Earthbox Mulch Kit

    6 Aug 2015 | 6:38 am
    The mulch kit from Earthbox keeps both water and nutrients in, while proecting against weeds and other threats.Price: $6.99
  • Terra Cotta Turtle Pot Riser

    6 Aug 2015 | 6:38 am
    The Barefoot Turtle Riser is a tasteful clay piece made with the high level of quality you can expect from Burley Clay.Price: $3.99
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    Grow Our Way

  • How to Prune Tomato Plants

    Safer® Brand
    25 Aug 2015 | 4:27 am
    Are your tomato plants becoming large, unruly, and disease-ridden? It might be time to prune. Pruning is the delicate process of removing certain leaves or stems in order to grow larger, more flavorful tomatoes and reduce the plant’s chances of disease or insect damage. While pruning isn’t absolutely necessary, it does ensure all the nutrients go to the plant’s fruit and not to growing more branches and leaves. There are two main types of tomato plants: 1) Indeterminate Tomatoes, which will continue to grow and produce fruit until stopped by cold weather. These types of tomato plants…
  • Easiest Vegetables to Grow

    Safer® Brand
    6 Aug 2015 | 8:00 am
    “What should I plant in my garden?” Your garden might be blooming already with squash, peppers and peas but this question is always at the back of your mind. The hundreds of possibilities can be daunting, especially to beginner gardeners. Perhaps your busy life has left little time for gardening so you just want the easiest plants to take care of. If you’re looking for some garden inspiration, browse this list of the easiest vegetables, fruits, and herbs to grow. Below we’ve broken down the list even further for those who want the easiest plants to grow from seed, to keep in a pot…
  • How to Kill Weeds Naturally [Video]

    Safer® Brand
    2 Aug 2015 | 7:23 am
    Are weeds choking your garden or invading your lawn? Pulling weeds one by one is usually the task gardeners hate most. Many homeowners revert to using harmful chemicals to get rid of those pesky plants, but there are other all-natural weed killers that are better for the environment and your family. Many of them you can even find around your home! Watch the video below on how to kill weeds naturally and ways to keep weeds from growing in the future. All-Natural Weed Killer Prevention is key for a happy weed-less lawn and garden. Buy clean lawn seed and compost when first getting your yard…
  • 24 Amazing Benefits and Uses of Neem Oil for Plants

    Safer® Brand
    29 Jul 2015 | 4:15 am
    When searching for a safe and effective product to control insects and disease in your lawn and garden, look no further than neem oil. It’s a powerful organic solution to your most difficult-to-manage infestations. What is neem oil? Neem oil is a natural byproduct of the neem tree. The oil is harvested from the trees’ seeds and leaves. While it has been used as natural pesticide for hundreds of years, you’ll also find it in many products you use in your home, including: -Cosmetics -Toothpastes -Dog shampoo -Soaps People in India have been using the neem leaf for its medicinal properties…
  • 20 Common Tomato Plant Problems and How to Fix Them

    Safer® Brand
    14 Jul 2015 | 12:30 pm
    If you’re one of the three million people who planted a home garden this year, you’re most likely growing tomatoes. Nine out of 10 gardeners grow tomatoes, and that number would be 10 out of 10 if the holdouts would taste a fresh garden tomato and compare it to a grocery store purchase. Nothing beats the taste of a fresh home-grown tomato! Many gardeners who grow tomatoes, however, are frustrated with the progress of their plants. The plant may not set fruit. Or your tomatoes may ripen, but have ugly, spongy black spots at the bottom. Worse still, your plants may look great in the evening…
 
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    In the Garden...with Mariani Landscape

  • The Uncommon and Outstanding Franklin Tree

    Gina Iliopoulos
    2 Sep 2015 | 4:00 am
    Today we have another remarkable tree for you, this one deemed rare by its small native habitat.  The Franklin tree, Franklinia alatamaha, was originally identified in Georgia, and only Georgia, along the Altamaha River.  No other natural habitats are known … Continue reading →
  • The Rare and Spectacular Tulip Tree

    Gina Iliopoulos
    31 Aug 2015 | 4:00 am
    What does it mean to be rare?  There are plants that are truly rare by definition: not found often or in large numbers in their native setting.  Rare can also mean uncommon or unfamiliar.  So when thinking of plants for … Continue reading →
  • Multicolored Hydrangea

    Gina Iliopoulos
    28 Aug 2015 | 4:00 am
    We showed you some native plants in bloom last time and today we have more ornamentals as the focus of our garden tour.  We start with hydrangea.  We have talked about hydrangeas in the past, unique cultivars and specimens, and … Continue reading →
  • Natives in Bloom

    Gina Iliopoulos
    26 Aug 2015 | 4:00 am
    Last time we showed you some amazing combinations for your summer displays.  Today we show you some combinations that feature native plants.  You can use native plants in combination with non-natives and create a colorful, textured show.  Below, spotted joe … Continue reading →
  • Combinations in Bloom

    Gina Iliopoulos
    24 Aug 2015 | 4:00 am
    Periodically, here in the garden, we give you an update on what’s in bloom.  This week we not only show you what’s in bloom, we bring you some wonderful images of garden displays at their peak.  Most of the plants … Continue reading →
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    Harmony Gardens Landscaping

  • DIY: How to Divide your Perennials

    HGadmin
    1 Sep 2015 | 4:08 pm
    How to Divide your Perennials Water your perennials one week and then one day before dividing if possible. Divide and transplant on a cool, cloudy, calm day if at all possible. Cut straight down around root ball with transplant spade, aiming to include as many roots as you can. Gently loosen root ball but keep it intact leaving as much soil on as possible to lessen transplant shock. Inspect the plant for obvious places to divide remembering that each new plant needs a balance of top growth and roots. Gently spread leaves, start in centre […] The post DIY: How to Divide your Perennials…
  • Dividing and Transplanting

    HGadmin
    28 Aug 2015 | 3:53 pm
    Dividing and Transplanting Dividing, transplanting and reducing the size of overgrown perennial clumps are essential tasks that rejuvenate the perennial garden resulting in healthier, better-looking plants and more perennials. You can expect clumps of perennials to need thinning or dividing and transplanting every three to five years. Some transplanted perennials can take awhile to get re-established and to bloom again. Perennial clumps that have taken on a doughnut shape need to be divided and transplanted. This growth pattern where most of the vigorous shoots are on the outer perimeter with…
  • Interlock Cleaning and Maintenance

    HGadmin
    27 Aug 2015 | 9:55 am
    Interlock Cleaning and Maintenance Interlocking, patio stones, flagstone, stepping stones or any hard surface will eventually get weeds and require cleaning out prior to regular maintenance. Cleaning out of weeds from hard surfaces can be done by: 1) Hand weeding to remove weeds, sand and debris using an L-shaped interlock weeding tool. Ensure to remove all soil, roots and debris prior to re-sanding. Very time consuming method. 2) Thermal weeding should be done by a professional so as to not burn and mark pavers. Weeds are burned out by using a propane torch weeder. 3) […] The post…
  • Dead-Heading Techniques

    HGadmin
    14 Aug 2015 | 6:10 am
    Perennials bloom for a few weeks each season but gardeners have learned to extend blooming periods by dead-heading. Dead-heading is the removal of spent, mature flowers that are turning brown or losing their petals. If left to nature most of these spent flowers will develop seeds. When they ripen the plant starts to decline in preparation for dormancy and next season’s growth. Deadheading interrupts this natural cycle encouraging plants to continue to produce new buds, prolonging the blooming period thus more flowers in your garden. Dead-heading prolongs blooming, promotes a second flush of…
  • Chinch Bugs

    HGadmin
    6 Aug 2015 | 8:03 pm
    Chinch Bugs Three species of chinch bug commonly invade turf grass in North America. Only hairy chinch bug (blissus leucopterus hirtus) occurs in Canada and is found from Ontario eastward. The chinch bug is a true bug, meaning it is a member of the order Hemiptera. Bugs are characterized by half wings, piercing-sucking mouth parts and a three stage life cycle (eggs-nymphs-adults). Life Cycle: Adult chinch bugs overwinter in protected places in and around turf grass. When temperatures reach 7 degrees C in spring they come out of hibernation and mate. Egg-laying begins 2 weeks […] The…
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    Garden Wholesale

  • Buy Wall Scones at Duqaa.com

    Duqaa
    31 Aug 2015 | 7:46 am
    Enjoy Free Shipping & browse our great selection of Wall Scones and more. Shop Wall Scones online. Find Best Offers & deals on Wall Scones at Duqaa. com. ✓Best Price Promise. Wall Scones at wholesale prices. Buy Wall Scones at Duqaa.com.
  • Flower Fountains

    Duqaa
    16 Jul 2015 | 11:03 am
    Duqaa Offers You Stunning Collection of Flower Fountain to Decor Premises Duqaa 3 Tier flower fountain baskets Ideal for the Patio, Balcony or Decked areas. Gives three levels of cascading color. Perfect for a combination of upright and trailing plants. It will create an eye-catching feature all summer by adding height to floral displays. Strong metal rod and strip construction and durable coating give a long life. Easily assembled all fittings and instructions included. The traditional Georgian design made from wrought iron  and other material will look fabulous wherever you wish to place…
  • Incense Burner & Sticks

    Duqaa
    16 Jul 2015 | 10:55 am
    Duqaa Proudly offers a Diverse Collection of Authentic Incense Burner and Sticks Duqaa offer a quality range of Religious Products that gives a pure, aesthetic and religious feel. Moreover, our range of products is manufactured from quality raw material that is procured from trustworthy vendors of the industries. Incense burners, incense holders, ash catchers come in various sizes and shapes. Some are used for one kind of incense, others are more multi-purpose. Incense burners take a variety of forms and are created from many different materials, depending on the region. Most are open…
  • Votive & Candle Holders

    Duqaa
    16 Jul 2015 | 10:41 am
    Duqaa Give An Elegant Look To Your Home With Home Decor Items Decorating home with Votive, lanterns and candle Holders are becoming the most popular trend. These can be used in various purposes, such as family function, party, get-together, festive occasions among others. These help to explore the beauty as well decoration of your function. As well as lanterns bring the perfect texture. If you are looking for the reliable source that can offer your quality as well as affordable lanterns post,cylinder vases then you can take the help of the internet. One of the most reputed and reliable online…
  • Garden Planters

    Duqaa
    16 Jul 2015 | 10:30 am
    Duqaa that specializes in offering a wide range of home and garden decorative products. The following press release is written to provide information about the trustworthy online store that offers beautiful, elegant and eye catching Home and Garden decor Planter at remarkable rates. Duqaa is resourced with an incredible team of experts who have minutely focused on product quality and come up with the best of the Indoor and outdoor large flower pots, planters. Many home and garden products, garden supplies and other elements of garden decor are now a part of the daily living and lifestyle. A…
 
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    Tipsplants.com

  • 18 Most Important Rules of Compatibility of Plants and Vegetables in The Garden [Infographic]

    admin
    13 Aug 2015 | 6:29 am
    General TipsWhen you know what to plant next to this or that plant, there's no magic or luck involved. In fact: Some crops should never be planted next to each other and you should take it into consideration when planting. Also, the same vegetables shouldn't be grown on the same vegetable patch for a lot of years. The location of the plants chould be changed according to the rules.
  • Kopper King Hibiscus – Major Features and Care Tips

    admin
    23 Jun 2015 | 7:14 am
    HibiscusKopper king hibiscus is one of the modern day hybrids created by crossbreeding the hardy hibiscuses. Just like all the hybrids you will not be able to grow it from the seeds as the child plants might look different from the original. If you look after it and cultivate it the right way this deciduous shrub will keep you happy with its big beautiful flowers for quite a few years. The main distinctive feature is the copper or burgundy colored dark foliage. The dark leaf plays up the hand sized white to pink flowers.
  • Hibiscus Bouquet: For the Unforgettable Tropical Themed Wedding

    admin
    23 Jun 2015 | 6:45 am
    HibiscusHibiscuses are known as garden flowers with all kinds of hibiscus seedsand plants for sale . There are numerous gardeners and fans that love the variety that hibiscuses can offer combined with their affordability and ease of cultivating.
  • Hibiscus Mutabilis – A Symbol of South

    admin
    23 Jun 2015 | 5:51 am
    HibiscusThis type of plant is the ancestor of the native hibiscuses that grow in Southern and Gulf States hence the second name Confederate rose as this plant is very popular among the local gardeners with its huge flowers and simple care. It belongs to the hardy perennials and feels good in mild climates surviving mild winters well. Another representative of the breed is Rubrum hibiscus mutabilis or single confederate rose. It has five distinctive petals common for all hibiscuses but does not have the distinctive skirt.
  • Double Hibiscus: The Most Unusual Exotic Variety 7 Major Planting Rules

    admin
    23 Jun 2015 | 5:37 am
    HibiscusA double hibiscus is a member of the broad hibiscus family that has been cultivated and broadened by the nurseries all over the world. The flowers are really beautiful with the same five base blooms but they have ruffle skirts and the blossoms are double making them look even bigger.
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    Tree Fails

  • The Dead Tree Project

    Tree Fails
    29 Aug 2015 | 2:47 pm
    This Palo Verde tree has been dead for so many years that its crispy, peeling bark has been bleached white by the sun.  It looks like it belongs in front of a scary haunted house, not a restaurant on a busy street. Let’s get a better view of this bone-dry, kindling.
  • Release The Kraken

    Tree Fails
    23 Aug 2015 | 8:06 pm
    Driving through central Phoenix I spotted some hacked Olive Trees.  I pulled over to take a couple of snaps for my TREE fails archive and departed.  As I rounded the corner to leave the neighborhood I came across one of the most eye-popping hack jobs I’d ever seen.  A Chinese Elm had been carved into […]
  • Straight Outta Candy Land

    Tree Fails
    15 Aug 2015 | 8:06 am
    Rollin’ down the street I spotted what appeared to be 2 Texas Ebony trees carved into the shape of Dots candies.  The landscape professionals™ responsible for this brought their A-Game because they also whittled down the bushes into the shape of cupcakes.  Formal pruning might be harmful to plants and trees but I have to […]
  • Keep It Real

    Tree Fails
    9 Aug 2015 | 9:34 am
    Some people are of the opinion that formal trimming looks silly, but that’s not its biggest drawback. Formal trimming harms plants and trees by creating countless, tiny wounds that leave them open to disease.  It’s comparable to getting punched in the stomach by the school bully once a week.  You might survive but you won’t […]
  • Little Surprises

    Tree Fails
    8 Aug 2015 | 5:45 pm
    This gem comes from Scottsdale, Arizona.  I rounded the corner of some high-density residential and shazam!  Right in front of me was a long line of Olive trees hacked to bits.  I suppose that’s what $75 buys these days.  Hopefully they kept their receipt. For these trees their best days are behind them.  Sickness and […]
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    Best Grow Lights

  • The Ultimate NFT Grow Guide for Beginners

    gi77on
    27 Aug 2015 | 4:00 pm
    There are a lot of hydroponic systems that you can use to grow high-quality plants or vegetables, but the NFT (Nutrient Film Technique) system maybe… Continued reading The Ultimate NFT Grow Guide for Beginners The post The Ultimate NFT Grow Guide for Beginners appeared first on Best Grow Lights.
  • Best Dehumidifier for Grow Room Use

    gi77on
    24 Aug 2015 | 2:44 pm
    If your grow room is too hot and humid your plants will struggle to grow, so it’s important that you have the best dehumidifier for… Continued reading Best Dehumidifier for Grow Room Use The post Best Dehumidifier for Grow Room Use appeared first on Best Grow Lights.
  • How To Lower Humidity in a Grow Room

    gi77on
    22 Aug 2015 | 9:39 pm
    It’s important you keep the climate of your grow room at the right level, but should this change it’s important you know how to lower… Continued reading How To Lower Humidity in a Grow Room The post How To Lower Humidity in a Grow Room appeared first on Best Grow Lights.
  • T5 Grow Lights: The Ultimate Resource

    gi77on
    22 Aug 2015 | 4:02 pm
    Expected Reading Time: 4 Minutes A key component of a successful propagation process is the choosing a suitable lighting system and T5 grow lights are… Continued reading T5 Grow Lights: The Ultimate Resource The post T5 Grow Lights: The Ultimate Resource appeared first on Best Grow Lights.
  • The 7 Best T5 Grow Lights

    gi77on
    22 Aug 2015 | 3:41 pm
    Don’t you love that feeling when you see your vegetables begin to peek out of the soil? It’s a wonderful feeling and can give you… Continued reading The 7 Best T5 Grow Lights The post The 7 Best T5 Grow Lights appeared first on Best Grow Lights.
 
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    La Habra Fence Company Blog

  • Steps to Measure Your Yard for a Fence Installation

    Ron Frazelle
    2 Sep 2015 | 7:00 am
    To properly install a fence, several steps must be taken before the process begins. First and foremost, you must confirm the property lines so that your fence is on your property. Next, all utility lines must be identified to make sure you will not come in contact with them while digging the holes for the post. The last step is to accurately measure your yard and mark where the poles will be placed. The steps that need to be taken while measuring your yard for fence installation include the following: Determine How Many Fence Panels Will Be Needed You can determine how many panels will be…
  • 3 Factors to Decide the Right Fence Height for Your Property

    Ron Frazelle
    26 Aug 2015 | 7:00 am
    Security and privacy are important issues for many families and households that need to be addressed when considering the proper height of a fence. The height of your fence is mostly dependent on its purpose. If the fence is decorative, the height of the fence is not really a big issue. However, if you would like more privacy then you need to look at getting a taller fence. In order to determine the correct fence height, consider some of these factors: Bylaws Most cities have certain fencing bylaws that explain the maximum height you can have for a fence. Every city has slight variations in…
  • High Tensile Wire Fence: All You Want to Know

    Ron Frazelle
    19 Aug 2015 | 7:00 am
    Everybody knows the main purpose of a fence is to keep intruders off your property and to clearly mark property lines. However, there are lots of different fences out there, and if you’re a homeowner or a business owner, you might not be quite sure which one to pick in order to best protect your property. One of the best options that you have at your disposal is wire fencing. In particular, we’re talking about high tensile wire fencing designed to last for many years and remain durable through bad weather. Unlike many types of fencing, high tensile wire fencing is designed to stand the…
  • Fence Installation: Important Tips to Know Before You Begin

    Ron Frazelle
    5 Aug 2015 | 7:00 am
    Fences serve a practical purpose for most homeowners and small businesses. They help to define boundaries and keep a space protected from criminals and vandals that could do you or your property harm. However, installing a fence isn’t something most people can do by themselves. In fact, most people don’t really know that much about fence installation and it can be a somewhat tricky process for the average home or small business owner. Use these tips to help you learn as much as you can about fence installation before you get the process going. You’ll save money and get better results.
  • Wrought Iron Fence: 5 Reasons to Install It on Your Property

    Ron Frazelle
    29 Jul 2015 | 7:00 am
    Whether you have a residential property or a small business, chances are you want to keep your property lines divided and keep your space safe. However, if you’re like many people, you really aren’t quite sure of the best way to do that. While a fence is obviously helpful, how are you supposed to know exactly what type of fence is best for you? In many cases, you may come to find that a wrought iron fence is your best choice for a variety of reasons. If you’re installing a new fence or replacing an old one, wrought iron should be on your list of potential materials. Here are five…
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